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Legal Marketing Association Conference

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I presented this on a panel discussion at the LMA Conference in SF on September 17, 2009. The panel's topic was: Social Media in the Legal Frontier and Beyond.

I presented this on a panel discussion at the LMA Conference in SF on September 17, 2009. The panel's topic was: Social Media in the Legal Frontier and Beyond.

Published in: Business, News & Politics
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  • 1. Social Media in the Legal Frontier and Beyond Jennifer Okimoto – Associate Partner 14 September 2009
  • 2. The evolving Web platform allows employees to work, connect, collaborate and manage knowledge in entirely new ways Web 2.0 is about connecting people , and making technology efficient for people. Web 1.0 was about connecting computers and making technology more efficient for computers. Web 2.0 changes the way in which organizations interact with customers and employees
    • Is about communities and social networks
    • Builds contextual relationships and facilitates knowledge sharing
    • Is about people and the way they collaborate
    • It is not a technology, not an industry, not a standard
    Key Characteristics
  • 3. There are critical success factors for using social media within and outside an enterprise Social Networking Culture Collaborative Tools To what extent do these characteristics exist within your organization or your clients’ organizations? Does the team have the skills necessary to collaborate effectively? (e.g. technical, communication, people, business, etc) Skills Do we have a method to collaborate? Mechanism Do I want to be approached? How do I approach this person? Access Why will I cooperate with this person? Am I motivated to work with this person? Motivation How can I develop my reputation as a trusted partner? Will this person help me? Benevolence (Trust) How can I advertise my expertise? Is this person competent? Competence (Trust) How can I become more known? How do I know who is out there? Awareness Contributors I am someone Seekers I need someone Critical Success Factors
  • 4. As new sources and methods to work, share knowledge and learn appear, none of the old disappear Traditional Time
    • Email
    • Communities
    • Websites and portals
    • Online presence and instant messaging
    • Team rooms
    • Forums
    • Web conferencing
    • Expertise profiles
    • Memos
    • Telephone
    • Newsletters
    • Books and journals
    • Data, information & docs in shared drives or databases
    • Taxonomies
    • Directories
    • Classrooms
    • Conferences
    Private Public Organizations are considering how they will shift from private and controlled environments to public and dynamic collaboration across multiple platforms
    • Telepresence
    • 3D Internet
    • Gaming
    • Virtual Worlds
    • Simulated and Immersive Environments
    • Information Mining and Analytics
    Work1.0 Work2.0 Beyond
    • Platform across the enterprise and beyond
    • Social spaces and networks
    • Feeds and subscriptions
    • Widgets
    • Mashups
    • Social software:
      • Blogs & Wikis
      • Social bookmarks
      • Tags & clouds
      • Voting
      • Pod & videocasts
      • Media sharing
      • Microblogging
  • 5. To learn: As an innovation-based company, we believe in the importance of open exchange and learning – between IBM and its clients, and among the many constituents of our emerging business and societal ecosystem. To contribute: IBM – as a business, as an innovator and as a corporate citizen – makes important contributions to the world, to the future of business and technology, and to public dialogue on a broad range of societal issues. As our business activities increasingly focus on the provision of transformational insight and high-value innovation – whether to business clients or those in the public, educational or health sectors – it becomes increasingly important for IBM and IBMers to share with the world the exciting things we’re learning and doing, and to learn from others.
  • 6. http://www.ibm.com/blogs/zz/en/guidelines.html
  • 7. CEOs – Top sources of new ideas and innovation IBM Institute for Business Value, CEO Study 2006 Employees Business Partners Customers directly Consultants Competitors Associations 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45%
  • 8. I encourage you to participate…join the conversation…jump in FEET FIRST
    • Google yourself and your colleagues
    • Get LinkedIn
      • Set up/update your profile and connect with your clients and colleagues
    • Twitter
      • Conduct research, follow clients, follow and share trends, keep people up to date about you
    • Watch YouTube
      • Watch videos about collaboration and social networking ( Common Craft )
    • Blog inside and outside the firewall
      • Go watch this 90 second YouTube video with Seth Godin and Tom Peters

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