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Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
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Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
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Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
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Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
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Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
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Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
Weekly Presentation [2 of 6]
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  • 1. UNPUBLISHED PHOTO All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE: The Fort Jackson Leader Andrew McIntyreTop Cop Compeitition
  • 2. USE OF TWITTER All Weekly DivisionTHIRD PLACE: Fort Mill Times Michael Harrison and Jenny Overman
  • 3. USE OF TWITTER All Weekly DivisionSECOND PLACE: Free Times Eva Moore
  • 4. USE OF TWITTER All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE: Free Times Corey Hutchins
  • 5. FACEBOOK PAGE All Weekly DivisionTHIRD PLACE: The Weekly Observer Matt McColl
  • 6. FACEBOOK PAGE All Weekly DivisionSECOND PLACE: The Cherokee Chronicle Tommy Martin, Jon Martin and Charles Wyatt
  • 7. FACEBOOK PAGE All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE: Fort Mill Times Michael Harrison and Jenny Overman
  • 8. BEST PUBLISHED EDITORIAL/OP-ED COLUMN Associate/Individual DivisionTHIRD PLACE: GSA Business Scott Miller Invest in better health, expand Medicaid A s one of the nation’s most unhealthy and impoverished states, South Carolina has a duty to its citizens to expand Medicaid and take the 9-to-1 match of federal funding to do so. Even if South Carolina opts against expansion, as a re- cent Supreme Court ruling allows, Palmetto State taxpay- ers will continue to help foot the bill for federal Medicaid dollars that other states will accept. Allowing the poor and uninsured to go without health care is expensive; hospitals, insurers, private businesses and anyone who pays for health care bear that cost. Expanding Medicaid will be expensive too, but not as much as Gov. Nikki Haley’s administration claims. Tony Keck, director of the S.C. Department of Health and Hu- man Services, says expanding Medicaid will cost the state at least $1.1 billion, possibly twice that. Independent analysis by the non-partisan Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation disputes Keck’s estimate, however. Kaiser says expanding Medicaid could cost South Carolina around $470 million from 2014 through and two thirds of adults, fourth worst. icaid would amount to leaving an estimated $2 billion a 2019, an average of less than $100 million a year. That • The death rate from stroke is 50 per 100,000 resi- year from the federal government on the table. It’s hard to amounts to a 3.6% increase for the state, Kaiser said. For dents, fifth worst. imagine the state delivering that kind of value on its own, that, an additional 250,000 impoverished, uninsured • 18.7% of South Carolinians are uninsured, even if it is more efficient. South Carolinians would receive covered care under the eighth worst. In her objection to expanding Medicaid, Haley is right. Medicaid program, possibly more. • Personal income is 80% of the national average. The Medicaid program can be wasteful. It needs to be re- Based on those figures, South Carolina would benefit • More than 18% of the population lives in poverty, formed to cover core services and provide states more flex- more by expanding Medicaid than all but three states, the sixth worst. ibility. But citing Medicaid’s imperfection is a poor reason Kaiser Foundation said. Here are some facts about South South Carolina ranks No. 45 among the states in overall to deny health care to so many South Carolinians. Carolina’s health and poverty from the U.S. Census Bu- health. It is time for South Carolina to invest in its health. Expanding Medicaid is a long-term investment in reau, Kaiser and the United Health Foundation: Haley says the state could provide more efficient, less our state’s most vulnerable population, and this is a • More than 10% of adults have diabetes, fifth worst costly health care on its own. The problem is the state time for the state’s leadership to back away from parti- in the nation. won’t make the investment on its own, or hasn’t shown a san politics and do the right thing for the citizens who • One third of children are overweight or obese, willingness to do so in the past. Refusing to expand Med- need it most.
  • 9. BEST PUBLISHED EDITORIAL/OP-ED COLUMN Associate/Individual DivisionSECOND PLACE: Murrells Inlet Editorial/Opinion: I miss my father at Christmas time 10/Murrells Inlet Messenger/December 2011 By Tim Callahan newspaper publisher. Boss (God); the coach (the Twelve Steps); and Messenger I don’t miss my father too often, but Christmas He also became an alcoholic who couldn’t hold is one of those times. A tough, Irish boy who barely graduated high We moved 12 times in my first 18 years of life. school, my father became a professional photog- Oddly, he never had booze in the house. All we a job. fellow players (AA members). Dad was a man who lived in an age when AA and psychiatrists were young, and asking for help was a sign of weakness, something a real rapher, small and big city reporter and weekly knew was that he would leave for work reason- man would never do. And, underneath all that Tim Callahan ably sane for an insane guy and come home a monster, who found fault and then started hit- ting. He broke my mom’s nose once and laughed garbage that was passed on down from his fa- ther, was a man with a terrible disease who had a few wonderful moments. Christmas day was his biggest moment. Know where you stand, at any time because my brother Pat and I, ages 8 and 10 at He not only stayed home Christmas Eve but It’s time you know where you stand when it comes to achieving your financial the time, yelled at him for doing it. Meanwhile, could be found on the roof when we were young. goals. Our Envision® process offers you an easy, effective way to identify your highest priority financial goals and develop an investment plan mom was passed out in a pool of blood. There Of course, we thought it was Santa. Some years designed to help you reach them. Most important, theprocess provides a was no trip to the hospital. he would dress as Santa and let us catch him, personalized benchmark that helps you monitor your progress at any time. No one was as good as dad, just ask him. Praise belly laughing downstairs and telling us to go Contact me today to find out how the Envision process can be help bring clarity to your life goals – and enhance your confidence in being able to was not found on his lips except for himself. Bit- back to bed and be good. The outfit and act was achieve them. ing, sarcastic humor made the words hurt more so good, we didn’t know it was dad - until the than any blows he landed on mom and my older Christmas we caught Santa kissing mom. brother, Mike, his punching bags. I escaped his We were poor for two reasons: his chosen pro- wrath because I was both the athlete and the aca- fession paid a pittance for a man with seven kids, demic in the house, who he could point at and and his drinking cut into the profits. Hunger was tell his very few friends, “See, look at Tim, what a familiar rumbling in our bellies. But, Christmas a great dad I am.” day we ate like bandits, and came downstairs in Our Envision tool uses Monte Carlo simulations, which are based on historical and hypothetical information; there is no guarantee that investments will perform in accordance with the simulated trials. He tried to kill Mike once and then told the cops the morning to Christmas presents that filled the Mike had tried to kill him. Thankfully, my dad living room. left not too long after that incident to shack up But, much more than that, my dad was happy with someone. that day. My mom was happy. We were happy. Daniel Harrell I was 35 years old when a friend made me real- After some coffee and aspirin for dad/Santa’s 2050 Corporate Centre Drive, Suite 120 0 ize he was much more than a drunk. He was cer- egg nog headache, he would pass out the pres- Myrtle Beach, SC 29577 tifiably psychotic. I won’t shock you with more ents. He would smile and laugh and joke, and his daniel.harrell@wfadvisors.com Direct (843) 445-2002 hideous proofs. sarcasm and cuts took a holiday. www.wfadvisors.com/daniel.harrell For those of you who think this is the blaming Something else I remember about Christmas Investment and Insurance Products: the parent game, I turned out to be not much dif- time with dad: “Charlie Brown’s Christmas.” He NOT FDIC Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value A V W Fargo Wells F r Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC, is a registered broker-dealer and a separate non-bank affiliate of Wells r r registered broker-dealer r r k r separate r Wells ferent. I didn’t hit, but I drank, and I could not loved that cartoon. Snoopy and Charlie had him F r Fargo & Company. ©2010 Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC. All rights reserved. 0910-3528 [74018-v2] A1287 Fargo Company. y W F r Wells Fargo r rights r 8 [74018-v2] stop. Not without major league help: from the Continued on page 11
  • 10. BEST PUBLISHED EDITORIAL/OP-ED COLUMN Associate/Individual Division S.C. should set clean energy standards By James T. Hammond to drive up operating costs of coal-fired plants.FIRST PLACE: One reason the coal-fired plants can be shut down S outh Carolina is on the cusp of dramatic change is the growing capacity of cleaner, natural gas-fired in the way electric power is generated here, and generators and nuclear reactors under construction. the electric utility companies currently are act- SCE&G is building 2,200 megawatts of new nucle- ing without long-term policy guidance from state ar generating capacity at Jenkinsville in Fairfield government. County. Currently, Santee Cooper, the state-owned Utilities statewide plan to electric utility, owns 45% of those two new nuclear retire coal-fired electricity units. Columbia Regional generating plants on a large Nuclear power plants emit no noxious chemicals, scale, reducing by at least and the two new reactors at Jenkinsville will dramati- one-quarter the number of cally reduce SCE&G’s emissions into the atmosphere. the generators that emit sul- Duke Energy estimates it will retire the W.S. Lee fur, nitrogen oxide, mercu- Steam Station’s coal-fired operations by 2015. The ry, carbon dioxide and other utility is studying whether to convert the boilers to noxious chemicals blamed natural gas and will announce the decision later this Business Report Hammond for aggravating asthma and year. other respiratory illnesses. But no state is an island when it comes to clean air, These actions are good for environment and for and national and international trends will continue business. The Upstate and the Midlands have tot- to impact South Carolina’s air quality. tered on the brink of non-attainment of EPA goals for The amounts of chemicals pouring from coal- clean air. Slipping into non-attainment could bring fired plants worldwide is staggering. In 2004, the harsh limits on new industrial development. use of coal resulted in emissions of 3.9 billion met- Utility managers need the assurance that their ric tons of carbon dioxide in the United States alone, James T. Hammond decisions mesh with state policy. South Carolina has no policy on clean energy standards. Such a bill was introduced in the last session by Sens. John Matthews and Phil Leventis, but it died in a Senate subcommit- tee at the end of the General Assembly’s session in June. So far, planned retirements and closures of coal- according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. China belches the most pollutants into the Earth’s atmosphere and is building new coal plants at a tor- rid pace. But in the U.S., the shift toward natural gas and away from coal has been dramatic. The annual share of fossil-fired electric power generation from coal Duke Energy’s W.S. Lee Station in Anderson County is scheduled to from burning coal on a large scale. The Southern Environmental Law Center in Chapel Hill, N.C., said coal-fired power plants are among South Carolina’s fired plants include: has plummeted to about 55% of the total in 2010, biggest water users, in addition to the safety, land and from almost 80% in the late 1980s, according to the water problems associated with coal ash waste. Carolina Electric & Gas. U.S. Energy Information Administration. In the same The fact that utilities are not abandoning coal - period, the annual share for natural gas rose to about makes it even more imperative that the state set ville, owned by Duke Energy’s Progress Energy sub- 45% from less than 15%. standards for future coal plants. For example, Duke sidiary. Rising shale natural gas output has exceeded nat- Energy has a new coal unit under construction, the ural gas demand growth and depressed natural gas 825-megawatt Unit 6 at Cliffside Steam Station. Anderson County operated by Duke Energy. prices, while coal prices have risen, according to the Located just across the state line, on the Cleveland/ EIA. Those trends began in 2009 to change the cost- Rutherford County line in North Carolina, Duke Savannah River Site operated by the Department of benefit impact of using coal versus natural gas in the Energy’s Cliffside Station retired four coal units last Energy. eastern United States, the EIA reported. year. But, it continues to operate one existing unit, Meanwhile, Santee Cooper idled its Dolphus M. Between 2000 and 2012, natural gas generat- and plans to bring the new coal-fired unit online this Grainger coal-fired generating plant in Horry Coun- ing capacity grew by 96%, while coal-fired capac- year. ty, keeping it on standby in case the utility needs ity growth slumped, and petroleum-fired capacity Taken together, the trends away from burning coal backup generating capacity. The Grainger plant and declined by 12%. in our region and toward natural gas and nuclear the aging Jefferies plant in Berkeley County are under According to the EIA, current trends in electric generation of electric power are positive. review to determine whether the two units can be power generation suggest many coal-fired genera- As the utilities seek to maintain South Carolina’s brought into compliance with Environmental Protec- tors may be retired. In its annual energy outlook, the abundant and reliable sources of electric power — tion Agency regulations in a cost-effective manner. EIA expects 49 gigawatts of coal-fired capacity to be the fuel of modern industry — South Carolina poli- In 2010, 38 electric generators in South Carolina closed by 2020, or about one-sixth of existing coal cymakers should heed the energy companies’ urging power plants of at least 1 megawatt capacity reported capacity in the U.S. and less than 5% of total electric- to adopt clean energy portfolio standards, as neigh- using coal as their primary fuel source, according to ity generation nationwide. boring North Carolina already has done. the South Carolina Energy Office. The environmental impact of such a change would To continue the billions of dollars of investment The tide has been running against coal-fired elec- be huge, since today’s natural-gas plants give off only required to modernize the state’s electricity infra- tricity generation in South Carolina. about half the carbon dioxide as a similar sized coal structure, the utilities need the assurance that they In August 2009, Santee Cooper suspended plans to plant. and the state General Assembly speak with one voice build a 600-megawatt coal-fired power plant on the Studies have estimated that particle pollution from on these important standards. cr br Great Pee Dee River in Florence County. The plans more than 400 coal-fired power plants kill 13,000 met strong public opposition. Santee Cooper CEO people a year, and most coal-fired plants are concen- James T. Hammond is editor of the Columbia Regional Lonnie Carter said a decrease in electricity demand trated in the Midwest and Southeast. Business Report. Reach him at 803-401-1094, extension and proposed environmental legislation threatened Air pollution is not the only environmental impact 201.
  • 11. HARRIS AWARD FOR EDITORIAL WRITING All Weekly Division F R O M T H E E D I TO R I A L D E S K Wright was right MIX A CAREER CRIMINAL, attempted rape and a Southern sheriff advising women to pack heat with the words, “you ain’t gotta be accurate, you just gotta get close” and it’s clear why Spartanburg SheriffTHIRD PLACE: Chuck Wright is the Palmetto State’s newest international celebrity. With one short press conference, he managed to trip over just about every Southern stereotype conceived on this continent and beyond. Type his name in Google’s search engine and you’ll get 2 million hits. It was Britain’s Daily Mail that quoted him as saying, “I know I’m going to get lit up by people that don’t like guns.” Yes, national gun control groups have been predictably negative. Yet Greenville Journal the overwhelming public support the sheriff describes is no surprise, either, considering the facts of the case that prompted him to advise women last week to “get a concealed weapons permit. Don’t get Mace. Get a firearm.” The victim in the Oct. 30 attack was reportedly walking her dog around 2:30 p.m. in Spartanburg’s Milliken Park when a man approached and asked if the dog was friendly. When she said it was, Susan Clary Simmons he grabbed her, dragged her into the woods, forced her to strip and attempted to rape her. She was later able to identify 46-year-old Walter Lance as her assailant – a career criminal Wright said has amassed more than 20 charges since 1983, including DUI, grand larceny, criminal domestic violence, escape and high and aggravated assault and battery. A prior arrest for criminal sexual conduct was not pursued because the victim was uncooperative. There’s no question the sheriff hit a public nerve when he said “our form of justice is not making it,” that he is tired of telling victims “I’m sorry, we can’t keep them in jail.” It’s also clear he spoke out of deep frustration, not a desire for vigilante justice. Wright made it plain he expects those who arm themselves to do so legally. Not everyone should have a gun, he said, but “it’s too bad someone with a concealed weapons permit didn’t walk by (Oct. 30). That would fix it.” It is this image – of civilians pulling guns in public spaces – that adds the threat of unintended consequences to Wright’s words. At minimum, state law requires those who hold a concealed weapons permit to take an eight-hour handgun education course that includes firing the gun in the instructor’s presence. Satisfying one instructor in a controlled environment comes nowhere close to the training level demanded of law enforcement officers, or their experience. Reliable research on the value of handguns in self-defense is tangled in the gun control wars. For every study that says using a firearm to resist assault increases the risk of injury or death, there’s another that shows thousands of civilians successfully defend themselves or their property with handguns every year, in numbers varying from 800,000 to 2.5 million. Several showed simply the credible threat of a gun was enough to end the majority of attacks. Even so, the key here is “credible threat.” A gun’s effectiveness in self-defense remains directly proportional to the skill of the person using it – as is the safety of those innocents anywhere nearby. Sheriff Wright made it plain he understands this distinction in the interviews that followed his first, emotional press conference. Now he owes it to his community to ensure all those women zipping pistols in their fanny packs at his urging understand it extremely well.
