‘Missing Daddy’:The Exclusion of Fathers inMainstream Parenting MagazinesJeremy SarachanSt. John Fisher CollegeDepartment ...
Social construction of genderParenting rolesChanging definitions throughout historyNormative attitudes are not the average(...
Fathers through the yearsVariable and culturally based   Colonial fathers: ‘child’s guide, governor,   disciplinarian, and...
The development of fatherhood Continually defined by the media (Beynon) Easy for fictional media to conform to stereotypes ‘...
The myth (and perils) of       parenting magazinesClarifies advertising message(McCracken)Even a local parenting magazine c...
Rhetorical examples‘Part-time father/Mother as main parent’‘Father as mother’s bumbling assistant’‘Father as line manager’...
More text examples from the literature (Rashley)  From BabyCenter website:        “Dad’s cheat sheet for childbirth class....
HypothesisParenting magazines take a negative viewof the role and responsibilities offatherhood more than 50% of the time.
MethodologyStudents reviewed six months of Parenting, Parents, FamilyCircle, and Family Fun (2011).All mention of fathers ...
Visuals
Range of content types             Student Student                A       B    Positive 36.4% 40.7%     Positive/     Neut...
Category of behaviorsFamily Togetherness        63Cooperating with Spouse    34Playing with kids          33Other         ...
Neutral/positive quotes"The kids love using dry-erase markers on the imagesto make silly faces, turning each other, and Mo...
Quotes“Its especially common for kids to be sad aboutleaving mom (Sorry Dad!).” (Parenting EarlyYears)“If you try to strai...
More quotes“A sleep-deprived, grumpy father snaps at his son fora minor offense (spilled chocolate milk?). The boybegins t...
AuthorshipMost male writers: doctors, celebrities,or don’t write about the act of parenting.Need to balance fathers and mo...
Daddy Blogshttp://www.babble.com/dad/fatherhood/babble-s-top-50-dad-blogs-for-2011/
Market focus/trapped in the past  Hypothesis not proven.  However, these magazines perpetuate enduring  stereotypes (Sunde...
Works cited“‘Baby entertainer, bumbling assistant and line manager: Discourses of fatherhood in parentcraft texts” by Jane...
Thank youQuestions?Jeremy sarachan@jeresarachanjsarachan@sjfc.edu
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Missing daddy: The Exclusion of Fathers from Mainstream Parenting Magazines

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NEPSCA Conference, St. John Fisher College, Rochester, NY.
October 27, 2012

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Missing daddy: The Exclusion of Fathers from Mainstream Parenting Magazines

