The Game of Go “ Gentlemen should not waste their time on trivial games -- they should play go.” -- Confucius, The Analect...
<ul><ul><ul><li>Game is played by two player </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>One player takes black, the other white <...
The Objective  <ul><li>Objective is to have more points at the end of the game than your opponent </li></ul><ul><li>Two wa...
Making Territory  <ul><li>Completely surround intersections </li></ul><ul><li>Each intersection surrounded scores 1 point ...
Capturing the Enemy  <ul><li>Enemy stones are captured by  </li></ul><ul><li>being completely surrounded </li></ul><ul><li...
Ending the Game <ul><li>The game ends when both players agree </li></ul><ul><li>When a player has no further valuable move...
Because the board is empty at the start of the game, the stronger player can give his opponent a “head start” to even thin...
IT’S A BIG CHALLENGE The number of possible go games has been estimated at 10 761  (=361!,  OMNI ,  June 1991 ), far more ...
COMPUTERS CAN’T PLAY! Go is so complex that the best programs routinely lose to talented children. Computer programmers ca...
Go exist since at least 3000 years old, probably much older. No one knows where it came from. Some people think the board ...
THE FOUR SACRED ARTS During China’s “golden age” (the  Tang  and  Song  dynasties ca. 700-1400 A.D.) the cultured person m...
 
Go became a common theme in 19th century  ukiyo-e  prints. Here, Tadanobu, a famous samurai, fights off his enemies with a...
Repelling demons while playing go. (1861)
 
THE “MINISTER OF GO” Tokugawa Ieyesu, the first  shogun , established four “houses” to study go and compete in annual “Cas...
<ul><li>THE MOST POPULAR GAME </li></ul><ul><li>IN THE WORLD TODAY </li></ul><ul><li>120 million players </li></ul><ul><li...
 
Go in asia <ul><li>Go originated in South-East Asia, and the majority of Go players and institutions will be found in that...
Weiki <ul><li>In  China , the  government   strongly  supports the organisation and promotion of Go. </li></ul>
I-Go <ul><li>In  Japan  Go is recognised as an instrument contributing to key elements of human life, such as young people...
Baduk <ul><ul><li>In  Korea  the demand for Go is rising rapidly. A number of Korean youngsters are the  top players  in t...
<ul><li>UNIVERSAL RANKING SYSTEM </li></ul><ul><li>Similar to martial arts, golf </li></ul><ul><li>Rank yourself by playin...
<ul><li>GO ON THE INTERNET </li></ul><ul><li>FREE! </li></ul><ul><li>At least 10000 online any time of day or night </li><...
 
HIKARU NO GO In this popular “coming-of-age” story, the ghost of a famous player guides our hero to the pinnacle of the go...
 
Go in the West <ul><ul><li>In the West, the first to mention go was Marco Polo, back from China. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><l...
 
Go in France <ul><li>1968 : go arrive in France, some players meet in the back shop of a Parisian shop </li></ul><ul><li>1...
 
 
 
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PréSentation Anglais Jeu De Go Jerome Salignon

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English presentation of the game of go (in France).

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PréSentation Anglais Jeu De Go Jerome Salignon

