• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
A Closer Look  at Strategy 4 and 7
 

A Closer Look at Strategy 4 and 7

on

  • 356 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
356
Views on SlideShare
329
Embed Views
27

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

1 Embed 27

http://www.lths.net 27

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    A Closer Look  at Strategy 4 and 7 A Closer Look at Strategy 4 and 7 Presentation Transcript

    • A Closer Look at One of the PLC Pieces: FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT STRATEGY 4 & 7
    • Session Objectives: I WILL : differentiate between self-assessment and self-reflection. identify the characteristics of valid self-assessment and self-reflection. explain the value of self-assessment and self-reflection. create a (or modify an existing) self-assessment and self- reflection strategy to use in my classes. aspire to create a class culture in which students value self-assessment and self-reflection.
    • Agenda: 1. The PLC Cycle, Formative Assessment, & Strategies 4 & 7 2. Activity #1: Make a Prediction & Determine the Difference: Self-Assessment and Self-Reflection 3. Activity #2: Identify Characteristics of Valid Self-Assessment 4. Activity #3:Self-Assessing Level of Mastery of a Learning Target 5. Activity #4: What does the research say? 6. You Choose: Self-Assessment
    • Agenda: 7. Your Draft: Self-Assessment 8. Strategy 7, Categories of Tracking Growth, Examples 9. You Choose: Self-Reflection 10. Your Draft: Self-Reflection 11. Exit Slip (Teacher Self-Reflection) & Conclusion
    • The PLC Cycle & Formative Assessment
    • The Seven Student-Centered Strategies of Formative Assessment Strategy 1: Provide students with a clear and understandable vision of the learning target. Strategy 2: Use examples and models of strong and weak work. Strategy 3: Offer regular descriptive feedback. Teach students to self-assess and set goals. Strategy 5: Design lessons to focus on one learning target or aspect of quality at a time. Strategy 6: Teach students focused revision. Engage students in self-reflection, and let them keep track of and share their learning. Strategy 4: Strategy 7: Where Am I Going? Where Am I Now? How do I Close the Gap?
    • Activity #1: Make a Prediction: Self-Assessment and Self-Reflection Directions: •. Find Activity #1 in your packet. •Write a definition for the terms: –Self-assessment –Self-reflection Packet p. 1
    • Activity #1: Determining the Difference: Self-Assessment and Self-Reflection Directions: • Watch each video clip (2 in total). • Record the language and activities in the clip that justify it as an example of self- assessment or self- reflection.
    • Clip #1: Self-Assessment WHAT MAKES THIS CLIP AN EXAMPLE OF SELF-ASSESSMENT?
    • Clip #2: Self-Reflection WHAT MAKES THIS CLIP AN EXAMPLE OF SELF-REFLECTION?
    • Concluding Activity #1: Determining the Difference: Self-Assessment and Self-Reflection WITH YOUR TABLE: 1) Discuss the characteristics of each clip with your table group. 2) Answer the following question: What distinguishes the example of self-assessment from the example of self-reflection?
    • Self- Assessment vs. Self-Reflection Self-Assessment (Strategy 4) • Reviewing individual pieces of evidence to identify specific strengths and areas for further work • Where am I now? Self-Reflection (Strategy 7) • A more global process of looking back over a collection of evidence • How do I close the gap?
    • How it Happens in the Classroom SELF-ASSESSMENT SELF-REFLECTION • Class period • Game • Meet • Class unit, Mid-unit, quarter • Sports season • Series of games • Olympic run Methods: •Assigning a rating •Stomp and Clap •Fist to 5 •Assigning quality level with a rubric • or Methods: •Tracking, graphing, summarizing trends about progress •Using a collection of: -daily entry/exit slips -daily assignments -unit performances
    • Who is helped by Strategy 4 & 7? •All students – Targeted intervention for students not reaching learning targets – Differentiated tasks
    • STRATEGY 4 Teach students to self-assess and set goals.
    • STRATEGY 4: Teach students to self-assess and set goals. THE COMPONENTS OF VALID SELF-ASSESSMENT: Self-assessment:: Students make judgments about what they know, have learned, or have mastered. The judgment should be tied to a learning target. Justification: Students show evidence in their work as rationale for their judgments. Goal Setting: Students make a plan for continued learning. Goals should be specific and challenging.
    • Gregory, Cameron, & Davies (2000) Options for Self-Assessment BEFORE LEARNING “When students are involved in self-assessment, they provide themselves with regular and immediate descriptive feedback to guide their learning. They become more actively involved in a curriculum that otherwise can seem unrelated to their lives and personal experiences.” SELF- ASSESSMENT: BEFORE LEARNING
    • Options for Self-Assessment • During PowerPoint lecture or exit slip • During mid-unit quiz DURING LEARNING = full understanding  = need to “check” ? = confused or lost
    • Options for Self-Assessment AFTER LEARNING Using the results of a formative quiz or assignment SELF- ASSESSMENT: AFTER LEARNING
    • Activity #2: Identify Characteristics of Valid Self-Assessment Directions: • As a table, select one subject area: – PE (pgs. 2-5 in packet) – History (pgs. 6-9 in packet) • Review Billy and Sally’s Self-Assessments • Compare and contrast Billy and Sally’s assessments • Determine which one is more valid than the other and why To Compare & Contrast: Does the student… assess in relation to the learning target? compare current status to the targets? justify judgment with evidence from work? set specific goals that guide next actions? Packet p. 2-5; 6-9
    • Activity #2: Identify Characteristics of Valid Self-Assessment To Compare & Contrast: Does the student: assess in relation to the learning target? compare current status to the targets? justify judgment with evidence from work? set specific goals that guide next actions? Why is this self-assessment? •student determines their own level of mastery as it relates to 1 learning target •student justifies what he/she needs to work on •student determines what he/she needs to do next to reach the learning target
    • Activity #3: Self-Assessing Level of Mastery of a Learning Target Packet p. 10 Directions: •Turn to page 10 of your packet • Review the 3-box rubric • 2 student responses have been provided, the first with a model of self-assessment. •Assess the second student response below as if it were your exit slip answer
