Elements of Crime and Justifications notes (2/17) *Also see pages 102-113 of your textbook
Elements of a Crime <ul><li>A. There are 2 essential elements required for criminal  </li></ul><ul><li>      liability: </...
Defenses to Crime <ul><li>A.  Excusable </li></ul><ul><li>     1.  Insanity </li></ul><ul><li>           M'Naughton Rule (...
Defenses to crime (cont.) <ul><li>B.  Justifiable </li></ul><ul><li>     1.  Duress --when wrongful, serious threat causes...
Defenses cont. <ul><li>3.  Entrapment --when police or other officials talk a  </li></ul><ul><li>         person into comm...
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Elements of Crime and Justifications

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Elements of Crime and Justifications

  1. 1. Elements of Crime and Justifications notes (2/17) *Also see pages 102-113 of your textbook
  2. 2. Elements of a Crime <ul><li>A. There are 2 essential elements required for criminal  </li></ul><ul><li>     liability: </li></ul><ul><li>     1. Actus Reus (Criminal Act) </li></ul><ul><li>     2. Mens Rea (Guilty Mind or Criminal Intent) </li></ul><ul><li>         a. Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>         b. Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>         c. Negligence </li></ul><ul><li>         d. Recklessness </li></ul><ul><li>B. Exceptions: &quot;Strict Liability Laws&quot;--can be guilty w/o mens rea. Usually involve endangering the public in some way. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Defenses to Crime <ul><li>A. Excusable </li></ul><ul><li>     1. Insanity </li></ul><ul><li>           M'Naughton Rule (applies in MN)--a person is  </li></ul><ul><li>           legally insane and not criminally responsible if they  </li></ul><ul><li>           a) didn't know what they were doing or b) they  </li></ul><ul><li>           were unable to distinguish right from wrong. </li></ul><ul><li>     2. Involuntary Intoxication --often involves side  </li></ul><ul><li>         effects. (Voluntary Intoxication is less common and  </li></ul><ul><li>         12 states have eliminated it.) </li></ul><ul><li>     3. Mistake of fact --e.g. accidentally walk off with  </li></ul><ul><li>         someone else's property.  (Mistake of law is  </li></ul><ul><li>         usually not valid; &quot;Ignorance of law is no excuse.&quot;) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Defenses to crime (cont.) <ul><li>B. Justifiable </li></ul><ul><li>     1. Duress --when wrongful, serious threat causes a  </li></ul><ul><li>       person to perform an act they would otherwise not  </li></ul><ul><li>       perform  </li></ul><ul><li>             a. threat is immediate and inescapable </li></ul><ul><li>             b. must not be involved through one's own fault </li></ul><ul><li>     2. Self-defense --when a person believes they are in  </li></ul><ul><li>         danger of being harmed (or their dwelling or other  </li></ul><ul><li>         property) they are justified in defending themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>             a. deadly force can only be used if person thinks  </li></ul><ul><li>                 that imminent death or serious bodily harm will  </li></ul><ul><li>                 otherwise result.  </li></ul><ul><li>     </li></ul>
  5. 5. Defenses cont. <ul><li>3.  Entrapment --when police or other officials talk a  </li></ul><ul><li>         person into committing an illegal act that they are  </li></ul><ul><li>         not otherwise predisposed to commit. </li></ul>
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