  • 12. HARRIS AWARD FOR EDITORIAL WRITING Opinion All Weekly Division Can I please speak to Mrs. Franklin? Let me make one thing per- for potential columns. I had point. I acknowledge the phone fectly clear. I am not a woman. written “I’m no woman, man” has rung and that I have picked Never have been and I don’t re- on the list more than a year up the handset thing. Now, the ally see any circumstance ago. ball is back in your court. TellSECOND PLACE: where I ever will be a female. But I couldn’t pull the trig- me why you disturbed me just Let me make another thing Franklin’s ger. (Another manly reference.) when I was polishing my fin- perfectly clear. I am an avid I couldn’t admit to God and gernails. supporter of women. I’m mar- Corner everybody that people think “I’d like to place an ad,” the ried to one, I have a daughter I’m femalely. I didn’t want voice said. It was the voice of a who’s a female, a granddaugh- By Larry Franklin Rush Limbaugh to think me a woman. She had thrown the ter who’s a female and a slut. ball back to me in that way that The Clinton Chronicle daughter-in-law who’s a fe- phone. The only thing I can The last straw happened last women throw balls. Sissy-like. male. come up with is that my voice Friday. The phone rang, so I “I’m sorry,” I said. “Every- I work with hundreds of sounds female on the phone. did what any good woman one who could possibly help women every day. At least it Admitting that is almost as would do - I rushed to answer you - and even care about you seems there are hundreds of painful to me as having some- it. and what you want - is busy at them. one look at me and think I’m a “Chronicle,” I said firmly the moment. The men in the of- But I’m tired of people woman. and manly. None of that, fice are busy working. The thinking I’m a woman. It’s I’ve always thought my “Thank you for calling The women are talking about what Larry Franklin never happened in a face-to- voice was mainly and strong. Clinton Chronicle, Clinton’s they are going to cook for sup- face setting. If you are looking Sexy. hometown newspaper since per and how they could possi- at me, it’s pretty clear I’m a Nope. It’s soft and feminine. 1900 and now home of the bly be lucky enough to work man. Beyond the bulging mus- The first few times I was re- wildly successful and popular with someone as virile than me. cles and other tell-tell signs, ferred to as “mam” on the www.clintonchronicle.com, Can I get one of the gals to call there’s the baldness. phone, I chalked it up to a bad where you can take a test to see you back when they’re done Women don’t go bald, I’ve connection. After that, I de- if you qualify as a Republican cleaning and stuff?” found in my studies. It has cided the person to whom I was in Laurens County. To which of “Yes, mam. Have them call something to do with they are talking was an idiot. That was our award-winning employees me at 864-555-U812. Thanks, missing the “comb your hair in enough to sooth my bruised may I direct your call? May I sweety.” a circle” gene. manly feelings. I mean, it was personally suggest the hunky I was stunned. And hurt. It The times I’m accused of enough to make me cry. publisher?” That’s the way the reminded me of the time I was being a woman is when I’m Faithful readers will remem- females answer the phone. a senior in high school and I talking to someone on the tele- ber I keep a written list of items I’m more direct and to the had an accident. After asking me if I was OK, the man driv- ing the car who hit me asked me if my girlfriend was hurt. “I heard her screaming,” he said. I appreciated his concern, but I was alone in the car when it happened. These things really get my panties in a wad. (Larry Franklin is publisher of The Chronicle. His email ad- dress is lfranklin@clin- tonchronicle.com. Franklin’s Corner can be read online at www.clintonchronicle.com.) Vic’s Views By Vic MacDonald
  • 13. HARRIS AWARD FOR EDITORIAL WRITING All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE: Coastal Observer Charles Swenson
  • 14. PUBLIC SERVICE FOR WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS All Weekly Division Celebrating 10 years: Former benefit familiesTHIRD PLACE: still fighting Lake Wylie Pilot John Marks Julia Nesbitt The DeCuir family with dad Michael holding MacKenzie. - Dakota Gay with his sister Samantha By John Marks Want to help? jmarks@lakewyliepilot.com LAKE WYLIE — From a small, The 2012 Lake Wylie Children’s Charity concert will lakefront garden grows something be held Sept. 23 near T-Bones on the Lake. that time, season changes and Before the Sept. 23 event, the 2012 LWCC Poker Run even disease haven’t withered. will be held Sept. 15 with registration beginning at 11 Lannette Conder spends time a.m. at Sweetwater Bar & Grill on Charlotte Highway. tending that garden, a memorial All vehicles are welcome. Cost is $20 per vehicle and to her late son Dakota Gay. It’s $5 per extra rider. Stops include Sweetwater Bar & Grill in Lake Wylie, been five years since Dakota lost McKoy’s Smokehouse and Saloon in Charlotte, Tavern on the Tracks in his fight with brain cancer. It’s Charlotte, Mac’s Speed Shop in Steele Creek and final stop at T-Bones been nine years since his commu- on the Lake. For more information, visit lkwchildrenscharity.org. Mom Kathy holding Shalazia nity first rallied around his diag- Rhinehart nosis. But they’re still rallying and still continue to do in his name.” mia patient Luke Moore, 3. because organizers knew Dakota growing. Dakota’s fight became the It started as the Justin Mychals and wanted to help. They contin- “He knew what his destiny cause behind an annual fall fund- Child Cancer Benefit, named for a ued because, given the numbers was,” Conder said of Dakota, who raiser that now helps other fami- since relocated resident who and stories learned, planners just lost his father to brain cancer, too. lies facing pediatric cancer. On spearheaded the effort. This year, couldn’t stop. “He never ever gave up hope, but Sept. 23, the concert returns for its mostly the same volunteers work “They decided that they wanted he was the one who talked about 10th lakeside date, this time help- beneath the Lake Wylie Children’s all the things he wanted people to ing Lake Wylie resident and leuke- Charity banner. The events began S e e FA M I L I E S ■ 5 A
  • 15. PUBLIC SERVICE FOR WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS All Weekly Division COASTAL OBSERVERSECOND PLACE: P.O. Box 1170, Pawleys Island, SC 29585 • 843-237-8438 • Fax 843-235-0084 Coastal Observer To the judges: Pawleys Island is a historic beachfront community that has been able to maintain its low-key character Charles Swenson and in spite of decades of population growth. That was challenged when a development group proposed to redevelop an old shopping center to allow a Walmart, which would become the area’s first big-box national retailer. Talks with county officials had gone on for over a year before the project was made public. Our Jason Lesley reporting began when the developer bought the property through a foreclosure sale a week before a zoning application was filed and only six weeks before a public hearing. The first challenge was getting officials to say on the record that Walmart was the tenant. The second was to report the impact of the proposed big-box store. The developer cited jobs, impact fees and tax revenue. We showed those impacts also included more traffic, closed businesses and – once the zoning changed – more big-Walmart plans Pawley’s box retailers. The immediate impact of our reporting and editorials was to raise public outcry to the point that the developers who had touted the Walmart to officials asked the county to stop using the “W word”Island store when speaking of their project. The public hearing drew over 1,300 people from a community of about 10,000, the largest audience for any county hearing. In addition to coverage in our print issue and online, we created a page on our website that updated automatically as we reported the progress of the hearing. Posts were made every five minutes over the course of the five-hour hearing. (The page attracted over 14,000 hits.) The Planning Commission voted to require the developer to stay within the county’s building-size limit. The developers claimed the motion was unclear and that the member who made it was tricked by the commission chairman. Our reporting showed otherwise. The final result of this issue may not be known by the time you read this letter. However, after the contest period ended, the developers informed the county that they will remove the big-box store from the project and revise their plan. Thank you for your consideration. Charles Swenson Editor
  • 16. PUBLIC SERVICE FOR WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. Perry, Michael Smith, Tom O’Dare and Steve RobertsonExecutive’s past raises questions Covation exec didn’t file tax returns for 14 years Project Blue’s chief operating officer racked up more than $1.2 million in unpaid taxes, penalties BY MICHAEL SMITH AND CHARLES D. PERRY court transcripts show. interfere with the lawful government support of the project after a Herald comment. THE HERALD In 1999, Rocker was sentenced to functions of the IRS,” according to report about Rocker’s prison record. In an interview with the Herald 14 months in prison after he pleaded the Internal Revenue Service. New revelations about the circum- last month, Dave Rockers business Dave Rocker failed to file income guilty to one count of conspiracy to Rocker is currently the chief oper- stances leading up to Rocker’s prison partner and father, Bill, said the IRS tax returns for 14 consecutive years, commit income tax evasion. He ating officer of Covation Holdings, sentence only reinforce concerns pursued his son in the late 1990s. racking up more than $1.2 million in served 12 months before he was according to Horry County records. about using taxpayer money to sup- “You’ve got to understand, at the unpaid taxes and penalties, accord- paroled in January 2001, according Covation has been in talks with the port the Covation call center, some time, what was going on in the Inter- ing to federal court documents. to the federal prison bureau. Myrtle Beach Regional Economic council members say. nal Revenue Service,” he said. “They Rocker, an executive with Covation Rocker’s charges were reduced Development Corporation (EDC) “We’ve had too much trust and not were at the apex of their power.” Holdings — the company that’s after he agreed to assist the IRS in its and Horry County Council to possi- enough verification,” said council- But Bill Rocker didnt deny his seeking millions in taxpayer money investigation of a Klein conspiracy in bly build a call center at River Oaks man Carl Schwartzkopf. “Before you sons tax troubles. to open a Carolina Forest call center which Rocker participated. and International drives, creating up invest, it is absolutely essential that “David failed to file personal in- — also faced allegations of misrepre- In a Klein conspiracy, two or more to 1,020 jobs. you investigate. This is part of that come taxes for several years and sentation, inflating business expens- individuals agree to “use deceit, County council postponed a Sep- verification.” es and even sexual harassment, craft, trickery or dishonest means to tember vote to borrow $8 million in Rocker couldn’t be reached for See COVATION, Page 3A
  • 17. SPORTS ENTERPRISE REPORTING All Weekly DivisionTHIRD PLACE: Free Times Eva Moore and Patrick Wall Blowfish Down to Final At-Bats;Bases Empty Is a Minor League Team On Deck? A post-storm rainbow appears as the Capital City Stadium grounds crew readies the field for the BY EVA MOORE AND PATRICK WALL Columbia Blowfish to resume their July 19 game against the Thomasville Hi-Toms. The game was PHOTOS BY PAUL COLLINS delayed for roughly an hour due to heavy rains. In the meantime, college students mill Benjamin is hell-bent on bringing to town? I t’s 10 minutes before first pitch on a mid- July Thursday, and thick drops of rain are pelting the north end of Assembly Street. about, downing two-dollar beers. Kids squeal and bounce in the inflated play castle and play the assorted mini-games in the concourse, seemingly oblivious to the delay on the field. It’s fitting that rain threatens to wash Making A Sale Last year, the Atlanta-based development group Bright-Meyers approached city of- ficials about buying the Capital City Stadium. out what could be one of the final games in It was part of a plan by megaretailer Walmart But Debbie, who answers the phone at infield dirt is soaked; it’s gone from a bright Capital City Stadium, a field notorious for to expand its presence in the Columbia area. the Columbia Blowfish box office, says the tan to a deep, dark brown. Water’s started flooding problems. Back in June, Columbia City Councilman Brian Newman — team’s baseball game against the Thomasville pooling on the concrete steps of the lower- City Council voted 6-1 to move forward with whose district includes the stadium — later Hi-Toms will go on as planned. There’ve level seats and collecting in the dugouts. selling the historic stadium to a developer told Free Times that although he understood been a few claps of thunder, she says, but the As the rain intensifies, most of the planning to build a Walmart-anchored at the time that Bright-Meyers usually ballpark is bone dry. fans scurry for cover — either under the shopping center there. The Blowfish’s final worked on behalf of Walmart, it wasn’t a Still, the threat of a summer storm has grandstand or to their cars. Those in the regular-season game in the wood-bat sum- sure thing Walmart was behind the deal. All kept the fans away — only about 400 or so grandstand aren’t totally safe; the corrugated mer collegiate Coastal Plain League is Aug. 1. he knew for certain was that the developer show up. (By contrast, Saturday’s game, in metal roof leaks, and strong winds whip rain Unless the Blowfish make the playoffs — the planned to build a retail development there. near-perfect baseball weather, draws about sideways into the seats. Creedence Clearwa- team finished in second place in the first- And Newman welcomed the investment in 2,000.) It’s raining steadily by the time Mi- ter Revival’s “Have You Ever Seen the Rain?” half standings, but currently sits first in the Columbia. chael Wilson leads off for the Blowfish in the plays on the loudspeakers. second half — the team could be homeless So did other city leaders. They wouldn’t bottom of the first. It’s pouring by the time Those who haven’t fled file into the con- after Aug. 1. make much off the sale, but the city stood Josh Miller runs a 2-2 count against Thomas- course. A ticket-taker by the front entrance With a sale of the Capital City Stadium to take in millions in tax revenue from the ville pitcher Kyle Keller, and the umpire’s had wonders aloud where everyone is going. His property seemingly imminent, there are businesses that would move in. Whereas enough. He suspends the game. nametag reads “Jim”; he’s middle-aged and questions: Where do the Blowfish go from the stadium actually costs the city money to The grounds crew races on the field with heavy set, his bright red Blowfish T-shirt bulg- here? And can Columbia land the profession- maintain, the sale would put the property on a large tarpaulin, but the damage is done: The ing at the waistline. This’ll blow over, he says. al minor league baseball team Mayor Steve the tax rolls for the first time. In October, Columbia City Council qui- 16 coverstory free-times.com | twitter.com/freetimessc | facebook.com/freetimes | July 25-31, 2012
  • 18. SPORTS ENTERPRISE REPORTING All Weekly DivisionSECOND PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. PerryPower to the Pedal POWER PEDAL Growing cycling community inspires county plans for new bike paths TO THE BY CHARLES D. PERRY | THE HERALD “It’s the closest thing to flying.” Now Brunson is biking two to three times Sue Brunson’s week didn’t always include 45- weekly. She joined a local triathlon club and she mile bike rides. occasionally commutes to work on two wheels. A year ago, Brunson’s pastor saw her at a gym “It’s a lifestyle,” she said. and suggested that she try cycling. So the Myrtle That lifestyle has become more common Beach daycare operator joined the pastor and along the Grand Strand in recent years. At least his wife for a group excursion. three bicycle groups have formed in Horry “I got out and I loved it,” she County since 2010 and county officials are now said. developing plans for a network of bike paths. “We’ve gone from just little pockets of riders,” said Tim Woolford, co-owner of Grand Strand Bicycles in Myrtle Beach and Murrells Inlet. “It has real- ly just grown like crazy.” When Woolford arrived here seven years ago, he started a Saturday morn- ing group ride. The first trip consisted CHARLES D. PERRY | THE HERALD of Woolford and two friends. Local cyclists take part in a group ride. Last summer, there were more than 100 cyclists on five of the group rides. Some of the burgeoning interest can be at- Go green, save green tributed to higher fuel prices, Woolford said. • $4.6 billion: What bicyclists in the United States He also pointed out that the emergence of save every year by biking instead of driving groups like the Waccamaw Trail Blazers and • $308: Average annual cost of operating a bicycle the Myrtle Beach Triathlon Club has given • $8,220: Annual cost of operating average car people new options for bike riding. “All that spurs it,” he said. • 40%: Increase in the number of bicycle commuters Nationally, biking has become more from 2000 to 2010 popular, too. From 2000 to 2010, • 12%: Percentage of trips taken in the U.S. that the number of bicycle com- cyclists and walkers account for muters increased by 40 • 1.6%: Percentage of federal transportation dollars percent, according to that support bicycle or pedestrian transportation Sources: Sierra Club, League of American Bicyclists, National See BIKES, Page 10A Council of LaRaza
  • 19. SPORTS ENTERPRISE REPORTING All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE: Coastal Observer Roger GreeneTroubled fund manager makes a new start on the cover Troubled fund manager makes a new start on the court BY ROGER GREENE he resigned from his previous COASTAL OBSERVER head coaching position at the private Oak Hill Military Acad- Stan Kowalewski does not emy in North Carolina, he did take his involvement with the so with the intention of spend- Waccamaw Middle School bas- ing more time with his children ketball team for granted. A and helping them reach their year after being charged by the academic and athletic poten- Securities and Exchange Com- tial. It is a commitment he does mission with securities fraud, not take lightly. Kowalewski sees his return to “I’ve watched my own kids the bench as a volunteer coach grow up around basketball,” as the start of a new chapter in Kowalewski said. “I’ve coached his life. their AAU teams and tried to A former fund manager in be involved with helping them Greensboro, N.C., Kowalews- as much as they’ve wanted me ki and his family moved to the to be. I’ve made a pact with my- Pawleys Island area last year. self that I’m only going to be in- In September, he was fined volved with coaching teams my $16.8 million by a U.S. District sons play for. They have a love Court judge in Atlanta and or- for the game and I have plen- dered to repay $8.6 million in ty of years of basketball left Tanya Ackerman/Coastal Observer what the court called “ill gotten with them. I don’t want to have gains.” Kowalewski, left, directs the action in the Wildcats’ any regrets that I didn’t give He appealed the fine and game with Rosemary this week. them every minute of time they while it is pending before the wanted.” U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Ap- Principal Bill Dwyer and peals, Kowalewski says work- out in New York who played at the middle school level. It’s basketball coach Marion Bus- ing with middle school athletes basketball at Dartmouth Col- rewarding.” by say Kowalewski’s influence has rekindled his passion for lege. “The kids are fun to work Kowalewski’s interest in reaches far beyond that of his basketball. with. The parents and adminis- coaching at Waccamaw Middle own son. Both say his presence “It’s been great,” said Kow- tration are very supportive. It’s arose from one of his four chil- has benefitted the entire team. alewski, a high school stand- been a while since I’ve coached dren being on the team. When SEE “COACHING,” PAGE 6
  • 20. BUSINESS REPORTING All Weekly Division Fraud probe being swept Delinquent under rug?THIRD PLACE: BY JERRY BELLUNE JerryBellune@Yahoo.com Infinity Business Group investors are frustrated. Many are worried they may never property taxes Lexington County Chronicle drop in county be able to recover millions of dollars they invested in the company. Others are angry because they feel the investigation of fraud charges may be swept un- INSIDE |_ der the IBG officials face rug. state fraud charges, INSIDE: Are you delinquent? A list of who is & The Dispatch News Inves- A3 tigative Execs spent lavishly sources on themselves, A3. can be found on Pages B2-11 deny this. Everyone lost at IBG, They A3. BY JERRY BELLUNE say it is IBG dream dies, A8. a highly Settlement ends JerryBellune@Yahoo.com compli- fight, A8. There’s a sign of hope on Lexing- Jerry Bellune cated case involving many investors who may be called ton County’s economic radar. to testify against Wade and Brad Cordell and others involved with It’s a small but detectable blip that them in the collapse of IBG. IBG operated from a brick build- shows property tax payments are up ing owned by Brad Cordell at 140 THE CHINA OFFENSIVE Gibson Road in Lexington. Among and non-payments are down. its operations was a bad check col- At this time last year, owners of China contract concerns our readers lection service for clients ranging from the food industry to retail stores to the public schools. Twin investigations have been un- derway for more than a year since 300,524 taxable properties had not paid. BY JERRY BELLUNE INSIDE _ | tractor did not underbid the - the first complaints surfaced. The complaints included charges This year, Gene Rishkofski of the JerryBellune@Yahoo.com that the Cordells and their inner The high cost of River Bluff competition and make it up circle spent investors’ money on ex- pensive cars and boats, a condo at Lexington County Treasurer’s Of- High School has been a subject with overruns. Clemson, visits to gentlemen’s clubs fice said he expects that to drop to and otherwise lived lavishly. of local concern. These allegation were included in around 300,100 parcels. But of even more concern to bid amount,” she said. complaints filed with the state Attor- The Chronicle also asked, at ney General’s office. In monetary terms, the county Chronicle readers is the issue of She said the project is on readers’ requests: Attorney General Alan Wilson has a Chinese government-owned - time and within the bid. confirmed his office has been inves- tigating and gave the Cordells 30 was owned more than $9.3 million River Bluff and the two company building the $138.9 fications or notices of cost over- Meadow Glen schools were ap- days to respond. The Cordells’ attorneys have de- in property taxes at this time last million showplace school. run has the Chinese contractor The Chronicle asked Lexing- proved by voters in the 2008 nied all charges. year, he said. This year he expects presented? Federal and state investigators ton 1 a month ago for: Bond Referendum. This includ- have been involved although FBI of- ficials say they can neither confirm that to drop to $8.9 million. ed $138.9 million for the new not deny they have an investigation Property taxes are paid by own- bid amount,” spokesperson Meadow Glen Elementary and high school land, site work and underway. Mary Beth Hill said. But investors FBI agents have in- ers of boats, businesses, commer- Middle schools and how much construction, Hill said. terviewed told the Chronicle what “There have been no cost of that will local resident work- overruns.” One way the China Construc- they were asked and how they an- swered a series of questions posted cial and private property, farmland, ers and suppliers receive. tion Company successfully un- on an FBI web site. homes and vehicles. der bid U.S. builders, industry The Better Business Bureau with- performance bond? sources say, is that it uses cheap drew accreditation after IBG officials Lexington County uses the media for the high school. “ There have been no claims filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy un- The district has not respond- under the performance bond,” Chinese labor and below market der the federal Bankruptcy Act Sep- tember 1, 2010. to alert property owners who may ed to these questions. financing and insurance from Involved in the investigation are be unaware that their tax payments she said. officials who successfully prosecuted Chinese banks and insurers. the Home Gold and Carolina Inves- tors fraud case. are overdue.
