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Social Media Connection for Chapters

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  • JEN
  • JENSHOW VideoAfter the video, debrief as follows:Welcome to the digital age!They said Social media isn’t a fad. It’s a fundamental shift in how we communicate. This tells me all of our chapter communication plans need to include a social media. It’s not just about whether to use it, but how to use it effectively. Transition to next slide
  • JEN
  • Throughout the session, we will provide challenges for you to answer via Twitter. We’ll post them with C1, C2, C3, etc preceding the tweet.Respond using the C1, C2, C3, etc. plus the session hashtag. We also have QR code challenges on the tables. Scan and tweet those for bonus points!The person with the most challenge responses will win a fabulous prize!
  • JEN
  • JENC1) How can you use Social Media to provide more value to members? ASK participants “what are the benefits of engaging in social media for your chapters?” Capture answers on flip chart. ASK if anyone does not see value in it. – Help them see the value. REVEAL the benefits on slide.
  • JENC1) How can you use Social Media to provide more value to members? ASK participants “what are the benefits of engaging in social media for your chapters?” Capture answers on flip chart. ASK if anyone does not see value in it. – Help them see the value. REVEAL the benefits on slide. TELL Story: I created a Twitter account about a year before I actually started using it, because I just didn’t see the value in it. Then a funny thing happened. I attended the ASTD International Conference in 2010. I heard all this talk about Tweeting during the conference and I felt like I was missing out on some private joke or conversation. Turns out it wasn’t private at all, but very public! I talked to other people around me to ask how it all worked. How do I see these tweets and conversations? I learned to search for tweets (or posts) about the conference by using a specific code (or hashtag) that was commonly used in all the tweets. I searched for all tweets using that hashtag and BAM! – there were posts about the conference – people were posting comments about the key note speaker. It was overwhelming at first – trying to keep up – the posts kept coming through 20 at a time. I mostly just watched the posts for awhile. Someone referred to that as Twatching! LOL Eventually, I tried it – I made my first tweet – I basically just said I was new to twitter – so bare with me, but used the hashtag for the conference. Wow! I couldn’t believe it – I felt loved! People responded with great support and welcoming messages. Tweeters are friendly! Suddenly, the conference content and session became much more engaging and richer. I gained additional thoughts, opinions, and resources on the topics. I gained more followers and started following more like minded people. At this year’s conference, I can’t tell you how many people I met face to face for the first time said they felt they already knew me thanks to Social Media. I do feel I have made great professional and even personal relationships with people I have never even met face to face. One such person was one of the pioneers of Social Media at ASTD. He was slated to be president of the Cascadia Chapter for 2012 and died suddenly in late 2011 – Terrence Wing. I never met him, but mourned for him and still miss his presence on Social Media. And, of course – how did I learn of his passing – on Twitter! I learn of many breaking news items on Facebook or Twitter – usually Facebook. Good example – I might first hear of breaking news on Facebook – like when a celebrity passes away. For example, when I heard that Whitney Houston passed away on Facebook. I then went to Twitter and searched #Whitney and saw all the comments. When you search a hashtag, you see all tweets using that code, not just those from those you follow.
  • JENInstagram & Flickr
  • JENOne main goal of social media is to engage with others. It’s not just about providing information, but also about communicating with members and learning from them. While there really isn’t a “right” way to use social media, here are a few tips and lessons learned: Note that your chapter doesn’t need to use all of these social media tools. It is important to create a plan for using social media and determine which tools best fit the chapter's communication strategy and member needs. Avoid overloading members with too many tools at once. Select a social media strategy that doesn’t intimidate your board, one that your chapter leaders can handle.
  • JEN
  • OPTIONAL ACTIVITY:Use the Getting Started with Twitter Handout.
