Safety on the InternetDo You KnowWhere Our Children Are?          Jennifer Jilks,       Muskoka, ON, Canada          www.j...
Internet Usage•   1.3 billion Internet users world-wide (2008)•   22 million users in Canada•   11 billion web pages avail...
Various types of risks• Accessing inappropriate information:    • Porn, hate, intolerance, bigotry, gore,      violence, h...
SiteMeter.com
Internet Safety• students are spending increasing amounts of time  on computers• accessing information previously unavaila...
The Information Highway•   Few barriers•   Fewer medians•   No stop lights•   No speed limits•   Little parental guidance•...
Spam• Adults simply delete hateful spam• Students are more vulnerable:  • exploring their sexuality  • may be tempted by t...
Parents Must Know• Reading our kid’s private stuff is  distasteful and uncomfortable at best• Monitoring software is a goo...
Potential DangersThere are way to broach the topic:  • ‘I cleaned out some files and found…’  • ‘checked into history and ...
Teens easy preyThey have open or misinformed attitudes:  • About sex  • About the Internet  • Bizarre sense of safety and ...
Rights vs. Privileges• Children do NOT and should not have the  privacy rights of an adult• ‘While they live in my house, ...
Instant Messaging• 73 % of 371 students surveyed do I.M.• 38 % spent more than one hour/day• 42 % I.M. with people they do...
Graphic Images• Customized icons supplied by AIM:  • Vulgar messages ‘Yankees suck’  • Busty blonde set back the women’s  ...
Internet Pornography• 92 % received some form of risky e-mail• 57% told their parents• Teens more likely to visit porn sit...
Who Ya Gonna Call?• 3% victims notify authorities          usually => teachers• 4% notify Internet Service  Providers.
Age of Consent
Legal Age of Consent•   In Canada adults can legally have sex with 14 year olds or    any age child if they take “all reas...
YouTube
YouTubeSubscribers to kid’s sites can be spammers, or thoseselling porn. I have had to monitor my websitecontinually. Some...
YouTube
Facebook
The Wall:This is a message found on aFacebook ‘wall’ one on user’s site.Kids see no issues with suchoffensive work.It dese...
Facebook• Originally a collection of headshots of incoming   freshman class by collegesIn 2005:• An institution, like cell...
LiveWWWires• Video games to teach on-line safetyGames:• Missing (for kids ages 11 - 14)• Mirror Image (kids 14-16)• Minist...
BLOGSMedindia.net Research:•   Equal samples: Male/Female•   Average age: 15 yrs.•   Nearly 70% include real names•   61% ...
Facebook examples    •   Many glorify violent images.    •   What does this photo tell us about the        user?    •   If...
BLOG examples•   In Virginia: A 17-yr. old: posts photos of herself in underwear•   A 12-yr. old (middle school) student’s...
Viewing Pornography•   20% youth experienced stress symptoms when they    end up on pornographic sites•   Pornographers cr...
Child Pornography• Child pornography generates $3 billion                          annually• 100,000 web sites involved in...
Child Find Manitoba• 1 in 4 children have had a stranger online ask  to meet them in person• 15% of young Internet users m...
Student Usage• 99% of kids have access to the Internet.• 80% of them have Internet access in their  homes.• 25% of them ha...
Vulnerable Students• develop immunity to potentially dangerous                    conversations• meet strangers who have b...
Chat Rooms• Participants can see what everyone is typing.• They use screen names or real names.• Everyone is privy to the ...
Chat Room Use• moderated or unmoderated• little or no control over conversation content.• Monitored chat rooms have some c...
Chat Room Use• More than half (56%) of Canadian  kids aged 9-17 use chat rooms.• 30% of 9-10-year-olds visit.• 70% of 15-1...
QuickTime™ and aTIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor  are needed to see this picture.                                    Chris...
“A boy’s sordid on-line world”          Justin Berry• At age of 13: entered Chat Rooms to make  friends• Paid $50 to sit b...
Vulnerable Kids• Develop immunity to potentially  dangerous conversations• Talk over months• Meet strangers: they perceive...
Web groups foster: sick sense of                community•  Pictures or short films of violent sexual assaults•  Viewer is...
