Statistical survey project

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Statistical survey project

  1. 1. Statistical Survey Project<br />By: Jonathan Peñate <br />and<br />Arnold Gonzalez<br />
  2. 2. Our Survey Questions<br />1. What is your gender?<br />2. What grade are you in?<br />3. What is your current age?<br />4. How many people live in your household (including yourself?) <br />5. How many pets do you own?<br />6. Do you like your parents?<br />7. Are you for or against the legalization of marijuana? <br />8. Are you in a school sport?<br />9. If yes, how many?<br />10. Are there any video game consoles in your house?<br /> 11. How many TV’s are in your household?<br />
  3. 3. Confidence Interval for Means<br />Question 2<br />Question 3<br />Question 4<br />Question 5<br />Question 9<br />Question 11<br />
  4. 4. Confidence Interval for Proportions<br />Question 1<br />Question 6<br />Question 7<br />Question 8<br />Question 10<br />
  5. 5. Confidence Interval for Mean Q.2<br />What grade are you in?<br />X= 10.054, St. Dev= .882, n=92, df=91, z*=1.96<br />10.054-1.96(.882/sqt 92) = 9.874<br />10.054-1.96(.882/sqt 92) = 10.234<br />Confidence Interval: (9.874, 10.234)<br />We are 95% confident that the true mean grade of the students is between 9.874 and 10.234<br />
  6. 6. Confidence Interval for Mean Q.3<br />What is your current age?<br />X= 15.543, St. Dev= 1.042, n=92, df=91, z*=1.96<br />15.543- 1.96(1.042/sqt 92) = 15.330<br />15.543+ 1.96(1.042/.sqt 92) = 15.756<br />Confidence Interval: (15.330, 15.756)<br />We are 95% confident that the true mean age of the students is between 15.330 and 15.756<br />
  7. 7. Confidence Interval Q.4<br />How many people live in your household?<br />X= 5.889, St. Dev= 2.470, n=90, df= 89, z*=1.96<br />5.889- 1.96(2.470/sqt 90) = 5.379<br />5.889+1.96(2.470/sqt 90) =6.399<br />Confidence Interval: (5.379, 6.399)<br />We are 95% confident that the true mean of people living in the students’ households is between 5.379 and 6.399<br />
  8. 8. Confidence Interval for Mean Q.5<br />How many pets do you own?<br />X= 1.441, St. Dev= 1.515, n= 92, df= 91, z*= 1.96<br />1.441- 1.96(1.441/stq 92) = 1.314<br /> 1.441+ 1.96(1.441/stq 92)= 1.751<br />Confidence Interval: (1.314, 1.751)<br />We are 95% confident that the true mean of pets owned by the students is between 1.314 and 1.751<br />
  9. 9. Confidence Interval for Mean Q.9<br />How many school sports are you in?<br />X= .359, St. Dev= .585, n=92, df= 91, z*1.96<br />.359- 1.96(.585/sqt 92) = .239<br />.359+ 1.96(.585/sqt 92)= .479<br />Confidence Interval: (.239, .479)<br />We are 95% that the true mean of students who are in a school sport is between .239 and .479<br />
  10. 10. Confidence Interval for Mean Q.11<br />How many TV’s are in your household?<br />X= 3.990, St. Dev= 1.600, n= 92, df= 91, z*= 1.96<br />3.990- 1.96(1.600/stq 92) = 3.663<br />3.990+ 1.96(1.600/stq 92) = 4.317<br />Confidence Interval: (3.663, 4.317)<br />We are 95% confident that the true mean of TV’s in students household is between 3.663 and 4.317<br />
  11. 11. Confidence Interval for Proportion Q.1<br />What is your gender? p= males<br />p= .467, q= .532, z*=1.96, n=92<br />.467- 1.96*sqt[(.467)(.532)/92]= .365<br />.467+ 1.96*sqt[(.467)(.532)/92] = .569<br />Confidence Interval= (.365, .569)<br />We are 95% that the proportion of male students is between .365 and .569<br />
  12. 12. Confidence Interval for Proportion Q.6<br />Do you like you parents? <br />p= .887, q= .123, z*= 1.96, n=89<br />.887- 1.96*sqt[(.822)(.178)/89)] = .822<br />.887+ 1.96*sqt[(.822)(.178)/89)] = .953<br />Confidence Interval: (.822, .953)<br />We are 95% confident that the true proportion of students who like their parents is between .822 and .953<br />