  • 21. BUSINESS REPORTING All Weekly Division Bookstore is a tribute to late husband’s dream By Nathaniel Cary Tribune-Times Writer ncary@tribunetimes.comSECOND PLACE: Mike and Dianne Bailey had a dream. After years traveling together on the road selling books, they had discovered the perfect place to buy a small store- Tribune-Times front and open up a quaint, used-book store in Foun- tain Inn. They bought the shop, painted its walls and lined Dianne Bailey displays some of the inventory at her those walls with shelves of Bookquest Bookstore on Main Street in Fountain Inn. Nathaniel Cary Cemeteries look to capitalize on cremation books. GWINN DAVIS/STAFF Then they found out Mike had lung cancer. INTERESTED? She doesn’t sell many Seven weeks later, in new titles — can’t keep up October, he died, leaving Bookquest Used Book Store, with the large chain prices behind his wife to pursue 108 S. Main St., is open 11 or the appeal of electronic their dream alone. a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday and readers — a change from Fountain Inn funeral ent than the traditional burial, Cannon For a while Bailey didn’t Friday and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. which has made it appealing to Funeral Home the new books she and Saturday. home debuts garden more people today. know what to do. Peddling Mike sold in their Green- in Fountain Inn The national average cost for a books had always been opened a new ville stores that once upon a By Nathaniel Cary funeral and burial in 2009 was something they did togeth- Used Books before the holi- time had been named Vol- cremation IS THE COFFEE ‘CONNECTOR’ Staff Writer ncary@greenvillenews.com More South Carolinians than ever before are choosing to have $6,560, according to the National Funeral Directors Association. That’s compared with a $1,650 av- erage for cremation with basic memorial service and urn, ac- er through 40 years of mar- riage. They had owned three used bookstores in the Greenville area dec- ades ago. Then they drove days and said that special ume 1, Volume 2 and Vol- garden. GWINN time had brought a new- DAVIS/STAFF found realization — “that bookselling can be fun,” she wrote on her store’s ume 3. “Used and out of print was so much more fun that we eventually just said to their remains cremated, good cording to a 2010 report by the the open road, selling Facebook page. heck with the new books news for crematoriums and mak- Cremation Association of North books at Christian book- “Maybe Mike gave me and got into used,” Bailey ers of urns but bad news for ceme- America. stores across the Southeast the best Christmas gift said. tery owners and casket makers. Cremation has brought up a and searching through es- ever, a wonderful book There are sections for Cremation is less expensive in new set of questions: What to do most cases and it gives family with the remains? Where to visit tate sales and auctions to store, even if he is not here South Carolina History, members more options for the re- find literary gems to col- to enjoy it with me,” Bailey modern first editions and mains. It’s also something differ- See GARDEN, Page 7A lect or sell on the side. wrote. collectible children’s They sold first editions Three days a week, Bai- books. She’s sold Tolkien or out-of-print books in an- ley unlocks the front door collections, Peter Pan, tique malls or online, but to her store at 108 S. Main Hemingway and Rudolph,COFFEE ranked 16th nationally in $47.5 million in 2010 and acquainted with some of 2011 in total imports, up $122.3 million in 2011, ac- the world’s top java. from 19th in 2009 and 2010, cording to ITA. “I want my coffee to sold out to sugar cane growers, the few who re- mained through the coffee that hang in two rows on the wall of Pereira’s office. “This is my little hall of were drawn to Fountain Inn’s Main Street when St. The red-brick exterior and large front windows all before Christmas. She wanted to create aContinued from Page 10A according to the Interna- Brazil is also the world’s have a unique taste,” Perei- low-points in the 1980s and fame,” he said. “There are they happened upon it in give a peek to passerby of comfortable place forfor South Carolina’s busi- tional Trade Administra- top coffee-producing na- ra said. “I don’t like to have ’90s have dedicated them- like 5,000 little guys like the spring. the potential treasures in- browsers where “peoplenesses large and small.” tion, a branch of the U.S. tion, with about 54 million a coffee that’s kind of bor- selves to the craft, he said. them producing coffee in It was perfect. side. could come in and talk Imports are tough to Commerce Department. bags produced annually, ing, mellow, there’s not too Most farm 30-50 acres total the top of the mountains intrack because the state Brazil was businessman Ricardo Pereira imports Brazilian coffee beans and ships themmuch going on. I like coffee Simpsonville the top im- according to the U.S. De- to coffee and produce smaller this region in Brazil and “All we had to do was A bell jingles as you step about books if they want roasters and coffeehouses along the East Coast and overseas. PHOTOS BY GWINN DAVIS/STAFFthrough which imported porter of agricultural prod- partment of Agricultural. that has some character.” amounts of coffee but fo- they’re calling it the Coffee paint the walls,” Bailey inside. Music plays softly to.”goods first enter the Unit- ucts to South Carolina entrepreneur finds niche Simpsonville in Pereira was drawn into He focuses on smaller cus on its taste, he said. Tuscany of Brazil.” said. over the speakers. Tables Before Mike died, heed States might not be their 2010 and 2011, according to the coffee business be- farms that practice sus- “They pay such atten- Pereira dips his hands Then they got the news. and chairs are set up in made one final trip a weekfinal destination and may ITA. importing high-end java from his nativetainable or organic farm- cause of the relationships Brazil tion to quality that the cof- into an open bag and liftsinstead reflect a storage or Brazilian Cary imports and the opportunity to ing and he’s visited farms By Nathaniel with a degree fee knocks the socks off out the blond beans, letting Doctors discovered cancer spots. Two soft-cushioned to what would have been in youth minis-distribution center, accord- through South Carolina watch ONLINE EXTRA Tribune-Times Writer ncary@tribunetimes.com farmers in Brazil get more than a dozen times, tries. your feet because it’s so them fall through his fin- too late for medical mir- chairs are tucked away be- their place to enjoy a sort of Watch a video linked to this article A friend ining to the U.S. Census Bu- have grown exponentially paid well to produce high- sometimes taking his cus- online at GreenvilleOnline.com. Greenville good,” he said. gers as he speaks of the acles. hind a register, welcoming retirement.reau. in the past threeinside the glass front quality coffee and to watch tomerscof- A first step years from planted thealong with him. idea The farmers’ smiles ra- lengthy process farmers Still, South Carolina door of BRASC Coffee Importers in $12.3 million in startle the senses. consumers here become to begin a Mike wanted her to browsing customers to sit “He was tickled with it,” Simpsonville may 2009 to While many farmers fee-import diate from 5-by-7 photos go through to bring the Rather than the sweet aroma of connections are what have allowed the business. beans here. press on, so she decided to for a few minutes to flip Bailey said. “He just said, ‘I freshly roasted coffee beans, visitors coffee connoisseur and native of Brazil When Pereira was are instead greeted with a scent remi- to carve out a niche business in the laid off from a local Coffee grows on trees. It open the shop. It could be a through an appealing book. can’t believe we made the niscent of fresh produce, as if stepping middle of a recession in the Upstate company when the economy into a verdant garden. thousands of miles from home. soured in 2008, he took the radical step to place to relax and enjoy the That’s where Bailey wrong decision. Go ahead Ricardo Pereira, who started BRASC Pereira’s tale offers a glimpse into shift careers and become his own boss. Coffee Importers in 2008 and is set to the fabric of a shifting Upstate econo- Though as a boy Pereira often had days and to be surrounded sometimes sits with a mug and do it.’ ” expand its operations soon, leads the my that entrepreneurs like him are walked along mountain paths between way through a small office to a one- weaving to create jobs for themselves trees filled with deep red coffee cherries by the bound titles that of tea. She sells some books And so she has. room warehouse and the source of the where none previously existed. in the mountain region of Alta Mogiana in aroma — hundreds of 132-pound bags of Importing coffee beans hadn’t al- southeast Brazil, he never considered Mike had loved for a life- online but, “I’m cutting green coffee beans stacked neatly on ways been at the top of Pereira’s list of that coffee would one day become his pallets. planned occupations. He worked in livelihood. time. back to bring more titles in ■ Nathaniel Cary can be Each bag bears the markings of purchasing and human resources in He already had the connections, how- small Brazilian farms run by farmers Brazil before he attended Bob Jones See COFFEE, Page 10A She opened Bookquest here.” contacted at 864-616-4209. Pereira knows personally. And those University where he graduated in 2006
  • 22. BUSINESS REPORTING All Weekly Division There’s a new boat on Shem Creek BY SULLY WITTE daughter graduated from EDITOR@MOULTRIENEWS.COM Wando, Cliff continued to call on Magwood to take Everybody has a favorite her students on his boat. He teacher, but for a kid who continued to do so until CliffFIRST PLACE: didn’t love school that much, retired. becoming the teacher’s pet “A friend of hers was teach- wasn’t high on his list of pri- ing at Trident Academy and orities. she called and wanted me to So, the relationship be- take a class out. Vasa Tarvin tween Trident Academy and his brother were in that teacher Paula Urbano and class nine years ago,” said student Vasa Tarvin devel- Magwood. He said they The Moultrie News oped rather slowly. In fact, it took a liking to the boat and all started with a marine sci- shrimping in general. Their ence field trip aboard Wayne teacher then approached Magwood’s shrimp boat, The Magwood about the possibil- Winds of Fortune. ity of letting them work with Magwood had been host- him over the summer. ing marine science classes “I took them out and they on his boat for years. He had didn’t get sea sick (which is Sully Witte four daughters who all took the main thing). Out of the STAFF PHOTO BY SULLY WITTE (now retired) Wando High two, Vasa really liked it and Shrimp Boat Captain Wayne Magwood mentored and trained Vasa Tarvin who School teacher Julie Cliff’s he stuck with me every sum- now owns and runs his own shrimp boat out of Shem Creek called Miss Paula. marine science classes. Even See more pictures online at www.moultrienews.com after Magwood’s youngest See Vasa, page 3A. The extreme dream team Professional homebuilders help Habitat hammer home the need for affordable housing Structures Building Com- pany is again partnering with East Cooper Habitat for Humanity to raise walls on a home and give hope to low-income families seeking decent and affordable hous- ing east of the Cooper as part of Habitat for Humanity’s Home Builders Blitz 2012. During this year’s event, the nationwide project seeks to build and renovate more than 200 homes, thanks to the skilled labor provided by local professional home- builders and construction firms. Habitat’s Home Builders Blitz is a partnership between Habitat affiliates and the building community to build and renovate homes across the United States. Builders STAFF PHOTOS BY SULLY WITTE and Habitat affiliates work Structures Building Company is again partnering with East Cooper Habitat for Humanity to raise walls on closely to organize all aspects a home and give hope to low-income families seeking decent and affordable housing east of the Cooper as of building, including secur- part of Habitat for Humanity’s Home Builders Blitz 2012. This home will be built in a week and is located on ing subcontractors and sup- Kent Street. pliers, fundraising and seek- ing donations of materials. Builders participating in the with builders and engage manity International CEO. thank the builders for their ing Company and owner program this year will work them in our work to help “By sharing their talents and commitment and dedication S t e v e K e n d r i c k g a t h - with more than 100 Habitat families in need of afford- skills with us, we are able to to making Home Builders ered subcontractors and affiliates. able housing,” said Jonathan increase our capacity to help Blitz 2012 a success.” “We are excited to partner Reckford, Habitat for Hu- transform communities. We Locally, Structures Build- See Habitat, page 12A
  • 23. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION All Weekly DivisionTHIRD PLACE: Coastal Observer Charles SwensonImages drift down river
  • 24. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION All Weekly DivisionSECOND PLACE: Coastal Observer Tanya AckermanBurning of the socks
  • 25. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE: Carolina Forest Chronicle Michael SmithFootball puzzle
  • 26. BEST WEBSITE Associate/Individual DivisionSECOND PLACE: Greer Today Jim FairGreerToday.com
  • 27. BEST WEBSITE Associate/Individual DivisionFIRST PLACE: Municipal Association of South Carolina Staffmasc.sc
  • 28. WEEKLY NEWSPAPER WEBSITE All Weekly DivisionTHIRD PLACE: The Dillon Herald
  • 29. WEEKLY NEWSPAPER WEBSITE All Weekly DivisionSECOND PLACE: The Press & Standard
  • 30. WEEKLY NEWSPAPER WEBSITE All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE: Fort Mill Times Michael Harrison
  • 31. PHOTO GALLERY ON A NEWSPAPER WEBSITE All Weekly & Daily Under 20,000 Divisions CombinedTHIRD PLACE: Free Times Jonathan SharpeAbout last night: Drake,Colonial Life Arena
  • 32. ONLINE SPORTS VIDEO All Weekly & Daily Under 20,000 Divisions CombinedTHIRD PLACE: The Weekly Observer Matt McCollColeman Shannon
  • 33. LIFESTYLE/FEATURE SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Weekly DivisionTHIRD PLACE: The Moultrie NewsLowcountry Life
  • 34. LIFESTYLE/FEATURE SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Weekly Division Beaches STANDARD U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 26 PAWLEYS ISLAND, S.C. 2012 Edition 29585SECOND PLACE: The Coastal Observer’s window on the summer Coastal Observer WILDLIFE A naturalist naturalistBeaches walks walks SEA TURTLES the beach the beach Nesting Nesting SECOND FRONT ECOND RONT CO D RO season season PAGE 10 AGE 10 GE ESSENTIALS FAQs about FAQs about A o beach rules beach rules PAGE 2 AGE E BOOKS Ideas for Ideas for summer summer reading reading PAGE 31 AGE 31 E WHAT’S INSIDE FOURTH OF JULY | Where to HUNTINGTON BEACH | State HISTORY | Before Pawleys, go to wave the flag. park campers unplug. North Island was the Page 7 Page 14 place to go. Page 28
  • 35. LIFESTYLE/FEATURE SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE: BAN BOZOS, NOT BOOZE | FREE Charleston City PaperThe Pride Issue The Pride Issue PAGE 21 Downtown Shift Sermet’s ditches the Corner for Downtown P.42 Class Act Sarah Jarosz balances school and touring P.52
  • 36. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING All Weekly Division THIRD PLACE: The News and Reporter Travis Jenkins
  • 37. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING All Weekly Division SECOND PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. Perry
  • 38. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE: The Berkeley Independent Why? Murders anger, bewilder community BY DAN BROWN The Independent The anger is mixed with a one- word question: Why? Different theories have been As the residents of Berkeley floating around the community Frank Johnson County continue to come to terms that seek to answer that question. with the murder of two young None of them make sense. Yet few women, 18-year-old Dana Woods details about the double murder and 22-year-old June Guerry, do. anger towards the men charged in their killing is rising. See MURDERS Page 6A Suspects face additional charges BY STEFAN ROGENMOSER appeared in bond court Friday for The Independent the second time after being arrest- ed Sept. 1. Caleb Matlock and Ray Chavis, On Friday the suspects received suspects in the double murder of additional charges from the Dana Woods and June Guerry, See CHARGES Page 6A Crime scenes revisited by BCSO BY STEFAN ROGENMOSER On Thursday, Sept. 6, investiga- The Independent tors were on the site of the area near Cordesville off Cane Gully Berkeley County Sheriff’s Office Road. This is area where the body Caleb Matlock hangs his investigators were back on the of Dana Woods, 18, was found head during a bond scene of the double murder that hearing on Sept. 2. shook Berkeley County last week. See BCSO Page 6A Frank Johnson/Independent Art Aging winners Snakebit tour in named works The 22nd Annual Old South Carolina Lt. Gov. Santee Canal Fine Arts Glenn McConnell was set to Exhibition began Aug. 25, begin a series of visits this and the event, hosted by The week to senior citizen facili- Berkeley Artist Guild, Santee ties throughout South Cooper and Berkeley County Carolina to assess existing Council, continued through services and gather sugges- Sept. 9. tions on improvements from The popular event drew a local seniors, caregivers, and large number of artists from residents. all over the state as well as Aging facilities in Berkeley, from Berkeley County. This Dorchester and Charleston year 90 pieces were entered will be visited Sept. 24-25. and shown. Each stop is scheduled to This year’s winners are (list- ed in order of finish) include a forum for public • Best in Show Mixed input as well as visits to area Media nursing homes, assisted living Regrets? I have few by facilities, and senior centers. Meyriel Edge “Finding ways to make • Aqua Media: Charleston meaningful improvements to Music Man by Bob Graham, current Aging services in Golden Hour by Louise South Carolina is my top pri- James, and Mama And Me by ority, and I don’t understand Dorothy Nichols. how substantive change can • Oils: Mozart and His be made without discussing Daemons by Gingi Martin, Dominic McKelvey/Special to The Independent some of these issues face-to- The Teal Necklace by Denny Cane Bay’s Richard Henderson wraps up Berkeley quarterback Conner Teague during the Cobra-Stag game last face,” said McConnell. “I Stevenson, and Early Spring week. For complete coverage of the contest, see Sports. want the opportunity to inter- See ART Page 3A See AGING Page 6A The Berkeley Independent • www.berkeleyind.com e y t w d
  • 39. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 Division FLOODINGTHIRD PLACE: Sinking car traps 2 women Coastal Observer BY CHARLES SWENSON COASTAL OBSERVER Scott Hurston walked into the gym at HealthPoint around Charles Swenson 6 p.m. last Wednesday to start his workout. He was going to start with shoulders and legs. Instead of his usual workout, he pulled two women from a car Only the as it sank into a stormwater re- bumper o tention pond outside Health- Point that had overflowed in a the Toyo torrential rainstorm. was show “I’m just a normal guy,” said ing after Hurston, a senior vice president women w with Merrill Lynch at Pawleys rescued. Island. “I never dreamed that P something like that would hap- John pen.” Neither did Mary Ann Go- dlewski and Kathy Eagen, two Heritage Plantation residents WALMA who said they nearly drowned in Godlewski’s Toyota Corolla. “We were pretty darn close to not making it,” Godlewski said. Swing vote expected “I’ve never been so scared BY CHARLES SWENSON foot store for w in my life,” Eagen said. “I can’t COASTAL OBSERVER Walmart, eyes believe a car would fill up with district that run water that fast.” When Georgetown County Council de- western border It wasn’t raining hard when nied a rezoning request for a Lowe’s Home There’s a th they left Heritage Plantation Improvement store at Pawleys Island in trict, and candi headed for a Zumba class at 2005, the swing vote in the 4-3 decision ing much about HealthPoint. But by the time came from the council member from Dis- Pleasant Hill, P they reached Litchfield, the trict 5. With council now facing a request er precincts, b SEE “RESCUE,” PAGE 5 to allow construction of a 119,500-square- jobs and taxes.
  • 40. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionSECOND PLACE: Coastal Observer Jason LesleyMURDER AT CLUB ISIS Shooting victim was in county for funeral BY JASON LESLEY COASTAL OBSERVER Renee Milton stopped in the parking lot at Club Isis on Highway 17 Tuesday afternoon to light a candle near a small shrine to her 21-year-old son, Sean Edwards. He was shot to death there early Saturday morning for no apparent reason, Milton said. “He was out celebrating a cousin’s birthday,” she said. “Whoever shot him was a cow- ard. He didn’t see who the shooter was.” Pawleys Island police officer Jono Fairfield was the first of- ficer on the scene, according to the Georgetown County Sher- iff’s Office. Deputy Sean See- bode’s report said Fairfield felt a faint pulse in the victim. He was face-up on the ground be- tween a silver Dodge Durango and a trash container. He was unresponsive, and the deputy Tanya Ackerman/Coastal Observer noted blood on the left side of SEE “SHOOTING,” PAGE 2 Family members gather in prayer outside the club this week.
  • 41. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE: The Berkeley Independent Where Frank Johnson SANDERS from page 1A over three weeks. “It is important to empha- size that there have been no sightings of Mr. Sanders on surrounded on that night, but the wily criminal proved to be elusive. The Medical University of is he? said. Sanders escaped BY FRANK JOHNSON Thursday, Jan. 26 after he The Independent was incorrectly placed in a on is out of money. And police agencies across the county, state and country are on the Monday, remains at large. It’s been over a month since the 39-year-old has dark hair. At the time of his escape he sported a goatee; the facial hair was Sanders’ residence is in our campus in more than South Carolina has con- holding area for prisoner His face is known lookout for him. slipped out of the Hill- gone when he was spotted Ridgeville. three weeks,” she said. firmed that Sanders was preparing to be released a throughout Berkeley in the Sangaree area one In the latest twist in the Yet, frustratingly, James Finklea Detention Center in “Moreover, the person inside MUSC on more than Hill-Finklea. The tempo search for Sanders, the County and the Sanders has defied the odds Moncks Corner. Sanders, a week after his escape. whom Mr. Sanders was vis- one occasion since his rary confusion stemmed Medical University of iting left the facility two escape. Lowcountry. He reportedly and, as of press time on white male, stands 57" and See SANDERS Page 6A from a sentence handed South Carolina has released weeks ago. There is no rea- Since the Sangaree sight- down to Sanders on tha video surveillance of son to believe that he will ing, Berkeley County day. Sanders inside the hospital return to campus since his Sheriff’s Office spokesper- Sanders already faced on more than one occasion acquaintance is no longer son Dan Moon said that in the days following his prison time for crimina present, but we remain vig- other sightings have been domestic violence of a high escape. ilant in assuring that there reported. “We have learned that and aggravated nature are no threats to the safety “We’ve got a couple of within a week of his escape, when he appeared before a of anyone on this campus.” different sightings … but Mr. Sanders was at our hos- judge and received time Images from the video of they didn’t pan out,” Moon pital visiting an acquain- served for violating a Sanders at MUSC can be said Friday. “People will tance,” MUSC Media restraining order. Upon hi viewed online at call and say, ‘I think I see Relations Director Heather return from the hearing, he www.berkeleyind.com. your guy over here.’ But Woolwine said in an email After he first fled Moncks they just haven’t panned was able to slip away from to The Independent. “A sub- Corner by catching a ride to out.” the prison after he wa sequent review of surveil- downtown Charleston, offi- Do the sightings mean incorrectly placed in a hold lance videotapes has con- cials believed Sanders was Sanders has chosen, ing area for prisoners who firmed that Mr. Sanders was likely gone from the whether by design or neces- are about to be released. present in two waiting areas Lowcountry. That belief sity, to stay close to home? Sanders is considered dan on Feb. 3 and 4. changed the following week “It’s hard to say,” Moon gerous. Anyone with infor “In none of the videotape when he was spotted by said. “If some of these spot- mation regarding Sanders segments is there any evi- several different witnesses tings turn out to be legiti- location is asked to call the dence of Mr. Sanders inter- in the Sangaree Parkway mate, then he (may be in the Sheriff’s Office at (843 acting with anyone other area, and then on the area).” 719-4412, or simply cal than his acquaintance.” Summerville side of I-26. Moon was asked BCSO 911. Woolwine said the hospi- The BCSO and other law officials remain optimistic For more information and tal has no indication that enforcement agencies that a capture will take updates on the case, please Sanders has been back in seemingly had the escapee place. “Absolutely,” he see www.berkeleyind.com
  • 42. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. Perry Sun Fun Sunk
  • 43. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Horry Independent Heather Gale Manhunt in Conway
  • 44. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE: The Gazette Stefan RogenmoserTwo Keys, 1 assault, 3 arrests BY STEFAN ROGENMOSER with a pool stick and about local hospital with injuries ern’s video surveillance, The Gazette 20 more patrons were after bleeding severely from which substantiates the locked inside and robbed. the head with a laceration alleged battery of a patron Three people have been The incident occurred just about five inches long and with a pool stick, according arrested in connection with after 6 a.m. on April 21 at one inch wide, according to to police. an incident where one Two Keys Tavern in Goose a Goose Creek Police The manager became irate employee in a Goose Creek Creek. Department report.Gary Eugene Long Golden Luis Deleon Timothy D. Lawhorn tavern assaulted a patron One man wound up in a Police obtained the tav- See TAVERN Page 7A the area in a white GMC or electronics department. suspect loads the seven If you know the identity SHOPLIFTER Chevrolet SUV. Surveillance video shows computers into the blue of this individual you are from page 1A The suspect stole seven after several attempts, the storage container and walks encouraged to the contact Acer laptop computers with unknown suspect gained to the front door of the the Goose Creek Police police. a combined value of entry to the storage lockers, business, according to the Department at (843) 863- The suspect entered the $2,336, according to a according to the report. report. 5200 or our Crime Tip Line Goose Creek Wal-Mart on police report. Footage then shows the As the suspect exits the at (843) 863-5210. April 24 at about 1:15 a.m. The unidentified black suspect leaving the area business he gets into an He exited the store with the male pulled on the secured and coming back with a unidentified white truck laptops without paying for storage lockers where com- large blue plastic container and exits the area in an them. The suspect then left puters are stored in the in his shopping cart. The unknown direction.