  • JEN
  • JENC1) How can you use Social Media to provide more value to members? ASK participants “what are the benefits of engaging in social media for your chapters?” Capture answers on flip chart. ASK if anyone does not see value in it. – Help them see the value. REVEAL the benefits on slide. TELL Story: I created a Twitter account about a year before I actually started using it, because I just didn’t see the value in it. Then a funny thing happened. I attended the ASTD International Conference in 2010. I heard all this talk about Tweeting during the conference and I felt like I was missing out on some private joke or conversation. Turns out it wasn’t private at all, but very public! I talked to other people around me to ask how it all worked. How do I see these tweets and conversations? I learned to search for tweets (or posts) about the conference by using a specific code (or hashtag) that was commonly used in all the tweets. I searched for all tweets using that hashtag and BAM! – there were posts about the conference – people were posting comments about the key note speaker. It was overwhelming at first – trying to keep up – the posts kept coming through 20 at a time. I mostly just watched the posts for awhile. Someone referred to that as Twatching! LOL Eventually, I tried it – I made my first tweet – I basically just said I was new to twitter – so bare with me, but used the hashtag for the conference. Wow! I couldn’t believe it – I felt loved! People responded with great support and welcoming messages. Tweeters are friendly! Suddenly, the conference content and session became much more engaging and richer. I gained additional thoughts, opinions, and resources on the topics. I gained more followers and started following more like minded people. At this year’s conference, I can’t tell you how many people I met face to face for the first time said they felt they already knew me thanks to Social Media. I do feel I have made great professional and even personal relationships with people I have never even met face to face. One such person was one of the pioneers of Social Media at ASTD. He was slated to be president of the Cascadia Chapter for 2012 and died suddenly in late 2011 – Terrence Wing. I never met him, but mourned for him and still miss his presence on Social Media. And, of course – how did I learn of his passing – on Twitter! I learn of many breaking news items on Facebook or Twitter – usually Facebook. Good example – I might first hear of breaking news on Facebook – like when a celebrity passes away. For example, when I heard that Whitney Houston passed away on Facebook. I then went to Twitter and searched #Whitney and saw all the comments. When you search a hashtag, you see all tweets using that code, not just those from those you follow.
  • JEN
  • JENShow example of Tweet Chat
  • JENThis will be redundant if I have just shown Tweetchat.
  • MICHAEL
  • MICHAELResource – link to “how to create your own fan page.
  • MICHAEL
  • MICHAEL
  • MICHAEL
  • MICHAELDevelop a strategy by identifying your objectives and your audience. Ask yourself what you want to achieve: Are you branding your organization? Are you fund raising for a cause? Are you gathering feedback from supporters? Determine your audience by asking where your supporters congregate online: Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, texting or e-mail? What do I want to achieve?Launch an initiative designed to achieve your objective and reach your target audience. This could a Facebook page, a Twitter feed or a YouTube channel, to name a few. Be creative and original, but also look at what others are doing and adapt it to your needs. Don’t be afraid to experiment.My initiative will be:Feed and nurture your initiative. Find the people in your organization that can generate content to power your initiative. My social media team includes:Measure and evaluate your initiative. What worked and what didn’t. How much time did you spend on it and did it have an effect? My measurements include:
  • MICHAELHave Participants work at their tables to create marketing plans for an upcoming event. INSTRUCTIONS:Choose an event that is coming up for one of your chapters represented at your table. Work as a group to help come up with a marketing plan for that event. One person at each table TWEET a message about the event. At least one other person at the table RETWEET it. Use your chapters hashtag as well as our session hashtag, so we can pull the tweets in the backchannel.
  • MICHAELPull up the backchannel
  • MICHAELSo now that you’ve put the hours and effort into your social media strategy, what are you getting out of it? Facebook for our example today, offers some great analytic tools to provide you some return on your investment. This is just a sample weekly email from the Nebraska Chapter on both their chapter page, and their event page. As you can see it breaks down some of the interaction information, but you can actually go deeper to understand who is coming to your page, and who is viewing or sharing your posts.
  • MICHAELFacebook offers great visual on user interactions, by week, month, day so that you can see if a post is viewed.
  • MICHAELYou can also see where visitors are going on your page in this breakdown and how they got there.
  • MICHAELFacebook also offers great demographics. Who is visiting your sight? What age group? Where are they from? Being able to break down all of this information allows you to refocus your efforts to get the best return on your investment of volunteer time in conjunction with your marketing plan.
