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PDFs and images of the 2011 S.C. Press Association Weekly and Associate Member News Contest winners. Part 1 of 4.

PDFs and images of the 2011 S.C. Press Association Weekly and Associate Member News Contest winners. Part 1 of 4.

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Weekly Awards Presentation - Part 1 of 4 Weekly Awards Presentation - Part 1 of 4 Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome to theWeekly & AssociateAwards Luncheon!
  • South CarolinaPress Association Hall of Fame Robert Ashe Pierce 1928 - 2007
  • South CarolinaPress Association Hall of Fame Peter Manigault 1927 - 2004
  • South CarolinaPress Association Hall of Fame Benjamin F. Perry 1805 - 1886
  • Save the date for NNA’s Annual Convention
  • BEST NEWSPAPER PUBLICATION Associate/Individual Division Murrells Inlet MessengerTHIRD PLACE MAY VOL. 2 NO. 4 The local newspaper for Murrells Inlet and Garden City Beach WWW.MURRELLSINLETMESSENGER.COM Ply ‘sees’ miracles every day in his local business FREE By Tim CallahanMurrellsI nletM essenger - - see real well.” - - generation. Courtesy of Waynes View Photography Son’s murder in NC leads to inlet and charity By Tim Callahan Editor/Publisher “Vampires” killed Chris Eggleston. - - - - - their son. Continued on page 13 - Blessing of the Inlet this month was her son. th an- It was – and it wasn’t. - Extra! Extra! - Send us your news Call us about ads - 843-344-3197 - - prison. a.m. E-mail: editor@murrellsinletmessenger.com For more information and the event schedule, Continued on page 12 visit www.BlessingoftheInlet.com
  • BEST NEWSPAPER PUBLICATION Associate/Individual DivisionSECOND PLACE Town Election October 27, 2011 Blythewood rose is fairest of the fair Rezoning request Information withdrawn By Barbara Ball, editorThe Voice Election Day Tuesday, Jan. 10, 7 am-7 pm. Seats to be filled Mayor, two town council seats. How candidates file Candidates must file between 12 o’clock noon, Oct. 12, and When a number of Rimer Pond Road residents showed up at a Richland County Council public hearing on Monday night, Oct. 25, to protest the rezoning of 16.86 acres on the road from RURAL to RS-MD (Residential Single Family Medium Density) zoning, the developer, Landtec, withdrew his proposal. 12 o’clock noon, Nov. 10 at Two weeks earlier, the County the Blythewood Town Hall, Planning Commission, voted 5-4 171 Langford Road (754- to recommend against rezoning the 0501.) Town Hall is open property. M-F, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fil- The zoning proposed by ing fees are $10 for mayoral Delores Snellgrove is shown here with the rose (insert) named Queen Landtec would have allowed up candidates and $5 for town of Roses at the State Fair this month. The rose came from Snellgrove’s Blythewood rose garden to 86 homes to be built on the par- council candidates. Candi- in Eagles Glen. The Pop Warner rose is white with a pink tinge in the center. Snellgrove also won cel, or 5 homes per acre. dates must live within the the Prince of Show award for the best single Floribunda rose (named Johnny Becnel) and the The property was formerly town limits. Arthur Cottingham Trophy for the best boquet of yellow roses. Snellgrove also won many more Rimer Pond Golf Center and Driv- Terms of office blue, red and yellow ribbons. She is currently President of the South Carolina Rose Society. ing Range and is located next to The mayor’s office and coun- Round Top Elementary School. cil offices are for four year terms. Who can vote? PSC heard public testimony on SCE&G’s lines Only those residents who live 23+ acre property is located. After tion both parties filed with the affect the aesthetics, attractiveness within the town limits are eli- More testimony to be and development of the Town. the meeting, Shives expressed that PSC asking that it intervene in gible to vote in the municipal heard Thurs., Oct. 27 he would prefer the lines follow the the final route SCE&G has cho- Richland County has also election. VOTERS MUST BE SCE&G right of way as it currently sen for its lines. filed a letter of intervention REGISTERED IN THE PRE- By Barbara Ball, editor exists through the Blythewood area. Members of the public will against SCE&G asking that the CINCT IN WHICH THEY Mr. Bill McDaniels, who owns also be allowed to address the lines not be installed near a rec- LIVE (there are four precincts The SC Public Service Com- the new McDaniels Acura facility PSC at that meeting since a no- reation facility it hopes to build in in Blythewood.) But everyone mission held a public hearing on on Killian Road, pointed out that tice in The State newspaper had the future along Farrow Road. will vote at Blythewood Park Oct. 20 concerning SCE&G’s ap- SCE&G’s final route encircles the misstated the dates that the pub- The Town and County are (the Richland County Recre- plication to construct new power front portion of his $15 million lic would be allowed to speak. both being represented by attor- ation Center on Boney Road, lines for electricity generated by Acura facility and appears to veer In its letter of intervention, the ney Danny Crowe who is the ad- across from Bethel-Hanberry two new nuclear generating units from the current right of way. He Town of Blythewood said it does visor to two of the Town’s boards. Elementary School.) to be built near the existing VC asked that the line take a different not want SCE&G’s new power The Oct. 27 PSC hearing is Summer Nuclear Station. route than past his car dealership. lines to follow the current right of open to the public and is set for Voters must register by Two members of the public “There are many other areas way through Blythewood which 10:30 a.m., in the PSC hearing Dec. 10 room, Synergy Business Park, addressed the PSC in regard to for this line to go without de- borders the town to the north. John Where to register? the Blythewood-Killian segment stroying Killian Road,” McDan- Perry has said the lines should run 101 Executive Center Dr. For Registration