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Chapter13

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AP Psychology Emotion by David Myer's textbook.

AP Psychology Emotion by David Myer's textbook.

Published in: Education
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  • Where do emotions come from? Why do we have them? What are they made of?
  • OBJECTIVE 1 | Identify three components of emotions, and contrast James-Lange, Canon-Bard and two factor theories of emotion.
  • 1) Cannon suggested that body’s responses were not distinct enough to evoke different emotions. 2) Physiological responses seemed too slow to trigger sudden emotions.
  • OBJECTIVE 2 | Describe the role of the autonomic nervous system during emotional arousal.
  • OBJECTIVE 3 | Discuss the relationship between arousal and performance.
  • OBJECTIVE 4 | Name three emotions that involve similar physiological arousal.
  • OBJECTIVE 5 | Describe some physiological and brain pattern indicators of specific emotions.
  • OBJECTIVE 6 | Explain how spillover effect influences our experience of emotion.
  • OBJECTIVE 7 | Distinguish the two alternate pathways that sensory stimuli may travel when triggering an emotional response.
  • OBJECTIVE 8 | Describe some of the factors that affect our ability to decipher non-verbal cues.
  • OBJECTIVE 9 | Describe some gender differences in perceiving and communicating emotions.
  • OBJECTIVE 10 | Discuss the research on reading and misreading facial and behavioral indicators of emotion.
  • OBJECTIVE 11 | Discuss the culture-specific and culturally universal aspects of emotional expression, and explain how emotional expressions can enhance survival.
  • OBJECTIVE 12 | Discuss the facial feedback and behavior feedback phenomena, and give an example of each.
  • OBJECTIVE 13 | Name the 10 basic emotions, and describe two dimensions psychologists use to differentiate emotions.
  • OBJECTIVE 14 | State two ways we learn our fears.
  • OBJECTIVE 15 | Discuss some of the biological components of fear.
  • OBJECTIVE 16 | Identify some of the advantages and disadvantages of openly expressing anger, and assess the catharsis hypothesis.
  • OBJECTIVE 17 | Describe how the feel-good do-good phenomenon works, and discuss the importance of research on subjective well-being.
  • OBJECTIVE 18 | Discuss some of the daily and longer-term variations in the duration of emotions.
  • OBJECTIVE 19 | Summarize the findings on the relationship between affluence and happiness.
  • OBJECTIVE 20 | Contrast the effects on happiness of the adaptation-level and the relative-deprivation principles.
  • OBJECTIVE 21 | Summarize the ways that we can influence our own levels of happiness.
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