0
MAKE ME FAMOUS
(abridged)
A few tools for tracking research
impact in the creative industries
Jennifer Thomas – CI Liaison...
• QUT ePrints – repository statistics
• Your Staff Profile
• What the heck is an h-index?
• Google Scholar Citations
• Usi...
CRICOS No. 00213Ja university for the worldreal
R
ePrints repository statistics
QUT ePrints hit 10 million
downloads on 28...
CRICOS No. 00213Ja university for the worldreal
R
Staff Profiles
RAD
Staff Profiles
ePrints
The h-index is a single number that measures both
the productivity (number of papers) and the impact
(number of citations)...
Stuart Cunningham
• Web of Science: 4
• Scopus: 5
• Google Scholar 28
(as at 27 June 2013)
h-index varies according to you...
CRICOS No. 00213Ja university for the worldreal
R
Google Scholar
Citations
The rise of social media in research
CRICOS No. 00213Ja university for the worldreal
R
CRICOS No. 00213Ja university for the worldreal
R
Create your „Google profile‟
Think about your “Google” profile
Queensland University of Technology
CRICOS No. 00213J
Jenny
Architecture, Landscape
Architecture Industrial/ Interior/
Urb...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Make Me Famous! (abridged version)

146

Published on

This presentation is tailored to the needs of Design researchers and includes customised research impact tracking with a focus on non‐science based citation tools, alternative evidence of impact and esteem measures. Go away with a clear understanding of staff profiles, Google Scholar (and how to set up your own profile), and what the heck is my h-index and how do I make sure it goes up and up and up...

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
146
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Abridged version of Make me famous.There’s a lot we could cover including journal impact factors and other traditional metrics – but many of them aren’t relevant to your disciplines and you can come along to one of the library’s research support sessions to learn more about those.
  • None of this could be overly effective without Open Access.Open Access = more people can find you therefore more people can download and cite you = higher impact.QUT ePrints is ranked as the top repository in Australia, and the world’s 14th top institutional repository and 21st top repository overall in the Ranking Web of Repositories.
  • The information in Staff Profiles can be viewed by anybody using the internet and so in RAD, researchers have to select the information they wish to appear on their Staff Profile page. Staff Profiles are intended to provide a brief summary of a researcher's expertise and area of interest – not a full CV, but a showcase of the best bits.Each section; publications, HDR completions, Category 1 funded grants and keywords is therefore limited to a maximum of ten items. Researchers should therefore selectthe ten publications that best highlight their research. A link is provided to their ePrint page where the rest of their publications can be found. It has a link to include your publications – this section is populated through RAD, and relies on you having deposited your articles into ePrints.Updates and changes in the Staff Profile Module of RAD will update to a researcher's Staff Profile webpage by 9.30am the following day.Important to keep your keywords/areas of interest up to date and relevant. Staff Profiles is public, therefore people can find you based on your areas of interest. You should want people to find you.
  • It provides a mechanism for the work of individual researchers to be compared with others in the same discipline.The h-index is most appropriate for researchers who are established and have published extensively. A solid and robust track record is best for the measure to provide meaning.It does have it’s advantages and disadvantages -Advantages– - The h-index offers a more sophisticated measure than just citation counts or average citation counts, which can be skewed by one highly cited paper- So it measures “durable” performance, not only single peaks– this can also be a limitation-any document type can be included including conference papers and book chapters- Itis acumulative indicator ofperformance and it can be calculated using citation tools such as Web of Science, Scopus and Harzing’s Publish or Perish. Limitations – The h-index is a less appropriate measure of academic achievement for researchers in the humanities and social sciences as it might take several years before a paper acquires a significant number of citations Itis not a good indicator for early career researchers, since both their publication output and citation rates will be relatively low compared to more experienced researchers. It is highly dependent on the length of a researcher’s career, meaning only researchers with similar years of service can be compared fairly. It is based on long-term observations. It is insensitive to one or several highly cited papers in a scientist’s paper set – as per advantages Itprovides no indication of dips in publication performance. A researcher’s h-index can only rise (with time), or remain the same. It can never go down, and so cannot indicate periods of inactivity, retirement or death – also an advantage?Journal coverage of both Web of Science and Scopus is USA-centric. Two researchers with different citation counts can in fact have the same h-index. So, even in the same discipline, caution should be used in comparing the h-index of researchers.Do not use h-index to compare across disciplines benchmark against average or expected citations in a field of research
  • Demonstrate the fragile-ness of the h-index, it varies greatly according to your toolSTUART CUNNINGHAMWeb of science – 4Scopus – 5POP - 27
  • Based on Google Scholar data Need a Gmail account to set it up. Allows you to build an online profile - check who is citing your publications and graph citations over time You can make your profile public, so that it may appear in Google Scholar results when people search for your name Can take it with you when you leave an institution Your citation metrics are computed and updated automatically as Google Scholar finds new citations to your work on the web. You can choose to have your list of articles updated automatically or review the updates yourself, or to manually update your articles at any time. Can add links such as to Staff Profiles, LinkdIn, Marcus Foth - http://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=Q3YPpnwAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=aoVesnaPopovic - http://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=k12AAjkAAAAJ&hl=enMirkoGuaralda - http://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=Nfex73cAAAAJ&hl=enJean Burgess - http://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=dfpq_bkAAAAJ&hl=enEvonne Miller - http://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=aRLdejMAAAAJ&hl=enLindy Osborne - http://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=HJp5ZzIAAAAJ&hl=en
  • Social media is allowing the spotlight to fall on the article and research itself – research is becoming less beholden to the journal. Tools can analyze patterns in what people are reading, bookmarking, sharing, discussing, and citing online. Social media ties in neatly with open access – if it’s freely available, more people can access it and cite it. Ergo, if you want people to read your papers, make them open access, and let the community know (via blogs, twitter, etc.) where to get them. Research has been done into this and people will download your research if you tell them about it, particular via Twitter and blogs, or a combination of the two. There is reason to believe that in the future, SM metrics will eventually be used for promotion/tenure decisions. Reward system still linked to impact and rank – but is changing. Some thoughts from the ‘thesis whisperer’ – design online character as an online persona, a performance - but be authentic, personable and clever - develop a positive approach to trolls blogs are a controlled way of revealing your skills and ideas to the world is the CV dying? - people are now googled and if you want people to find you, you should be on that front page of results. Do you need to tweak your keywords? Re research articles - there has been a shift from an economy of scarcity to a 'pedagogy of abundance' - egmoocs/citizen journalism/ music industry – mostly those who embraced it first, survived - scary, but less risky than taking it up too late Used to be Publish or perish – it’s now be visible or vanish If you’re new to something like Twitter, lurk - but productively - find out about it, e.g. twitter, watch and copy what works act like its a gift economy - give yourself to get return - size isn't important -not numbers of followers,but having the right followers treat academic publishing as a 'niche marketing problem', e.g. send emails to those you cite, get on mailing lists and share papers - evidence this increases cites - tweeting papers increase downloads x11, ergo cites gets media calls, invites with the VC, dinner with VC, job offers... Blogging and TwitterAgain – a perfect fit with Open Access and ePrintsThe more you get the word out about your work, the more people see it, download it, cite it, the quicker your H-index rises.
  • If you’re new to Twitter, follow hashtags like #phdchatand #ecrchatGreat places to ‘meet’ other researchersTweets are 140 characters maxFind out who in your research circle tweets and follow them. Follow who they follow.An academic who is a regular tweeter has told me that she has found her last five jobs through twitter – she has recently landed her first, fully paid keynote address in New York, through interactions with an international peer on Twitter, whom she has never met in person.Look at Axel’s tweets – talks about achievements of peers also.
  • A Google search for QUT researcher Jean Burgess brings all her social media presences , staff profiles, right to the top of the list. She’s easy to find.
  • Transcript of "Make Me Famous! (abridged version)"