Cyberstalking• Kids may experiment in chat rooms with  titillating, flirting and sexual conversations.• An environment in ...
Cyberbullying•   students can abandon all manners•   do not practice Netiquette protocol•   anonymity of cyberspace.•   cr...
Cyberbullying• Occurs once a week or once a month• An isolated event or over years•  Online, offline, or both• Can be upse...
Dr. Michele Ybarra• School: the most common environment• almost a third kids 11-16 years of age are  bullied• 11% bullied ...
Internet Abuse• www.cyberbullying.ca• ISP terms of service are explicit:forward the entire message to the  Internet Servic...
Cyberstalking• Police services have set up special task forces• monitor chat rooms• First 6 months: Ottawa team arrested 6...
Cyberstalking
Grooming: Phase One•   They look for vulnerable children who are alone•   Prey on latchkey kids with access to computers• ...
Grooming: Phase Two• Begin attempting to identify the child• Ask questions about their school mascots• About nearby restau...
Grooming: Phase Three•   The predator => information needed to identify the    location•   Starts the abduction plan•   Pr...
How Educators Can Help•   In the classroom the teacher maintains vigilance.•   Create a classroom AUP in a cooperative lea...
Net Family News• Keep informed about the issues• Receive a weekly info letter• Understand what is happening in  Cyberspace...
Web Wise Kids
Child Find Manitoba
Safe Schools•   Be familiar with your Board’s online AUP•   Discourage participation in chat room activities•   Teach olde...
Netiquette for Kids1. Avoid hurting someones feelings with e-mail.2. Respect other peoples online rights.3. Avoid insultin...
For Parents•   Teach children to be aware that people can misrepresent    themselves.•   Discuss Internet activities and l...
Tips1. Place the computer in the family room or other visible area, not in child’s    bedroom.2. Use gender-neutral screen...
References•   Beyond Borders www.beyondborders.org/ June, 2003.•   Cyberbullying www.cyberbullying.ca•   Code of Conduct f...
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Internet safety

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Internet Safety for parents and students

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  • teachers have learned to educate students in reflecting on web page content. McKenzie warns us of that great garage sale in cyberspace
  • www.internetsuperheroes.org/parents/risks.html
  • Sitemeter: April 12, 2008
  • Rideau Valley Middle School adapted a survey from one done by the National Media Awareness Network (2001).
  • porn-napped sites are increasing (innocent sites with expired domain names taken over by pornographers) as are typosquat sites (sites created and registered by pornographers using misspelled names)
  • Child-porn web groups foster a sick sense of community Headshot of Christie Blatchford CHRISTIE BLATCHFORD [email_address] * E-mail Christie Blatchford * | Read Bio * | Latest Columns March 29, 2008 The new child pornography is almost never what you might imagine. Sometimes, it is pictures or short films of sexual assaults so violent, or carried out upon those so young, or both, that the ordinary viewer is left with an altered and bleak view of the world. Infants in diapers and toddlers being penetrated; pre-pubescent boys and girls who have been raped and used degradingly for so much of their young lives they appear downright bored; home movies with titles that openly brag of a "daddy" doing the unspeakable to his kids: It would all have been unbelievable just a decade or so ago. The trends in a general way are to custom orders (where online voyeurs may "order" that certain props are placed by the victims) and real-time live abuse of real-life live victims. There are few studies with reliable data, and sometimes it is hard to tell which is the horse and which is the cart, but police certainly know that some online customers progress to real-life sexual abuse, and their guts tell them that with the normalizing effects of web groups devoted to such grim stuff, this transition is happening more quickly, and more often, all the time.
  • One practice I have faced in the classroom is student who have created rude, intrusive, messages in which girls continually spam and dump on their peers. Students, familiar with simple web page creation, have used such free sites as Geocities to take the opportunity to harass weaker, unsuspecting peers in a bid for power and control. “ Flaming” are the types of emotional and strongly worded opinions that can run away in a bid to state a belief. Children often use slang, forget grammar and utilize short cuts like emoticons to convey meaning. Participants may forget on-line rules of Netiquette and basic manners in a bid to express themselves.