forms available: of the line. iels told the commission. through the rural since running information, call the PSC at 803- Blythewood Town Hall (171 William Shives, who lives off On October 27 the PSC will them along the current route would 896-5100. Langford Rd., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 Blythewood Road, expressed his take testimony from the Town of p.m., 754-0501) hope that the new lines would not Blythewood and Richland Coun- Richland County (2020 run through rural areas, where his ty regarding letters of interven- It’s time for Pig on the Ridge! Hampton St, Columbia, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., 576-2240) Executive session to discuss community center cancelled The council authorized a sales PRESORTED By Barbara Ball, editor contract with The Knight Company STANDARD ECRWSS on Feb. 28, 2011, to sell the center U.S. POSTAGE An item on the agenda of and the surrounding 5-acre property. BLYTHEWOOD, SC the Oct. 24, Blythewood Town According to discussions by Council meeting was cancelled council at a meeting on Jan. 31, PERMIT NO. 2 with no explanation. the sales contract calls for the POSTAL CUSTOMER The item was an executive ses- town to pay Knight a guaranteed sion ‘discussion of negotiations of flat rate fee of $1,500 per month proposed contractual arrangements.’ for not more than 18 months (nor Postal Asked by The Voice newspa- per after the meeting if the nego- less than 6 months whether or not he sells the property. tiations were about a proposed Perry told The Voice that Customer contract for the sale of the com- Knight is not required to make Ridgeway Mayor Charlene Herring shows off two of the painted pigs that can be seen around downtown Ridgeway to remind folks of the munity center, town administrator regular reports to the town on the upcoming Pig on the Ridge BBQ Festival, Nov. 4 & 5. For more de- John Perry confirmed that it was. progress of the sale. tails about the festival, see News from Ridgeway column, page 4.
  • BEST NEWSPAPER PUBLICATION Associate/Individual Division We’re Celebrating Our 1st AnniversaryFIRST PLACE From our Publisher Bob Gecy SimpsonvilleS entinel Bob Gecy and Judy Johnson on the set of TV Program “Focus On the Palmetto State” Sentinel’s first edition “Hot off the Press” News rack at Howard’s Pharmacy
  • BEST MAGAZINE ORSPECIAL PUBLICATION Associate/Individual Division THIRD PLACE S.C. Lawyers Weekly Carolina Paralegal News
  • BEST MAGAZINE OR SPECIAL PUBLICATION Associate/Individual DivisionSECOND PLACES.C. Farm BureauFederationS.C. Farmer
  • BEST MAGAZINE OR SPECIAL PUBLICATION Associate/Individual DivisionFIRST PLACE Carolinian USC Creative Services 2011 Fall Déjà vu all over again
  • BEST PUBLISHED FEATURE STORY Associate/Individual DivisionHONORABLE MENTIONS.C. United MethodistAdvocateJessica ConnorPastor Ink
  • BEST PUBLISHED FEATURE STORY Associate/Individual DivisionHONORABLE MENTIONS.C. United MethodistAdvocateJessica ConnorSpirit Singers
  • BEST PUBLISHED FEATURE STORY Associate/Individual DivisionTHIRD PLACE 10/Murrells Inlet Messenger/February 2011 Local man touches greatness on earth and in heavenMurrells Inlet By Tim Callahan Ten minutes on a basketball court saved Johnny DeLoache’s life – and his soul. DeLoache was a successful family business- man in Greenville who, in spite of his wealth and wouldn’t want me,” he said. “I’ve done too many bad things.” Maravich then told DeLoache about playing basketball drunk out of his mind. He said a guy pulled a gun on him and he wished the guy had Peter denied Christ three times. Christ not only forgave Peter, the speaker said, but asked him to lead the church so he can forgive you, too. That was Sept. 17, 1987, and that night De- Loache surrendered and gave his life to Christ.Messenger prestige, felt empty and lost. He had no meaning pulled the trigger. He also told him about the In one day, he had touched one of the greatest or purpose. good news of the gospel in a way DeLoache said basketball gods on earth and the greatest man He attended a men’s retreat in 1987 at the urg- he had never heard in church. who ever walked the earth, who owned both ing of a friend. He went with an attitude that he “I had always heard about the good news but earth and heaven. described as being a horse’s rear end. He wasn’t nobody ever explained what it meant,” he said. “It’s like yesterday,” DeLoache said. “I will even sure why he was there. “That I was a sinner, like everybody else, and never forget that day.”TimC allahan Before the retreat started, he was shooting hoops that Christ came to earth and took my place on a Johnny meant to write a letter to Marav- by himself on the grounds. A tall, lanky guy with cross and died so I could be forgiven for all my ich thanking him but never got a chance. Four brown hair and a basketball approached him and sins, the things I was so ashamed of. All I had to months later, Pete Maravich had a heart attack asked him if it was OK if he shot some baskets. do was believe this and ask him to forgive me of and died on a basketball court while playing “I don’t own it,” DeLoache said, with sarcasm my sins and to come into my heart to be my Lord hoops with James Dobson, the founder of Focus dripping from his tongue. and Savior.” on the Family. The guy took two long hook shots from almost His time with Pete was brought short as a bunch Since meeting Maravich, Johnny walked away the top of the key and made them. from the family business, graduated from So. “Hey,” DeLoache said. “I want you on my team. meet and greet “Pistol Pete.” Baptist Theological Seminary, been a church I’m Johnny DeLoache.” He stuck out his hand. Johnny shook his hand again and said, “Thank planter, earned a master’s in counseling from The guy stuck out his big hand and said, “I’m you for talking to me. You’re somebody and I’m - Pete Maravich. Johnny, God loves you and has a nobody.” plan and a purpose for you.” Maravich looked him in the eye and said, “You He owns a private practice, the Christian Coun- DeLoache was in shock. Not