  • JENAfter creating a social media plan it’s time to implement and sustain it. There are four keys to sustainability:Involve Chapter LeadersGet everyone involved in some way. Whether it’s thinking about social media for promoting an event, or actively participating in the chapter’s social media tools, each chapter leader should participate by commenting, posting, and tweeting. Following are sample posts/suggested tweets for chapter leaders to build upon. It is a good idea to break the plan into small pieces, and delegate. Create a board level position for social mediaOne chapter leader should have specific accountability for the chapter’s social media strategy. This role may be a “VP of Technology”, “Director of Social Media”, or “Chapter Communication Chair.”  Example: Mid-Michigan ChapterThe Mid-Michigan Chapter has a VP Technology position on their board of directors. The brief role description is: “The Vice President of Technology’s primary focus is to provide a technology infrastructure, including chapter website, social networking and other communications tools in support of the chapter.”Include social media in all marketing and communication plansAs outlined in the sample Marketing Planner above, use social media to promote all chapter events, communicate information, and market the chapter.  Example: Orange County ChapterThe Orange County Chapter actively uses social media to promote chapter events and market the chapter. In addition to using Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter, the chapter has a YouTube channel with short videos of chapter events and advertising for the chapter. To measure the marketing strategy’s effectiveness, employ Social Media Metrics.See http://www.sas.com/reg/gen/corp/1108464-social-media-analytics-c?gclid=COPLvpnhv64CFWoaQgod4zrgLg. Facebook has a tool called "Insights" to assist you with engagement metrics.Involve and engage chapter members One of the main differences between social media and simply using technology to communicate is dialogue and involvement.  Example: Central Indiana ChapterThe Central Indiana Chapter actively promoted their annual conference via Twitter. They created a special hashtag for the conference and began using it weeks in advance of the event. They asked conference speakers to submit short “teasers” and “questions” related to their conference sessions, and posted those to Twitter. In addition to using Twitter for advertising, they deliberately chose to involve and engage attendees:They made it easy to use Twitter, even for non-Twitter users, by advertising ways to post tweets via web or text messaging.They promoted Twitter usage by holding a usage contest with an e-reader as the prize. They displayed Twitter fountains during conference breaks and in the main hallway to encourage use and to show non-users the Twitter conversation.The following page provides a sample Twitter Event/Session Prep Worksheet. Use this to prepare for a fully engaged Twitter backchannel for chapter events.
  • JEN
  • JEN
  • JEN & MICHAEL
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Social MediaConnection for Chapters Jennifer Tomarchio, CPLP @Jenni694 Home Chapter: South Florida National Advisor for Sunshine Area Chapters Michael Merritt @MichaelMerritt Home chapter: Nebraska and LincolnNational Advisor for Inter Mountain West Area Chapters Tweet #ASTDALCS102
    • 2. Social Media Revolution http://youtu.be/0eUeL3n7fDs 2
    • 3. What’s In It For YOU? Use social media to engage and recruit chapter members, communicate chapter events, and promote your chapter. 3
    • 4. Tweet #ASTDALCS102• During this collaborative session, please feel free to Tweet your – Ideas / Tips / Discoveries / Ah Ha! Moments• Everyone benefits!• Hashtags: #ASTDALC #ASTD #ASTDChapters• Mentions: @jenni694 @MichaelMerritt 4
    • 5. Session Challenges• Questions will be posted via Twitter• Respond using C1, C2, C3, etc. and the session hashtag #ASTDALCS102• QR Code Challenges on Social Media tables Champion
    • 6. Social Media Toolkit• What is Social Media?• Types of Social Media• Creating a Social Media Plan• Best Practices• Resources www.astd.org/clc Click the Social Media Tab
    • 7. Challenge #1C1) How can you use Social Media toprovide more value to members? Tweet your answer(s) 7
    • 8. So What? / Why Tweet?• Communicate directly to and among chapter members, and potential members• Put your message in front of people where they already are• Connect with millennials and seniors• Secure transfer of learning from events• Pooled knowledge and wisdom• Easy to connect - don’t have to be at an event• Messages are easy to pass on to many• Teach members to use the tools that are growing in use in their workplaces and communities• Rapid mobilization for member and community needs• Added value to members 8
    • 9. TYPES OF SOCIAL MEDIA
    • 10. When to Use WhatI create training Here’s a training ice breakerI “like” training Cool pictures of my last training eventI hang out withpeople who like training I write (blog) about training best practicesThis is where I conducttraining I recommend my favoriteWatch me train! Places to buy training toolsI’m skilled at multiple I am listening to one of mytypes of training mentor’s training sessions 10
    • 11. What Tools to Use• What do we want to accomplish?• Whom do we want to reach?• Which media offers the best access to membership and community?• How much time do we have and will you spend?
