Experience Economy: Paris Hilton Retail Shop Case Study by Jens Gregersen

1,614 views
1,558 views

Published on

This article is a descriptive analysis of the profit strategy of combining traditional sales principles with the ones of online social media in the Paris Hilton retail shops worldwide based on the premises of the experience economy.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,614
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
11
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
26
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Experience Economy: Paris Hilton Retail Shop Case Study by Jens Gregersen

  1. 1. COMMERCIALISING IDEASEN/13 AUGUST 2011/ THE EXPERIENCE ECONOMY: PARIS HILTON RETAIL SHOP STUDY
  2. 2. 01 > COMMERCIALISING IDEAS/EN/13 AUGUST 2011/Experience Economy—A Paris Hilton Case Study THE EXPERIENCE ECONOMY: PARIS HILTON RETAIL SHOP CASE STUDYToday, and even more so in the near future, customers  a profit, among the reasons for this change in consumer  preference are technological breakthroughs in terms of take functional features, quality and a positive brand  production, transport and distribution, which have cre‐image for granted. As such, companies will need to  ated product availability of little or no difference – mak‐apply more than storytelling to their products – cus‐ ing it increasingly difficult for the producers to differenti‐tomers must be emotionally involved through their  ate themselves from their competitors.  senses and stimulated intellectually.  This article is a descriptive analysis of the profit strat‐ A Fourth Economic Offering  egy of combining traditional sales principles with the  Succeeding in the experience economy is not just about  adding meaningful and present emotional stories to ones of online social media in the Paris Hilton retail  products as the way it is done – modern consumers are shops worldwide based on the premises of the experi‐ not naïve as they might have been years back. Today, ence economy. and more so in the future, consumers expect personal,  authentic and meaningful experiences beyond the prod‐By Jens Gregersen  ucts and services themselves. In other words, according   to Pine and Gilmore (1998) experiences are a not to be Since the experience economy was published back in  categorised as a service, it is a distinct fourth economic 1998 the world has changed significantly  offering, which is as differ‐– especially the online universe through  ent from services as ser‐the increased use of social media – but  vices are from products the basic principles of participation and  (Progression of Economic connection still apply.  Value).     The Experience Economy  It is through the usage or As modern large scale branding started  consumption of the prod‐in the 1940’s companies shifted their  ucts and services that focus from marketing product features  companies need to en‐(utilitarian consumption) to building  gage the consumers to customer relationship and loyalty. But  create memorable events during the past years consumer behav‐ – “An experience occurs iour is becoming even more emotional  when a company inten‐and less materialistic orientated. What  tionally uses services as matters now are the stories related to  the stage, and goods as the products and how these relate to the customers. This  props, to engage individual customers in a way that cre‐is seen in terms of a willingness to pay a price premium  ates a memorable event. Commodities are fungible, that special experience or design.  goods tangible, services intangible, and experiences Rolf Jensen, Director at Institute for Futures Studies, ex‐ memorable” (ibid). plains the development; “[…] we are moving away from   the global to the local, the slow overtakes the fast, the  The two writers point out an important fact, that experi‐handmade replaces mass production, co‐influence and  ences are perceived differently from person to person – active participation become increasingly important fac‐ and that the personal experience is based on the interac‐tors for the consumers.”  tion between the event and the consumer’s attitude, his   or hers “… emotional, physical, intellectual, or even spiri‐In the era of the experience economy it is no longer just  tual level” (ibid). In other words, one solution does not fit a matter of wrapping up a product nicely and sell it with  all as it is a personal experience. 
  3. 3. 02 > COMMERCIALISING IDEAS/EN/13 AUGUST 2011/Experience Economy—A Paris Hilton Case StudyA Two Dimensional Design Process  rate brands. This strategy is based on the belief that the When applying storytelling to a product or service the  qualities and public opinion embedded in celebrities are sender (company) should design the process across two  transferable. Also, celebrities can very often provide free dimensions. The first one being customer participation –  advertisement as they ruinously are invited onto TV‐to what extend can the customers get involved in creat‐ shows, pictured in magazines etc. – such appearances ing the experience, as  also lower the risk of brand blindness, active participants or  which views of traditional ads might passively being enter‐ experience. Certain products categories, tained?   which are subject to regulations such as   alcohol, tobacco and drugs (medicine), The other dimension  can through celebrities find their way to focuses on the level of  otherwise restricted communication connection – is the  platforms e.g. TV and radio. product or service   appealing to the  Since the 1990’s celebrity branding has senses or are the par‐ changed character as more and more ticipants simply by‐ products have been marketed in the standers from a dis‐ name of the celebrity. This trend was tance?   first seen on a massive scale in the fra‐  grance sector but extended into a wider An example would be  product range throughout the 2000’s. a football (soccer)  For example in 2007 pop idol Madonna match. If you want to  designed a limited collection for the have the best possible view of the game you are better of  Swedish fashion chain H&M. In 2009 actress Penelope turning on the TV at home, but this is merely a functional  Cruz signed a similar deal with the Spanish fashion chain benefit compared to experiencing a life football match at  Mango.  a stadium.   