    • Implementation Challenges & Self-Assessment Templates Challenges We Face: • Culture • Inaccurate Self-Assessment • Logistical Trickiness
    • Research Says… •Students will achieve at higher levels without additional instruction – Black & Wiliam (1998a): Feedback on oral reading rates. – White & Frederiksen (1998) Self-assessment on scientific inquiry skills.
    • Activity #4- Table Discussion: What does the research say? Directions: •Read the eight research findings (pg. 11). •Put a check mark next to the two pieces of research that you find most thought-provoking. •In the space provided explain why those quotes catch your eye. When you are done… • Walk to the front of the room and a place a sticky note on the two pieces of research that you found thought-provoking. Packet p. 11
    • You Choose: Self-Assessment By yourself: •Review the templates in the self-assessment examples packet. •Consider the questions on pg. 12 of your Activity Packet. Determine: •Who in your classes would benefit from these strategies? •When (during a unit) would be a good time to use these strategies? •How would you use these strategies for your specific classes? •Select a template that you could use or adapt Packet p. 12
    • Your Draft: Self- Assessment Directions: • Create a self- assessment for student use during your next instructional unit • Activity Packet pg. 13 Meaningful & valid self-assessment: – Assesses in relation to the learning target – Provides evidence – Sets specific goal Packet p. 13
    • STRATEGY 7 Engage students in self-reflection, and let them keep track of and share their learning.
    • STRATEGY 7: Engage students in self-reflection, and let them keep track of and share their learning Self-Reflection: Students: •connects students to their growth. •is embedded in the lesson design. •offers opportunities for students to share their progress. •is a gap-closing strategy because of its impact on student motivation and retention. •track progress •reflect on their learning processes and growth •share observations about achievement or about themselves as learners
    • CATEGORIES EXPLANATION Recording Progress Tracking forms: •link each entry to a learning target • include a place for students to record and date their results on multiple trials Keeping Learning Journals •A collection of student thoughts about any aspect of learning can provide students and teachers with regular descriptive feedback. Collecting Samples of Work •A portfolio can be used for self-reflection, •especially if it documents growth, project completion, or achievement over a collection of learning targets. 3 Categories of Tracking Growth
    • Tracking Growth must be Followed by Reflection • Students must look over their collection of tracked work and think meta-cognitively about their learning. Students should draw conclusions about:: What they have learned How they have learned it What worked and didn’t work What they would do differently
    • Recording Progress: LTHS Example
    • Recording Progress with Self-Reflection: LTHS Example
    • Recording Progress with Self- Reflection: LTHS Example
    • What should accompany this graph to make it an example of self- reflection? Recording Progress: LTHS Example
    • Differentiated Tasks Asks student to reflect on the task they chose and if it was appropriately challenging for their learning.
    • Learning Journal: Example West Virginia Department of Education. Retrieved from: http://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/LearningResponseLogs.html
    • Learning Journal: Example Shadle High School. Retrieved from : http://www.spokaneschools.org/Page/7603
    • Portfolio with Reflection Statement: Example Student Portfolio :Williamson, Sean. http://newtechhigh.org/Sample_Portfolios/sean/
    • LTHS Example: Self-Reflection •How did you learn this? •What worked? Why? •What will you do to review this? •How will you learn this?
    • You Choose: Self-Reflection By yourself or with your table: •Review the templates in the self-reflection packet. •Consider the questions on pg. 14 of your Activity Packet. Determine: •How is a student tracking their progress? •How is the student being prompted to draw conclusions concerning their learning and growth over time? •How could you use this in your classroom? •Choose a template that would work for your students! Packet p. 14
    • Your Draft: Self- Reflection Directions: • Design a self-reflection for use this semester. • Please make sure this reflection prompts students to look at a collection of work and draw conclusions. • Activity Packet pg. 15 SELF-REFLECTION INVOLVES: • Students must look over their collection of tracked work and think meta-cognitively about their learning. Students should draw conclusions about::  What they have learned  How they have learned it  What worked and didn’t work  What they would do differently Packet p. 15
    • Session Objectives: I CAN… • differentiate between self-assessment and self- reflection. • identify the characteristics of valid self-assessment. • explain the value of self-assessment and self- reflection. • Identify or create a self-assessment and self-reflection strategy that can be useful in my classes • Aspire to create a class culture in which students value self-assessment and self reflection
    • Reflect on Today’s Session Directions: • Please think about first quarter and your goals for second quarter, when completing this form.
    • WHAT MATTERS MOST IS HOW YOU SEE YOURSELF. Assessment for learning is used not to punish or reward, but to guide students on their learning journey.
    • References Chappuis, Jan (2009). Seven strategies of assessment for learning. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc. 2009.’ Harlen, W., & M. James. (1997). Assessment and learning: Differences and relationships between formative and summative assessment. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy, & Practice 4(3), 365-379. Sadler, D. R. (1989). Formative assessment and the design of instructional systems. Instructional Science, 18,119-144. Shadle Park High School (2012-2013). Learning log: Sample learning log. Retrieved from http://www.spokaneschools.org/Page/7603. Stiggins, R (2007). Assessment for learning: An essential foundation of productive instruction. In Douglas Reeves (ed.), Ahead of the curve (pp56-77). Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree. West Virginia Department of Education. Learning logs: Math journals. Retrieved from http://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/LearningResponseLogs.html Williamson, Sean (2011). Student portfolio. Retrieved from