  • 45. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionTHIRD PLACE: The News and Reporter Travis Jenkins BY NANCY PARSONS/THE N&R Emergency responders look at the boxes of meat left laying in the road as a result of Mondays accident. Pork...it’s what’s for dinner BY TRAVIS JENKINS Last year, a truck carrying a load of senger escaped and were uninjured. No tjenkins@onlinechester.com generators traveled down the same one was hurt in the collision, but the road, got hung on the same train tracks train sheared the trailer in half and Had it been a hotter day, you could and was hit by a train. That wreck sent boxes of frozen, wrapped pork loins have heard the sizzle for miles. occurred, Murphy said, because a truck flying in every direction. The boxes and On Monday morning at approxi- driver could not get his truck under the some packages of meat were left laying mately 6:30 a.m., an Eknoor Trucking Seaboard overpass going down Center in the road and on the tracks. Company truck carrying a load of pork Street. He tried to bypass the overpass Grant said the truck was bound for tenderloins was traveling down Wylie by going down Wylie, which led to the New Orleans Gold Storage in Street in Chester. As the truck tried to accident. An official with Eknoor Charleston. An Eknoor official said it make it over the railroad tracks on Trucking Company said the man on was headed toward South Charlotte. Wylie, it became hung. A sign in front of Monday was apparently visiting some- Murphy said, remarkably, the train the railroad tracks clearly indicates one in the area. managed to stop within a couple of hun- that large trucks should not drive over Ricky Grant, with the Chester Fire dred yards of the accident site. the tracks for that reason. Department, said shortly after the Thankfully, Murphy said only a limited “It’s the second time in a year a trac- truck became hung on the tracks, a amount of diesel fuel leaked from the tor trailer has been on a road he had no train rounded the bend. truck. business being on,” said Chester County “The train ran right through the Murphy was originally under the Emergency Management Director trailer,” Grant said. Eddie Murphy. The driver of the truck and his pas- See TRAIN, Page 2-A
  • 46. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly 2/3 Times Division Fire damages apartment complex SIXTEEN PEOPLE LEFT HOMELESSSECOND PLACE: The Lancaster News “We’ve got three days in a hotel Christopher Sardelli and then what? Then where am I supposed to go?” – Angela Patterson, left, whose apartment burned Tuesday morning photos by CHRIS SARDELLI/csardelli@thelancasternews.com Five departments respond to early morning blaze on Memorial Park Road Christopher Sardelli csardelli@thelancasternews.com A charred shingle peeled away from the exposed roof and slow- ly drifted to the ground as An- gela Patterson surveyed the damage to her apartment Tues- day morning, April 10. Patterson’s apartment, as well as four other units in the one- story building at the Westway Apartments complex, were damaged during a blaze about 7 Five units at Westway Apartments were damaged in Tuesday’s fire. a.m. in the 1500 block of Memo- rial Park Road. smell of burned wood hung in “We’ve got three days in a hotel With tears pouring down her the air as family and friends and then what? Then where am I face, and clutching a packet of placed what’s left on the front supposed to go?” she said, sob- information given to her by the lawn – a box, some bags, a few bing. “I don’t have anywhere.” American Red Cross, Patterson potted plants. Firefighters from several de- turned and looked at what was Next to Patterson, an air condi- partments responded to the left of Apartment 1515. tioning unit sat on its side below blaze, including the Gooches “I l t thi I h ”P t th i d it bl t f
  • 47. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionFIRST PLACE: Bodies of missing Chronicle-Independent NC teens found Martin L. Cahn under I-20 bridge By MARTIN L. CAHN C-I (Camden, S.C.) editor mcahn@chronicle-independent.com The South Carolina Highway Patrol (SCHP), Kershaw County Sheriff’s Office (KCSO) and other law enforcement and emergency agencies recovered the bodies of two missing Catawba County, N.C., teenage boys from underneath a bridge near the Wateree River on I-20 near the Sunday afternoon. Kershaw County Coroner Johnny Fellers confirmed Sunday night that the bodies were those of Jake Ziegler, 18, and Ray Pierce, 17. “I’ve spoken to members of both families,” Fellers said during a telephone interview several hours after the recovery effort ended. “I think they’ve been down there since the day they went missing.” Tuesday, Fellers said an autopsy showed the boys drowned, but added his office is waiting on a toxicology report. According to Catawba County, N.C., Sheriff Coy Reid, Jake and Ray were last seen around 1:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 13, when they left a par- ty in their hometown of Sherrill’s Ford, N.C., about 45 minutes north of Charlotte near Lake Norman, and headed for Myrtle Beach. “Their parents called us the next morning because they hadn’t See Boys, Page A6 © 2012 G l M
  • 48. BEST PUBLISHED NEWS STORY Associate/Individual Division $5 million civil penalty imposed on Katie Cauthen Barbara Ball -THIRD PLACE: Publisher - dicates that between February 2008 and April 2010, Cauthen and William Worthy collected - as a separate violation by these respondents. Cauthen was elected to the Blythewood Town Council in January 2008 and announced in surance premiums.” “Under this formula, the The Voice of Cauthen, a former Blythewood Town Councilwoman, for what - were collected from the 498 - total proposed penalties for Blythewood the Department said was Cau- - cal insurance. a fraudulent insurance scheme - Memorandum on Penalties for sands of individuals nation- Barbara Ball - these premiums were wired to various accounts controlled by Worthy, Cauthen and/or an in- - and were never remitted to an partment of Justice Feb. 2 and insurer. issued to Cauthen March 2. Barbara Ball - Memorandum, these respon- posed on at least 14 other indi- dents used a portion of the viduals and companies that the premiums to pay claims, and Department says were associ- Cauthen also used a portion of the premium money to pay em- act as customer service repre- Columbia City Police patrol sentatives. The order states that “Wor- thy and Cauthen used the re- Blythewood for the day Barbara Ball - $5,498,500 for personal and Publisher - - tures.” Blythewood residents may patrol Blythewood. have noticed a swarm of Colum- The deputies were off to at- bia City Police patrol cars in the residents for what it called bo- lot June 30, from about 8 a.m. - 2 violation and $10,000 for each p.m. subsequent violation. That was the headquarters for the day of the City of Colum-
  • 49. BEST PUBLISHED NEWS STORY Associate/Individual Division July 30 - Aug. 12, 2012 SPECIAL REPORT Your home, their rulesSECOND PLACE: By Matt Tomsic owners Association filed its lien against mtomsic@scbiznews.com Deese and Oliver for $6,225, according to Charleston Regional filings with the Charleston County Regis- F our years ago, Michael Deese and ter of Mesne Conveyance. Barry Oliver bought a three-bed- Deese and Oliver missed monthly room townhome on Johns Island payments of $299 from January 2010 for $210,000. Months ago, their home through December 2010, racking up was sold to Marsh View Homeowners roughly $4,000 in debt. In 2011, the dues Association for $500. increased to $330, and they continued Business Journal The public sale ended a foreclosure missing payments. process begun by Marsh View over unpaid dues. Trying to keep their home Since buying their home, Deese and McCabe said homeowners associa- Oliver had become disabled. They were tions decide case-by-case when to fore- working with their mortgage lender in close on a home for unpaid dues. McCabe the Home Modification Program as their and Laumann both recommend that monthly dues to the Marsh View Home- association boards — a group of home- Matt Tomsic owners Association increased and con- owners elected to govern the commu- tinued to go unpaid. The dues piled up nity — adopt a written policy to govern while they struggled to pay their mort- foreclosures. Associations must consider gage. Photo/Leslie Burden the amont of money owed, the amount By November 2011, they owed $9,500 of time from the last payment, the fidu- in dues and other legal costs. ciary duty of the board to collect the debt, That same month, Marsh View filed bylaw requirements, financial conditions, a foreclosure lawsuit against Deese and the costs associated with legal action and Oliver to recover the unpaid dues. Court other factors. documents outline the legal fight for McCabe and Laumann also urge asso- Deese and Oliver’s home. ciations to consider payment plans with Their case is one of hundreds of fore- the homeowner and use foreclosure as a closures filed since 1993 by homeowners last resort. associations in Charleston County for In court documents disputing the foreclosure of their home on Johns Island Marsh View filed its foreclosure case unpaid dues and assessments — some against Deese and Oliver in November for as little as $332 — according to an 2011, and by then, they owed $9,500. analysis of the filings by the Charleston A month after the filing, Deese and Regional Business Journal. tool to recover unpaid dues. Homeown- Two aspects of state law allow associa- Oliver wrote their own answer to the While the majority of cases are dis- ers stake their homes and risk losing an tions to file liens against property owners legal complaint. missed or settled, homeowners associa- asset worth tens — if not hundreds — of for unpaid dues. If the association con- “We are in the process of working tions have legally foreclosed on a handful thousands of dollars over a few sentences sists of condominiums, then the Hori- with our mortgage company for a Home of homes, and in some instances, received included in closing documents. zontal Property Act governs it, said Ryan Modification Program due to disabilities the property’s title during the public sale McCabe, an attorney who specializes in of both defendants so we can keep our by using the debt owed instead of actual $5,000 or less homeowners association law for Colum- house,” they wrote. cash. Since 1993, Charleston County home- bia-based Rogers, Townsend & Thomas. Deese and Oliver argued the asso- Charleston County has more than 750 owners associations have filed roughly The act allows associations to file liens ciation didn’t provide the services paid homeowners associations, according to 630 foreclosures for unpaid dues, with then foreclose on the lien and have the for by the dues. Both men couldn’t be voluntary filings with Homeowners Asso- 63% of the cases filed after 2000. property sold to pay the debt. reached for comment after repeated ciation USA, which provides education, Of those 400 cases filed after 2000, 47 If the property isn’t a condominium, attempts. Marsh View wasn’t available to support and referrals to associations. No homeowners owed less than $1,000 when then associations can foreclose if they are comment on the case. government agency oversees, licenses or the foreclosure was filed; 101 homeown- given that power in its declaration and “Lights were turned off in the common collects data about homeowners associa- ers owed between $1,000 and $2,000. bylaws. The developer usually creates the areas, grass was not cut and the pool was tions, and state law provides the frame- In total, 68% of homeowners received declaration and bylaws, but the associa- not maintained,” they wrote. “We also work for associations to foreclose on its foreclosure summons for less than $5,000 tion can amend them through a vote of disagree with the amount being claimed homeowners to recover unpaid dues and in unpaid dues and assessments. all the homeowners. and ask for a complete accounting as we assessments. “While it seems like it’s a very harsh “When people hear the term foreclose, believe funds were not credited to our A state lawmaker targeted those issues thing to do, the thing is, it’s very effec- they think of a mortgage,” McCabe said. account and the balance is incorrect.” in 2011, when he introduced the South tive,” said Jim Laumann, the president “But a foreclosure is a type of lawsuit that Carolina Homeowners’ Association Act, of Homeowners Association USA. In covers a whole lot more than mortgages Bigger dollars but the bill stalled in a state Senate com- Charleston County, roughly 1% of the and assessment liens.” Laumann said homeowners who fall mittee. cases end with foreclosure, and most are Legally, McCabe said, a homeowners behind need to be proactive in address- Homeowners associations risk losing settled or dismissed. “Most people are not association foreclosure would be similar ing the debt because late fees, interest and amenities and insurance coverage when going to allow that sort of asset to go into to a contractor’s foreclosure on a home other costs can add to the homeowners homeowners don’t pay their dues, and foreclosure over homeowners association because of a lien for unpaid renovations. debt, making it more difficult to catch up foreclosure lawsuits can be an effective dues.” In March 2011, Marsh View Home- on the mounting debt.
  • 50. BEST PUBLISHED NEWS STORY Associate/Individual DivisionFIRST PLACE: South Carolina Policy Council - The Nerve Rick Brundrett
  • 51. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACE: The Clinton Chronicle 2A Wednesday, August 29, 2012 www.clintonchronicle.com The Clinton Chronicle Larry Franklin Residents, apartment managers point fingers at each other By Larry Franklin Publisher neighborhood throw trash in the box. “When it’s filled up, they throw (trash) on the side of the Residents of a Clinton neigh- road,” Hardin said “If it’s a com- borhood near Clinton Elemen- munity issue, we will remove tary School say two nearby the box. The trash on the ground apartment complexes are not is not coming from Derby (resi- being kept clean on the outside dents). and they are frustrated in their “I’ve done all I know to do,” efforts to get the problem re- he said. “It’s an ongoing issue.” solved. He said he is going to contact The two people who manage City National Bank officials and and rent The Derby Apartments recommend they remove the and Settlers Apartments on Bel- box. He said Derby residents can mont Stakes say they are aware take their trash to the county- of the problems and are working owned trash collection center on to get them resolved. Charlotte Road. Jeff Adams, who lives just Adams and Hardin both say below both apartment buildings, they have talked to Laurens said the problem of litter in and County officials about the prob- around the complexes has been lem. Adams said he has filed a going on for quite awhile. written complaint with Buddy He said there is a trash prob- Skinner, the county’s building lem at both apartments, but said codes and inspections officer. Settler Apartments are “a disas- Skinner confirmed he has re- ter.” ceived the complaint and has “People don’t know what to been contacted by another resi- do,” he said “It looks so bad. It dent about the issue. didn’t used to be that way. All He said he inspects the prop- they need to do is clean it up.” erties and then contacts the own- Adams, who has lived in the ers and makes them aware of the neighborhood 33 years, said he issue if it violates the county’s has talked to the man who rents nuisance ordinance. the Derby Apartments and other Skinner said if the problem is not resolved, the county can they will see vast improve- neighbors have talked to the man issue a court summons and clean ments.” who manages Settlers Apart- ments. “Nobody wants to do any- up the property itself and then file a lien to get the money spent Clyde said there are plans un- derway to make improvements 864-682-3111 888-681-6033 cleaning the property. to the decks and sidewalks. thing,” Adams said. He said the property owners “Hopefully, folks can see the Local real estate agent work going on and find it posi- Cauley Hardin is the rental agent have 30 days to fix the problem. tive and beneficial for us and for Just Announced! for The Derby Apartments, If they don’t respond, the court which are owned by City Na- tional Bank. Hardin said the summons will take another 30 days, he said. them. We don’t want (the apart- ments) to have a negative impact Ford Kick-Off Special ADDITIONAL “It would be at least 60 days on (the neighborhood),” he said. property is in foreclosure and is before we can get them into Clinton City Manager Frank for sale. Stovall said there is nothing the Rebates from He said there is a large trash court,” Skinner said. He said his office receives city can do to help the residents box at the property for Derby one or two complaints a week since neither apartment complex 500 tto $1500 residents. The box is emptied by a private hauler every two about trash and litter. is in the city limits. $ weeks. Ron Clyde, who manages the “But if they decide to annex o Hardin said the problem is that other people are using the Settlers Apartments for the own- ers, Settlers Apartments, LLC, (into the city), we can promise to enforce the city’s building main- on Select Vehicles said he has been contacted by a tenance codes the same way we box to dispose of trash and, when the box is full, they are resident of the neighborhood. do in other areas,” the city man- Laurens County Chamber of Commerces ager said. dumping the trash on the ground. He said there were three workers at the property last Fri- Adams said he wouldn’t nec- SLCF Featured AUGUST BUSINESS day “cleaning up and doing gen- essarily be opposed to annexing “There is plenty of room in eral work” there. into the city, “but I don’t want to the box (for trash from the Asked if he thinks there is a pay double taxes.” Derby Apartments),” Hardin said. “The community at large trash problem at the apartments, Stovall said residents who an- nexed would see their water bills COME ON BY THIS THURSDAY, AUGUST 30 ONLY! puts trash in there.” He said res- Clyde said, “It depends on who looks at it. There is always room decrease more than the amount idents of Settlers Apartments for improvement, but I hope of city taxes they would pay. and the homeowners in the ALL DAY # #
  • 52. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE:The Hampton County Guardian Michael M. Dewitt Jr. Delinquent Dads
  • 53. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE: The Clinton Chronicle Vic MacDonald and Larry Franklin GOP wants candidates to sign pledge, pass interview By Vic MacDonald & regarding The Qualifications of Larry Franklin County party backs off requirement after story goes viral Candidates for the Primary Bal- lot” was passed unanimously by the executive committee on Tues- For The Chronicle By Vic MacDonald story on this page) - has at- been picked up by the Associ- eliminate vulgarities from ap- day, Feb. 28. tracted nationwide attention. ated Press, appearing in News- pearing on these national sites. A candidate who was at the Staff Writer There were 9,000 visitors day. The electronic comments executive committee meeting last To be on the ballot as a Re- on Monday to www.clin- The Huffington Post’s blog section for www.clintonchron- week said the members of the ex- publican in Laurens County, you tonchronicle.com, where the commentary about the loyalty icle.com has been disabled, in ecutive committee met in open With the nation watching, do not have to be “just” Republi- information first appeared, and litmus test has 895 comments part because of a concern session for about 30 minutes be- Laurens County Republicans can. more that 600,000 hits to the posted. Talking Points Memo about the vulgar language. fore asking everyone else to leave are clarifying a position re- You, apparently, have to be the site. The initial story had has 654 comments and 68,488 The Huffington Post had the room. garding its loyalty litmus test. “right kind” of Republican. The Chronicle’s initial story 12,326 page views. views. 629 comments from its readers After about an hour, the meet- You must oppose abortion, in A segment about the pledge Not all comments are ing was re-opened and Smith an- about the test - and a pledge any circumstances. nounced the resolution had been You must uphold the right to that Republican candidates are is on Fox News Carolina and posted; each comment goes Viral, 11A being called on to sign (see WSPA-TV, and the story has through a vetting process to adopted. The meeting was then have guns, all kinds of guns. adjourned and the committee You must endorse the idea of members would not answer any a balanced state and federal spouse. Your spouse cannot be a pornography. States Sovereignty.” mary ballot. questions. budget, whatever it takes, even if person of the same gender, and You must have: These are just a few of the 28 These are in addition to the The candidate, who asked not your primary responsibility is to you are not allowed to favor any “A compassionate and moral principles of Republicanism, qualifications outlined in state to be identified, said he is puzzled be sure the county budget is bal- government action that would approach to Teen Pregnancy;” some taken from the Jeffersonian law. by the action. anced. allow for civil unions of people of “A commitment to Peace view of democracy, that candi- Bobby Smith, chairman of the “I think the majority of the Re- You must favor, and live up to, the same sex. Through Strength in Foreign Pol- dates must pledge to adhere to if Laurens County Republican abstinence before marriage. You cannot now, from the mo- icy;” and they want to be allowed on the Party, said “A Resolution of The Republicans, 11A You must be faithful to your ment you sign this pledge, look at “A high regard for United Laurens County Republican pri- Laurens County Republican Party
