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Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
Engage motivationmea
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Engage motivationmea

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  • Jen
  • Introduce handouts (remind them objectives are there and then there are reflection/note taking boxes for each of these motivations)
    Jess
  • Drive by Daniel Pink
  • Jess
  • Jen 6 mLess of what we WANT:
    Intrinsic Motivation
    High Performance
    Creativity
    Good Behavior
    More of what we DON’T want:
    Unethical Behavior
    Addiction
    Short Term Thinking
    inutes
  • Jen 3 minutes
  • Jen 1 minute
  • Pgs. 18-19 Guthrie; Students must be motivated to become literate
    We must move them from performance-minded to mastery-minded
    Focus of our teaching must be mastery goals
    Page 7 of packet (Jess)—mindset graphic
  • p. 27 (Andrew math)—feedback comes AFTER goal, test, reflection!
  • Let participants brainstorm ideas for this and share out. . .
    Mastery goals—Andrew’s learning target example (Jen) p. 8
    Relevance vs entertainment (Jess)
    Hand on—RT p. 9 (Tom example of unpacking a standard)—Jess
    Re teach—How to (Jess)
    Effort over performance POL (p. 10)
  • Comprehension and Collaboration by Daniels and Harvey
  • Steven Layne Igniting a Passion; O’Brien
    Value Added Assessments
    Goal Setting
    Feedback prior to Evaluation
  • Burke’s What’s the Big Idea
    Definition of Relevance
    Engagement does not equal entertainment.
    Start a Modeling Career
  • Balance teacher centeredness with student centeredness. Our goal is to move from teacher over control to student empowerment.
    Students are motivated by mastery, especially with autonomy in how to get it done yet accountability for producing.
  • Transcript

    • 1. FROM CARROTS, CROWBARS, AND CANDY TO OPTI ONS, OPPORTUNI TI ES, AND OWNERSHI P: MOTI VATI ON AND ENGAGEMENT I N THE CLASSROOM MEA Conference Fall, 2013 http://jmplucker.blogspot.com
    • 2. Learning Targets I can: Consider how motivation and engagement research can be counter-intuitive. Gain exposure to five principles of engagement. Consider what we do well and places we can adjust to implement Principle 1: Meaning and Mastery is Motivating in our educational environments.
    • 3. Manage to handle or direct to make compliant to alter for a purpose
    • 4. Engage
    • 5. Guiding Principles 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Meaning and Mastery are Motivating Learning is Social Self-Efficacy Interest/Relevance Control and Choice Adapted from J.T. Guthrie (2008)
    • 6. Meaning and Mastery are Motivating
    • 7. Principle #1: Meaning and Mastery are Motivating  Have you ever offered incentives in class to produce a desired outcome?    Candy for quiet reading time Games on Friday What incentivized programs have you experienced?  Health club discounts
    • 8. Principle #1: Meaning and Mastery are Motivating
    • 9. Principle #1: Meaning and Mastery are Motivating Special circumstances where “carrots” won’t hurt, and might help. If assignment doesn’t inspire deep passion or require deep thinking, rewards c a n help. BUT:    Offer a rationale as to why the task is necessary. Acknowledge that the task is boring. Allow students to complete the task their own way.
    • 10. Principle #1: Meaning and Mastery are Motivating Essential Requirement for Extrinsic Rewards Extrinsic reward should be: unexpected and offered only after the task is complete. Now that NOT If-then rewards (Pink, 2009, p.
    • 11. Principle #1: Meaning and Mastery are Motivating What is motivating our students? Performance Goals    Show good behavior Complete an assignment Extrinsic rewards     Mastery Goals   get a good grade Outperform others Look smarter Understanding text—not important   Understanding is most important Argue, analyze, debate, explain, organize, connect, defend, conclude… Not isolated, connected to “big picture” Short or long-term
    • 12. “. . .Clearest findings I’ve ever seen: Praising children’s intelligence harms their motivation and it harms their performance.” ~ Carol Dweck
    • 13. Principle #1: Meaning and Mastery are Motivating 7 Practices of Mastery Motivation Provide mastery goals Make tasks relevant 1. 2.  1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Relevance vs. Entertainment Use hands-on activities Transform text to meaning Scaffold mastery motivation Provide re-teach opportunities Reward effort over performance
    • 14. Turn and Talk  Share with a neighbor your reflections on what you’ve just heard or ideas about how to apply Principle #1: Meaning and Mastery are Motivating.
    • 15. Learning is Social
    • 16. “I Can because I think I Can” (Self-Efficacy)
    • 17. Interest/Relevance
    • 18. Control and Choice

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