from the God stuff would be somebody in His body.” seling Clinic in Pawleys Island, and is a part- but because he was on the same basketball court Even after the chance meeting with greatness, with one of the best ballhandlers the NBA and Johnny said he still wanted to go home. But, world had ever known. Maravich had been an for some reason, he stuck around. That night, DeLoache moved here in 2005 to be closer to All-American at LSU who averaged 44 points family. He moved to Nashville in 2007, where a game and an All-Star in the NBA. He was his changed while he was coming in on the plane. he had worked before, before he returned here in era’s Steve Nash. The world knew him as “Pistol The speaker said that message was that some 2010. He opened his practice in May. Pete.” people in the audience had been in church their Over the years, he has worked with teenagers, When reality hit, DeLoache felt ashamed. “God whole life but had rejected Christ. He said that Continued on page 13
  • BEST PUBLISHED FEATURE STORY Associate/Individual Division SECOND PLACE The Catholic Miscellany Christina Lee Knauss Caregivers: The challenges, rewards and help for those taking care of family members BY CHRISTINA LEE KNAUSS THE CATHOLIC MISCELLANY alive, but they’re grieving the loss of the privacy reasons. Here’s how to reach out to care- person they knew.” “Caregiving is just a hard job, but itarles Minges of Columbia spends givers in your own family, neigh- Minges said the biggest challenge he fulfilling,” she said. “The main thing of each day helping his wife of 52 borhood or parish: faces with his wife’s dementia is the learned is you can’t do it all. A caregis with her most basic needs. lack of communication as the condition has to think of themselves sometimesraldine, affectionately known as Offer to help with daily tasks such progresses. Sometimes it’s hard to un- that’s something I totally forgot to do ry,” suffers from Parkinson’s dis- as grocery shopping or other derstand what she is saying or what she the beginning. You can’t do this job u spinal stenosis and dementia. Min- errands, light housework or yard needs. you take care of yourself.” resses her, helps her shower, feeds work. “There’s the constant question of am I On Thursday mornings, Doris bringgives her medication, helps her in doing too much, or am I doing enough for her mother to a respite care programout of a wheelchair, and drives her to Prepare a home-cooked meal or her?” he said. offered by Our Lady of the Hills Churor’s appointments. offer to bring one from their favor- in Columbia, one of two parishes in th is a caregiver, part of a rapidly ite restaurant. Information is key Midlands that offer the service. St. Jo ing community of people around the Church on Devine Street also runs a try who provide full-time care for If the caregiver would like some People can better deal with the difficul- Thursday program. ses, parents, children and other rela- company, visit them at home. Just ties and rewards of caregiving if they At respite care, trained volunteers s with serious illnesses or disabilities. an hour of conversation over cof- go into the process armed with as much meals and plan activities for clients sonumber of people caring for those fee can do a world of good. If visits information as possible. their caregivers have a few hours to r Alzheimer’s disease or other forms aren’t possible, phone calls can be Dodds urges learning as much about errands, do housework, exercise or sim mentia is growing the fastest. a source of support. their loved one’s condition as possible, and rest. ecent study by the American Asso- gathering information about area support “Those hours give me time to do whon of Retired Persons estimated that If the caregiver can get away for a groups, plus local, state and federal pro- ever, whether it’s something or nothin than 40 million people in the U.S. few hours, take them to a movie, grams that offer financial assistance and Doris said. “I can do housework or I c elping elderly or disabled loved ones, shopping, for a walk or beach out- other resources for caregivers. read a book. It’s my time.” rming work that is worth more than ing. Minges said he did extensive research Resources billion a year. on his wife’s condition, and for a whilee study shows family members aver- If their loved one can go out, offer took part in Internet discussion groups 0 hours a week, but for many, the to drive them to Mass, a doctor’s about Parkinson’s disease. Through re-and on time, energy and emotion is appointment or other errand so search, he also learned about state pro- A variety of resources are availableh greater. Patients with dementia, for the caregiver has a break. grams that offer small annual stipends to caregivers. nce, usually require round-the-clock help with his wife’s care. Two parishes in the Diocese of Charrvision. Offer to sit with their loved one “Get all the help you can, ask all the ton currently offer respite care:mily members of these patients will for a few hours so the caregiver questions you can,” he said. “There’s all do whatever it takes to keep their can go out. This can be especially kinds of help and information available Marydale Lane in Columbia has “Held ones out of nursing homes, but a valuable on a Saturday or Sunday out there once you start looking for it.”tage of home health aides and the if they want to attend Mass.ncial burden of home care, much of it The need for rest overed by Medicare, puts even more Make sure caregivers and theironsibility on the caregiver’s shoul- loved ones have access to the The 24-7 demand of caregiving causes a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday. Call Sister Ju Eucharist. Put them in contact with many people to deny their own needs. baby boomers age and live longer, extraordinary ministers of Holy Some caregivers get so caught up in their On the web:with federal and state budget cuts Communion at their church. duties that they don’t look after their ing the number of programs avail- personal health or well-being, and