  • 54. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACE: Living in Free Times Anna Gelbman Edmonds Limbo Foreign Students Caught Between U.S., Home Countries story By Anna Gelbman Edmonds photos by thomas hammond D espite what her passport says, Mariam Ashour is now a citizen of Nowhere. She lives in a dorm room in Columbia. 22-year-old Mariam Ashour is a senior at Columbia She calls Gaza City, Palestine, her home. College. She left her home of Gaza in 2008, but she has been unable to return because entering or But her visa has expired. She’s not sure leaving the territory is highly restricted. when she’ll be able to return home. hope of seeing them anytime soon, either. entry into Gaza would mean almost certain Official regulations on entry and exit require- confinement in a land suffering from severe ments, customs and other matters in Gaza sanctions and extreme poverty. Obtaining are subject to change without prior notice. another exit visa and permission to cross the Ashour, 22, is a refugee of the Occupied lab and is quick to answer their questions. To re-enter Gaza, Ashour must pass through border again would be next to impossible. Palestinian Territory. That’s what’s printed in She defers to Hakimova when she needs help one of the checkpoints at Israel’s borders with When asked what her alternatives are, she her passport. She’s also a senior at Columbia herself. Only their faint accents give away Jordan or Egypt. To do so requires certain cocks her head and shrugs her shoulders. College, majoring in business administration that they’re foreign students. Ashour and documents. But she can’t be sure of which Ashour is just one of many foreign college and minoring in art. She’s involved in the Hakimova are popular among their peers documents to bring, because only the check- students in the Columbia area who are living campus Model United Nations, has complet- and are model students. point personnel determine which documents their dream of getting an American educa- ed two summer internships on Capitol Hill One difference between them, though, is are required on any given day. Even if she tion, but who either cannot or dare not visit and is often found in the school computer that Hakimova goes home every summer. happened to have the proper documenta- their native countries when classes break. lab, where she works at the information Since Israel designated Gaza “under tion, she would need permission to cross the The college years can be stressful under technology help desk with her best friend, siege” in 2007, it’s nearly impossible for border into Gaza. That permission is rarely the best circumstances. But for this group of 21-year-old Farzona Hakimova of Tajikistan. anyone to go in or come out. Ashour got out granted. students, cultural acclimation, language bar- Both young women are soft-spoken and in 2008, barely, but she hasn’t been back and Ashour is trapped. Unless she’s awarded riers, financial concerns and isolation from gentle. Ashour smiles warmly at students hasn’t seen her family in the three years she’s a full scholarship to graduate school, she’ll family make for high anxiety in their day-to- who approach her for help in the computer been in the United States. She doesn’t hold be required to leave the U.S. An unlikely re- day lives and plans for the future. 14 coverstory April 11-17, 2012 | free-times.com
  • 55. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 DivisionSECOND PLACE: N NEWS Charleston City Paper Paul Bowers Jonathan Boncek THERE ARE 360 VACANT PROPERTIES IN CHARLESTON, INCLUDING THIS HOUSE AT 227 NASSAU ST., BUT IT CAN BE A TOUGH TASK TO FIX THEM UP AND ATTRACT NEW RESIDENTS Troublesome Houses Tales of squatters, crime, and new life in Charleston’s vacant homes BY PAUL BOWERS The vacant house at 47½ Line St. was an architectural study in properties within city limits, almost all of and then as a civilian director, and he has them on the peninsula. For Riccio, a retired seen what goes wrong when vagrants take up doom. Broken windows were open to intruders and the elements, cop who spent 23 years at the Charleston residence in the Holy City’s troubled houses. the yard was a sea of discarded clothes and warped plywood, and Police Department, the work isn’t just about The problem becomes especially dangerous keeping up appearances in a tourist town — in the winter months, when people try to set the interior was in shambolic decay. On July 20, the unthinkable it’s about preventing crime. He and seven fires indoors to keep warm. This past winter, happened inside its buckling walls. code enforcement officers pay regular visits the Charleston Fire Department investigated to empty houses to make sure the owners are fires in vacant houses at 61 Amherst St. and An hour before sunrise, according to a Later that same day, a demolition crew keeping up with the city’s minimum stan- 55 Poinsett St. and determined that they police report, a woman with lacerations on arrived to start tearing down the house at dards: No Trespassing signs on the property, were started accidentally by vagrants. her upper thigh stood naked in the down- 47½ Line St. The seeds of the 92-year-old sound structural integrity, no gaps where town street and flagged down a passing house’s destruction had been sown three rain can get in, and boards over the doors and trucker. After police arrived and wrapped her years ago, when a code enforcement officer windows to keep out intruders. 47½ Line St. in a blanket, she told them that a man had from the City of Charleston first contacted “It’s a neverending battle,” Riccio says, In his sparsely decorated office within the bought her a beer, convinced her to follow the owner about violations on the property, “because we can get a house boarded, but the Department of Planning, Preservation, and him into the empty house on Line Street to but the timing made it look like an act of criminal element’s going to break in again.” Sustainability on Calhoun Street, Riccio drink it, and then threatened to break her divine vengeance. Riccio has worked with the Livability Court pulls up the case file for 47½ Line St., which neck while he raped her. She finally escaped According to Dan Riccio, the city’s for its entire 10-year existence, first as a through an open window. director of livability, there are 360 vacant police officer assigned to enforce court orders continued on page 16
  • 56. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE: F And flying high in the middle of the grounds is a defiant Confederate flag. Inside the State House it’s no better, observes John Crangle, a retired attorney and lobbyist who has run the state chapter Free Times of Common Cause for 25 years and teaches of political science at Limestone College. ate tion “John C. Calhoun, one of the biggest St rup disasters that would ever be inflicted on any state — guess what — he’s right in the middle of the lobby,” Crangle says of another statue. “You might almost say that the State Corey Hutchins Cor House grounds is a Jurassic Park; you have to be some kind of prehistoric monster in order to be memorialized over there.” Modern corruption in South Carolina government is legendary, benchmarked by a legislative vote-buying scandal in the Receives early 1990s that was broken up by the th Carolina Nationwide feds and dubbed Operation Lost Trust. Sou ade in Since then, the Palmetto State has continued to suffer from the failures of r Failing Grvey of State integrity in its politicians, such as from former Gov. Mark Sanford who used a Su t taxpayer-funded trip in 2009 to carry Governmen on an affair with a woman in Argen- tina, and former Lt. Gov. Ken Ard, Corruption who was indicted on public corrup- tion charges earlier this month. And right now, South Carolina could benefit from a federal probe similar to that of Operation Lost Trust, says outgoing Democratic INS Rep. Boyd Brown of Fairfield Y HUTCH BY CORE County. “From what I see going on on a daily basis at the State House, we’re primed for another inves- tigation,” Brown says. One of the youngest law- makers in the General Assembly, Brown says the perception of widespread T o stroll through the State House grounds in Columbia is to behold by many corruption under the dome is one of the main reasons why he’s not run- accounts a memorial to the failures of human integrity. There’s a towering ning for re-election. “I tell people all the statue of “Pitchfork” Ben Tillman, the one-eyed savage racist. There’s a time that I got elected thinking I could change the world, but the only bust of Marion Sims, noted as the father of American gynecology, who performed thing that’s going to change is myself and I’m extensive experimental surgery on slave women without anesthesia before not going to become one of those sorts of people,” operating on upper-class whites. Then there are statues of former Gov. James Brown says. “When people are putting their self interests over that of Byrnes, a defender of segregation, and of Strom Thurmond the Dixiecrat. the public, it’s time for folks to go, whether it’s at 16 coverstory March 21-27, 2012 | free-times.com
  • 57. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionTHIRD PLACE: The Lancaster News Jesef Williams TO CARRY... OR NOT TO CARRY The need for self-protection Residents bear arms in response to violent crimes Jesef Williams now, she wants to have it on her But after hearing the news of handgun with her, versus only facilitated by Maj. Matt Shaw of jwilliams@thelancasternews.com body at all times. recent murders, assaults and storing it in her home or vehicle. the Lancaster County Sheriff’s When Roney moved into a new other violent crimes, Roney And by the sound of things, she’s Office. Crystal Roney keeps a pistol house about two years ago, she wants to take things a step fur- part of an ever-growing group. Roney said she didn’t know the on her bedroom night stand. decided to take a gun-safety ther by obtaining a concealed- Roney, a Lancaster resident, state’s gun laws and wanted to During road trips, it’s in her class, given that she’d be living weapons permit. took a self-defense and gun- car’s glove compartment. And alone. That will allow her to carry a safety class in 2010, which was See CARRY | Page 8A
  • 58. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly 2/3 Times Division There’sSECOND PLACE: GOLD in the ground The Lancaster News of southern PHOTOS BY JESEF WILLIAMS/jwilliams@thelancasternews.com Lancaster Co. Here’s an up-close look at a piece of ore that contains sliv- ers of gold. Haile Gold Mine Inc. estimates the ore body at Jesef Williams its site is about 1.5 miles long. Haile Gold Mine continues to explore while waiting on permits Jesef Williams jwilliams@thelancasternews.com KERSHAW – A tour of the Haile Gold Mine property may remind you of the field trips elementary school students take with their science class. There’s plenty of land to explore. The natural outdoors surround you. Unfa- miliar terminology is used periodically, as a facilitator talks in detail about the wetlands, wildlife and natural resourc- es close by. In this case, gold is the most impor- tant resource – the one that is expected to yield economic vitality for at least the next 10 to 15 years in southern Lan- caster County. What’s going on? Things have remained quite busy at Haile Gold Mine, the historic site a few miles east of the town of Kershaw that was first mined in the 1800s. In 2007, Canadian company Romar- co Minerals Inc. bought the property, which includes 4,300 acres of land – some of which borders U.S. 601 near Kershaw Correctional Institution. Haile Gold Mine Inc. – a subsidiary of Charlie Foote, chief assayer at Kershaw Mineral Lab, displays a test tube that Romarco Minerals – continues to do contains a very small pebble-shaped gold sample. This is after the ore had exploratory drilling at the site. Analyses been crushed and heated, which separated the gold and silver from all the of ore samples are conducted regularly, other elements in the ore. all in an effort to gauge where the larg- est concentrations of gold may be Recreation Center, where residents say they are “on the fence” about HGM’s found. were able to ask questions related to presence in the community. However, construction of mining fa- Romarco’s permitting process. “We need the jobs, but if it messes up cilities and the actual mining can’t be- David Thomas, general manager for the environment, I’m against it,” How- gin until the company receives a wet- Haile Gold Mine Inc. (HGM), said he ard said. lands permit from the U.S. Army Corps was glad to see community members Thomas said HGM’s practices ensure of Engineers. come out to the event. Nearly 200 peo- that streams and other wetlands won’t Last month, the Corps held an open ple attended. be harmed. He expects to receive the meeting at Kershaw’s Andrew Jackson Some locals such as Brace Howard See GOLD | Page 8A
  • 59. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly 2/3 Times Division FIRST PLACE: The Press & Standard George SalsberryBurglary victim finally finds concerns eased
  • 60. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Lee County Observer Lil Turner Down on the farm
  • 61. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division The newSECOND PLACE: paranormal Coastal Observer Charles Swenson Photos by Charles Swenson/Coastal Observer Steven Hicks, left, founder of Lost Souls Paranormal, says the team tries to respect the properties as well as the spirits A haunted past makes they investigate. At Litchfield Plan- Litchfield Plantation tation last week- end, he set up a fertile ground for Lost Souls magnetic sensor and a camera in the attic, top. BY CHARLES SWENSON the investigators are oc- The equipment, COASTAL OBSERVER cupied with other things below, takes and providing playback As the bright sun streams through for those “did you see various mea- the ballroom windows on the second what I saw” moments. surements at floor of the Litchfield Plantation house Sometime during the night different levels Steven Hicks sits at an antique desk a ball of light moved across of sensitivity. and stares at a grainy video playing on the camera trained on the They used the a laptop computer. This is the grunt top of the stairway. An in- work for a paranormal investigator. sect? A reflection? Or what devices to But it will be dark in a couple of investigators call an orb? find spirits hours. The Lost Souls don’t in the living Hicks is the founder of Lost Souls know, but they have the tape room on Sat- Paranormal, a group of 26 investigators to study. urday night, with chapters now in Savannah, Atlan- And along with the vid- ta and Aiken, where Hicks lives. He and eo, there’s a soundtrack. Re- bottom five other members spent the weekend corders capture sounds beyond photos. at Litchfield Plantation’s colonial home what the human ear can regis- looking for signs of the afterlife, the ter. Friday night, those sounds spirits that have made generations of included a series of “pongs” that, visitors at least a little uncomfortable if when played back on a computer, not downright fearful with a medley of may also have included a voice. ringing bells, footsteps and things that Again, they don’t know for go bump in the night. sure, but the recording came from It didn’t take long for the Lost Souls a room that used to belong to Dr. to connect with the tradition. They were Henry Tucker, the plantation’s sitting in the living room Friday night best know spirit. after setting up their seven infrared “We got some intelligence,” Hicks video camera. There was a distinct chill said. in the room, centered on a particular Dr. Tucker was the third genera- chair. “It was cold as ice,” Hicks said. tion of Tuckers to own the property. A device that measures magnetic He lived there until 1897, when he fields was placed on the chair. Glenn sold the plantation. He was said to Zimmerman of Edgefield, the newest ring a bell outside the plantation gate member, but an old hand at things para- when he returned at night from vis- normal, was reading aloud about Alice iting patients. Some believe the habit Flagg, a legendary spirit from Murrells continued after his death in 1904. Inlet. The device, known as a K2, lit up. “If there is a ghost, I want to know That was only the start. The camer- about it,” said John Miller, president as serve two purposes: watching when SEE “TEAM,” PAGE 16
  • 62. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE: Coastal Observer Roger Greene Tanya Ackerman/Coastal Observer Ab Wilkinson and Flick during a morning workout. Hawkish Falconry isn’t just a hobby, it’s a ‘rage,’ says Ab Wilkinson BY ROGER GREENE son’s left hand and wrist. He COASTAL OBSERVER wears strong leather jess straps – which function like anklets – It’s just a little past 8 a.m. on around his legs, though on this a recent blustery morning and morning they are mostly un- already Flick, a 19-week old necessary for control, providing male Harris hawk, is a whirl- further evidence of the temper- wind of activity. Gracefully ament that makes the Harris swooping from perch to perch hawk so popular with falconers. amongst the trees that dot the Especially those like Wilkin- landscape around the Pawleys son, who are still in the appren- Island area home of falconer Ab tice stage. Wilkinson, Flick appears to be “Harris hawks are much at ease. more sociable than other rap- He keeps his attention fo- tors,” Wilkinson said. “They’re cused on Wilkinson and the cu- curious, they want to see what rious neighborhood dog who you are doing. Falconry is such has wandered over to check out a natural sport for me to be in- the flurry of activity on the fal- volved in. I’ve always been an coner’s property. When sum- animal person. And there is moned, Flick lights upon the something about these birds heavy glove that covers Wilkin- SEE “FALCONRY,” PAGE 3
  • 63. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division LIVING HERE B WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012THIRD PLACE: s to ‘I’m a tie-dyed dance super hero. I’m spreading out the fun ove and saving people from sadness.’ Mr. Tony The Greer Citizen ny m r. To schools, bringing an M impromptu party to the campuses. Krista Gibson shoes, He has a new choreographer Mr. Tony has for his crazy dancing who added the hearse, works with Cirque de Soleil custom painted by Chuck and a new record producer for Whitlock of Metal Art Customs his CD of dance tunes called and a gun called the Happy “Living the Extreme,” due later BY KRISTA GIBSON Howitzer that will shoot Mr. this year. STAFF WRITER Tony tie-dyed t-shirts or “fun,” “It’s being mixed and mas- as Walter said. tered in Florida right now,” M r. Tony returned to Greer “I am such a happy guy, rid- Walter said. His producer is last week to pick up his ing in my hearse,” Walter said. Tommy Marolda, a Grammy- latest colorful prop: a award winning producer. “He 1996 Fleetwood Cadillac hearse painted in a tie-dyed pattern of ‘I’m taking all these said I was so different from anybody else that I’m going to bright pink, yellow, blue, green and red. crazy steps to make it make it.” Different is an apt descrip- The man in the hot pink unitard with a matching pink bigger.’ tion of the man who changed his course in life after a series wig is building his arsenal of of losses. Walter came to the happiness and taking it all back Mr. Tony Upstate from Germany in 2004 to Las Vegas, his new home. to work as an automotive engi- Tony Walter, a.k.a. Mr. Tony “I needed a plexiglass coffin neer. Just two years after arriv- and formerly Tony the Dance and some girls to carry me ing, his beloved cat died from Machine, is ready to make a around. Since they can’t carry stomach cancer after being a splash as an entertainer in the me for long, I needed a hearse part of his life for 13 years. Ten city known for larger than life with windows.” days later, his dog died after productions. He and photographer and surgery meant to cure him. “I’m a tie-dyed dance su- videographer Dave Serdinak The next year, his wife, home- PHOTO | SUBMITTED per hero. I’m spreading out are driving the Happy Hearse sick for Germany, left to go the fun and saving people back to Las Vegas, visiting back. A month later, she filed NEW PROJECTS: He’s not just a dancer now. Tony Walter has also from sadness,” Walter said. colleges and universities for divorce. Their marriage of recorded a music CD as Mr. Tony. “I was unlucky in life so I along the way. Walter will nine years broke up. had to do something.” don his costumes and Then he lost his job. He felt Along with his suit- crank up his dance music as if he had no control over any to get up and dance. It didn’t He started getting paid to case filled with color- at the part of his life and he sank into matter that he danced all by dance and decided to pursue ful unitards, wigs and sadness. himself. As he moved to the this new persona full time. One evening to get music, something changed That was a few years ago. In away from the pain, within him. January, he left for Las Vegas Tony went to a He smiled. He felt for a bigger stage. “I’m taking nightclub. He hope for the first all these crazy steps to make it decided time in a long time even bigger. I’m enjoying doing and a desire to fight this. It’s totally great for me,” the sadness that Walter said. “I’m far out of the had enveloped box.” him. He danced In one of his songs, Walter and danced, sings, “This is a story of a man letting go who was living in a foreign more and land. He had a constant dream more each that he’d be seen with all the time. He stars and fancy cars.” made new That dream is finally coming friends and true. MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN they started calling him kgibson@greercitizen.com | 877-2076 IN GREER: Mr. Tony stopped by The Greer Citizen “Tony the Dance Machine”. office to show off his new tie-dyed hearse.
