illustration for Wee Writers Cards - watercolor
illustration for Glenn Tilton’s (CEO of United Airlines) personal holiday card - watercolor & pen
house portraits for private client - watercolor
botanically correct illustration - watercolor
portfolio piece - watercolor & pen
leaf studies, portfolio piece - watercolor
studies of interiors, portfolio pieces - watercolor & pen
homeplace Magazine                                                      https://www.helpfulhardwareclub.com/secure/member/...
botanical illustration, portfolio piece - watercolor
illustrations for baby boy-themed fabric for Spoonflower.com - watercolor
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Watercolor Illustration

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My first love, watercolor painting!

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Watercolor Illustration

  1. 1. illustration for Wee Writers Cards - watercolor
  2. 2. illustration for Glenn Tilton’s (CEO of United Airlines) personal holiday card - watercolor & pen
  3. 3. house portraits for private client - watercolor
  4. 4. botanically correct illustration - watercolor
  5. 5. portfolio piece - watercolor & pen
  6. 6. leaf studies, portfolio piece - watercolor
  7. 7. studies of interiors, portfolio pieces - watercolor & pen
  8. 8. homeplace Magazine https://www.helpfulhardwareclub.com/secure/member/homeplace... Home | Acehardware.com | Store Locator | Contact Us JENNIFER , sign out? Terms & Conditions Use this tool to jump Reward Certificates homeplace Magazine Spring 2006 directly to seasonal projects or education. Key Return PROJECTS EDUCATION Choose a Topic Repotting houseplants is a bit of routine annual maintenance that can boost new growth and promote healthier foliage for both young and established plants. Young plants can outgrow their pots and enlarging the containers will free the roots to absorb nutrients and water more efficiently. Though they may be in the right size pot, established plants may be sitting in soil which is drained of its nutrient qualities. 1. Removing the plant from the pot is usually easier when the soil is on the dry side. Turn smaller pots upside down with one hand, while supporting the soil at the base of the foliage with your other hand. For larger plants, lay the pot gently on its side. Then, ease the plant out of the pot by handling it at the base of the foliage while rolling the pot gently to free the root ball. 2. Inspect the root ball. If the roots have grown thick and curled around the edge, the plant is root bound. Select a pot that’s one size larger than the previous container. If the root ball is shallow, use the same pot with fresh soil. 3. Clean the new pot. Use a solution of one part bleach to 10 parts water to remove salt or mineral residues and kill lingering bacteria that may be harmful to plants. Place terra-cotta shards or stones loosely over the pot’s drainage hole. This allows excess water to drain without losing soil. 4. Using a trowel, scoop fresh soil mixture into the pot so the root mass will sit about 1/2 inch below the pot rim. Use prepared potting soil, which usually consists of vermiculite or perlite, peat moss, fertilizer and sterile soil. Fresh soil will retain moisture, improve drainage and is free of diseases and weed seeds.1 of 2 6/16/06 10:16 PM illustrations for Ace Hardware magazine, article on repotting a plant - watercolor
  9. 9. botanical illustration, portfolio piece - watercolor
  10. 10. illustrations for baby boy-themed fabric for Spoonflower.com - watercolor

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