    • 12. Twitter• Build relationships with potential members• Create personal connections with existing members• Provide content for your members• Additional, collaborative learning during chapter events• Resources: Twitter 101: http://bit.ly/jTaTDC
    • 13. Getting Started• Set up your account – recognizable name• Brand yourself – 1 line “bio” – Website address – Actual location – Use a picture…Don’t be an Egg Head!• Find people/members to follow• Invite them to follow you 13
    • 14. Follow Other Chaptershttp://goo.gl/TsHWn
    • 15. Challenge #2C2) Does your chapter have a Twitteraccount? Hashtag? Tweet your answer(s) 15
    • 16. The Backchannel• Poll Participants• Ask Questions• Check for understanding• Distribute information• Watch for Q & A• Resource: The Backchannel: How Audiences are Using Twitter and Social Media and Changing Presentations Forever by Cliff Atkinson http://tinyurl.com/d4pubwz
    • 17. Tools / Apps• Tweetdeck (http://www.tweetchat.com)• Hootsuite (http://www.hootsuite.com)• Tweetchat (http://www.tweetchat.com)• SAP (http://www.sapweb20.com/blog/pow erpoint-twitter-tools/) 17
    • 18. Check the Backchannel
    • 19. LinkedIn• Create a Chapter Group (Greater Atlanta Group ) – Add websites – Upload contacts – Use to create discussion, job board, etc. – Open or closed? – Invite your National & not local members• Resources: Group Management http://learn.linkedin.com/group-management/ LinkedIn Expert Tip: How to Create a Group in LinkedIn (YouTube video) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zoqw3b290o
    • 20. Facebook• Create a chapter “fan” page – Can send messages directly to your members – YouTube video box, content info, photos, blog – Post photos from meetings – Send invites to chapter events – Upload notes (press releases) – Metro DC• Resources: Managing your page: http://www.facebook.com/help/?page=904 How to create your fan page: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhP0wvAsnQA&feature=related
    • 21. Google+ • Centralized professional and personal information (Circles) • Hangout • Sparks • Huddle
    • 22. YouTube• Create a chapter YouTube channel to post advertising messages• Post vignettes of highlights from live events• Share videos of upcoming speakers• Resources: YouTube 101: How to Upload http://www.youtube.com/user/youtube?blend=3&ob=4#p/s earch/17/SzSwnbxb9TY
    • 23. Blogging• Use to engage chapter members in writing posts to continue the discussion post event• Share reflections following events or other activities• Establish schedule and topic list for blogs• Resources: How to Start a Blog http://www.howtostartablog.org/ Blogger: How to start a blog http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bU4gXHkejMo
    • 24. Marketing Tips1. Develop a strategy by identifying your objectives and your audience2. Launch an initiative designed to achieve your objective and reach your target audience3. Feed and nurture your initiative4. Measure and evaluate your initiative
    • 25. Marketing Plan• Blog 1 – 2x month• Twitter posts – increase frequency as event approaches• LinkedIn – start discussions related to topic / follow up afterward• Facebook – Post events / invites – Post Youtube videos to promote – Follow up with event photos – Media releases
    • 26. Check the Backchannel
    • 27. Analytics / What’s the ROI?
    • 28. Analytics / What’s the ROI?
    • 29. Analytics / What’s the ROI?
    • 30. Analytics / What’s the ROI?
    • 31. Sustaining Engagement • Involve Chapter Leaders • Create Board Position (Director of Social Media; VP of Technology) • Include Social Media in all Communications • Involve and Engage Chapter Members
    • 32. Resources The New Social Learning: A Guide to Transforming Organizations Through Social Media [Paperback] by Tony Bingham, Marcia Conner, and Daniel H. Pink (Sep 1, 2010) http://tinyurl.com/8obvu9k
    • 33. Social Media for Trainers Social Media for Trainers: Techniques for Enhancing and Extending Learning (Essential Tools Resource) Jane Bozarth (Author) http://tinyurl.com/9yc6vse
    • 34. Thank You!Jennifer Tomarchio, CPLPjennifer.tomarchio@firstdata.comMobile: 954-461-5724@jenni694Michael MerrittMichaelMerritt@hdrinc.comMobile: 402.968.2006@MichaelMerritt