  • 64. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Horry Independent Heather GaleDarla the deer makes way into family’s heart
  • 65. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE: Urban Free Times Foragers Weeds, Eva Moore Dumpsters and Other Unconventional Eating William Addy searches a grocery store dumpster in West Columbia on Sunday afternoon, finding only a bag of bagels. Addy says the best time By E va Moore to “dumpster” is at night, just after the stores close, when food has just photos by jonathan sharpe been discarded. He also notes that flies are less of a problem at night. Y ears ago, when William Addy was was like, ‘Get out of here, go get some real And they want to find alternatives to the food.’ He was kind of being an ass, but he was regular industrial food supply chain. being nice at the same time,” Addy says. Americans, according to one govern- a student at the University of South The cop was enforcing the law: Digging ment study cited by the New York Times, through dumpsters is often considered tres- waste about 27 percent of the food that passes passing. But he was also enforcing a stigma through that supply chain. Carolina, he took a friend out to dig against eating what most people consider garbage. To eat outside the system, some people forage for mushrooms and wild plants. Some through dumpsters for food. To most of us, the line between Food and grow as much of their own food as pos- Not Food is bright and crisp. There’s the stuff sible, keep chickens for eggs, trade for other you buy at the grocery store, or grow in your foods. And some pick through dumpsters for garden, or are served at a restaurant. That’s food. Some of these people dub themselves “You know, teach a man to fish, he’ll eat what they were doing. food. But the unwanted weeds growing in “freegans” and identify with a slew of other forever,” Addy says. “So I was like, ‘Hey man, Addy describes the rest of conversation. between your carefully planted tomatoes anti-consumerist ideologies. For others, it’s come with me and I’ll show you kind of what “Looking for food,” Addy answered. and cucumbers? Not food. Once something’s more about sustainable agriculture and en- I’m doing.’ He wanted to dumpster, but I feel “What do you mean you’re looking for been tossed in the trash, it’s garbage. Not vironmentalism. Others skip the labels. But like if I take him with me, then I can teach food?” food. whether they’re inspired by punk ideology or him the respect for it — because I’ll go, and “We’re looking for food.” But to some people, that line is fuzzier. by the green movement, people who manage if there’s garbage outside of [the dumpster] “You guys go to school around here?” Not because they can’t afford to buy food to eat outside the regular food system are few after I’m done, I’ll clean all that up. Leave it “Yeah, I go to USC; he goes to Midlands — not usually. It’s because they believe we and far between in a city like Columbia. better than when you found it.” Tech.” should think more carefully about where There are legal considerations. It’s il- They were at a dumpster behind a Cayce “Don’t they have some kind of program our food comes from. They worry about the legal to remove or damage plants on public business — Addy was actually inside the where you’re not eating out of the garbage?” enormous amount of food that’s wasted by property in most places, including Columbia. dumpster — and a cop pulled up and asked ‘I was like, ‘Yeah, but it’s expensive.’ He restaurants, grocery stores and consumers. Although the landscaping crews at city parks 16 coverstory free-times.com | twitter.com/freetimessc | facebook.com/freetimes | May 9-15, 2012
  • 66. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionTHIRD PLACE: The News and Reporter GREAT FALLS PAGES Pages 1B – 3B CLASSIFIEDS Nancy Parsons Pages 5-B – 6-B PUBLIC RECORDS Page 4-B Marine buddies reunite after 45 years BY NANCY PARSONS the soon-to-be recruits to eat all the time.” gfreporter@onlinechester.com their last meal before step- After basic training, the ping on the island for two moved on to Camp “Semper Fi (Fidelis).” 13-weeks of basic training. Geiger, part of Marine Corps It is a Latin term used as Faile remembers an African Base Camp Lejeune, for six the motto for the U.S. Marine American on the bus who weeks of infantry training. Corps meaning always faith- was made to sit alone. At the end of the training, ful. Faile, then 20, said the the Marines were scheduled A Marine will tell you experience opened his eyes for a 30-day leave. But the that the phrase goes beyond to the ugliness of prejudice. leave was cut in half and teamwork – it is a brother- “I’m not prejudice any they had to return to base. hood that can always be more,” Faile said. “You are Their next move was to counted on. friends, not black and white, Camp Pendleton, Ca. And 45 years later, friends you are brothers. The best “We were getting ready Preston “Hambone” Brown things in life are friends.” to go to our first duty sta- of Great Falls and Sam Faile Brown and Faile joined tion,” Faile said. “They told of Rock Hill realize how 76 other men in Platoon 127 us that we came to the west strong the brotherhood at Parris Island. They said coast for a training exercise, formed in their early 20’s is. the training was intense and but they were blowing smoke. Brown grew up in Chester challenging. We were among the first big and moved to Great Falls “It was tough,” Brown with his parents when he said. “They were in your face See MARINES, Page 3-B was five-years-old. After graduation, he played base- ball and attended a semester BY NANCY PARSONS/GREAT FALLS REPORTER at Elon University. He also U.S. Marine buddies Sam Faile, right, and Hambone Brown got together last week attended the University of for the second time in 45 years. The men trained together at Parris Island and were South Carolina for a while deployed to Vietnam together. Looking through a photo album and Marine Corps but a knee injury prevented annual brought back a lot of memories for the two. him from signing a letter of intent. up for three years of military ried he, Brown and a few Recruit Depot Parris Island Brown said a Marine service. other young men from the in 1964. Corps recruiter kept encour- Faile grew up in Rock Rock Hill, Clover and The bus traveled through aging him to enter the Corps Hill. He remembers the bus Charlotte, N.C. area to basic Rock Hill and Great Falls so at 21-years-old, he signed ride from Charlotte that car- training at Marine Corps and stopped in Columbia for
  • 67. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionSECOND PLACE: The News and Reporter Nancy Parsons Stolarski shares j CSF experience with movie star BY NANCY PARSONS Stolarski suffered a CSF (an gfreporter@onlinechester.com escape of the fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord) leak. Tracy Moss Stolarski did what The best friends were thrilled to many women would love to do. find their seats on the eighth row. She met George Clooney. Stolarski carried with her all of “It was one of the most thrilling her returned letters, cards, litera- things I’ve ever done,” Stolarski ture, etc. in hopes of finding a way said. to get them to Clooney. Stolarski of Atlanta, Ga., for- She had a program for the event merly of Great Falls, is the daugh- but didn’t look at it. When Winter ter of the late Charles and Elizabeth showed her that audience ques- “Lib” Moss. tions were included on the pro- She and her best friend, Ann gram, Stolarski’s heart raced. Winter of Augusta, Ga., traveled to “Oh my gosh! Would I have a the Wortham Center in Houston, chance to ask a question?” Stolarski Texas to attend the Brilliant Lec- pondered. ture Series on May 3. About five minutes before the The BLS is a non-profit organi- interview began, a sound guy put a zation that supports young people microphone in the aisle one row and their families, particularly stu- behind the women. dents from under-represented por- “I was excited to know I might tions of society in their journey have a chance at being first in line through life. to ask a question,” Stolarski said. Stolarski said she attended the But to Stolarski’s dismay, lots of PHOTO PROVIDED lecture in hopes of meeting Clooney other people were already coming Tracy Stolarski took the microphone during after reading he also suffered a down the aisle to the microphone. a lecture /interview where George Clooney, spine/head injury and is leaking left, was the guest speaker. Stolarski found cerebrospinal fluid. See STOLARSKI, Page 3-B a way to ask Clooney a question.
  • 68. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionFIRST PLACE: The Gaffney Ledger Scott Powell Andrew Poeng carefully dips a doughnut into melted chocolate and covers the freshly made pastry in chocolate chips Oct. 4 to prepare for his second day operating his new Sunny’s Donuts business. (Ledger photo/ SCOTT POWELL) Poeng seeks sweeter end to doughnut story By SCOTT POWELL that was taken away from them by earning Ledger Staff Writer an education and starting my own busi- spowell@gaffneyledger.com ness.” His parents, Sunny and Lang, survived Andrew Poeng carefully dips a hot the Khmer Rouge silent genocide instituted Sunny Poeng shapes doughnut into melted chocolate Thursday by Pol Pot from 1975-1979. Pol Pot and his one of the doughnut before sprinkling a coat of chocolate chips guerilla followers ruthlessly imposed an ex- recipes he created over the top of the pastry. tremist program to reconstruct Cambodia for the Sunny’s Poeng places the chocolate bar onto an on the communist model of Maoist China. Donuts shop he oven rack at 6 a.m. as his dad, Sunny, cooks Residents in the towns and cities fled owned in California. an apple doughnut pastry inside the kitchen under the threat of death. Sunny is a refugee at Sunny’s Donuts in Gaffney. The 26-year- Lawyers, doctors, teachers, engineers, from Cambodia who old Poeng is learning the homemade family scientists and professional people in any escaped the Khmer recipes his dad concocted to develop a pop- field were murdered, together with their ex- Rouge silent geno- ular doughnut shop in Ukiah, Calif. tended families. cide instituted by Pol For 17 years, Sunny Poeng would leave “It was possible for people to be shot Pot from 1975-79. his family at midnight and stay awake all simply for knowing a foreign language, His son, Andrew, has night to put together the tasty doughnuts. wearing glasses, laughing, or crying,” An- established his own His family recipes are now being passed drew said. Sunny’s Donuts in- onto his son Andrew who has restarted One Khmer slogan ran ‘To spare you is side the Sunny’s Sunny’s Donuts as his first business at no profit, to destroy you is no loss.’ Quick Stop conven- Logan and Granard streets. People who escaped murder became un- Speciality items include “Tiger Claws” ience store his par- paid laborers, surviving on minimum ra- filled with cinnamon and apple chunks, but- ents have operated tions and working long hours. They slept termilk bars, and chocolate chip bars baked and ate in uncomfortable communes delib- since moving to in chocolate chip dough. The doughnuts are erately chosen to be as far as possible from Kings Mountain, N.C. served with locally roasted coffee from their old homes. eight years ago. Broad River Coffee Roasters in Boiling “Children were not allowed to have an Springs, N.C. education. They just wanted us to work,” There is more than just doughnuts at recalled Lang Poeng, Andrew’s mother. can only imagine,” Andrew Poeng said. “It hopes the gas station will become known work here, though, as Andrew Poeng fol- “They would give us only one meal a day. was really tough for him, but he faced cer- for another reason. lows in his father’s footsteps to pursue the It was a cup with a little rice and water. Peo- tain death if he had not escaped Cambodia. Andrew opened his own Sunny’s Donuts American Dream. ple soon became weak from overwork and He met my mother while they lived on a store on Oct. 3 in Gaffney. Andrew became the first college graduate starvation. Many people got sick and died.” United Nations Red Cross refugee camp for While there are still a few stores with this in his family when he earned his degree at Sunny Poeng attempted to escape Cam- Cambodia residents in Thailand for a year name in California, none have the secret Appalachian State University four years bodia on three occasions. The first two and half. They married and moved with recipes Andrew is now learning from his fa- ago. He sees his effort to own and operate a times he was captured and returned to the their family to New York in search of a bet- ther. He was even able to locate an Atlanta business as a symbol of the freedoms his country by Thailand soldiers. ter life.” food distributor so he can order the same parents were denied in Cambodia. Sunny found freedom by walking across The Poengs spent six years in Connecti- flour his dad used to make doughnuts in “We are a working family,” Andrew said. a mountain, relying only on water for suste- cut before settling in Ukiah, a city of 15,000 California. “We have never taken any vacations be- nance. His journey included crossing mine people in northern California. They opened “It’s a funny story actually,” Andew said. cause my parents always had to open the fields and sleeping with dead bodies at their first doughnut shop as part of a Chi- “During my teenage years, I once told my business to support their family. Now I night in order to escape detection. nese restaurant in a shopping center. parents in my teenage voice, ‘I hate the have been given a chance to live a dream “My father has lived through horrors I Lang became a U.S. citizen in 1990 while doughnut shop. I will never work in the
  • 69. BEST PUBLISHED FEATURE STORY Associate/Individual Division Don’t be like Smokey By Tim Callahan A motorcycle wreck that broke bones in his neck and back was not the worse thing to hap- pen to John “Smokey” Calhoun in 2010.THIRD PLACE: Four months after the accident, John’s 29-year- old son, Austin, accidentally died from an alco- hol and drug overdose. A believer, Smokey doesn’t blame God. Murrells Inlet Messenger He blames himself. It was him who snorted percocet and then took off on his motorcycle that fateful night. It was Tim Callahan him that his son was following in the footsteps of with drug and alcohol abuse. And, it is him who has to dig himself out of the pit of shame and despair, a hole he couldn’t fathom rising out from without the help of God, and his wife, Carla, who has stuck with him in good, bad and ugly times. One of the ways he and Carla envision good coming out of bad is by John telling his story and hoping others won’t imitate him like his son did. It is a story that, two years later, John still can’t tell without bursting into tears. “I remember snorting percocet, and the next thing I remember is waking up in Murrells In- let in rehab,” John said. (Carla said when John “woke up” he had actually been in the hospital for weeks. He just didn’t know it. He was “out of it,” she said.) “The wreck was on Pennyroyal Road in Georgetown,” he said, “I broke four bones in Continued on page 14
  • 70. BEST PUBLISHED FEATURE STORY Associate/Individual DivisionSECOND PLACE: S.C. United Methodist Advocate Jessica Connor
  • 71. BEST PUBLISHED FEATURE STORY Associate/Individual DivisionFIRST PLACE: DETERMINING SCBIZ Matt Tomsic www.scbizmag.com Photo/Matt Tomsic 18
  • 72. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACE: Coastal Observer Jason Lesley Who killed Scoopy? Family still searching for answers two months after Parkersville shooting BY JASON LESLEY COASTAL OBSERVER New evidence sent to crime lab James Earl Richardson Jr. Investigators have turned “We have was a big baby, 9 pounds at up “a major piece of evidence” a good rela- birth. His mother called him in the investigation into the tionship with “Scoopy” because he was such death of James Earl Richard- the family,” an arm load to scoop up. son Jr., Assistant Sheriff Cart- Weaver said Thanks to his grandparents, er Weaver said. Tuesday. “We Irvin and Albertha Richardson Weaver said the evidence owe them the of Waverly Road, Scoopy, 18, has been sent to the state crime justice.” was planning to make some- lab for analysis. Anyone thing of himself. He liked to Two full-time investigators with infor- write songs. He was waiting are working the case. mation about on a callback for a part-time The body of Richardson, the homicide may call the sher- job and hoping to join the Navy right, was found alongside iff’s office at 546-5010 or send after he finished Waccamaw Parkersville Road on May an anonymous tip by text mes- High. 25. He had multiple gunshot sage to 274637. Text GCSOTIP None of those things will wounds to the torso. followed by the message. SEE “FAMILY,” PAGE 2
  • 73. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Marion Star & Mullins Enterprise Naeem McFaddenGraduate’s journey from homelessness to Ivy League
  • 74. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE: Union County News Anna Brown Lisa Greer holds Hanna, her boxer, and Ashley and Lindsey Jarvis are shown with their Labrador retriever, Kate. Kate alerted Lisa on July 2 when Hanna was choking. Four-legged hero Dog alerts neighbor when best friend needs help By ANNA BROWN the doorknob. Hanna, on the is there - if I open the door. Kate the chocolate-colored other hand, is exuberant and She doesnt scratch on my Labrador retriever and Hanna when she wants out she door, she doesnt bump the the boxer have been best scratches heartily - so much door for treats; she just lies friends practically all of their that the Greers had to put there patiently.” lives. Plexiglas on their door to pro- A few minutes later Lisa In their Rockport subdivi- tect it. heard a scratch on the door. sion neighborhood, they play So, when Kate began She opened it, saw Kate there, together and are guests in each scratching the door of the spoke to her, shut the door and others homes. Kate belongs to Greer home on the evening of went back to cooking. the Rev. Robert and Kelly July 2, it didnt take Lisa long “A minute later she Jarvis and their daughters, to figure out something was scratched again,” Lisa said. “I Lindsey, 13 and Ashley, 16. wrong. opened the door and said, Hannas owners are Bobby and “I was cooking dinner and Whats wrong with you? You Lisa Greer. had just fed Hanna her dinner dont scratch. I didnt even get Their personalities are a lit- and she wanted to go outside,” the door shut and she tle different. Kate is low key Lisa said. “I saw Kate when I scratched twice in a row, real and laid back. When she wants opened the door - that is usu- fast. I opened the door and to go out, she gently nuzzles ally the only way I know she See HERO, Page 2
  • 75. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division Soldier’s letters returned after 43 years By MIKE A. GLASCH Public Affairs OfficeTHIRD PLACE: The Fort Jackson Leader Mike A. Glasch FLAHERTY Photo by SGT. GRANT MATTHES, 101st Airborne Division Lt. Col. Townley Hedrick, deputy commander, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, presents four letters from Sgt. Steve Flaherty to Flaherty’s sister-in-law Martha Gibbons and his uncle Kenneth Cannon on Saturday at a ceremony at Columbia’s Vietnam War Memorial. Flaherty wrote the letters before he was killed in Vietnam in 1969.
