Rubrics 101

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Rubrics 101

  1. 1. Rubrics 101: Content, Clarity, and Grading Presented by Marie Gillespie and Karen Raino LT’s January Institute, 2014
  2. 2. Objectives O I can identify and explain the traits of a high quality rubric. O I can evaluate a rubric for content and clarity. O I can consider the implications of grading and rubrics.
  3. 3. Agenda O Elements of a High Quality Rubric O Rubric Analysis O Rubric Grading
  4. 4. Examining Rubrics “Good rubrics for evaluating student proficiency in a performance assessment context specify the important content (what counts) with sharp clarity (everyone understands the criteria) (Stiggins, An Introduction to student-involved assessment for learning, p. 173).”
  5. 5. Rubrics and Content Good rubrics… O Understand what a good performance is. O Align content with essential outcomes (learning targets), state/national standards O Align content with what you are really assessing.
  6. 6. Rubrics – Content and Clarity Good Rubrics… O Categorize and divide the criteria logically. O Have enough levels to show progress. O Show a clear distinction between levels. (Stiggins, An Introduction to student-involved assessment for learning, p. 173-175)
  7. 7. Rubrics and Clarity O Rubrics are clear when everyone knows and understands what is wanted and needed. O Levels defined with descriptors O Written in student friendly language O Inter-rater reliability O Levels of the rubric are parallel in content (Stiggins, An Introduction to student-involved assessment for learning, p. 173-175)
  8. 8. Common Rubric Errors 1, Emphasis on quantity instead of quality Use counts when they are part of quality If forgotten: 2. Important criteria are neglected 3. Non-essential elements are included O It suggests it is unimportant O The student is not given feedback O There is a lack of info. for instructional planning Connect criteria with essential outcomes
  9. 9. More Errors 4. Rubrics are used as a scoring guide Fails to define quality, which is the goal 5. Rubric is skimpy Levels of quality are not thoroughly defined 6. Including effort in a rubric Standards & expectations should not be adjusted as a result of effort
  10. 10. Metarubric Summary O Content- What counts? What users see is what you’ll get. O O O O Clarity- Does everyone understand what is meant? O O O Are terms defined? Are various levels of quality defined? Are there samples of work to illustrate the levels of quality? Practicality- Is it easy to use? O O O O O Does it cover everything of importance- doesn’t leave important things out? Does it leave out unimportant things? Will students understand what is meant? Is there a student-friendly version? Can students use it to self-assess & set specific goals? Is the information provided useful for planning instruction? Is the rubric manageable? Technical Quality/Fairness- Is it reliable & valid? O O O Is it reliable? Will different raters give the same score? Is it valid? Do the ratings actually represent what students can do? Is it fair? Does the language adequately describe quality for all students? Are there racial, cultural, or gender biases?
  11. 11. Rubrics 101: Grading
  12. 12. As of the end of the 2010 season, he leads all active players in batting average,[4] slugging percentage ,5] and on-base percentage, and ranks among the top 50 leading home run hitters in Major League Baseball history.[6] He was selected by ESPN.com as the greatest player of the decade from 2000–2009.[7] He stands 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m), weighs 230 pounds (100 kg), bats and throws right-handed.[8]”” Article was retrieved from Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Pujols on March 5, 2011.
  13. 13. Render a Verdict: Baseball Performance Pujols played in 155 of 162 games in the last series. Does your opinion of his baseball performance change considering the information above?
  14. 14. Render a Verdict: Baseball Performance Pujols’s batting average is .333. Does your opinion of his baseball performance change considering the information above?
  15. 15. Grading According to Arter & Chappuis “Grading…is a summing up, a judgment about the quality of student work or the amount a student has learned.” (Arter & Chappuis, 111)
