Introduction to Scriptwriting

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Introduction to Scriptwriting

  1. 1. Introduction to Scriptwriting<br />8 Imagine – Mr Jensen<br />
  2. 2. Elements of Drama:<br />Situations <br /> What is the story?<br />Roles<br />  Who is involved?<br />Relationships<br />  How do these people feel about each other?<br />Place<br />  Where are they? <br />
  3. 3. Elements of a play script:<br />Number of Actors<br />Name of Play<br />Stage Directions, Setting and Character Profile<br />Characters<br />Dialogue<br />Stage Directions<br />
  4. 4. Characters and Character Profiles:<br />Things to include:<br /><ul><li>Name
  5. 5. Age
  6. 6. Gender
  7. 7. Physical Appearance
  8. 8. Employment
  9. 9. Hobbies
  10. 10. Personality traits
  11. 11. Strengths
  12. 12. Weaknesses
  13. 13. Likes
  14. 14. Dislikes
  15. 15. Always CAPITALS!</li></ul>RICHARD WILLEY A suave and successful man and a Junior Minister and in Government<br />THE MANAGER A severe man<br />THE WAITER A nimble and wily old servant<br />THE MAID A plump Italian woman in her fifties<br />JANE A attractive but dizzy young lady<br />A BODY A nondescript middle-aged man<br />GEORGE PIGDEN An upright pleasant man of nervous disposition<br />RONNIE An angry young man<br />PAMELA An attractive sophisticated woman in her forties<br />GLADYS A bossy but attractive woman in her forties<br />
  16. 16. Setting and Setting Profiles:<br />The action of the play takes place in Suite 648 of the Westminster Hotel, London. It is about 8:30pm on a September evening. The action is continuous with one intermission.<br />Questions to answer:<br />Where does the play take place?<br />What is happening?<br />What time is it?<br />What season (summer, winter etc)?<br />This information will be used by directors/actors to ‘set the scene’ for the play<br />
  17. 17. Stage Directions:<br />These are instructions for an actor or director which are not spoken. They indicate what an actor should be doing or how they should say the line. <br />There is a very specific way these should be written:<br />JANE Hey you’ve got my-- (SHE sees RICHARD with the BODY and screams.)<br />RICHARD (Jumping.)Ahh!<br />JANE (Horrified.) What are you doing Mr Willey?<br />RICHARD (Through gritted teeth.) The Fox Trot, what does it look like I’m doing, Miss Worthington!<br />
  18. 18. Narrative structure:<br />Climax<br />Complications<br />Resolution<br />Beginning<br />
  19. 19. Narrative structure:<br />Sets up the: <br />Situation (what’s going on)<br />Roles (who are we)<br />Relationships (how do we feel about each other)<br />Place (where are we?)<br />Beginning<br />
  20. 20. Narrative structure:<br />Complications<br /><ul><li>Start building to the climax
  21. 21. The problems the characters encounter on their way to the climax</li></li></ul><li>Narrative structure:<br />Climax<br />The BIG EVENT of your script!<br />What happens?<br />Who is involved?<br />How might it be resolved?<br />
  22. 22. Narrative structure:<br />Resolution<br />How is the BIG EVENT of the script resolved?<br />What happens that brings your script to a logical end?<br />How do you leave your audience feeling satisfied?<br />

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