Among celebrity branded products Paris Hilton has intro‐At the stadium the crowd is “contributing to the visual  duced the widest range. Since launching her first two and aural event that others experience” (ibid); in other  fragrances in 2005, Paris Hilton and Just Me, she has con‐words, there is a level of participation. Further, being  tinuously added more categories to her branded product part of an 80.000 people football crowd appeals to the  universe, making her the lead representative for a grow‐sights, sounds, and smells – as such, there is a close con‐ ing trend among celebrities to market products in their nection, which is not found nor experienced watching the  own name. As of August 2011 Paris Hilton’s name is same match on a TV set at home.  found on sunglasses, handbags, fragrances, bed linen,   swimwear, and shoes etc. – products which are sold As mentioned earlier in this article, for product or service  worldwide. related stories (storytelling) to be believed or accepted   by the customers they have to be localised, personal,  Paris Hilton – The Brand authentic and meaningful experiences. Designing experi‐ Born into a famous and wealthy family Paris Hilton has ences should be based on an ongoing process of explora‐ been covered by the media all her live. The media’s inter‐ est in the blond celebrity increased in 2001 as she first tion, scripting, and staging. “In short, how goods and ser‐vices are staged and performed is vital to how they are  started modelling, but from 2003 she became a house‐consumed (including retention and loyalty), the price peo‐hold name with the online leak of the infamous sex tape ple will pay, and hence the value created.” Coles & Hall  (One Night in Paris), followed by her participation in the (2008).  television series The Simple Life. Since then she has en‐  gaged in a range of public endorsements, TV‐shows, pub‐Celebrity Branding as a Profit Strategy  lished books and records etc. As a result Paris Hilton is The experience economy is a competitive advantage  today one of the world’s most photographed women strategy, which is based on appealing to the senses, emo‐ ever and name and face is known worldwide. tions and involvement of the customers. Of different   marketing strategies available to involve the customers  Case Study: Paris Hilton Retail Shops emotionally, few achieve the same effect as the use of  The following is a descriptive analysis of the customer celebrity endorsement.   experience strategy in the Paris Hilton retail shops based   on the premises in The Progression of Economic Value Throughout decades celebrity endorsement have been  process: make goods, deliver services, and stage experi‐fairly common practise to support products and corpo‐ ences. 
  4. 4. 03 > COMMERCIALISING IDEAS/EN/13 AUGUST 2011/Experience Economy—A Paris Hilton Case StudyIn 2008, just two years after having launched the Paris  The 1990 publication Delivering Quality Service: Balanc‐Hilton branded handbags and accessories line throughout  ing Customer Perceptions and Expectations by Zeithami the US and Europe, preparations were made to enter the  et al. defines service as “[c]ustomers’s perception of how Middle Eastern market, a market known for mono‐ well a service meets or exceeds their expectations.” From branded standalone retail shops compared to multi‐ this definition two important matters become clear, the brand department stores in major parts of the rest of the  first one being that service is not a fixed variable, and world. As such, the work on developing a Paris Hilton  that a service is subject to individual evaluation. Further, branded retail shop concept began (for background infor‐ the writers outline that service is constituted by four mation on shop concept: Paris Hilton branded retail shop  characteristics, which if followed will make service an concept). As of August 2011 a total of 30 branded shops  integral part of the organisational culture. have opened throughout the Middle East   and Asia.  Service vision: In order to provide a uniform level of   service an organisation first needs to make this ex‐Make Goods  plicit. In other words, the management team must The main product available in the Paris  first decide on the service vision and then com‐Hilton retail shops are handbags (purses),  municate and implement this throughout the which constitute about 70% of product  organisation. Zeithami et al. articulate service availability – the rest are smaller  as being the foundation for competing; “[q]goods such as wallets, beauty  uality of service as the foundation for com‐cases and belts. All products are  peting.” – further, “[t]hat superior service clearly branded Paris Hilton.   is a winning strategy, a profit strategy.” The use of hardware (primarily   gold and silver coloured) and  High standards: A customer orientated imitated leather is prevalent  organisation defines its own stan‐throughout the collections. The  dards. Thus it will not base this on general retail price range for a  what the competitors do, nor will handbag is 100 – 140 euro.  service organisations seek standard   solutions and try to fit these to all As Paris Hilton is a “household  customers. A customer orientated name” and her brand is con‐ organisation looks for improve‐tinuously developed in and by  ments in areas their competitors the media any inconsistency in  do not consider or find worth the the product designs and her  effort. “Service leaders are inter‐image would be considered  ested in the details and nuances untrustworthy and a “cheap” commer‐ of service, seeing opportunities cial trick by the consumers, which con‐ in small actions that competitors sequently would lead to a direct and  might consider trivial.” (ibid).  negative influence on sales.  As such,  A service organisation is truly when designing the handbags collec‐ customer orientated, down to tion is paramount that it reflects the  the individual customer, and public image of Paris Hilton; currently  these organisations do not con‐the design framework is based on three main “pillars”:  sider service a way to solve problems but strive to build fashion, glamour, and sexiness.  customer loyalty and differentiate from their competitors   by getting the service right the first time. As Pine & Gilmore conclude, the products are taken for   granted and they are fundamental. In other words, in a  In‐the‐field leadership style: Visions and standards are world clustered with products and prices of little differ‐ worth little if management does not lead by example ence, competing on product features will seldom consti‐ through rewards and a continuous focus on providing the tute a competitive advantage, why companies must as a  defined standards of service – to be a customer orien‐minimum go beyond focusing on communicating product  tated organisation the service standards must become an features.   integral part of the corporate culture. “They   [management] challenge the organizational unit to be Deliver Services  excellent in service, not just the individual employee Pine & Gilmore explains that service is distinct from prod‐ [...]” (ibid). ucts and that service is the next step in achieving a com‐  petitive advantage and staging experiences.   Integrity: Integrity is a matter of saying what one means,   and do what one says. Nothing is truer in the customer 