  • "Bullying can happen once a week or once a month; it can be an isolated event or something that happens for years; it can be online, offline, or both. It is a varied behavior and it can be upsetting and have psychological impacts across the board; or not. You do not need to be beat up every day and taunted in every environment to be affected," wrote Dr. Michele Ybarra of Internet Solutions for Kids in a recent email to a few of us online-safety advocates. Here are some brand-new findings from her latest "Growing Up with Media" study of 11-to-16-year-olds.... "School is overwhelmingly the most common environment that kids 11-16 years of age are bullied in," with almost a third of kids saying they've been bullied there. Eleven percent have been bullied online and 10% "in the community (e.g., on the way to and from school)." Six percent have been bullied by cellphone. Only very small percentages of young people have been bullied monthly or more often - the most, 5%, at school, and 2% have been bullied that often online. Because being bullied monthly or more often is so uncommon, wrote Dr. Ybarra, "you can see how this particular subset of youth is particularly concerning from a health and development perspective." In other findings, it's heartening to see that almost two-thirds of 11-to-16-year-olds - 63% - "are not bullied anywhere; 17% report being bullied in one environment, 9% in two environments, 5% in three, 2% in four, and a very concerning 3% report being bullied in all five environments assessed" (school, Internet, cellphone, community, and "other").
  • Canadian and many police services have set up special task forces, which monitor chat rooms. Constables Jupp and Stocki of the Ottawa Police Services in a February, 2004 PD presentation to OCETF state that in 6 months their team has arrested 6 men who have subsequently been charged with luring. These pedophiles groom the children over a period of time, luring them into increasingly intimate conversations. They send them photos and then soft porn. They gently establish a relationship that leads to intimacy and sexual content before these children realize what they are doing. Youth who suffer from lack of intimacy and have needs for friendship are the most vulnerable to predators. Predators know that these troubled adolescents are looking for self-validation and companionship; these kids are vulnerable as they lack the protective networks that the rest of us have around us.
  • Canadian and many police services have set up special task forces, which monitor chat rooms. Constables Jupp and Stocki of the Ottawa Police Services in a February, 2004 PD presentation to OCETF state that in 6 months their team has arrested 6 men who have subsequently been charged with luring. These pedophiles groom the children over a period of time, luring them into increasingly intimate conversations. They send them photos and then soft porn. They gently establish a relationship that leads to intimacy and sexual content before these children realize what they are doing. Youth who suffer from lack of intimacy and have needs for friendship are the most vulnerable to predators. Predators know that these troubled adolescents are looking for self-validation and companionship; these kids are vulnerable as they lack the protective networks that the rest of us have around us.
  • . We know that teens are fighting authority, experimenting with their sexuality in an unsafe medium. They gain the confidence of the child, appear to be a like-minded peer and begin chipping away at parental authority.
  • Some tips about netiquette for kids: 1. Avoid hurting someone's feelings with e-mail. Sometimes, online, people can't tell that you are joking. When you write an e-mail message, make sure the person you're sending it to will know whether you are happy, sad, angry, joking, etc. You can do this by using smileys, such as :). 2. Respect other people's online rights. People on the Internet have rights just as they do in everyday life. If someone sends you a threatening letter, or makes crank phone calls to your house, it can be annoying and sometimes very scary. The same is true on the Internet. If someone sends you e-mail which threatens you or makes you feel uncomfortable, talk to a parent or other adult right away. 3. Avoid insulting someone unless you want to start a flame war. A flame war is when angry people try to punish each other with e-mail. Sometimes this can be done by sending so many messages that a mailbox gets jammed, and sometimes this is done by sending a few very nasty messages meant to hurt someone's feelings. If you insult someone with e-mail, they will probably get angry just as they would if you insulted them face to face. 4. If someone insults you, be calm. Starting a flame war is serious business on the Net. Even if you are angry with someone, you don't need to take things any further. Try being calm, ignoring the message, or sending a polite message asking for them to explain what they meant. It may have been a misunderstanding. 5. Avoid "crashing" discussion groups or forums. People on the Net frequently get together online to talk about things they may have in common. This can be done on a listserv, a bulletin board, a chat group, etc. If you join the discussion just for the fun of "crashing" it, or ruining it, people will definitely get angry. 6. Respect the privacy of other people. If someone tells you something secret, it should be kept secret. This includes passwords, full names, addresses, or interests. Sharing your own password with someone else, even someone you like, is never a good idea. Passwords and personal information are private, and are never safe to share with others. 7. Be responsible online. When you are at the computer, you are in control. Avoid using the computer to harm other people. Taking things which are not yours (such as files, passwords, or credit card numbers), spreading rumors about other people online, and infecting other computers with viruses (on purpose) are examples of harming other people online. 8. Help other people learn more about the Net. Chances are someone else taught you a lot of what you know about the Internet. The Net is growing quickly, and it's difficult to keep up. Other kids, or even your parents and teachers, may need help understanding what it's all about. Try to help them if you can. Who knows? They might show you a thing or two someday!
