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Literature circle presentation elk river

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  • 1. Introduction to LITERATURE CIRCLES Jennifer McCarty Plucker, Ed.D.
  • 2. Today’s Learning Targets
    • We will experience an introduction lesson you can use with your students.
    • We will explore the benefits and challenges of implementing literature circles in the English/Language Arts classroom.
  • 3. Warm-up Activity
    • Do you go to movies with friends or watch the same television show with friends or play the same video game?
      • My fav show: The Bachelor!
    • In small groups, no more than 4 per group
      • Identify a movie or television series that everyone in the group has seen.
      • Talk about the movie/show for 3 minutes.
      • Ready, set, GO!
  • 4. Post-Discussion Reflection
    • The person in your group whose birthday is closest to today is the SPEAKER.
    • What did you talk about?
    • Did everyone participate or share?
    • How did you know what to talk about?
  • 5.  
  • 6. Elements of Literature Circles
    • What we already naturally do with movies and TV!
    • Choice of books
    • Individual practice reading and thinking skills
    • Small group discussion
    • Collaborative learning
    • Literature circles spark inquiry
      • Inquiry: question and investigation
      • Invoke your natural curiosity
      • Similar to watching a movie that makes you think
  • 7. Dr. McCarty’s Example:
    • Book: Thinking in Pictures by Temple Grandin
    • True story written by an autistic animal scientist who overcame stigmas, misunderstandings, and challenges of living in what she describes as an ‘outside world’ to be a successful teacher, speaker, writer, and inventor.
    • I wondered…
      • What was her childhood like?
      • Do some of my students with autism wish they had “squeeze machines” nearby?
      • How much of a positive impact has her inventions had for cattle companies?
  • 8. Another Example
    • Book: Lord of the Flies
      • A plane crashes on a nameless island
      • No adult survivors; only boys from a private school
      • Various ages from 6-12 year old
    • I wondered…
      • What would happen in a society with no adults?
      • Wasn’t there a TV show about this? Kid Nation ?
      • What are the chances of surviving this type of situation?
      • Has this ever happened in real-life?
  • 9. To consider during book talks
    • Choose a book that sparks your natural curiosity
      • Think about what you have learned about the books
    • Approximately 3 weeks to finish book
    • Dr. M. forms groups based on your top choice
    • Dr. M. has executive power if you choose poorly
    • Once groups are assigned, you’re locked in
    • Choose in your interest area
      • Not necessarily same as your friends
      • We are not always productive with our friends
  • 10.
    • “ Reading without reflecting is like eating without digesting. ”
      • Edmund Burke
  • 11. What are literature circles? When readers come together to read, discuss, and share a book in a community that takes ownership of their reading process much like an adult book club—that is a literature circle.
  • 12. Eleven “Key Ingredients… Daniels, 2002 1. Students “choose” their own reading materials.
  • 13. 2. Small, temporary groups are formed based on book choice
  • 14. 3. Different groups read different books.
  • 15. 4. Groups meet on a regular, predictable schedule to discuss their reading.
  • 16. 5. Kids use written or drawn notes to guide both their reading and discussion.
  • 17. 6. Discussion topics come from the students.
  • 18. 7. Group meetings aim to be open, natural conversations about books, so personal connections, digressions, and open-ended questions are welcome.
  • 19. 8. The teacher is a facilitator, not a group member or instructor.
  • 20. 9. Evaluation is by teacher observation and student self-evaluation.
  • 21. 10. A spirit of playfulness and fun pervades the room.
  • 22. 11. When books are finished, readers share with their classmates, and then new groups form around new reading choices.
  • 23.
    • Example Literature Circle Unit
    • Learning Targets (from new MN ELA standards)
    • Develop a capacity for sustained silent independent reading for enjoyment. 9.5.10.10
    • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 9.5.1.1
    • Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. 9.5.2.2
    • Use technology , including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. 9.7.6.6
    • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners. 9.9.1.1
  • 24.
    • Example Literature Circle Unit
    • See Calendar in Handbook
    • Essential Learning Target:
    • Sustain authentic conversation centered on text to deepen comprehension and experience.
  • 25. During Reading Activities
    • Additional Reader’s Response ideas could be introduced as a during reading activity and an additional discussion item:
    • Story Map
    • Concept Map
    • 3-2-1
    • Double Entry Journal
  • 26. Management Ideas
    • Build Small Group Community
    • Bookmarks
    • Calendars
    • Discussion Day Facilitation
  • 27. Assessment Ideas
    • Formative
    • Status of the Class
      • Role sheets
      • Exit/Admit Slips
      • Self-Evaluations
      • Group Evals
    • Discussions
      • 30 minute x 4
    • Warm Ups and Closing Activities
    • Summative (final application)
    • Book Trailer
    • Reflection Board
    • Sales Speech