give up is an international Catholic organizatto assist caregivers, the challenges Caregiving can be a strain on fam- treasured hobbies and activities. that offers spiritual and practical sup continue to grow. ily finances. Gift cards for gas, gro- “One of the most important things they for caregivers, including prayer, (wwwat’s why caregivers must learn about ceries or from stores like Walmart can do is start caring for themselves,” fsjc.org). They also offer a free book, “ esponsibilities they face, and why can be a huge help. Dodds said. “For many who are in the Little Book of Caregiver Prayers.” Caviduals and churches need to do thick of it, it’s hard to stop and ask ‘Whathey can to reach out and help, said should I be doing for myself?’, but it’s ca Dodds. She and her husband Bill very important. There’s a real need to be individual caregivers can also be foun he Friends of St. John the Caregiver, stress the idea that this is not a sprint, it’s tions, ranging from fear to anger, or is refusing help,” she said. “There’s emo- awareness. able to step back. Sometimes it can be as www.YourAgingParent.com. holic spiritual resource group for a marathon. A person has to plan their frustration and hopelessness when a tional stuff going on both sides, and that It’s particularly hard, Dodds said, simple as going out on the front porch togivers (www.FSJC.org). The couple care-giving journey as a marathon. If loved one’s condition continues to decline, can make for some tough days.” when a patient no longer recognizes their sit there for a few minutes. We all need by offering support groups, respite cawrites a column, “Your Aging Par- you go too gung ho and don’t get help for Dodds said. Some people who are caring for an aging spouse or child. time to be able to breathe. The challenge and other programs can learn more a for Catholic News Service. yourself and accept others’ support, pretty They must also handle their loved one’s parent might also feel resentment if sib- “That person is gradually slipping is finding the time.” www.CatholicCaregivers.com. ople often don’t realize how much soon you’re going to burn out.” feelings, and the daily emotional roller lings or other family members don’t come away from you, even if physically they Learning to look out for her own needs caregiving is when they start,” coaster many patients go through as they forward to offer support. might last for a number of years and need was a big challenge for Doris, who attends Alzheimer’s disease visit: www.hands s said. “First you’re helping out with The emotional toll learn to deal with an illness or disability. Those who care for patients with Al- significant care,” she said. “For many Corpus Christi Church in Lexington and health-sc.org and click on “Go Local-S to the doctor, and then gradually “People will have a hard time under- zheimer’s or dementia must also face their caregivers, their grieving process starts cares for her elderly mother at home. She
  • BEST PUBLISHED FEATURE STORY Associate/Individual DivisionFIRST PLACE S.C. United Methodist Advocate Jessica Connor
  • BEST PUBLISHED NEWS STORY Associate/Individual Division Federal RICO lawsuitHONORABLE MENTION By Barbara Ball, editor A class action lawsuit has been filed against Blythewood thy Group in Blythewood. The suit alleges that funds from vic- tims in Illinois are transmitted to bank accounts in Blythewood that are controlled by Cauthen. town councilwoman Kathleen (Katie) Cauthen in Illinois North- The lawsuit accuses CauthenThe Voice ern District Court under the fed- and others in The Worthy Group eral Racketeer Influenced and of “perpetrating a U. S. nation- Corrupt Organizations (RICO) wide fraud that targets less afflu- statute. ent consumers and younger con- The lawsuit, filed on Septem- sumers who do not have health ber 17, 2010 by Shalon Jefferson, insurance coverage.”BarbaraB all asks for damages it alleges were caused by a nationwide unauthor- ized insurance scheme and also names William Worthy of Isle of Palms, two other individuals and The lawsuit alleges that “Cauthen was responsible for cre- ating and controlling an adminis- tration front company, Viking, in the name of her father, the now a corporation as defendants in the deceased John C. Schultz.” case. The lawsuit refers to the de- It further alleges that “Cau- fendants as The Worthy Group. then has established and created On Oct. 29, the defendants other shell companies in fur- filed a petition for the case to be therance of the fraud scheme,” dismissed. Judge Harry D. Leinen- and “also controls and/or man- weber is expected to rule on the ages bank accounts for the fraud motion to dismiss on Feb. 16. scheme through multiple front The federal lawsuit alleges shell companies with multiple that Cauthen, who lives in Ash- names.” ley Oaks in Blythewood, controls Cauthen, Worthy and 16 Viking Administrators, LLC, a other individuals and corpora- Tennessee limited liability com- tions, were named in “a massive pany, as well as an entity called multi-state health insurance fraud Worldwide Family Benefits As- scheme orchestrated in large part sociation (WWFBA) which the from South Carolina, in which lawsuit says is a front for bank limited benefit medical plans accounts controlled by the Wor- backed by nonexistent insurance were being sold to unsuspecting consumers through associations,” Equestrian according to a cease and desist or- der issued by the South Carolina See CAUTHEN, Page 3
  • BEST PUBLISHED NEWS STORY Associate/Individual DivisionTHIRD PLACES.C. Policy CouncilEric Ward
  • BEST PUBLISHED NEWS STORY Associate/Individual DivisionSECOND PLACES.C. United Methodist AdvocateJessica Connor
  • BEST PUBLISHED NEWS STORY Associate/Individual DivisionFIRST PLACE (TIE) S.C. Policy Council Rick Brundrett
  • BEST PUBLISHED NEWS STORY Associate/Individual DivisionFIRST PLACE (TIE) S.C. Policy Council Rick Brundrett