  • In many instances, this is an informal means by which companies collect data. All of us must realize that there is often no need for giving such information to potential strangers. There are many things we can communicate to parents to educate them. These lists can be posted in school newsletters and communicated to parent councils. Parents must understand the gravity of this situation and the potential threats.
  • Mitchell, K.J., D. Finkelhor and J.Wolak (2003) The Exposure of Youth to Unwanted Sexual Material on the Internet, Youth & Society, 34 (3), March 2003, p.330-358. Wolak, J., K.J. Mitchell and D. Finkelhor (2003). Escaping or Connecting? Characteristics of youth who form close online relationships. Journal of Adolescence, (26) p.105-119. Media Awareness Network, (2001).Young Canadians In A Wired World, Environics Research Group.
  • Transcript of "Internet safety"

    1. 1. Safety on the InternetDo You KnowWhere Our Children Are? Jennifer Jilks, Muskoka, ON, Canada www.jilks.com
    2. 2. Internet Usage• 1.3 billion Internet users world-wide (2008)• 22 million users in Canada• 11 billion web pages available to be viewed?• Web pages: undependable, inaccurate and unreliable• The Internet is growing by about 10 million web pages per day.• Often cannot control the sites students are visiting• Can teach them appropriate behaviour while they surf. www.internetworldstats.com/am/ca.htm
    3. 3. Various types of risks• Accessing inappropriate information: • Porn, hate, intolerance, bigotry, gore, violence, hoaxes, misinformation, hype• Cyberstalking, cyberbullying, harassment• Victims of luring• Give out private, $ and PIN information• Targeted by irresponsible marketers• Scammed & defrauded
    4. 4. SiteMeter.com
    5. 5. Internet Safety• students are spending increasing amounts of time on computers• accessing information previously unavailable• primarily screened by the adults around them.• parents and teachers: • how to access technology safely• increased risks.
    6. 6. The Information Highway• Few barriers• Fewer medians• No stop lights• No speed limits• Little parental guidance• No supervision: webcams• Children vulnerable to strangers• Potentially computer illiterate users• Students surf the Internet alone.
    7. 7. Spam• Adults simply delete hateful spam• Students are more vulnerable: • exploring their sexuality • may be tempted by these messages• Offerings of drugs• Access to pornography• Contains illicit and X-rated content.
    8. 8. Parents Must Know• Reading our kid’s private stuff is distasteful and uncomfortable at best• Monitoring software is a good tool• Parents found disturbing: • Sexual exploits • Drug experimentation • Info on criminal activity • Wide range: mooning to keg parties to robbery.
    9. 9. Potential DangersThere are way to broach the topic: • ‘I cleaned out some files and found…’ • ‘checked into history and was shocked to find’ • ‘overheard a conversation while volunteering…’
    10. 10. Teens easy preyThey have open or misinformed attitudes: • About sex • About the Internet • Bizarre sense of safety and community while online. • Receive more spam with gmail and yahoo accounts than you will ever know or understand • Become desensitized to language and images.
