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Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass
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Using Rubrics for Strategies 4 & 7 johns&bass

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  • Start at 41seconds
  • Specific points on the rubric that describe a proficient or excellent teacher as one the fosters self-assessment and self-reflection. I used to think that was to get TEACHERS to be self-reflective, but now I understand it is ALSO to get students to reflect or assess their OWN work.
  • “Rubrics are not assignment directions set into chart form.”
  • Transcript

    • 1. Using Rubrics for Student Self-Assessment and Self Reflection How to use Strategies 4 and 7
    • 2. Session Objectives I can select rubrics that will help students to self-assess or self-reflect.  I understand there are multiple tools that I can utilize to have student self-assess or self-reflect.  I will be able to create or modify a rubric that can be used by my current students to self-assess and self-reflect.  I will aspire to create or seek out other examples of rubrics that I can use in the future to have our students self-assess or self-reflect. 
    • 3. Agenda Activity #1 – Identifying self-reflective practices The PLC Cycle and formative assessment Review stategy 4 and 7 Why should you use self-assessment or self reflection.  Learn how to select/create an effective rubric  Activity #2 – Analyze you own rubric.  How to self-assess/self-reflect using a rubric     ◦ Examples  Learn how rating scales and checklists can be used for self-assessment and self-reflection ◦ Examples  Activity #3 - Create a self assessment/reflection that can be used in conjunction with your course rubric
    • 4. Activity #1 Reviewing self-assessment and selfreflection Directions: 1) Turn to page 1 in your activity packet. 2) Watch the video clip and record the aspects of self-assessment or selfreflection that you notice. 3) Following the clip, discuss the aspects that you noted with your group members.
    • 5. Self Reflection Clip
    • 6. STRATEGY 4: Teach students to self-assess and set goals. THE COMPONENTS OF A VALID SELFASSESSMENT:  Self-assessment: o Students make judgments about what they know, have learned, or have mastered. The judgment should be tied to a learning target.  Justification: o Students show evidence in their work as rationale for their judgments.  Goal Setting: o Students make a plan for continued learning. Goals should be specific and challenging.
    • 7. Self-assess during unit  Different drafts  Example: students may self assess their formative drafts using the rubric that will be used for the summative draft  Homework assignments  Example: Classes may begin with a self-assessment on the prior night’s assignment  Exit slips  Example: students may self-assess an exit slip from the previous lesson as a bell ringer for the next day.  Quizzes  Example: after quiz is graded, have students assess their performance and set a goal to adjust learning for next quiz
    • 8. STRATEGY 7: Engage students in self-reflection, and let them keep track of and share their learning Self-Reflection:  Connects students to their growth.  Is embedded in the lesson design.  Offers opportunities for students to share their progress.  Is a gap-closing strategy because of its impact on student motivation and retention.
    • 9. Self-reflect at conclusion of unit  Prior to unit exam ◦ along with handing out the study guide, students may reflect on formative assessments and articulate both what they understand and what they need to study  Prior to final draft ◦ along with reviewing the rough drafts, students may reflect and articulate how the drafts reflect strengths and weaknesses in skill development
    • 10. Why use self-assessment or selfreflection?  Research says: ◦ “Certain formative assessment practices increased the achievement of low-performing students to the point of approaching that of high-achieving students.” (Chappuis, p.2) ◦ “If applied to performance on recent international assessments, [the gains] would move the United States’s rank from the middle of the pack of 42 nations tested to the top five (Black & Wiliam, 1998b).”
    • 11. Also…The Danielson Rubric
    • 12. How to write/select rubrics  Characteristics of high quality rubrics Appropriate Each criterion represents an aspect of a standard or objective Definable Each criterion has a clear meaning to both students and teachers understand. Observable Describes quality in performance that can be perceived by someone Distinct from one another Identifies separate learning targets or aspects of the learning targets Complete All criterion together describe the whole learning outcome Support descriptions on the continuum of quality Each criterion can be described over a range of performance levels.
    • 13. Common Misconceptions about Rubrics  Rubrics should not focus on the task, but rather the learning outcome. ◦ Rubrics should not be assignment directions in a chart format.  Rubrics are not about the requirements for the assignment, nor are they about counting things. Look in the EXAMPLES packet for both strong and weak rubrics.