  1. 1. The Game of Go “ Gentlemen should not waste their time on trivial games -- they should play go.” -- Confucius, The Analects ca. 500 B. C. E.
  2. 2. <ul><ul><ul><li>Game is played by two player </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>One player takes black, the other white </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Each player takes a turn putting a stone on the board </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stones are played at the intersections of the lines on the board </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Once a stone is played, it doesn’t move </li></ul></ul></ul>The Rules
  3. 3. The Objective <ul><li>Objective is to have more points at the end of the game than your opponent </li></ul><ul><li>Two ways to make points: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enclose (surround) an area of the board </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Capture your opponents stones </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Making Territory <ul><li>Completely surround intersections </li></ul><ul><li>Each intersection surrounded scores 1 point </li></ul>
  5. 5. Capturing the Enemy <ul><li>Enemy stones are captured by </li></ul><ul><li>being completely surrounded </li></ul><ul><li>Connected stones must be captured as a group </li></ul><ul><li>Open intersections are called liberties </li></ul><ul><li>Capturing occurs when liberties are reduced to zero </li></ul>
  6. 6. Ending the Game <ul><li>The game ends when both players agree </li></ul><ul><li>When a player has no further valuable moves he passes </li></ul><ul><li>The other player can either pass or play </li></ul><ul><li>If both pass, the game ends </li></ul>
  7. 7. Because the board is empty at the start of the game, the stronger player can give his opponent a “head start” to even things out. Nearly any two opponents can play a game that either of them could win.. HANDICAP: THE GREAT EQUALIZER
  8. 8. IT’S A BIG CHALLENGE The number of possible go games has been estimated at 10 761 (=361!, OMNI , June 1991 ), far more than the number of subatomic particles in the known universe.
  9. 9. COMPUTERS CAN’T PLAY! Go is so complex that the best programs routinely lose to talented children. Computer programmers call it “the last refuge of human intelligence.”
  10. 10. Go exist since at least 3000 years old, probably much older. No one knows where it came from. Some people think the board and stones were originally used to foretell the future, or as a calculator.
  11. 11. THE FOUR SACRED ARTS During China’s “golden age” (the Tang and Song dynasties ca. 700-1400 A.D.) the cultured person mastered four skills: painting, calligraphy, lute-playing and go. attributed to Kano Shoei (1519 - 1592)
  12. 13. Go became a common theme in 19th century ukiyo-e prints. Here, Tadanobu, a famous samurai, fights off his enemies with a go board.
  13. 14. Repelling demons while playing go. (1861)
  14. 16. THE “MINISTER OF GO” Tokugawa Ieyesu, the first shogun , established four “houses” to study go and compete in annual “Castle Games” of great national importance. Each year’s winner became the go-doroko (“Minister of go”), occupying a cabinet-level position in the government.
  15. 17. <ul><li>THE MOST POPULAR GAME </li></ul><ul><li>IN THE WORLD TODAY </li></ul><ul><li>120 million players </li></ul><ul><li>68 countries / 5 continents </li></ul><ul><li>Millions of fans in Japan, China, Korea </li></ul><ul><li>Top players earn millions </li></ul><ul><li>International tournaments pay up to $400K </li></ul>
  16. 19. Go in asia <ul><li>Go originated in South-East Asia, and the majority of Go players and institutions will be found in that area. </li></ul>
  17. 20. Weiki <ul><li>In China , the government strongly supports the organisation and promotion of Go. </li></ul>
  18. 21. I-Go <ul><li>In Japan Go is recognised as an instrument contributing to key elements of human life, such as young people’s education, leisure activities, promotion of culture . </li></ul>
  19. 22. Baduk <ul><ul><li>In Korea the demand for Go is rising rapidly. A number of Korean youngsters are the top players in the world. In many schools Go is part of the curriculum . </li></ul></ul>
  20. 23. <ul><li>UNIVERSAL RANKING SYSTEM </li></ul><ul><li>Similar to martial arts, golf </li></ul><ul><li>Rank yourself by playing ranked opponents (on internet or during tournaments) </li></ul><ul><li>All serious players know their rank </li></ul><ul><li>The rank is going from 30kyus to 1kyu then from 1d to 7d </li></ul>
  21. 24. <ul><li>GO ON THE INTERNET </li></ul><ul><li>FREE! </li></ul><ul><li>At least 10000 online any time of day or night </li></ul><ul><li>Anonymous play </li></ul>
  22. 26. HIKARU NO GO In this popular “coming-of-age” story, the ghost of a famous player guides our hero to the pinnacle of the go world -- or does he?
  23. 28. Go in the West <ul><ul><li>In the West, the first to mention go was Marco Polo, back from China. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1881 : first western go book, written by Otto Korschelt, a german ethnologist and chess player, who discovered go when travelling in Japan. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1920 : the first non-Asian go club was created in New York </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1934 : foundation of the American Go Association </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1957 : foundation of the European Championship </li></ul></ul>
  24. 30. Go in France <ul><li>1968 : go arrive in France, some players meet in the back shop of a Parisian shop </li></ul><ul><li>1969 : creation of the Parisian go club </li></ul><ul><li>1970 : creation of the French Go Association and organisation of the first French Championship </li></ul><ul><li>1978 : creation of the French Go Federation and the same year took place the first Amateur World Championship </li></ul>

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