• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
The Public Sector Problem
 

The Public Sector Problem

on

  • 1,158 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,158
Views on SlideShare
1,158
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    The Public Sector Problem The Public Sector Problem Document Transcript

    • Speak Up Memo The Voice of Young Conservatives THE WEEK OF APRIL 26, 2010 The Outrage Used and forgotten. In 2008, young people gave Democrats their vote and in 2009  Democrats showed young people the door. Well it’s time to tell the Democrats to  stop and listen up. From health care to student loan reform, Democratic policies  have consistently ignored the needs of our generation.  If we want change, 2010  must be different.   What You Can Do About It Speak up! As a conservative we must begin to win hearts and minds before we can  win elections. The process starts by educating people about what we truly believe. It  starts with you in the classroom.    We’ll arm you with the facts you need to win the argument. It’s your job to carry the  message on to your campus. It’s your job to speak up! By engaging ourselves in the  debate, we’ll spread the message of conservatism – the message of small  government, Xiscal responsibility, and individual rights – to one campus, one  classroom, and one student at a time. Over the next Xive weeks the CRNC will be looking into the growing entitlements that  left unreformed will doom this country’s Xiscal future. We must realize that  government is not the solution to the problem…it IS the problem. This Week’s Theme: The Public Sector Problem The Promise: President Obama has said, “[w]e are spending money on things we  don’t need and we are paying more than we need to pay.” To Xix the problem he said,  “I can  promise  you that  this  is  just  the  beginning  of a new  way  of  doing  business  here  in  Washington,  because  the  American  people  have every right to expect and to demand a government that is more  efXicient,  more  accountable,  and  more  responsible  in  keeping  the  public’s trust.”  A weekly publication by the College Republican National Committee. Copyright 2010.
    • The Reality: The public sector continues to grow in numbers and government  employees continue to earn more than their private sector counterparts. The  government fails to understand that an over‐stressed private sector cannot continue  to subsidize a bloated bureaucracy.  Fact 1: Public Sector Far Out­Earning the Private Sector According to the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Economic Analysis the average  wage disparity between federal and private sector workers was approximately  $60,000. When we take state and local public employees into account a similar trend  emerges. Data compiled by the Cato Institute Xinds that, “The average compensation in the private sector was $59,909 in 2008,  including  $50,028  in  wages  and  $9,881  in  beneXits.  Average  compensation in  the public sector  was  $67,812,  including $52,051 in  wages and $15,761 in beneXits.”  A job‐by‐job comparison also reveals the startling pay difference between the public  and private sector. In fact, in 83% of comparable occupations, federal salaries exceed  private sector pay. Consider a sampling of data provided by the Bureau of Labor  Statistics and compiled by the USA Today: JOB FEDERAL PRIVATE DIFFERENCE Broadcast Technician $90,310 $49,265 $41,045 Civil Engineer $85,970 $76,184 $8,876 Computer Specialist $45,830 $54,875 -$9,045 Dental Assistant $36,170 $32,069 $4,101 Financial Analyst $87,400 $81,232 $6,168 Landscape Architects $80,830 $58,380 $22,450 Machinist $51,530 $44,315 $7,215 Paralegal $60,340 $48,890 $11,450 Public Relations Mngr $132,410 $88,241 $44,169 Secretary $44,500 $33,829 $10,671 Surveyro $78,710 $67,336 $11,374 A weekly publication by the College Republican National Committee. Copyright 2010.
    • Fact 2: Public Sector Pensions are Bankrupting Many Governments A recent survey by CareerBuilder found that “[m]ore than seven‐in‐ten (72%) of  workers over the age of 60 who said they were putting off their retirement are doing  so because they can’t afford to retire.” But while the private sector struggles, many  public servants are spending their golden years very comfortably. Consider: • Four‐in‐Xive workers have lifetime pensions, compared with only one‐in‐Xive  in the private sector • On average the public sector receives $13.65 worth of beneXits per each hour  they work compared to $8.02 dollars for private sector workers • Public sector workers can generally retire earlier ‐ usually age 55 ‐ and still  qualify for up to 90% of their income in pension • The average public pension plan is 35% underfunded The public pension problem creates a huge economic burden on government. For  instance, some towns in California such as Vallejo and Desert Hot Springs, have been  forced to Xile bankruptcy due to the inability to pay the cost of employee pensions.  The cost of California pensions, have grown from $150 million per year to over $3  billion per year in just the last decade ‐ a 2,000% increase.  This is not a California speciXic problem. Orin Kramer, chairman of New Jersey’s  INvestment Council, who has studied the problem, Xinds that the total unfunded  liability of the nation’s public pension could be as large as $2 trillion. Some would  say even this huge Xigure underestimates the problem. Joshua Raugh, professor of  Xinance at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University says that  “our calculation is that it’s more like $3 trillion underfunded. Fact 3: Young Adults Will Be on the Hook for the Governments Excesses Governments are refusing to face up to the economic realities of a huge bureaucracy.  Given the data it appears that the federal government is paying well‐above that  which is necessary to compete with the private sector for skilled labor. Moreover,  despite the economic downturn which has caused a massive decrease in tax  revenue, the government keeps on hiring and spending. As Michael Barone recently  wrote for the Washington Examiner, “While the private sector has lost 7 million jobs, the number of public‐ sector jobs has risen. The number of federal government jobs has been  increasing  by  10,000  a  month,  and  the  percentage  of  federal  employees  earning  over  $100,000  has  jumped  to  19  percent  during  the recession.”  A weekly publication by the College Republican National Committee. Copyright 2010.
    • High wages for an increasing number of workers is not the only thing taxpayers are  on the hook for. The $3 trillion in unfunded public sector pension could also fall into  taxpayers laps as well. Public pensions are the legal obligation of the state ‐ meaning  that current obligations must be paid in full. Many courts have already ruled that  states are not allowed to reduce promised beneXits or require an increase in  contributions from workers to help fund pension plans. Young adults, who are having trouble Xinding a job themselves, will be footing the bill  for all this. The federal government’s only revenue source is taxes. The more public  servants it hires, the more strain that is placed on private sector workers who are  depended on to prop up the government. The huge deXicits we are running up  because of the ever‐growing bureaucracy will eventually be passed on to young  adults in the form of higher taxes and fewer beneXits. In addition, unless the huge  pension problem is dealt with quickly, the next generation of taxpayers (us) will be  forced to make hard choices to pay off $3 trillion in liabilities. Simply put, we can’t  afford this.  Bottom Line: Young adults must make it known that they will not stand for the  excesses of the federal government. We must begin to elect Xiscal conservatives who  are committed to reducing the size of the public workforce. We must demand that  our government pay public servants a wage that is competitive with the private  sector. Young adults must also begin to pressure legislators to make the pension  crisis an issue in the upcoming elections ‐ pushing for retirement ages and pension  levels that are comparable with the private sector. Government must stop thinking  about what beneMits them in the short term and begin worrying about what  hurts us in the long term.  A weekly publication by the College Republican National Committee. Copyright 2010.