    11. 11. Rights vs. Privileges• Children do NOT and should not have the privacy rights of an adult• ‘While they live in my house, eat my food, wear clothes I provide,I have the right to go in their room.’• It is my duty to protect their safety. --By a mom…
    12. 12. Instant Messaging• 73 % of 371 students surveyed do I.M.• 38 % spent more than one hour/day• 42 % I.M. with people they do not know.• 32 % received unwanted sexual comments. --2001 student survey in Ottawa
    13. 13. Graphic Images• Customized icons supplied by AIM: • Vulgar messages ‘Yankees suck’ • Busty blonde set back the women’s movement 40 years • Inane conversation • Emoticons rather than standard English • Slang literacy skills • Worse than phone calls
    14. 14. Internet Pornography• 92 % received some form of risky e-mail• 57% told their parents• Teens more likely to visit porn sites if: • they were depressed • experienced physical or emotional abuse • have difficulties in relationships. = potential victims.
    15. 15. Who Ya Gonna Call?• 3% victims notify authorities usually => teachers• 4% notify Internet Service Providers.
    16. 16. Age of Consent
    17. 17. Legal Age of Consent• In Canada adults can legally have sex with 14 year olds or any age child if they take “all reasonable steps” to determine a child is of age.• Pedophiles prey on our children and escape assault charges.• 44% of child pornographers go on to abuse children• 99.9 % child sexual abuse cases pornography was found in the perpetrator’s home• 40% of those using child pornography have been sexually abused as a child.
    18. 18. YouTube
    19. 19. YouTubeSubscribers to kid’s sites can be spammers, or thoseselling porn. I have had to monitor my websitecontinually. Some ‘subscribers’ lead to porn sites.
    20. 20. YouTube
    21. 21. Facebook
    22. 22. The Wall:This is a message found on aFacebook ‘wall’ one on user’s site.Kids see no issues with suchoffensive work.It desensitizes users to suchlanguage.
    23. 23. Facebook• Originally a collection of headshots of incoming freshman class by collegesIn 2005:• An institution, like cell phones• Social necessity for many• Embarrassing photos posted without critical reflection of moral value• Share plans, schedules, play games• Potential employers can find information• Professionals must be careful about shared info
    24. 24. LiveWWWires• Video games to teach on-line safetyGames:• Missing (for kids ages 11 - 14)• Mirror Image (kids 14-16)• Ministry commissioned Gr. 7 CyberCops Project: www.livewwwires.com
    25. 25. BLOGSMedindia.net Research:• Equal samples: Male/Female• Average age: 15 yrs.• Nearly 70% include real names• 61% provided contact info• 3% linked to their personal home page• 4% give IM contact details• 50% write about: love affairs, infatuation, sexuality debates, homosexuality opinions• 71% discussed homework grades, music preferences.
    26. 26. Facebook examples • Many glorify violent images. • What does this photo tell us about the user? • If a potential employer checked this out, what would it tell them? • Many families teach gun safety to their children. You can see the soldiers in what is a safe demonstration - but what would you think of this user? • Kids do not have adult-filters to process such information.
    27. 27. BLOG examples• In Virginia: A 17-yr. old: posts photos of herself in underwear• A 12-yr. old (middle school) student’s photo showed him with a handgun• A 12-yr.-old girl: talked about contracting a STD• A 17-yr. old writes about coping with H.S. stress through pain medications and cutting• Groups: those who cut, want to commit suicide, etc.• MySpace users often post photos that show more skin than necessary. It gives the impression that their bodies are for sale. It sets back the women’s movement 40 years!• Kids do not understand who or what they are yet.
    28. 28. Viewing Pornography• 20% youth experienced stress symptoms when they end up on pornographic sites• Pornographers create “mousetraps”, making porn sites difficult to exit.• Exit buttons takes users to another explicit web site.• Youth with problems were more likely to have been • asked by online “friends” for face-to-face meetings • attended face-to-face meetings• there is a trend towards these youth not telling parents that they were meeting strangers.
    29. 29. Child Pornography• Child pornography generates $3 billion annually• 100,000 web sites involved in child pornography. (OPP)• 70% of teens report accidentally accessing pornography• porn-napped sites are increasing• typosquat sites, too
    30. 30. Child Find Manitoba• 1 in 4 children have had a stranger online ask to meet them in person• 15% of young Internet users met a stranger• 1 in 4 children have been sent pornography• 1 in 2 children have a secret e-mail account unknown to parents• 70% of 13-14 olds enter chat rooms• Of above: 66% visit private or adult chat rooms
    31. 31. Student Usage• 99% of kids have access to the Internet.• 80% of them have Internet access in their homes.• 25% of them have been approached online by a stranger.• 15% of them have actually gone and met a stranger from the Internet in person.• The average child maintains about 40 "buddies" or contacts.• 10% of these "buddies" are unknown to them.