  • BEST PUBLISHED EDITORIAL/OP-ED COLUMN Associate/Individual Division 12/Murrells Inlet Messenger/October 2011THIRD PLACE Editorial/opinion: what is the Burgess Community? By Tim Callahan Editor/Publisher The sign is clearly visible on Route 707, just a short ways after turning onto the road between the Food Lion shopping center and CVS. Horry County. But, right beneath the Horry County sign is an- to a person, they were questions about where they lived. Interestingly, they didn’t say “Bur- gess” or “Murrells Inlet,” but the name of their development. And therein lies the rub. It is tough to give a community a united voice when they are not sure where they live. “That means taxes. No thank you,” he said. “We want to have a voice to speak to government,” he said. “That’s all.” It will be interesting to watch the GBCA’s ef- - - undated over the years with requests by residents other one: That is one of the reasons the Greater Burgess to lobby local and state government on behalf of Burgess Community. Community Association is holding meetings, to their interests, but MI 2020 was not a govern-Murrells Inlet Messenger “What is the Burgess Community?” educate residents that they live in a community mental or lobbying body. It took several years This was a question one man asked last week at called Burgess, mostly Murrells Inlet, Horry of educating the public before they realized MI a public meeting held at St. James High School. County, which is confusing enough as, for post 2020 did not speak for the community, although He was joined by about 125 other residents who were there for a presentation by Horry County Inlet, Georgetown County, and Murrells Inlet, community. planners, who were getting feedback to draft an Horry County, are all in the same zip code. Now, GBCA is doing the opposite. They do area plan. want to speak for the community, but, as with During the Q & A, several residents stepped up new residents were assigned either Murrells In- MI 2020’s adventures, residents are not sureTimC allahan to the microphone and asked questions. Almost let or Myrtle Beach zip codes. what the GBCA is, and who does what. Heck, they aren’t sure where they live – other Bank on is now well over 17,000, the GBCA stated. The county planners said it is now 25,000. It extends than in a development. It’s a shame. These developments, gated or not, Neighbors. from the southern end of Horry County, west of tend to isolate and separate people – the opposite Hwy. 17 Bypass, to the Waccamaw River, and of community. encompasses 28 square miles. My hat is off to the GBCA. They are trying to According to the GBCA, there are 30 develop- do what this paper has tried to do from day one:What is the Burgess ments in Burgess. give residents in an unincorporated, non-munic- A GBCA representative, Doug Maschin, said ipal area a forum, a voice, a sense of community. the GBCA has no intention of trying to form a I just hope that Murrells Inlet, Georgetown municipality. County, is not left behind as some Horry County residents shift their thinking from “My develop- ment” or “Murrells Inlet” to “Burgess Commu- nity.” It’s been tried several times, the Murrells InletCommunity? Civic Association was the last casualty, but Mur- rells Inlet, Georgetown County, might want to (843)485-0873 think about creating their own voice. Or, using Computer Repair ~ Computer Training the one that has already been created: The Mur- New & Used Computer Sales ~ Laptop Repair rells Inlet Messenger. Web Design ~ Networking Publishing good news features seems to give Graphic Design people the impression we don’t want letters to On-Site Service Available the editor. That is incorrect. What we said was that we wanted letters that offer possible solu- Serving Georgetown through Myrtle Beach tions to the area’s problems, instead of letters “The Lachicotte name is deeply rooted in www.ASAPcomputersONLINE.com bashing a particular party or person. these parts, so I was proud to be among Those bashing letters are entertaining. They Plantation Federal’s founders 25 years ago. might even increase readership. But, they don’t We live in a great part of the world … a lead to solutions. place that deserves a bank that takes care of They don’t lead to community. i hb N i hb h d b ki i Know where you stand, at any time
  • BEST PUBLISHED EDITORIAL/OP-ED COLUMN Associate/Individual Division Mr. Switzer is misinformed about role of planning commission chair As you will recall from the last episode... vote on the water tower issue by saying the Planning commissioner Mike Switzer town government had agreed to condition- called for Mr. Bob Massa to be removed as al zoning for Columbia’s water tower in chair of the Blythewood planning commission. exchange for Blythewood getting to annexSECOND PLACE Mr. Massa is placing the item on the the property where the water tower sits. commission’s Feb. 7 agenda for a vote. Such an agreement would constitute At best, Mr. Switzer’s complaints about contract zoning. While no case law ex- Mr. Massa are frivolous, unfounded and ists in South Carolina on contract zoning, reflect a lack of understanding of the Bly- it is presumed to be illegal. Contract zon- thewood planning commission’s rules as well ing occurs when a local government and a as state and local laws pertaining to zoning. landowner enter into a private agreement At worst, his complaints very nearly over how the zoning power is to be used. rise to the level of a public smear campaign Zoning is to be used for the public ben- against Mr. Massa. efit and not for the benefit of an individual Mr. Switzer’s various complaints don’t property owner.The Voice hold water. They are not referenced by any Next, Mr. Switzer opined that he felt Mr. state or local rules, procedures or laws pertain- Massa had not sufficiently explained his vote ing to any prescribed conduct for the chair of at the meeting, thus showing poor leadership. the Blythewood Planning commission. First of all, Mr. Switzer and his cronies They refer, instead, to concocted in- won the vote, so why does he whine? fractions, spun from what Mr. Switzer Second, Mr. Switzer and others on the ‘believes’ happened, what ‘in my opinion’ commission do