  13. 13. Confidence Interval for Proportion Q.7<br />Are you for or against marijuana? p= for<br />p= .473, q= .527, z*= 1.96, n= 91<br />.473- 1.96*sqt[(.473)(.527)/(89)]= .369<br />.473+ 1.96*sqt[(.473)(.527)/(89)]= .575<br />Confidence Interval: (.369, .575)<br />We are 95% confident that the true proportion of students who are for marijuana are between .369 and .575<br />
  14. 14. Confidence Interval for Proportion Q.8<br />Are you in a school sport?<br />p= .696, q= .304, z*= 1.96, n= 92<br />.696- 1.96*sqt[(.696)(.304)/92]= .376<br />.696+ 1.96*sqt[(.696)(.304)/92]= .583<br />Confidence Interval: (.376, .583)<br />We are 95% confident that the true proportion of students who are in a school sport is between .376 and .583<br />
  15. 15. Confidence Interval from Proportion Q.10 <br />Are there any video game consoles in your house?<br />p= .867, q= .133, z*= 1.96, n= 90<br />.867- 1.96* sqt[(.867)(.133)/90]= .063<br />.867+ 1.96* sqt[(.867)(.133)/90]= .203<br />Confidence Interval: (.063, .203)<br />We are 95% confident that the true proportion of students who own have a video game console in their house is between .063 and .203<br />
  16. 16. Hypothesis test for Q.1 vs Larger Study<br />1. Ho: p1 = p2; Ha: p1 ≠ p2<br />2. Randomness: The study is from the U.S. Census<br />10% rule: The sample consists of less than 10% of the population<br />np & nq= (.467)(92) > 10; (.499)(76899) > 10<br />np &nq= (.537)(92) > 10; (.501)(76899) > 10<br />3. We will conduct a 2-proportion z- test<br />Do the math… z= -.6128; p= .54<br />5. With such a high probability we fail to reject the null hypothesis. Therefore, there is not enough evidence to say that there is a difference between the two proportions.<br />
  17. 17. Hypothesis test for Q.7 vs Larger Study <br />1. Ho: p1 = p2; Ha: p1 ≠ p2<br />2. Randomness: Randomness is not stated.<br />10% rule: There is less than 10% of the total population<br />np & nq= (.473)(91) > 10; (.527)(91) > 10<br />np & nq= (.450)(828) > 10; (.500)(828) > 10<br />3. We will conduct a 2 proportion z- test<br />4. Do the math… z= -.4975; p= .618<br />5. With such a high probability, we fail to reject the Ho. There is not enough evidence to say that there is a difference between the two proportions.<br />
  18. 18. Hypothesis on affirmative responses (Males vs Females) for Q.6<br />1. H0: μ of males = μ of females; Ha: μ of males ≠ μ of females.<br />2. Randomness: This was a random sample<br />10% rule: We have less than 10% of the population<br />Nearly normal: We can assume the data is normally distributed.<br />3. We will conduct a 2 sample t- test<br />4. Do the math… t= .083; df= 3.88, p= .937<br />5. With such a high probability, we fail to reject the null hypothesis. There is not enough evidence to say that there is a difference in the two sample means of affirmative answers.<br />
  19. 19. Chi Squared Test for Homogeneity Q.6<br />
  20. 20. Chi Squared Test for Homogeneity Q.6 Continued<br />1. Ho: Responses are independent of grade level<br />Ha: Responses are not independent of grade level<br />2. Randomness: We conducted a random sample<br />10% condition: We have less than 10% of the population<br />3. We will conduct a X^2 test for homegeneity<br />4. Do the math… Chi^2 = 15.41; p= .22<br />5. Based on such a high probability, we cannot reject the null hypothesis. There is not enough evidence to say responses are not independent of grade level.<br />
  21. 21. Sample study links<br />http://www.maletofemaleratio.com/wiki/California-CA/Baldwin_Park.htm<br />

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