    32. 32. Vulnerable Students• develop immunity to potentially dangerous conversations• meet strangers who have become on-line friends (excites them)• perceive nothing wrong in meeting a like minded peer with whom they have developed a relationship• problem is that not all is as it seems• begins with safe conversations: chat room.
    33. 33. Chat Rooms• Participants can see what everyone is typing.• They use screen names or real names.• Everyone is privy to the conversation• Real-time conversations with many people at the same time.• Places to meet new people• May keep in touch with old friends• Casually vent in the time-old tradition of teenage angst
    34. 34. Chat Room Use• moderated or unmoderated• little or no control over conversation content.• Monitored chat rooms have some control on content and can avert sexual or violent discussions.• Unmoderated can promote hateful attitudes of offensive or illegal activities.• anonymity of chat room can encourage children to harass others with little adult maturity or self-censoring.
    35. 35. Chat Room Use• More than half (56%) of Canadian kids aged 9-17 use chat rooms.• 30% of 9-10-year-olds visit.• 70% of 15-17-year-olds visit.• 85% of these kids unsupervised while using the Internet.
    36. 36. QuickTime™ and aTIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Christina Long On Tuesday, May 21st, 2002, a man, whom she had met over the Internet, strangled Christina Long to death. • They had met, • had sex several times • he strangled her • Her parents had no idea • Powerless to stop such an incident. • She did not realize the danger in meeting this man.
    37. 37. “A boy’s sordid on-line world” Justin Berry• At age of 13: entered Chat Rooms to make friends• Paid $50 to sit bare-chested in front of WebCam by stranger (through Paypal)• Customers order real-time shows• hid Webcam under desk• Eventually lured into performing sex acts on Webcam• Could not get out of relationship (threats)www.nytimes.com/2005/12/19/national/19kids.ready.html
    38. 38. Vulnerable Kids• Develop immunity to potentially dangerous conversations• Talk over months• Meet strangers: they perceive as friends• See nothing wrong in meeting ‘peers’
    39. 39. Web groups foster: sick sense of community• Pictures or short films of violent sexual assaults• Viewer is left with an altered and bleak view of the world.• Infants in diapers and toddlers being penetrated• Children raped and used degradingly• Home movies with titles that openly brag of a "daddy" doing the unspeakable• Trends are to custom orders• Online voyeurs may "order" certain props and real-time live abuse• Few studies with reliable data• Police certainly know that some online customers progress to real-life sexual abuse• Most pedophiles have child porn in their possession when arrested“The normalizing effects of web groups devoted to such grim stuff, this transition is happening more quickly, and more often, all the time.” --Christie Blatchford
    40. 40. Cyberstalking• Kids may experiment in chat rooms with titillating, flirting and sexual conversations.• An environment in which they feel safe.• Experimentation with online relationships may lead to children into trouble: • sent pornography, • pressured to arrange meetings • Pressured to share phone numbers.
    41. 41. Cyberbullying• students can abandon all manners• do not practice Netiquette protocol• anonymity of cyberspace.• create rude, intrusive, messages• send spam, practice flaming• dump abuse on their peers• harass weaker, unsuspecting peers in a bid for power and control.
    42. 42. Cyberbullying• Occurs once a week or once a month• An isolated event or over years• Online, offline, or both• Can be upsetting: psychological impacts or not• Do not need to be bullied every day to be affected• Difficult to avoid
    43. 43. Dr. Michele Ybarra• School: the most common environment• almost a third kids 11-16 years of age are bullied• 11% bullied online• 10% "in the community• 6% bullied by cellphone"Growing Up with Media" - study
    44. 44. Internet Abuse• www.cyberbullying.ca• ISP terms of service are explicit:forward the entire message to the Internet Service Provider.