  5. 5. 04 > COMMERCIALISING IDEAS/EN/13 AUGUST 2011/Experience Economy—A Paris Hilton Case Studyorientated service organisation. “The best leaders value  Jens Gregersen explains how part of his strategy for the doing the right thing – even when inconvenient or  customer shopping experience includes applying person‐costly.” (ibid). If there is no integrity or consistency in the  alised storytelling to all products. “All products have a service provided the vision, standards and style are un‐ story based on Paris’ live associated to them along with a dermined and deemed irrelevant.  picture – this brings life to the products and arouses an   emotion with the customers.” Paris Hilton Retail Shops: The Service Strategy   Part of the Paris Hilton retail shop strategy is based on  For example one handbag group was named BFF based providing individual and personalized interaction be‐ on Paris Hilton’s BFF TV‐show (Best Friend Forever) and tween the shop assistants and customers and thereby  had the following story associated to it:  creating customer loyalty and closing more sales.      BFF’s are always by your side. To bring you comfort and Jens Gregersen, Director of Brand and Sales Strategy at  carefree fashion the BFF handbags are inspired by Paris’ Paris Hilton Handbags, explains; “Visitors to the shops  love for life and loyalty to friends. This group will never let feel they know Paris Hilton on a personal level – in a so‐ you down thanks to its resistant materials and construc‐cial media perspective she is like a friend to them – there‐ tion and will always make you look good. fore it was paramount to define a service strategy, which   in practise make the conversation between the customers  The way of applying stories known from the online social and employees one of friends.”  media to actual products creates a completely different   emotional attachment to the actual products by the cus‐This is done by ensuring that the sales assistance feel  tomers, stories that reflect and emphasize the values and more confident through a thorough understanding of not  image of the customers – it appeals to the senses of the just the product features but of how the different prod‐ customers. Also, the buyers will be able to talk to their ucts are best suited to e.g. specific body shapes – but  friends about the product beyond its functionality and even more importantly, all products in the shops have  design – “A clear benefit of celebrity branding compared individual stories from Paris Hilton’s life applied to them  to traditional and static brands created by a marketing making a quick, familiar and emotional chat between the  department.” Jens Gregersen stresses. sales assistant and customer possible. The underlying   premise is to create an atmosphere of trust and honesty  Social Media as an Integral Sales Strategy similar to the one found between friends.  With online social media such as Facebook, Twitter etc.   the distance between the celebrities and their fans or Besides from more traditional sales strategies as the ones  followers has decreased significantly. It is now easier described just above social media plays an increasingly  than ever to learn the latest news, whereabouts and important and integral part in the customer strategy as  opinions of a celebrity – over are the days when the this shape the level of customer participation and con‐ printed press was the only source of celebrity informa‐nection – vital components in the creation of shopping  tion. Of the different social media Twitter is probably the experiences.   most popular among celebrities and their fans – for ex‐  ample as of August 2011, Jennifer Lopez had about 2,5 Stage Experiences  million followers and Paris Hilton 4,5 million. Besides Customer participation and connection is a question of co from being a way celebrities can express their opinions ‐creating and feeling part of the “performance”, some‐ social media also makes it possible for the fans to com‐thing that has been the focal point of Jens Gregersen in  municate directly with the celebrity – which also gives his strategic work, he explains: “Paris is in daily contact  celebrities the chance to become familiar with reactions with millions of fans via Twitter and Facebook – taking  of the fans to their behaviour and opinions.  social media as my starting point in defining the shopping   experience strategy was obvious, especially as her fans  As people increasingly identify themselves and build their and customers primarily are teenagers and adolescents.   personal brand and image through online social media   any service orientated business – or any business for that The fundamental idea is that customers visiting the shops  matter – must include this communication platform in can real‐time read about Paris Hilton’s whereabouts and  their marketing and brand strategy. Also, customers are opinions via large TV screens connected to her Twitter  more than happy to express their opinions online thus profile, but more importantly, they can send greetings  making social media a paramount source of information directly to her along the lines of Hi Paris. I’m Mary visit‐ but companies will only succeed if done so respecting the ing your shop in Dubai, loves it! In other words, the cus‐ premises of this media.tomers become co‐creators of the shopping stage and performance in the shops by merging social media with   an otherwise traditional shopping environment.  

×