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Around the World in a Day
By: Koria Ampey & Corey
Martzig
Brazil imports from U.S.
• Brazil to the U.S.
• Crude oil … US$2.8 billion
• Steelmaking materials … $1.45 billion Semi-fi...
Brazil exports
• Computer accessories, peripherals and parts US $1.7
billion
• Civilian aircraft parts … $1.19 billion
• C...
Brazilian Government
• The Brazilian president is Luiz Inacio Lula da
Silva
• Brazilian law is based on Roman-Germanic
tra...
Brazilian currency
• Since 1994, the
Brazilian
currency has
been the Real
(plural: Reais),
symbol is R$.
• 1 U.S. dollar
e...
Language
• Brazils main language is Portuguese
• Como são você means how are you in
Portuguese
• o que é seu nome means wh...
Brazilian Religion
• Brazil has no set religion they have
freedom of religion.
• 90 percent declare some sort of religion
...
Brazilian Gestures
• The O. K. hand signal is a rude gesture in Brazil
• To express appreciation, a Brazilian may appear t...
Cultural differences
Attitudes towards work
• Make appointments at least two weeks in
advance. Never try to make impromptu calls
at business or...
Etiquette
• Midday is the normal time for the main meal.
• A light meal is common at night, unless entertaining formally
•...
Family
• The children in a Brazilian
family remain close with their
parents, and usually live with
them until they are mar...
Food
• Xin Xin de Galinha - Chicken braised in a shrimp, peanut, and coconut milk sauce.
• Acarajé -It is made from peeled...
Map of Brazil
Brazilian Flag
THE END
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Brazil

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Transcript of "Brazil"

  1. 1. Around the World in a Day By: Koria Ampey & Corey Martzig
  2. 2. Brazil imports from U.S. • Brazil to the U.S. • Crude oil … US$2.8 billion • Steelmaking materials … $1.45 billion Semi-finished iron & steel products … $1.38 billion • Industrial organic chemicals … $1.16 billion • Fully built civilian aircraft … $1.16 billion • Engines & engine parts … $1.07 billion • Footwear … $902.7 million • Finishing materials (e.g. shingles, wallboard) … $859.8 million • Fuel oil … $670.5 million • Stone, sand, cement & lime … $665.8 million
  3. 3. Brazil exports • Computer accessories, peripherals and parts US $1.7 billion • Civilian aircraft parts … $1.19 billion • Civilian aircraft engines … $1.18 billion • Organic chemicals …. $1.14 billion • Fully built civilian aircraft … $1.06 billion • Oil field drilling equipment … $894.5 million • Plastics … $757.7 million Semi-conductors … $693.6 million • Chemical fertilizers … $571.3 million • Pharmaceutical preparations … $566.2 million
  4. 4. Brazilian Government • The Brazilian president is Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva • Brazilian law is based on Roman-Germanic traditions • The legal system is based on the Federal Constitution, which was promulgated on 5 October 1988, and is the fundamental law of Brazil. • The form of government is that of a democratic republic, with a presidential system.
  5. 5. Brazilian currency • Since 1994, the Brazilian currency has been the Real (plural: Reais), symbol is R$. • 1 U.S. dollar equals 1.74978 Brazilian Reais
  6. 6. Language • Brazils main language is Portuguese • Como são você means how are you in Portuguese • o que é seu nome means what is your name in Portugeuse
  7. 7. Brazilian Religion • Brazil has no set religion they have freedom of religion. • 90 percent declare some sort of religion about 70 percent of the country declares themselves Roman Catholic
  8. 8. Brazilian Gestures • The O. K. hand signal is a rude gesture in Brazil • To express appreciation, a Brazilian may appear to pinch his earlobe between thumb and forefinger • To invoke good luck, place your thumb between your index an middle finders while making a fist. This is also known as the "fig“ • Touching arms and elbows and backs very common •  When women meet, they exchange kisses by placing their cheeks together and kissing the air • Flicking the fingertips underneath the chin indicates that you do not know the answer to a question
  9. 9. Cultural differences
  10. 10. Attitudes towards work • Make appointments at least two weeks in advance. Never try to make impromptu calls at business or government offices. • Be prepared to commit long term resources (both in time and money) toward establishing strong relationships in Brazil. This is the key to business success • Some regions have a casualness about both time and work. However , in some cities the word ‘casual’ refers to social and personal events . In these two cities, business meetings tend to start on time. •  Never start into business discussions before your host does. Business meetings normally begin with casual 'chatting' first
  11. 11. Etiquette • Midday is the normal time for the main meal. • A light meal is common at night, unless entertaining formally • If entertained in the home, it is polite to send flowers to the hostess the next day, with a thank- you note • Toast: Saude or Viva (Sah-OO-Day, VEE-va) • Eating out: Tipping is typically 10% in Brazil
  12. 12. Family • The children in a Brazilian family remain close with their parents, and usually live with them until they are married. Due to their close relationships with family members and desire to be close to each other they are more likely to consult family members on a lot of their personal decisions.
  13. 13. Food • Xin Xin de Galinha - Chicken braised in a shrimp, peanut, and coconut milk sauce. • Acarajé -It is made from peeled black-eyed peas formed into a ball and then deep- fried in dendê (palm oil). It is served split in half and then stuffed with vatapá and caruru. • Kibbeh or kibbe -torpedo-shaped burghul shell stuffed with chopped meat and fried. Other varieties are baked, poached, or even served raw • Quindim- is a popular Brazilian baked dessert, made chiefly from sugar, egg yolks, and ground coconut. It is a custard and usually presented as an upturned cup with a glistening surface and intensely yellow color.
  14. 14. Map of Brazil
  15. 15. Brazilian Flag
  16. 16. THE END
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