    • 14. Activity #2 Your turn to Self-Assess…   Look at page 2, 3, and 4 in your ACTIVITY packet Take a few minutes to review your rubric and use our self-assessment checklist to see if your rubric meets the standards of the high quality rubric. Self Assess: teacher rubric using the check list GOAL: assess whether or not your rubric needs to be modified to better promote student Self-Assessment. Task: focus on each category of the rubric checklist. Use the below tables to help Self-Assess your rubric based on the Rubric Check List. Write specific phrases from your rubric that exemplify its presence in each category. Category: Appropriate Each criterion represents an aspect of a standard or objective Category: Definable Each criterion has a clear meaning to both students and teachers understand. Category: Observable Describes quality in performance that can be perceived by someone Fully describes my rubric YES/NO Corresponding quote from your rubric that aligns with the assessment (YES/NO) of your rubric Fully describes my rubric YES/NO Corresponding quote from your rubric that aligns with the assessment (YES/NO) of your rubric Fully describes my rubric YES/NO Corresponding quote from your rubric that aligns with the assessment (YES/NO) of your rubric
    • 15. Activity #2 – Directions  Take a few minutes to self-assess your rubric. ◦ Provide evidence for each standard  When you have finished selfassessing, turn to your small group and share your assessment with your group
    • 16. October session example Look at your EXAMPLE packet, pg. 1
    • 17. General Rubrics  Is it possible to develop a rubric that can be used to assess multiple assignments or student work? ◦ Yes, and you can save time while still helping students to reflect on their strengths and weaknesses.
    • 18. Close Reading Rubric Examples of General Rubric with Student Self-Assessment The Scarlet Letter fall 2013 Argument—clear claim and focused arguments  Exceptional -Thoroughly address the tasks of the essay prompt -Thoroughly developed, intelligent ideas Successful -Complete the tasks of the topic well -Shows insight but usually with less precision and clarity than higher-scoring essays. -Demonstrates sufficient examination of the text -Explores the literary devices of the text but does not fully push the how/why that links them with the central idea. -Short quotes that are imbedded but could be clarified with more context. English Example: Evidence and Explanation -Strong evidence -Significant understanding of the passage, its intent, and the literary devices the author employs -Short quotes imbedded successfully. Style/structure -Well organized with strong transitions -demonstrates stylistic sophistication and control over the elements of effective writing. -Sound and logical organization -Articulate diction -Organization does not advance argument. Simple transitions. -There may be lapses in correct diction or sophisticated language, but the essay is generally well written. Developing -Complete the task, but without special insight -Lacks depth and merely states the obvious -Writing conveys the writer’s ideas, but they are presented simplistically -Uneven or insufficient understanding of how/why literary devices create the author’s point. -Often the writer seems to list observations without analyzing its effect – unsuccessfully embeds quotes. -Needs more transitions -Ideas are predictable and the paragraph’s development is weak. -Lapses in diction or syntax
    • 19. Goal Setting  Goal setting engages the students in the learning process. ◦ Self-assessment: end with an opportunity for students to set a goal for future learning. ◦ Self-reflection: reflect on previous goals and determine whether or not the goals have been met.
    • 20. Rating Scales and Checklists Not rubrics, but can be very useful for assessing behaviors, effort, or meeting the requirements of an assignment.  Checklists ◦ students can reflect before turning in an assignment to make sure the requirements are present.  Rating Scales ◦ Students can reflect/assess on list of specific characteristics or behaviors with a place to mark or give a rationale for the degree that each characteristic or behavior is displayed.
    • 21. Examples of rating scales or checklists
    • 22. More examples of rating scales with reflection
    • 23. Your turn… Activity #3 1. Use the remainder of the time to tweak your rubric to make sure it meets the guidelines of the high quality rubric ◦ OR – is it better to use a rating scale or checklist? 2. If you have a sound assessment, brainstorm with your table on how you can use it for self-assessment or selfreflection. 3. Begin to create the self-assessment or self reflective piece to be used with your rubric.
    • 24. Reviewing our objectives At the end of our session… Can you select rubrics that will help students to self-assess or self-reflect?  Do you understand there are multiple tools that I can utilize to have student self-assess or self-reflect?  Are you able to create or modify a rubric that can be used by your current students to selfassess and self-reflect?  Will you aspire to create or seek out other examples of rubrics that you can use in the future to have students self-assess or selfreflect. 
    • 25. References

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