  1. 1. ‘Missing Daddy’:The Exclusion of Fathers inMainstream Parenting MagazinesJeremy SarachanSt. John Fisher CollegeDepartment of Communication/Journalism
  2. 2. Social construction of genderParenting rolesChanging definitions throughout historyNormative attitudes are not the average(Brandth and Kvande)
  3. 3. Fathers through the yearsVariable and culturally based Colonial fathers: ‘child’s guide, governor, disciplinarian, and protector.’ 19th century fathers: entertainers Early-20th century fathers: sports, entertainment, and masculinity 1970s and 1980s: greater responsibilities (Pleck)
  4. 4. The development of fatherhood Continually defined by the media (Beynon) Easy for fictional media to conform to stereotypes ‘Mr. Mom’ vs ‘Ms. Dad’ (Unger)
  5. 5. The myth (and perils) of parenting magazinesClarifies advertising message(McCracken)Even a local parenting magazine cansend the wrong message
  6. 6. Rhetorical examples‘Part-time father/Mother as main parent’‘Father as mother’s bumbling assistant’‘Father as line manager’ (Sunderland)
  7. 7. More text examples from the literature (Rashley) From BabyCenter website: “Dad’s cheat sheet for childbirth class.” “The father is increasingly important in care—but not that he is an equal partner.” “Strategizing the date of conception around the potential conflict between birth and certain sports.”
  8. 8. HypothesisParenting magazines take a negative viewof the role and responsibilities offatherhood more than 50% of the time.
  9. 9. MethodologyStudents reviewed six months of Parenting, Parents, FamilyCircle, and Family Fun (2011).All mention of fathers in the editorial section logged.Evaluated as positive/neutral/negative.Coders also chose from a list of topics that described text/image content.
  10. 10. Visuals
  11. 11. Range of content types Student Student A B Positive 36.4% 40.7% Positive/ Neutral 0.6% 1.9% Neutral 54.0% 38.9% Negative/ Neutral 0.6% 1.9% Negative 8.5% 16.7%
  12. 12. Category of behaviorsFamily Togetherness 63Cooperating with Spouse 34Playing with kids 33Other 28Caring about family/kids 23Educating kids 16OthHousehold Chores 16Concerned about kids 16Travel with family 11Cooking 9Sports (with kids) 9
  13. 13. Neutral/positive quotes"The kids love using dry-erase markers on the imagesto make silly faces, turning each other, and Mom andDad, into clowns, pirates, cats, bunnies andmore." (Family Fun)"Everyone in the family- including mom and dad-received a sticker for each book read." (Family Fun)
  14. 14. Quotes“Its especially common for kids to be sad aboutleaving mom (Sorry Dad!).” (Parenting EarlyYears)“If you try to straighten the house every day, andyour husband likes to chill in front of the TVeach evening, and you have a baby, somethinghas to give.” (Parenting Early Years)
  15. 15. More quotes“A sleep-deprived, grumpy father snaps at his son fora minor offense (spilled chocolate milk?). The boybegins to cry. The mother comforts the child whilegiving Dad the evil eye.” (Parenting Early Years)"...women are at a greater risk of back pain than men(so why is he always the one complaining?)" (ParentingEarly Years)
  16. 16. AuthorshipMost male writers: doctors, celebrities,or don’t write about the act of parenting.Need to balance fathers and mothers asauthors.
  17. 17. Daddy Blogshttp://www.babble.com/dad/fatherhood/babble-s-top-50-dad-blogs-for-2011/
  18. 18. Market focus/trapped in the past Hypothesis not proven. However, these magazines perpetuate enduring stereotypes (Sunderland), possibly as a means to simplify ad sales. Images offer more equality, blandly, but negative portrayals of fathers continue. A greater gender balance of authors is necessary.
  19. 19. Works cited“‘Baby entertainer, bumbling assistant and line manager: Discourses of fatherhood in parentcraft texts” by JaneSunderland in Discourse Society 11:249. “The commercialization of masculinities” by John Beynon in Critical Readings: Media and Gender, edited by Carter andSteiner.Decoding Women’s Magazines by Ellen McCracken.“Masculinity and child care: the reconstruction of fathering by Berit Brandth and Elin Kvande in The Sociological Review46:2.Men Can: The changing image and reality of fatherhood in america by Donald N.S. Unger.“‘Parenting’ or ‘Mothering’: The case of modern childcare magazines’ by Jane Sunderland in Discourse Society 17:503.“Ralph, Fred, Archie, Home, and the King of Queens: Why television keeps re-creating the male working-class buffoon”by Richard Butsch in Gender, Race, and Class in Media, edited by Dines and Humez.“The social organization of Masculinity” by R.W. Connell in The Masculinities Reader edited by Stephen M. Whiteheadand Frank J. Barrett.“Two dimensions of fatherhood: A history of the good dad-bad dad complex” by Elizabeth H. Pleck in The role of thefather in child development, 4th edition, edited by Michael E. Lamb.“‘Work it out with your wife’: Gendered expectations and parenting rhetoric online by Lisa Hammond Rashley, NWSAJournal 17:1.
  20. 20. Thank youQuestions?Jeremy sarachan@jeresarachanjsarachan@sjfc.edu

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