  16. 16. Arter & Chappuis’ 3 Caveats 1. “Use Grades Only to Communicate” Do not use to penalize or motivate. 2. “Use Grades Only to Communicate About Learning” A grade’s purpose in communicating academic learning is lost and the grade is meaningless if attendance, behavior, etc. are included. 3. “Grades are not the best way to give students feedback on learning” Grades are not assessments for learning- they are summative. (Arter & Chappuis, 112-115)
  17. 17. Converting Rubric Scores to a Grade Using a Logic Table (Conversion Chart) Prior to logic tables you would “take a straight percentage of number of points earned divided by a total # of possible points” and this would lead to a “grade that doesn’t make sense” Ex: 3 on a 5 point scale isn’t wonderful, but it isn’t an F “Developing a logic rule has not been standardized”, but to develop a rule or logic table: 1) Work with others 2) Examine rubric and samples of work 3) Make judgments about which score averages should convert to which grades 4) Draft a logic rule to fit these judgments Arter & Chappuis, p. 120
  18. 18. RUBRIC SCORES SHOULD NOT BE TURNED INTO A PERCENTAGE & THEN A GRADE EX. 1 Criteria V Score 5 4 Criteria Y Score Criteria Z Score 2 1 X Criteria W Score Criteria X Score 3 X X X X Ex. 1: (80% +60%+80%+60% + 40%)/5= 64%= D or (4+3+4+3+2) = 16 and 16/25= 64%= D (Arter & Chappuis, Figure 5.2 from Creating & Recognizing Quality Rubrics, 117.)
  19. 19. Example 2 Ex. 2 4 Criteria V Score X Criteria W Score Criteria X Score 3 1 X X Criteria Y Score Criteria Z Score 2 X X Ex 2: (100% +75%+100%+50%+75%)/5=80%=Bor (4+3+4+2+3)/5=80%= B(Arter & Chappuis, Figure 5.2 from Creating & Recognizing Quality Rubrics, 117.)
  20. 20. Example 3 Ex. 3 Score 6 5 4 3 2 X Ex. 3: 4/6=67%= D “% don’t accurately reflect level of learning as measured by a rubric.g” (Arter & Chappuis, 116) 1
  21. 21. Rather… Convert: Rubric Score Grades LOGIC RULE : Logically decide how rubric descriptors equate to grades. (Arter & Chappuis, 116)
  22. 22. Converting Rubric Scores to a Grade Using a Logic Table (Conversion Chart) CONVERSION CHART FOR Rubric w/ 5 Levels & 6 Criteria RUBRIC: 5 Levels & 6 Criteria Beyond Above At Almos t There Try Again A X 4.2 and Above B 3.5-4.1 2.8-3.4 D 2.0-2.7 F 1.9 and Below X Evidence AVG. RUBRIC SCORE C Thesis GRAD E Citations X Grammar X Style Organization X X Possible Points: 5 Levels * 6 Criteria = 30 Possible Points  Add up points associated with each criteria: (4 + 4 + 3 + 3+ 5+ 4) = 23 Points  Divide Total Points Earned by # of Criteria: 23 Points/ 6 Criteria =3.8  Consult Conversion Chart : 3.8 =B Arter & Chappuis, p. 118
  23. 23. Converting Rubric Scores to a Grade Using a Logic Table (Conversion Chart) CONVERSION CHART FOR Rubric w/ 4 Levels & 5 Criteria RUBRIC: 4 Levels & 5 Criteria Beyond Thesis Try Again GRADE AVG. RUBRIC SCORE A 3.5-4.0 B X 3.0-3.4 C 2.5-2.9 D 1.5-2.4 F 1.0-1.4 X Grammar Style At X Evidence Citations Above X X Possible Points: 4 Levels * 5 Criteria = 20 Possible Points  Add up points associated with each criteria: (4+3+4+2+3) = 16 Points  Divide Total Points Earned by # of Criteria: 16 Points/ 5 Criteria =3.2  Consult Conversion Chart : 3.2 =B Arter & Chappuis, p. 118
  24. 24. Converting Rubric Scores to a Grade Using a Logic Table (Conversion Chart) RUBRIC: 3 Levels & 5 Criteria Above Thesis Try Again GRADE X Evidence At CONVERSION CHART FOR Rubric w/ 3 Levels & 5 Criteria AVG. RUBRIC SCORE X A Citations X Grammar X Style X Possible Points: 3 Levels * 5 Criteria = 15 Possible Points 2.6-3.0 B 2.1-2.5 C 1.6-2.0 D 1.0-1.5 F Below 1.0  Add up points associated with each criteria: (3+3+2+2+3) = 13 Points  Divide Total Points Earned by # of Criteria: 13 Points/ 5 Criteria =2.6  Consult Conversion Chart : 2.6=A
  25. 25. Weighting a Criterion RUBRIC: 3 Levels & 5 Criteria Above Thesis At CONVERSION CHART FOR Rubric w/ 3 Levels & 6 Criteria Try Again GRADE AVG. RUBRIC SCORE X A B 1.6-2.0 D 1.0-1.5 F Below 1.0 XX Citations X Grammar Style 2.1-2.5 C Evidence 2.6-3.0 X X Let’s Say your unit focuses on locating & using historical evidence. As a result, this criterion should be weighted more heavily. Possible Points: 3 Levels * (5 + 1 Criteria)= 18 Possible Points  Add up points associated with each criteria: (3+3+3+2+2+3) = 16 Points  Divide Total Points Earned by # of Criteria: 16 Points/ 6 Criteria =2.6  Consult Conversion Chart : 2.6=A Arter & Chappuis, p. 118
  26. 26. Review O Objectives O I can identify and explain the traits of a high quality rubric. O I can evaluate a rubric for content and clarity. O I can consider the implications of grading and rubrics. O Rubric Grading O Exit Feedback

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