not always address a spe-BarbaraB all should have happened, etc., etc. cific reason for their votes. And there is no The issue stems from a vote the plan- requirement that they do so. ning commission took at its Jan. 3 meeting However, to Mr. Massa’s credit, he concerning the zoning of water towers in has on many occasions made his position the rural areas of Blythewood. known about the importance of the public When Mr. Massa did not vote the way having input on water towers and many Mr. Switzer thought he (Mr. Massa) would other issues that have come before the vote, Mr. Switzer became missput and shot planning commission from time to time. off an ‘open call’ email painting Mr. Massa as Those who regularly attend the Bly- somehow deceptive and calculating, claim- thewood planning commission meetings ing that Mr. Massa’s vote was ‘a very disturb- know that it is the hallmark of Mr. Massa’s ing experience’ for him (Mr. Switzer.) service on the commission that he frequent- If Mr. Switzer is so easily disturbed, then ly votes independent of Mr. Perry’s and planning commission might not be a good fit town council’s plans and, instead, listens to for him. the concerns of the citizens. Mr. Switzer also noted that The Country Planning commissioners are public ser- Chronicle was “the only newspaper to ask vants and should not band together to vote Mr. Massa why he voted the way he did...” in lock-step with the town council and Mr. What Mr. Switzer failed to mention, Perry. It is important that commissioners however, is that he urged the editor of The be fully informed on agenda items and be Voice, in front of several witnesses, to ask about nurturing and preserving a govern- that same question of Mr. Massa and to ment of the people by the people and for print his answer. the people. But there was no more reason to ques- It would be an oxymoron for Mr. Mas- tion Mr. Massa’s vote than there was to sa to be removed from the chairmanship question any of the other 6 commissioners’ for being so bold as to vote for the rights votes. Why Mr. Massa should have been of citizens to object if a water tower should singled out is still a head scratcher. be proposed next door to their rural resi- Mr. Switzer tried to justify his own dential property.
  • BEST PUBLISHED EDITORIAL/OP-ED COLUMN Associate/Individual Division Councilman Moscati calls on community to take strong stand against The Voice In a deliberate voice punctuated had also been passed by this council to with frustration, town councilman Paul pay for--guess what--the town park which Moscati took to his bully pulpit at the council members have frequently calledFIRST PLACE June 27 town council meeting to vent his the crown jewel of the Master Plan? irritation with several newspaper articles How much more closely attached that have recently reported on town coun- could that millage be to this town council? cil meetings. And that millage would be in force With anger fairly spewing, Moscati la- right now but for the townsfolk initiating mented, “It’s a disservice to this communi- a petition last September that forced town ty to continue to allow this publication...!” council to either rescind the millage ordi- Uh...to what? ...to exist? ...to report on town council meetings? He didn’t finish the sentence. “It seems like there are I sat in the audience a little worried. those in this town who have The Voice Was the town government going to shut down my paper? Would I be placed un- fixated on trying to attach der house arrest? Was this Blythewood or taxes to this council!” China? Moscati later enlisted the royal ‘we’ to --Town Councilman Paul Moscati rally his fellow council members and, per- haps, the community at large. nance or hold a public referendum on it. BarbaraB all “We need to take a strong stand to refute While council didn’t exactly rescind some of these articles and this misinforma- millage ordinance 10.023 outright, it did tion!“ Moscati blustered, rattling his saber. repeal ordinance 10.025 which it passed He was spitting nails. He was tak- last July to provide for the issuance of gen- ing off the gloves. He was going to make eral obligation indebtedness. By repealing mincemeat out of The Voice for spilling the ordinance 10.025, council eliminated the beans on town council’s shenanigans. indebtedness that was required for council “I would like to publicly go on record to levy the millage in the first place. that I take strong exception to an article And Mr. Moscati wonders why folks that was published in a local publication would attach property taxes to this town recently,” Moscati said, “about council council? members all agreeing that we need to be And if that weren’t enough, on May 21, raising taxes in town to pay for the Mas- at a budget workshop at the town hall, this ter Plan. That is absurd! That is untrue! It council once again discussed in public and on is inaccurate! It is misinformation to the the record, for at least 20 minutes, the myriad community and a disservice to the com- of reasons why they felt a millage should be munity. It seems like there are those in this visited on the town’s property owners, and town who have fixated on trying to attach specific ways to levy that millage. taxes to this council!” Mr. Moscati now insists that they What? This council raise taxes on the were just josh’n us, suggesting that they property owners of Blythewood? How could have been talking about what some could anyone even think it? future council might do. Well, maybe because that’s exactly what Ah...the spin was never better. happened! I mean, wasn’t it just last year that As I re-listened to the May 21 budget these same five town council members DID workshop recording, the context of the dis- levy a millage on the residential and com- cussion about levying a millage was clearly mercial properties in this town? in the here, now and near future...I would And wasn’t that millage levied specif- suspect shortly after the January election if ically to pay back a portion of a bond that the vote favors the incumbents.