  • 76. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Tom O’Dare God’s Grace
  • 77. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE: Charleston City Paper Paul Bowers Jonathan Boncek Photos by Paul Bowers rebuilds his empire Wright also has more than a few friends in Charleston, as ANTHONY WRIGHT DIDN’T WALLOW WHEN HIS PEANUT he has discovered in the week since fire consumed the tools OPERATION CAUGHT FIRE — HE GOT BACK TO WORK, WITH of his trade — his cell phone was ringing almost nonstop as THE HELP OF FRIENDS HE DIDN’T KNOW HE HAD he stood in the smoky ruins of his backyard peanut produc- tion line last Tuesday afternoon. Friends were calling to make sure he was OK and to see what they could do to help. As he Starting from scratch — again with a little help stepped over a carpet of blackened peanut shells, a neighbor This is not the first time Wright has had to start over from walked over to give him a handwritten note and ask if he scratch. In 1991, he was making $17 an hour at a produc- needed someone to watch his dog, Bam Bam. tion control job in Lockheed Martin’s supply warehouse on Azalea Avenue when his mother asked him what he would do if the plant were to close down. “I said, ‘Mama, that plant Getting the pot boiling ain’t closing,’” Wright recalls. “I think my mama put a jinx from his friends Tony the Peanut Man is a living Lowcountry legend, but he is donation account. Now anyone who wants to pitch in toward on me, because after she said that, six months later, the plant perhaps best known as a fixture at Joseph P. Riley Jr. Stadium, recouping Wright’s $10,000 loss can make a donation at any closed, and I didn’t have experience doing anything else.” home of the Charleston RiverDogs minor league baseball First Federal location in the tri-county area. During non-busi- When his savings ran dry, he found himself getting in line team. While his face has graced T-shirts and even a comic ness hours, donations can be dropped in the night deposit box at the unemployment office. On the way there, he ran into an book through the years, the thing people tend to remember is with a note that they are meant for Tony the Peanut Man. The old acquaintance selling peanuts on the sidewalk. The man the song he sings in the stands on busy nights at the park. bank will also deliver any notes written to Wright. (Woods- offered him a job, but Wright said no. In fact, he turned the “Hey, hey, what I say, got some boiled and I got some Flowers says that since the donations are not going through a man down three times. “I almost let my pride get in the way,” BY PAUL toasted,” he croons in a classic Charleston brogue, launch- non-profit organization, they are not tax-deductible.) Wright says in retrospect. BOW ER ing into a fast-talking sales pitch while bowing his legs and Susan Codistoti, the banker who helped set up the The fourth time they crossed paths, Wright stopped to S bouncing on the balls of his feet. account, says a total stranger walked into the bank, spotted consider the offer. “I said, ‘Man, why should I go and sell Dave Echols, general manager of the RiverDogs, says Wright in her office, and stepped in to say he’d like to be the peanuts for you?’” he says. “He said, ‘You see that line back Wright is “definitely a mainstay ballpark character.” When first person to donate. “Word travels pretty fast,” she says. there?’ I said, ‘Yes sir.’ He said, ‘You deserve to get in that fans think of the RiverDogs, they think of the Peanut Man, Word also arrived at the corporate headquarters for line, because you work. But I want you to understand that if nthony Wright, the entrepreneur better known as Tony own backyard. No one was injured when the fire ravaged his who has been selling at the games since the team moved to Piggly Wiggly, and the management of the grocery store you get in that line, you might be looking for a handout the property, and it did not reach his house, but he estimates that the new stadium in 1997. chain decided to replenish Wright’s inventory with a 900- rest of your life.’” Broken down and bankrupt, Wright took the Peanut Man, was inside his house in the West Ashley he lost $10,000 worth of barrels, burners, grills, propane, and “It was a foregone yes that we were going to help him as pound donation of peanuts. “He’s a local institution, and the job and started hawking peanuts for a dollar a bag. neighborhood of Maryville last Tuesday around 1 a.m. when a cooking supplies. soon as we found out,” Echols says. Two days after the fire, we’ve known him for a long time and just wanted to do In the time since 1991, Wright has struck out on his own, He doesn’t know what started the fire, and a Charleston Fire the team started a four-game homestand against the West what we could to help him get the wheels turning again eventually employing other sellers to sling his famous salty neighbor came banging on his door to tell him that his peanut- Department spokesman could only say that it was believed “to Virginia Power, and they decided to sell peanuts — shipped quickly — or I should maybe say get the pot boiling,” says peanuts at RiverDogs baseball games and in the City Market. cooking equipment had caught fire in the backyard. The neighbor have been started with cooking materials.” Wright often boils in from Cromer’s P-Nuts in Columbia — and give a portion Christopher Ibsen, director of corporate affairs for Piggly Even at age 59, he will gladly sing and dance to make a sale. his peanuts overnight, as they can take up to 14 hours to attain of the profits to Wright. They also set up a donation station at Wiggly Carolina Company. For now, he is holding off on returning to a full-scale pea- had already called the fire department, so Wright ran around just the right consistency, and he says it had been about 45 min- Guest Services. And the donations just kept pouring in. People showed up nut-cooking operation until he can find a safer facility than FEATURE | charlestoncitypaper.com the outside of the house to grab a garden hose. As he turned the utes since he last checked on one pot he had left boiling that “When you’re a partner with somebody for that long and at Wright’s house and unloaded brand-new boilers from the his backyard. In the meantime, he is grateful to the numerous night. He says he had permission from the city to cook peanuts you run into some terrible news or bad luck or, God forbid, backs of their vehicles. One construction contractor offered friends and strangers who have lent a helping hand. corner, he “could hear the fire blooming,” and just as he got within in the yard, and he had always been careful to do his work far something like this, we certainly want to try to help as best free labor to help rebuild the backyard setup. A lawyer “That is more than money or buying anything back,” 20 feet of the tent that covered his pots and boilers, something away from any houses. Now he doesn’t know what’s next. we can,” Echols says. handed Wright $1,000. Fiery Ron’s Home Team BBQ lent Wright says. “I mean, what else can you ask for than that you “In my lifetime, I know that things can easily be turned As Wright discovered over the following days, he has friends him some portable cooking equipment so he could get back have unknown friends that you have contributed to and some exploded like a firecracker. He thinks it was a propane tank. around, so there’s no use in me getting angry or getting upset,” in high places. Among them is Cheryll Novak Woods-Flowers, to work. And bar and restaurant owners, including Mike you haven’t, and they have so much concern about you? I Wright says. “I’m walking away with a smile, and that’s what former mayor of Mt. Pleasant, who has seen Wright at so many Lotz at Triangle Char & Bar and Mike Vitale at Torch Velet mean, what else can you ask for in life?” Backing off toward the house, Wright watched as the blaze barrels had wilted like flower petals, and the tent was warped it’s all about. It’s like death. Somebody dies, you’re going to feel public events, she can’t remember exactly when they first met. Lounge, offered up their businesses as fundraiser locations. consumed 900 pounds of peanuts and melted down the walls and flapping in the wind. the pain, and then you pick yourself up from there. She says that while Wright didn’t seem to remember her over Woods-Flowers says Wright was overwhelmed by all If you would like to offer help or an encouraging word, of 50-gallon metal drums. He says firefighters arrived five Wright has been selling peanuts — boiled, fried, and “Don’t think I’m alone, now,” he adds, pointing skyward. the phone, he recognized her face when they spoke in person. the love and attention when she went to see him. “You go Wright can be reached at peanuttyme@yahoo.com or to 10 minutes later and were able to put out the fire before roasted — for 21 years at Charleston sporting events and “I’ve got a friend up there helping me out. As long as I’ve got The two went to a First Federal Bank on Coleman through your life and you just don’t know that so many (843) 478-0569. You can also make a donation at any it spread, but his equipment was already destroyed. Steel tourist hot spots, and he has done all of the cooking in his that, it’s all good.” Boulevard, where Woods-Flowers helped him to set up a people care about you,” she says. First Federal Bank in the tri-county area. 21
  • 78. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3 Times Division GREAT FALLS PAGES Pages 1B – 3B CLASSIFIEDS Pages 5-B – 6-B PUBLIC RECORDS Page 4-B Whittle is modern medical marvel BY NANCY PARSONS plastic surgery teams and tored on an hourly basis. first. gfreporter@onlinechester.com lasted about 10 hours. One “I was very talkative and She has intermittentTHIRD PLACE: group prepped Whittle and asking a lot of question when memories of the whole ordeal It has been six months the other cleaned the scalp I woke up,” Whittle said. but was awake for part of the since Ashley Whittle was that fortunately had been Medicinal leeches were leech treatment. She said it seriously injured in an indus- preserved by the first res- used to better control the took some adjustment on her trial accident. ponders. blood draining properly. part. And for 24-year-old “I was on both teams,” Whittle said she was not Whittle, it’s a day she’ll never Delaney said. “I was orches- aware of the leech therapy at See WHITTLE, Page 3-B forget. trating the entire process Whittle had worked at until we did the microsur- Morcon, a manufacturer of gery to hook the scalp up and The News and Reporter paper products, for almost then I was involved with four months when the unex- that whole process.” pected happened. She was Doctors properly posi- still in training and her job tioned Whittle’s scalp back was to pack and box prod- onto her head, temporarily ucts made at the facility. securing it in place with Whittle’s long, dark hair sutures. Arteries and veins fell to the middle of her back on the amputated scalp and so she kept it pulled up in a that were identified and Nancy Parsons ponytail at work. marked were unclamped and irrigated with an anti-clot- The accident ting solution. Using the “I was facing the machine,” microscope, two microsur- Whittle said. “All I remem- geons worked together to ber is being pulled into the hook up the ends of two to machine. It was so quick three veins between the that I didn’t realize what had amputated scalp and Whittle. happened. I didn’t know BY NANCY PARSONS/GREAT FALLS REPORTER Once the veins were hooked what was fully going on until Ashley Whittle had long, dark hair before an accident at up, the plastic and recon- the doctors and my dad told work ripped off part of her scalp. She was flown to the structive microsurgeons me what happened.” Medical University of Charleston where two teams of began work on the arteries. A section of Whittle’s surgeons performed surgery to reattach her scalp. Once completed, the blood scalp and forehead was torn Whittle’s hair is growing back and covers part of the vessel micro-clamps were off. Part of her scalp was still scaring from the accident. Her story was featured in removed and the blood flow attached but a portion was The Catalyst, a publication of the Medical University of was restored to the ampu- totally detached. South Carolina. tated scalp. Whittle’s scalp “It started at my eye, went immediately regained its around the side and up to the scope, we have to attach tion included a portion of her color. back of my head,” she said. those tiny arteries and veins right eyebrow, which meant The blood vessels that “The next thing I knew, I to the surrounding arteries the piece of tissue that had to were joined were then evalu- was in the back of an ambu- and veins still on her head to be sewn on was larger than ated using a Doppler machine lance. They said I never get adequate blood flow,” usual and the vessels in the that helps monitor the con- passed out. I knew some- Delaney said. brow area were smaller, tinued blood flow where the thing happened but I really The vessels are one to which made it even trickier. vessels had been joined. didn’t know what,” she said. three millimeters in size so it “It was one of the most Monitoring was critical. A medical helicopter first is delicate, painstaking work, complex cases that we’ve Whittle was placed in the airlifted Whittle to Palmetto Delaney said. ever had,” Delaney said. surgical intensive care unit Health Richland in Columbia Whittle’s scalp amputa- The surgery took two where her scalp was moni- after the accident on Jan. 30. She doesn’t remember the flight to Columbia. Because of the serious- ness of her injury, Whittle was loaded on to another air ambulance and transferred to the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. She remembers the second flight. “I was scared because I don’t like heights,” she said. The surgery Dr. Kevin Delaney was the plastic and reconstruc- tive surgeon who got the call when doctors at the Columbia hospital were trying to find a hospital who could handle Whittle’s case. After getting the call, Delaney hurriedly assembled two surgery teams and had Whittle air- lifted for the second time that day. Delaney said a successful scalp replantation happens only a few times yearly nationwide. “It’s difficult to treat because we have to take the tiny microscopic blood ves- sels that are still attached to the amputated scalp and, using a high-powered micro-
  • 79. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionSECOND PLACE: The News and Reporter Travis Jenkins BY TRAVIS JENKINS/THE N&R John “Buddy” Ernandez and his family react to his being awarded the Legion of Honor. Freedom and chocolate BY TRAVIS JENKINS open one of his two Chester-area tjenkins@onlinechester.com restaurants or become a renowned barbecue expert or move to Rock Hill, he was a teenager reading When Bernard L. Marie was a stories in the newspaper about young boy living in occupied fishing vessels from North France, the first two words he Carolina being sank by German learned in English were “Hershey” U-boats. When the Japanese and “freedom.” American soldiers launched a sneak attack on Pearl taught him those words. American Harbor, Ernandez was 17. He soldiers like John “Buddy” registered for the draft soon after Ernandez. and was called up. He was leav- On Sunday, Marie, now a ing behind his family, his two French dignitary, repaid the dogs and his beloved home of favor, awarding Ernandez the Lando to fight for his country. Legion of Honor, France’s highest Ernandez was to have been civilian honor, during a ceremony part of the 16th Regiment. He at the Magnolia Room at Laurel Ernandez salutes French digni- and a few thousand other soldiers Creek in Rock Hill. Marie tary Bernard L. Marie. were standing on a parade ground bestowed the honor on behalf of in Fort Meade, Md. As each sol- his grateful native country, but day. dier’s name was called they were said he owed Ernandez a person- Ernandez accepted congratu- to come forward. They would be al word of thanks as well. lations from friends and family placed on a train bound for New “What he did 68 years ago on Sunday and expressed his York, then on a boat to England changed my life,” Marie said. gratitude to Marie, but didn’t talk for final training ahead of the Marie lived in Normandy with about D-Day. He has done so fre- D-Day invasion. Ernandez was his mother, about eight miles quently in the past, though, often the last man left standing on the north of what Allied forces would telling school children about his parade grounds. As it turns out, refer to as Omaha Beach. experiences in World War II. the man reading the names had Ernandez was one of the thou- Ernandez lives in Rock Hill trouble pronouncing “Ernandez.” sands of soldiers who stormed the now, but was born and raised in As a result, he ended up staying beach on June 6, 1944, one day the Chester County community after Marie celebrated a birth- of Lando. Long before he would See ERNANDEZ, Page 2-A
  • 80. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionFIRST PLACE: The News and Reporter GREAT FALLS PAGES Pages 1B – 3B CLASSIFIEDS Nancy Parsons Pages 5-B – 6-B PUBLIC RECORDS Page 4-B Teen passes in her mother’s arms BY NANCY PARSONS The daughter of Craig strep throat. Doctors then x-rays and scans revealed a gfreporter@onlinechester.com Young and Jean Young of the began to question why infec- tumor above Tatyana’s kid- Pea-Ridge Community, tion remained in Tatyana’s ney. In April, 15-year-old Tatyana first developed phys- bloodstream and why the Three days after the diag- Tatyana Young dressed up ical problems in November young girl continued to run nosis of neuroblastoma, sur- pretty and went out for a 2006. She ached all over. Her temperatures of 102 and 103 geons removed the tumor, night with friends. She was legs, back, thighs and neck degrees. one of Tatyana’s ribs and adorned in a green formal hurt and she was having “The doctor told me some- lymph nodes. The family was gown and wore a floral cor- some chest pains. Her mother thing was terribly wrong hopeful Tatyana’s nightmare sage on her wrist. Her hair assumed it was growing because of the constant high was over, but 10 days later, a was pulled up and soft curls pains and wasn’t overly con- temperatures,” Jean Young bone marrow test confirmed fell to her face. cerned at first. But then said. cancer cells were in her bone She enjoyed a night of Tatyana began running a At the advice of her family marrow. elegance and fun at the Great high fever all the time. doctor, Tatyana was taken to The 10-year-old girl was Falls Middle School prom. It She was taken to her fam- the Medical University of started on chemotherapy to was her last junior high expe- ily doctor and blood work South Carolina in Charleston combat stage 4 cancer. rience before entrance into performed. The lab results for a brief check-up. Still “We were in the hospital high school. showed nothing to signal a nothing was found that war- two weeks out of every It wasn’t long after major problem. The pain con- ranted immediate attention. month,” Jean Young said. Tatyana celebrated laughter tinued so Tatyana’s mother In January 2007, Tatyana “She’d get an infection and with her friends that she took her to the emergency was admitted to Palmetto we’d have to go back to the began getting sicker from the room. She was told Tatyana Health Richland in Columbia. hospital.” illness she had fought for had pulled a muscle in her Three days later, Tatyana’s almost six years. arm. Another time, Tatyana family was told that the See YOUNG, Page 3-B Last Thursday, Tatyana’s was taken to the emergency family and friends gathered room because her leg was in the school she last attend- hurting. X-rays revealed ed to say farewell to the nothing abnormal. On yet PHOTO PROVIDED young girl who fought so long another trip to the ER, Tatyana Young poses at the school prom. and so brave. Tatyana was diagnosed with
  • 81. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACE: WAR! (on food) BY DAN BROWN turned out to be blood clots in The Independent the lungs, a pulmonary The Berkeley Independent For Bryan Gainey, life is a daily battle, an endless war waged against his arch neme- sis: food. embolism.” The blood clots were a direct result of his immense weight. Doctors warned him they could have proven fatal. The 39-year old Moncks So when Gainey walked out Dan Brown Corner resident has lost almost 300 pounds since declaring war on food back in June of 2010 when he was hospitalized for blood clots in of the hospital a week later he was determined to change his life. “I started out two years ago weighing 577 pounds,” said his lungs. the 5’8” tall Gainey. “I’m just “I had shortness of breath 10 pounds from my 300- and thought I was having a pound milestone.” heart attack,” he said. “But it See WINNING Page 6A At left, Bryan Gainey weighs 287 pounds, with a waist size of 44 inches, today. Below, two years ago, Gainey weighed 577 pounds and wore custom made pants with a size 77- inch waist. Dan Brown/Independent Photo Provided
  • 82. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Star Phyllis Britt Farewell, Papa Doe
  • 83. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE: News-Chronicle Charles Martin A soldier’s letters from the front tell the story of war Editor’s Note -- It was called “The Great War” now. The war is ended and to my waist and parts of my pants or “The War to End All Wars.” World War I ended you can bet the Yanks did were in “Fritz’s Wine.” on Nov. 11, 1919. It is on that date each year that Vet- their part. erans Day is observed. Former Belton postmaster I had beaucoup sou- Sgt. Martin was part of the 117th Redus R. Martin Sr. poured out his heart in letters venirs at one time, but infantry that broke the vaunted written home, letters that one of his sons Charles - when a guy comes out of Hindenburg Line in late September, known as “Charlie Bill” to many folks around town the scrap tired, footsore, 1918, that led to German overtures - has been reading and transcribing. Not too long hungry and “lousy,” he for an armistice. For his leadership ago, he sat down and started writing a story about soon gets disgusted and in that decisive battle, he was given his father and that war. With Veterans Day being throws it all away. Helmets an officers’ commission. observed on Friday, we felt it quite appropriate to are heavy, but would make publish Martin’s story. It follows: nice flower pots and can I had the satisfaction of busting be used for a washbowl “Van Hindenburg’s” pet line wide By Charles “Charlie Bill” Martin provided one can find a open. It was a tough job, but the Special to the News-Chronicle nice shell hole of clean boys of the old Second N.C. went _____________________________ water. through it like a dose of salts, and You have to be careful the Boche acted like it was them BELTON -- Until a few decades ago, this week’s about shell holes, though. that took the dose. It was one of celebration was called Armistice Day. At 11 a.m. on the I saw a fellow use one the biggest shows pulled off. There 11th day of the 11th month in 1918 the guns of World for a latrine one day. It is one word that all the Jerrys can War I fell silent, ending a four-year carnage that took had mustard gas in it and say when they are beaten...Kam- the lives of an entire generation of British, French and he had to eat his meals merade! I got my share. German youth, along with 81,000 Americans. from the mantle piece for More than 10 million combatants died in battle from awhile. As do soldiers in every war, wounds or disease related to battle. Martin got a “Dear John” letter War had become a killing machine thanks to new An earlier letter tells from a girl back home, breaking off technologies in weaponry. The general staffs who led a more sober story about a romantic relationship: the war were slow to adapt to this new type of war. a night raid on a German Among the war’s survivors was a lad from the little stronghold. The war was PHOTO COURTESY CHARLES “CHARLIE BILL” MARTIN Dear Dan, town of Maxton, N.C., who would later meet a cute fluid and Redus Martin did REDUS MARTIN SR., second from left holding rifle, was a prolific letter writer who sent You are right about the girls. If Belton redhead named Bessie, marry her, settle down not know where he was. numerous letters home from the World War I front. they won’t stick, they are no good. in Belton and become the father of Redus Jr., Betty and The news of E. went pretty bad at ..lights were going up in quick succession making it first, but shot and shell gives a fellow something else Charlie Bill Martin. Somewhere in France or Belgium too bright for comfort. Young Redus had joined the North Carolina Na- August 13, 1918. to worry about. It didn’t lesson my fighting ability. We were inside German wire entanglements and tional Guard and had been called up in 1916 to join it was a mess getting out with Fritz whanging away General John J. Pershing on the Mexican border in an Dear Dan, Sgt. Redus Martin came home in 1919. By chance, with all he had. My officer fell and was soon dead. I he met a Belton girl who would “stick” or be by his abortive hunt for the Mexican bandit Pancho Villa. We came out of the line Friday night after a 17- had no choice but to leave him, poor fellow. When America declared war on Germany in 1917, day stay and I am none the worse for the trip, except side for many decades to come. He became Belton’s I lay flat on the ground with MG bullets whistling postmaster in the mid-1930s and died in 1939. he would be shipped to France as a sergeant with the that we didn’t get much sleep or eats, and I got two over my head for about 10 minutes and shells burst- 30th Division and assigned to a front in the Flanders small scars on my face and one on the leg from a World War I ended in armistice, not victory... ing all around me. One fell so close that I was cov- ...cease-fire, not surrender... sector. In letters sent from the front he tells of both the piece of a grenade. It was just a scratch. It was a ered with dirt and stuff and the shock made my ears humor and horror of war on the western front. Six days nasty job and a wonder we were not all killed. Geopolitical goals were not achieved. numb for a few days. It was every man for himself so And, so, a scant 20 years later a following genera- after the armistice, he wrote this: There were 24 of us and two officers. All went I started making my way back guided by the dipper. Dear Dan, well until some fellow made some noise and then tion of British, French, German and American youth I finally got into the British lines, being fired on would have to fight World War I all over again... “Finish le Guerre.” “Vive le Armee de Etats all hell broke loose. We had run into one of Jerry’s all the way. I kept saying, “Boy, you aren’t scared.” Unis.” This is what the French people are saying machine-gun nests and they all opened up on us. ...and they had called it “The War to End All It’s a foolish thought, but it helps a lot. I was muddy Wars.”