    45. 45. Cyberstalking• Police services have set up special task forces• monitor chat rooms• First 6 months: Ottawa team arrested 6 men• Groom the children over a period of time• Luring them into increasingly intimate conversations• Youth at risk are most vulnerable to predators.• Adolescents are looking for self-validation and companionship
    46. 46. Cyberstalking
    47. 47. Grooming: Phase One• They look for vulnerable children who are alone• Prey on latchkey kids with access to computers• Computer illiterate parents• Teens are rebelling against authority• Teens are experimenting with their sexuality in an unsafe medium• Gain the confidence of the child• Appear to be a like-minded peer and begin chipping away at parental authority.
    48. 48. Grooming: Phase Two• Begin attempting to identify the child• Ask questions about their school mascots• About nearby restaurant chains and other landmarks.• Go to school websites• Use other information to pinpoint a child’s location• Use reverse tracing to trace IP addresses• Determine if child’s IP is served through a local node
    49. 49. Grooming: Phase Three• The predator => information needed to identify the location• Starts the abduction plan• Predator continues to talk to the child daily• Builds up a relationship: dependency and trust• Chooses a spot that is best for an abduction• Waits until the unsuspecting child comes along• The child is lured into the car and is abducted.• Predator can abduct a latchkey child• Parents arrive home a couple of hours later.
    50. 50. How Educators Can Help• In the classroom the teacher maintains vigilance.• Create a classroom AUP in a cooperative learning class activity.• Create a recommended list of resources• Carefully supervise their students• Bookmark safe, educational and relevant sites• Teach your students the appropriate response to clicking onto an inappropriate site.
    51. 51. Net Family News• Keep informed about the issues• Receive a weekly info letter• Understand what is happening in Cyberspacewww.netfamilynews.org/subscribe.htm
    52. 52. Web Wise Kids
    53. 53. Child Find Manitoba
    54. 54. Safe Schools• Be familiar with your Board’s online AUP• Discourage participation in chat room activities• Teach older children what to do in dangerous situations.• Teach children what to do if threatened• Teach them whom to call for support• Teach them how to walk away and close the browser.• Place computers in a high traffic area.• Give your students a friendly ear.• Do not dismiss their fears.
    55. 55. Netiquette for Kids1. Avoid hurting someones feelings with e-mail.2. Respect other peoples online rights.3. Avoid insulting someone unless you want to start a flame war.4. If someone insults you, be calm.5. Avoid "crashing" discussion groups or forums.6. Respect the privacy of other people.7. Be responsible online.8. Help other people learn more about the Net.
    56. 56. For Parents• Teach children to be aware that people can misrepresent themselves.• Discuss Internet activities and let them know that you are there if they need you.• Begin supervising when they are young• Report any suspected illegal content or activity• Teach children to forego online information registration forms (or lie)• Monitor the history feature of your browser• Ask questions about usage (siblings)• Ask for help to create a Facebook site (if necessary!)• Ask to see their Facebook/MySpace sites (or find them)
    57. 57. Tips1. Place the computer in the family room or other visible area, not in child’s bedroom.2. Use gender-neutral screen names.3. Talk to children about Internet safety and participate with them online. If they know more than you, let them teach you.4. Children shouldn’t believe anything said to them over the Net from an unknown source.5. Tell children they do not have to respond to messages sent to them, whether by e-mail or instant message.6. Children should never give out personal information, screen names, passwords or credit card information online.7. Use a good virus detection program.8. Supervise children’s computer usage. Don’t rely on filtering software to do the work. Check the history function of your browser to see which websites your children have visited.9. Know who your children are communicating with online. Get to know their online friends just as you would their other friends.10. Promote an environment where your children can talk openly with you.
    58. 58. References• Beyond Borders www.beyondborders.org/ June, 2003.• Cyberbullying www.cyberbullying.ca• Code of Conduct for the Protection of Children from Sexual Exploitation in Travel and Tourism: www.thecode.org• www.media-awareness.ca• www.wiredsafety.org• www.internetsuperheroes.org/• Yahoo Terms of Agreement Policy http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/• Net Family News <www.netfamilynews.org>• The Online Safety Project www.safekids.com• For teachers: www.otip.com/smartkids video

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