  • BEST PUBLISHED PHOTOGRAPH Associate/Individual DivisionTHIRD PLACEThe VoiceBarbara Ball
  • BEST PUBLISHED PHOTOGRAPH Associate/Individual Division SECOND PLACE Focus Carolina Kim Truett
  • BEST PUBLISHED PHOTOGRAPH Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE The Catholic Miscellany Deirdre Mays
  • BEST GRAPHIC DESIGN Associate/Individual Division 10 SCLW years South Carolina Lawyers Weekly 2001-2011 www.sclawyersweekly.comTHIRD PLACE Vol. 10, No. 24 Feb. 7, 2011 $7.00 per copy Experts for hire Womble Carlyle’s litigation support team is not just in-house By SYLVIA ADCOCK, StaffWriter sylvia.adcock@nc.lawyersweekly.com When Cris Windham arrived at Womble Carlyle 25 years ago, he got involved in the firm’s tobacco litigation and quickly began to see the need for in- house medical experts.S.C. Lawyers Weekly A litigation support team that included nurses and other experts to assist the firm’s attorneys in developing medical defenses was assembled. Over the years, it grew. And grew. Today, Womble Carlyle’s litigation support team is not only an in-house function. It is a subsidiary of the law firm in the form of FirmLogic, with services available not only to Womble Carlyle but also to other lawyers and firms. It’s an unusual set-up. Womble Carlyle, with of- fices in both Carolinas, is one of only a few largeMikeZ ellmer law firms in the nation that offers their own in-house support services to other lawyers. “We tried to take the niche of large-scale litiga- tion support and specialize in it and provide it to lawyers all over the country,” said Windham, the partner at Womble Carlyle who is charged with run- ning FirmLogic. I See EXPERTS on PAGE 9 Policy reformation unnecessary despite uncertainty over who completed form By FRED HORLBECK, S.C. Bar study on lawyer dissatisfaction garners national attention, approval Senior Staff Writer By FRED HORLBECK, Senior Staff Writer And a nationally recognized expert on ter suit the needs of law firms as well as fred.horlbeck@sc.lawyersweekly.com fred.horlbeck@sc.lawyersweekly.com lawyer retention said she is touting the the needs of their lawyers, she said. study as an unusually effective instru- With a 25 percent response ratio, the Witnesses couldn’t say A 2009 study detailing Palmetto ment for measuring the depth of lawyer 85-page study shocked Bar leaders as it whether Vincent Wiegand or State lawyers’ dissatisfaction with the dissatisfaction. detailed a spectrum of professional woes someone else checked off a legal profession is not only getting at- “I can say that if I have my way it revealed in an online survey conducted box certifying refusal to buy tention within the State Bar but is also will have an impact around the country. in October 2008. More than 1,160 UIM coverage in 1990, but drawing kudos nationwide. I have already mentioned it in a blog,” lawyers identified a host of issues that es- that didn’t mean a circuit court The study is becoming a model for said Cynthia Calvert, senior advisor and tranged them from their profession. could reform Wiegand’s pol- other state bars that are doing their own co-founder of the San Francisco-based Among the top turnoffs were stress, icy to include the coverage. Sweeny assessments of their members’ feelings nonprofit Project for Attorney Reten- billable hours and lawyers’ ratio of debt So said the state Supreme Court in an opinion about the legal profession, said Barbara tion. to income. Other concerns included long that tested just how much such details really matter George Barton, a Columbia lawyer who And when those measurements are hours, Rule 608 court appointments, lack when policyholders fill out insurance forms offering chairs the S.C. Bar’s Professional Po- complete, they can be an effective basis I See REFORMATION on PAGE 7 tential Task Force. for retailoring the legal profession to bet- I See RETAILORING on PAGE 6 Opinion Digests start on Page 10 Criminal Practice Civil Practice News Focus: Litigation Support INSIDE A drunk driver is not relieved of criminal liability for an Whether cash found in “close Plaintiff who lost hand in Web-based technology setting next accident victimʼs death when the paralyzed victim proximity” to illegal drugs may be stage for trial preparation Page 8 farm accident settles for declines to go back on an artificial respirator. State v. seized under S.C. Code Ann. § Martin. 44-53-520(a)(7) must be decided $650,000 Page 3 Page 11 on a case-by-case basis. Gowdy v. Gibson. Page 10
  • BEST GRAPHIC DESIGN Associate/Individual DivisionSECOND PLACESimpsonville SentinelDebbieP erkins Dave Larkin 864.979.4913 e-mail: dlremodeling@aol.com Licensed & Insured
  • BEST GRAPHIC DESIGN Associate/Individual Division 8 THE CATHOLIC MISCELLANY NOVEMBER 25, 2010 9 The Catholic Miscellany One was an abiding grati- invited a sampling of Catho- tude for Jesus’ sacrifice, lic school students to tell us and for being able to receive what they are grateful for the sacraments, especially in their lives. There were the Eucharist. Friends andFIRST PLACE many recurring themes. family also topped the list. Matthew McGuirt, Second Grade, St. Mary School, Greenville Jacob Barr, Third Grade, St. Andrew School, Myrtle Beach The Catholic Miscellany Anne Clark and Deirdre Mays Carly De Santis, Third Grade, St. Andrew School, Myrtle Beach Jessica Cummings, Seventh Grade, St. Mary School, Greenville ThankingG od Reegan Fiske, Third Grade, St. Anne School, Sumter Harrison Williams, Fourth Grade, St. Peter School, Beaufort Mary Bruns, Seventh Grade, St. Peter School, Beaufort Carly Allred, Third Grade, St. Anne School, Sumter
  • BEST PUBLIC RELATIONS PROGRAM Associate/Individual Division WANTED City Council & Mayoral CandidatesSECOND PLACE City of Simpsonville Municipal Election November 8, 2011 Mayor & 3 Council Seats: Wards 1, 3, & 5SimpsonvilleS entinel LEGEND Created on February 14th, 2008. Reproduction of this map is prohibited without permission of the City of Simpsonville. DISCLAIMER: The information contained herein is for reference purposes only. The City of Simpson- ville makes no warranty, express or implied, nor any guarantee as to the information provided herein. The City of Simpsonville explicitly disclaims all representations and warranties. The City of Simpsonville assumes no liability for any errors, omissions, or inaccuracies in the information provided herein.