    1. 1. MAKE ME FAMOUS (abridged) A few tools for tracking research impact in the creative industries Jennifer Thomas – CI Liaison Librarian 28 June 2013
    2. 2. • QUT ePrints – repository statistics • Your Staff Profile • What the heck is an h-index? • Google Scholar Citations • Using social media to promote your work • A quick intro to a few other tools... Use a combination of these to tell your story Today’s session
    3. 3. CRICOS No. 00213Ja university for the worldreal R ePrints repository statistics QUT ePrints hit 10 million downloads on 28 May 2013
    4. 4. CRICOS No. 00213Ja university for the worldreal R Staff Profiles RAD Staff Profiles ePrints
    5. 5. The h-index is a single number that measures both the productivity (number of papers) and the impact (number of citations) of your publications. h-index? What the heck? How it works If a researcher has an h-index of 4, the researcher has at least 4 papers that have each been cited at least 4 times or more. If a researcher has an h-index of 15, the researcher has at least 15 papers that have each been cited at least 15 times or more.
    6. 6. Stuart Cunningham • Web of Science: 4 • Scopus: 5 • Google Scholar 28 (as at 27 June 2013) h-index varies according to your tool
    7. 7. CRICOS No. 00213Ja university for the worldreal R Google Scholar Citations
    8. 8. The rise of social media in research
    9. 9. CRICOS No. 00213Ja university for the worldreal R
    10. 10. CRICOS No. 00213Ja university for the worldreal R Create your „Google profile‟ Think about your “Google” profile
    11. 11. Queensland University of Technology CRICOS No. 00213J Jenny Architecture, Landscape Architecture Industrial/ Interior/ Urban Design, Journalism ja.thomas@qut.edu.au e.thompson@qut.edu.au sheryl.clarkeholmes@qut.edu.au a.steiner@qut.edu.au Creative Industries Liaison Librarians Ellen & Sheryl Creative Writing & Literary Studies, Drama, Interaction Design, Visual Arts Alice Music & Sound, Film & TV, Dance, Fashion, Media & Communication
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×