  • 84. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Over 6,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACE: Citizen Rainey A Conservative’s Crusade for Integrity Free Times in Governor’s Mansion, State Politics Corey Hutchins By Corey Hutchins Photos by Sean Rayford When Rainey speaks, he does so deliber- many of its candidates,” says former South ohn Rainey is wearing a coat and tie as he J ately. An attorney by trade, he makes sure his Carolina GOP Chairwoman Karen Floyd. strides slowly across the grass of his 17-acre words are characterized correctly. He is not fast and loose with facts. If he doesn’t know “He helped to make many of our politicians.” Given his longstanding influence in the estate — called Fox Watch Farm — which something, he’ll tell you. If he doesn’t want party on the one hand, and his outspoken to discuss something, he’ll make it known criticism of the party’s governor on the other, is just outside the small town of Camden. quickly. it’s tricky for some people to speak openly When it comes to the immediate subject, about Rainey. Even dangerous, some might It’s after midday, and the sun is turning the reason a reporter and a photographer say. have come out to Fox Watch Farm to see him, Rainey’s charges against Haley are not the nearby dogwood trees gold. Two big he is clear about the motive of his most recent new: He focuses largely on her dubious endeavor: proving that the people of South compensation for work at Lexington Medical German Shepherds follow him through Carolina have elected a governor who lacks Center and engineering firm Wilbur Smith, a small English garden that surrounds a integrity. “As I’ve said before, I believe Governor arrangements that have both left clouds of lingering questions in the wake of Haley’s gazebo near a horse barn. Rainey, who turned 70 Haley is the most corrupt person to occupy rapidly rising political career. Those ques- the Governor’s Mansion since Reconstruc- tions, Rainey believes, still need a thorough last month, is a tall man. For years, he has loomed tion,” he says. “Put it another way: I think she investigation, which he has initiated as much is corrupt to the core of her being.” as he can as a private citizen. He also believes large in South Carolina Republican spheres of Rainey’s words have weight. He is not Haley’s election points to a dysfunctional some yahoo. Indeed, right now he is on the trend in American politics whereby candi- influence. He is responsible for recruiting Mark finance team of ex-ambassador to China and dates aren’t vetted seriously by their own former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, who is parties. Sanford to run for governor in 2002. Lately, the running for the Republican nomination for It’s why Rainey is a Huntsman guy, he longtime Republican fundraiser and powerbroker president. For eight years, Rainey chaired the state’s Board of Economic Advisors under says. He knows that someone who has un- dergone as many background checks as the has caught attention in certain political circles for Sanford. Before that, in the ’90s, he helmed former ambassador makes for a candidate the state’s public utility, Santee Cooper, and with no surprises. something else: his one-man mission to discredit navigated it out of one of the largest corpo- At the current political moment, you rate scandals in the state’s history. might think Rainey’s work for Huntsman the state’s governor, Sanford’s handpicked He and Sanford still keep in touch. “He’s would put a muzzle on the man. But he is an interesting guy,” the former governor said long past having consideration for such successor, Nikki Haley. about Rainey recently. things. He is trying to expose Haley, a fellow And his support for the GOP is legendary. Republican, for the betterment of the Grand “For decades John Rainey carried the Old Party, he declares, not to weaken it. Be- financial water for the Republican Party and sides, he says, before he’s a Republican he is a
  • 85. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. Perry Mr. Walsh’s wisdom
  • 86. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Over 6,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE: Charleston City Paper Paul Bowers Sounds AY SD UR of the TH IS City TH Charleston is one helluva music town. It may not be as The SHOVELS & ROPE duo find love, adventure, the cover [of the City Paper]?’ Isn’t that like, ‘Hey everybody, look at our RV, look at us The City Paper old-school cool as and fleeting fortune on the road and our sexy vehicle. What are you driving? Shovels & Rope’s hit the big time, kiss our Music Awards Detroit or as outlaw ass,’” Hearst says. “I don’t want people to judge Winners BY PAUL BOWERS us based on the luxury of our vehicle that we badass as Austin live in, because they don’t know why we have Showcase or as hipsterific as to live in that thing.” Brooklyn, but the Holy Few who have traveled like Hearst and Like the Grammys, ary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent, the Trent have would begrudge them their choice but smaller City has an unholy of transportation. Just reading their tour husband-and-wife band known as Shovels & schedule is enough to make a body tired; in amount of musical Rope, are having a devil of a time backing 2011, they played more than 170 shows and Brace yourselves, music fans: this talent. Take Shovels their Winnebago into several parking logged 60,000 miles on the road. Quaint as it Thursday, Charleston’s favorite may have seemed for them to sleep on an air bands will converge on the Pour & Rope for instance. spaces near Summerville’s town square. mattress in the back of the old van, it was high House for a showcase and awards The husband-and- At the steering wheel, Trent is using time for an upgrade. ceremony as we unveil the winners Not that the Winnebago is the Ritz on four of this year’s City Paper Music wife duo of Michael the vehicle’s built-in backup camera, but wheels or anything. Quarters are still tight, Awards. This mega-music lovefest Trent and Cary Ann Hearst isn’t so sure about it. and a self-enforced road rule demands that all will not only feature performances of their clothes and possessions must fit inside by six awesome CPMA winners, Hearst can stand four 12-inch fabric organizing cubes — the but we’re also throwing you a toe-to-toe with all the “You want me to dummy check your rear much radio time anymore. When American collapsible kind you can buy at Target — chance to win some high-end adult end, Mike?” she says. Songwriter got a hold of “Birmingham,” the which go inside a cubby over the dining area. toys from Guilty Pleasures and a big-time movers and This, apparently, is RV lingo, which the two lead single from the band’s latest album, O’ And then there’s the quest every other day guitar from Shem Creek Music. shakers in Nashville, have picked up handily since switching from Be Joyful, they called it “the kind of gorgeous, to find propane for the generator, or genny, Hey, maybe you’ll even win both. a 15-passenger van to the big rig in June. But down-home stuff that Gillian Welch which runs the air conditioner to Since we don’t want to completely and their time in the when Hearst says it, Trent gets a half-cocked and David Rawlings might’ve done keep their big ol’ brindle-coated ruin the surprise, here’s a sample national spotlight smirk on his face, the sort that audiences see so if they’d skipped music school hound Townes comfortable of the night’s lineup: Rocky Horror often onstage when he takes a sidelong gander and learned the ropes in road- while they’re away from the (Electronic Artist of the Year), is long overdue. Of course, there are at his partner. “Yeah,” Trent replies. “Dummy check my houses instead.” Hearst and Trent say they don’t appreciate Album, Song—— vehicle. And they still operate their own “stinky slinky,” the The 33’s (Punk Band of the Year), Wadata (Funk/Soul Band of the —— AND nd Countr y Baar rear end.” the underhanded swipe at Gill collapsible tube that is used to Year), and The Local Honeys (Up plenty of other acts Sitting with the two of them is a little like and Dave, but they’ll take the drain sewage from the vehicle and Coming Artist of the Year). in Chucktown that sitting with grandparents who have had a lifetime to develop their own comedic timing, compliment. Until five months ago, Hearst of the Ye at RV pump stations. The Winnebago also means You can read more about these guys and the rest of the winners are every bit as good who know the line between a loving nudge and and Trent did their traveling in a having a real bed, cooking the over the course of the next few as today’s current a caustic barb. Ask how many years they’ve van that once belonged to The occasional real meal in the pages. The lucky winners will all chart-toppers. And been married, and Trent will reply, “Three and Films, Trent’s old indie-rock a half, that’s what we got ... Three and a half band from Colorado that relo- Singer- microwave oven, and never having to pay for hotel rooms receive individualized, one-of- a-kind awards created by street here in the pages of thousand.” Hearst always returns fire. “This one, he always gets pinned young,” cated to Charleston and hasn’t played a show together since Songwriter on tour. They’re thinking about getting a grill for the artist Patch Whisky. You probably know him for his flying rainbow of the Year FEATURE | charlestoncitypaper.com our annual City Paper Hearst says of her husband, who does have 2010. Hearst is still a little road, which they’ve seen a lot monsters. The event is free, but Music Awards Issue, something of a baby face. “But he’s grown. self-conscious about the new of other RVers doing. “Like, we’ll gladly accept donations for He’s an old ass. He’s a 35-year-old man.” ride. She worries that people that guy Zac Brown has a huge musician Nick Collins’s medical we’ve got quite a few Simply put, Hearst and Trent have chemis- back home in Charleston will see food and music festival,” Hearst fund. of them. Read on and try, and they have no intentions of adding to it and think they’ve gotten too big for says. “I’d like to have a micro-Southern —Elizabeth Pandolfi the band’s lineup. Both are gifted songwriters, their britches, what with the sold-out shows Ground, also known as our little micro-tour learn who City Paper with their own solo records featuring murder in New York City, the glowing reviews every- bus and a grill. And like a crock pot with some Thurs. Nov. 8 Doors at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m. readers chose as their ballads, outlaw love songs, and drug-addled where from No Depression to Huffington chili in it. Chili dogs, come get your Shovels & Free toasts to bad luck. They’ve taken to calling Post, and the recent pair of arena gigs opening Rope chili dogs, ladies and gentlemen.” The Pour House faves for 2012. their music “sloppy-tonk,” a raucous barroom for Jack White. 1977 Maybank Hwy. James Island take on folk rock stirred with the sort of gritty, “Last night, I was lying in bed in my fit of (843) 571-4343 Katie Gandy Faulknerian country music that doesn’t get insomnia going, ‘Are we gonna put the RV on continued on page 24 charlestonpourhouse.com 23
  • 87. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionTHIRD PLACE: Chronicle-Independent , Former NCHS star pitcher all smiles Tom Didato after disease takes hands, feet By TOM DIDATO C-I (Camden, S.C.) sports editor tdidato@chronicle-independent.com Wessinger’s condition deteriorated to the point that she was put on that day and I said to a respirator. She stayed on a respirator until she woke up. About a Shannon, ‘Tell (the week into her stay, she underwent a tracheotomy. In all, she said, nurse) about the she had, at one time or another, 14 tubes being stuck into her body dream that you COLUMBIA -- Sometimes, she will carry her arms in her back which kept her alive and then, helped in her road back to health. had.’ (The nurse) pack. But Shannon Wessinger still wears her heart on her sleeve. Her list of medications which she has taken and/or continues to take told her, ‘That Not even being a recent quad amputee can wipe the smile from in her recovery is between six to seven pages in length. was me. I was the face or the resolve in her mind of the former Shannon Vincent, The illness which befell Wessinger was diagnosed as Strep A, a the random who in the spring of her senior season pitched the Lady Knights to condition which at the time of her being brought to the Lexington one you saw.’” the class A state softball title in 1999. It remains the school’s only Medical Center, affected only 220 other people in the world. Tammy To this day, state championship in any sport. Vincent said she was alerted to this fact by the physicians tending Wessinger said Today, the left arm which sent many an opposing batter to make to her daughter. what she saw in a U-turn back to the dugout has been cut off, just below the elbow. Physicians are still uncertain as to how Wessinger contracted the her dreams played Same goes for the right arm. The two legs which carried her around illness. Once in her system, Strep A morphed into three infections out in real life once the bases and provided the power to her throws have both been fit- and various parts of her body started shutting down to the point she woke up. ted with prosthetics. to which Wessinger DIC’d (disseminated intravascular coagulation) “It’s weird,” she If you think for one moment, however, that Wessinger has made three times. Wessinger explained the three-letter medical term and said, “I never saw the call to the bullpen due to what she might call a curveball having the Winthrop University graduate then put it into more blunt terms. those nurses before been thrown in her life, well, she may give a sneer before going out “It’s pretty much where everything shuts down and you die,” she in my life, but when I to prove any doubter wrong. said of her close calls. “The kidneys started shutting down; the liver woke up, they looked There is no quit in Wessinger who has already rebounded from a started shutting down. Breathing became difficult. I think I was on exactly like they did near-fatal infection to be well on her way to things being business as every piece of equipment that you could ever put on a person while when they were in my usual, albeit with a few physical alterations. I was in ICU.” dreams. It was weird It was during these times, Wessinger guessed, that the dreams because I had never seen ***** which she experienced were at their worst. those nurses before in my Throughout the ordeal, Wessinger’s mother and father, Joey Vin- life.” This is not how the 30-year-old Shannon Wessinger pictured her- cent, along with Eric kept a constant vigil. There were different sets self as recently as four months ago. “I was back there all the time; me, Joey and Eric were constantly of circumstances when it On May 8 of this year, Wessinger was induced into labor as she back there. We were there all the time,” Tammy Vincent said. “She came to Wessinger’s dreams. and her husband, Eric, were to become parents for the second time; was in ICU forever; she was only on the general floor for two weeks. There were the horrible a baby boy whom they had already chosen to be named Shaun. The We came and went as we wanted, 24 hours a day.” ones and then, there were birth went without a hitch as Shaun came into the world healthy “I was lucky. They let my family stay with me,” and ready to join his mom, dad and a 2-year-old sister, Jaime, at the Wessinger said of her support system. family’s home in Lexington, where Shannon is a teacher/assistant While being kept asleep so doctors could treat her, softball coach at White Knoll High School. Wessinger endured a series of dreams which became A day after Shaun’s arrival, Shannon underwent a tubal liga- all-too-real once she was awakened by one of her nurs- tion before being released to go home on May 10. The next morning, es in ICU. Wessinger developed a fever, which she thought nothing of other “Even though she was unconscious, there were than it possibly being related to having given birth. The following things that she can remember, but she thinks they Monday, however, the fever returned and the pain was enough that were dreams,” Tammy Vincent said before her daugh- Eric took his wife to the hospital. ter described what was going on in her mind. That is about the last thing Wessinger remembers of May 14. It In describing what she saw, Wessinger nodded in would be the last thing she would remember for, roughly, the next agreement when later asked if this was like Dorothy’s month and a half. For that time, doctors kept Wessinger medically coming back from a hit to the head in the film, The asleep in order to try and make sure her body healed. Wizard of Oz. “When I came to,” Wessinger said of her being awoken from her “I can remember some of my ICU nurses being in sleep, “I was in the hospital and was, pretty much, told the next day, my dreams,” she said. “I didn’t know they were my ‘Oh, by the way, you’re going to lose your hands and feet.’ ICU nurses at the time but when I woke up and I “I was like, ‘Wait. What? I need to know what happened first. started to understand and comprehend what was go- Then, momma and my husband started explaining things and I ing on, I said, ‘Oh, wait, you were in my dream, you tried to piece things together because for that month and a half, I were in my dream and you were the one that yelled at had dreams, but that was about it. I don’t really remember anything me in my dream. else. The last thing I remember, now, were the speed bumps going “Some random chick was screaming at me in my into the hospital in Lexington.” dream that I had.” In giving her first interview since her illness, Wessinger and her North Central rode the left arm of standout to the class A state softball title in 1999. Her mother later cleared up the confusion. The epi- pitcher Shannon Vincent, now, Wessinger, mother, Tammy Vincent, were seated in a treatment room inside the sode, she said, was not a dream. rehabilitation center at HealthSouth in Columbia. With a pair of “There was one nurse that yelled at her and she won- sunglasses pulled atop her brown hair, Shannon Wessinger was all dered why she was being yelled at,” Tammy Vincent said. “She was pleasant ones. She guessed the dreams came and went depending smiles and was more than open as to what turned her life around. the one who was yelling at her saying, “Shannon, you need to wake on the strength of the medication being pumped into her body. While later admitting that things could have gone catastrophi- up. You have to come out of this. Don’t you want to see your babies, When Wessinger was brought back from her sleep, her systems cally bad, Wessinger said a team of 17 doctors, around the clock at- again? Baby Shaun needs to see you. You have to see your babies. were working as they were supposed to. “When I woke up,” she said, tention from nurses and the support of family and friends all played You’ve got to wake up!’ “I ‘woke up.’” She was woken up after six weeks, but it was not un- a role in her still-ongoing recovery. “I said to her, ‘That wasn’t some random chick. That was your See Shannon, Page 4 In just the first 24 hours after being admitted to the hospital, nurse. When I came in the room, that nurse happened to be in there
  • 88. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionSECOND PLACE: The Lancaster News Gregory Summers GYPSY QUEEN OF THE ROAD When Gar y Sowell rides, beloved dog has his back Gregory A. Summers gsummers@thelancasternews.com Timmy Martin had Lassie as a faithful sidekick. Their adventures and exploits made for great televi- sion fiction. But could Lassie balance on Timmy’s bicycle like Gypsy rides Gary Sowell’s motorcycle? Probably not. “How she stays on, I don’t know,” Sowell said. “I’ve had to lock it down on the interstate and she rides so close to me that she just about kills my kidneys when she bangs into my back. I don’t know how to explain it, she just does.” And this is no movie screen trick; it’s the real thing. Sowell had never quite figured out if Gypsy needs him more, or he needs Gypsy. photos courtesy of GARY SOWELL It’s probably the latter, which is Gary Sowell, above, a member of the Widows Sons Masonic Riders Association, found Gypsy, seated See GYPSY | Page 5A behind him, in the road near his Westville home in 2004.
  • 89. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly 2/3 Times DivisionFIRST PLACE: Estonian immigrant returns to Johnson farm to reminisce The Gaffney Ledger By SCOTT POWELL Ledger Staff Writer spowell@gaffneyledger.com Every spring, Estonia immigrant Scott Powell Aavo Koiv drives from his home in Florida for a fishing vacation in the Asheville, N.C., area. The fishing is a reminder of a sim- pler time in his life during which he first discovered a world bursting with colors. His trip took on a special meaning Monday when he returned 62 years later to the Garland Johnson farm where his family first lived in America after fleeing a refugee camp in Germany. He was six years old when his col- lege-educated father brought his family on a one-year immigration work contract to the 3,900-acre farm Aavo Koiv and his brother Leho learned how to speak English from in 1949, where the Broad and their Estonian teacher Linda Laane at Sunnyside Elementary School. Pacolet rivers meet near the Union Aavo attended the first grade at the Cherokee County school while County line. his family lived on the Garland Johnson farm. A Christmas project to help the 32 Estonian residents living on the Sunnyside Elementary School near farm is detailed in a Dec. 10, 1949, the Johnson farm. article in The Gaffney Ledger (see “My father worked in the fields story at left). clearing rocks for 12 hours a day, His family lived in refugee camps six days a week,” Koiv said. “It was in Lingen and Geottingen in hard to do for someone with a col- Germany before escaping on a ship lege education. He did it for an to Boston. Members of a Lutheran opportunity to come to the country Church met the ship, gave the family and find a better life.” $40 and put its members on a train to His father was paid 25 cents per Cherokee County. day, given the use of a cabin and milk Koiv lived on the farm with his from a farm-owned cow as well as parents Roland and Marje, older several chickens which could be used brother Leho, and younger sisters to help feed his family. Ulle and Aita. Teacher Linda Laane None of the families from Estonia Aavo Koiv looks over the map from Estonia taught him and the stayed on after their one-year con- which helped lead him back other Estonian children the English tracts. They all moved to Chicago, Monday afternoon to the Garland language while they attended the See KOIV, Page 5 Johnson farm.
  • 90. SHORT STORY Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACE: The People-Sentinel Jonathan Vickery Memorial visit brings honor to attendees Airport in West Columbia. JONATHAN VICKERY “Finally, the fighting man Staff Writer felt welcomed,” said Dixon. jonathan.vickery@morris.com “It was a sight to see and was again, in my opinion, something that should be Though it took more than experienced by every service 40 years, one local veteran member who goes into a war received some of the recog- zone and returns home.” nition he and others did not Dixon, a veteran of the receive upon their return Korean and Vietnam wars, from war. believes veterans of his time Last week, Bob Dixon were not treated in a manner of Barnwell and a group “befitting of the American of South Carolinian veter- fighting man” when they ans received some of that returned from war. “They long overdue recognition have never asked for any on the Nov. 9 Honor Flight recognition from the Ameri- to Washington, D.C. The can people other than to see Pictured are Bob Dixon and the other Korean War veterans Photos Courtesy: Bob Dixon free trip allows veterans of some organized recognition on the Nov. 9 Honor Flight. Some were also World War II The Korean War Memorial consists of 19 statues of World War II, Korea and of their service,” Dixon said. veterans and veterans of the Vietnam War. infantrymen as a representation of a squad of soldiers. A Vietnam to visit the memori- “We were asked to go off to reflection of all 19 statues can be seen in the granite wall als honoring their wars. fight battles that the Ameri- was especially meaningful much level ground in Korea alongside the memorial. Though he enjoyed the can people did not support for Dixon because he was that I saw,” he said. entire trip, Dixon’s most and the American govern- an infantryman in the war. Dixon said he was “in- The Honor Flight expe- hopes they receive the same memorable moment was see- ment, in my opinion, did not He said he thought it was a spired” after meeting and rience gave Dixon a “re- kind of reception him and ing and hearing hundreds of intend to win.” fairly accurate depiction of spending the day with the newed sense of patriotism the other veterans received people welcoming him and Visiting the Korean War the war, though the statues other veterans. They ex- and appreciation” of soldiers on the Honor Flight. the other veterans home at Memorial, which depicts a should have been on a hill changed many stories during returning home from the the Columbia Metropolitan squad of 19 infantrymen, because “there was not that the trip. Middle East. He said he
  • 91. SHORT STORY Weekly Under 6,000 DivisionSECOND PLACE: The People-Sentinel Susan C. Delk Lost dog is more than just a pet for one woman most was helping Virginia only about five minutes eral but not much from local SUSAN C. DELK and being “spoiled.” passed and Bailey was gone. law enforcement and town Managing Editor Not too long ago, Bailey Somehow Bailey got out of officials. susan.delk@morris.com may have even saved Vir- the fence. To them, it is simply a lost ginia’s life. Devastated, the family dog, Joey said. The story of Bailey is not Virginia took an afternoon has sent out pleas to other He said there are no hard just one of another miss- nap and forgot she left a pet owners and friends, and feelings towards them but ing dog. It is the story of a pot on the stove. As the pot plastered posters across Wil- “it could be dogs now but it lost companion, friend and boiled dry and the heat be- liston. could be children later.” protector. gan to rise, smoke started to No one has reported seeing “If someone found her and Virginia Boyle is deaf and fill the kitchen. As the smoke Bailey. has kept her safe, we just unable to speak, and her six- detector started to screech, Bailey needs Virginia as want her back,” Joey said. year-old silky terrier Bailey Bailey nudged and nudged much as Virginia needs Bai- “She (Virginia) depended had lived with her since she Virginia until she woke up. ley, though. on her for more than one was a puppy. Virginia was able to get to the Bailey has some health is- reason,” Joey said, Although there had been burning pot and keep it from sues. She was recently hospi- Through Joey’s interpreta- no formal training, Bailey doing any damage. talized and requires a special tion, Virginia said, “I pray, Photo Courtesy: Virginia Boyles “even learned the communi- Simply, “she was mom’s diet and medications. Thank- just please bring her back Bailey, a six-year-old silky terrier, has been missing since cation of sign language with ears,” said Joey. fully, Bailey is micro-chipped, home safe,” as she patted July 13. She is not only Virginia Boyle’s pet, but companion, mom,” said Virginia’s son, Now those ears are gone. so when she is found, the two her shoulder, a place Bailey friend and protector. Joey Boyle. On July 13, a family mem- can be reunited. loved to lay. She loved to play Frisbee ber was at Virginia’s house “We’ve had a lot of sup- Bailey is a six-year-old and needs her special diet Anyone with information and go outside for short pe- and Bailey was in the fenced port,” said Joey. Support silky black, silver and tan and medications. But most of about Bailey, please call Diane riods of time. What she loved backyard. A time span of from the community in gen- terrier. She is micro-chipped all, she is Virginia’s ears. Shepperd at (803) 266-3405.

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