  • BEST PUBLIC RELATIONS PROGRAM Associate/Individual DivisionFIRST PLACE S.C.F armB ureauF ederation othermemberbenefits memberbenefits Ag in the Classroom (AITC) a non-profit {501(C)(3)} quickreference educational foundation helps teachers instill students with an appreciation of their food and fiber sources using grade-level specific lesson plans aligned with the SC curriculum standards. merchandise AITC sponsors staff development workshops for teachers at state, SC Farm Bureau Products Program district, and individual levels. www.SCFBproducts.com or call (803) 822-8636 or (800) 849-3778 Womens & Youth Leadership Programs coordinate Grainger Industrial Supply FB Account #802160051 agricultural, promotional, & educational activities. www.grainger.com or call (877) 202-2594 to find a store near you The Young Farmer & Rancher Program provides leadership Staples Business Advantage training and opportunities for young adults ages 18-35. Sign up online. Go to www.scfb.org, click on Member Benefits, then Merchandise SCFB Foundation provides scholarship assistance to persons pursuing a degree in agriculture or agriculture-related majors. Lands’ End http://ces.landsend.com/SCFB or call (800) 916-2255. SC Farm Bureau Commodity Advisory Committees provide South Carolina farmers opportunities to discuss and recommend Printing For Less solutions to problems affecting their particular commodity or www.printingforless.com/c/scfb special interest. financial South Carolina Farmer, a quarterly members magazine, features colorful and informative articles about SC agriculture SC Farm Bureau Insurance Services Call your County Farm Bureau or (877) 723-2762 and rural lifestyles. Farm Bureau Bank SC Farm Bureau Marketing Association provides marketing www.farmbureaubank.com or call (800) 492-FARM (492-3276) services in Anderson and Williamsburg (Kingstree) counties. Legislative Representation SC Farm Bureau is committed to home & family standing up for farmers in the legislative arena, serving as a strong, Pet Partners Inc. www.fbphp.com or call (877) 738-7888 honest and proactive voice of the agricultural community at the local, county, state and national level. ADT Alarm Team www.alarmteam.com/farmbureau.asp or call (866) 774-7612 T-Mobile Not a Member? New Customers call (866) 464-8662. Current customers call (877) 453-8824. Use Promo Code 9487TMOFAV Here Are 3 Easy health care Ways to Join. Agelity Discount Prescription Drug Plan Go to www.SCFB.com, click on Member Benefits, then Health Care memberbenefits 1. Call your County Farm Bureau Office QualSight Lasik Surgery www.qualsight.com/-SCFB or call (866) 979-9212 ClearValue Hearing 2. Call 1-866-FB-Member (888) 497-7447 or visit www.clearvaluehearing.com LifeStation Medical Alert System 3. Go to www.SCFB.org (877) 288-4958 any time or visit www.membersmedicalalert.com Use code FB103 Click on “Join Farm Bureau Now.” transportation & travel Avis www.avis.com or 1-800-331-1212 (savings code: A298840) SC Farm Bureau Federation Budget Prescription Savings Card www.budget.com or 1-800-527-0700 (savings code: Y775740) Dodge Rebate Program Bin# 009265 Ask your Dodge dealer or call your County Farm Bureau PCN# AG Group# ID# SCFB SCFB23202 Members Automobile Buying Service (MABS) Call (800) 849-4811 or visit www.mabsamerica.com Pharmacy Name: _________________________________________ Help Desk: 1-800-847-7147 Choice Hotels THIS IS NOT INSURANCE - DISCOUNTS ONLY www.choicehotels.com By using this card, the holder agrees to the terms under Click on “Select Rate,” then click on “Special Rate/Corp ID,” and which it was issued. Void where prohibited. Process all enter the SCFB account number 00800665. You must have a Choice prescriptions electronically. Privileges© number to make reservations by phone. To obtain one, call 1-888-770-6800. For reservations, call 1-800-258-2847.
  • BEST INNOVATIVE CONCEPT Associate/Individual Division THIRD PLACE The Catholic Miscellany Stephanie Stockton
  • BEST INNOVATIVE CONCEPT Associate/Individual Division SECOND PLACE The Catholic Miscellany Stephanie Stockton
  • BEST INNOVATIVE CONCEPT Associate/Individual DivisionFIRST PLACE Murrells Inlet Messenger Tim Callahan Memories, Memoirs, and Miracles
  • EDITORIAL OR COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOI/GOVERNMENT ISSUES Open Division C ODY S OSSAMON It’s not WHAT they did, it’s HOW they did itTHIRD PLACE I don’t have a problem with the school district set- tling a sexual harassment complaint with former teacher Jenny Stroupe. I’m not much one for settling any complaints or law- suits, but in this case — based on what I know — I don’t think she got enough. What I do have a problem with is the apparent viola-The Gaffney Ledger tion of the S.C. Freedom of Information Act by the school board in agreeing to the settlement. There are several rea- sons prescribed by law that allow public bodies to haveCody Sossamon meetings closed to the pub- lic. One of those reasons is the receipt of legal advice and to discuss settlement of legal claims.It’s Not What They Did, They can discuss among themselves any action they wish to take as a result of that advice. They cannot poll members for a consen- sus. Any action taken as aIt’s HOW They Did It result of the closed-door meeting must be voted on in public. The law states: “The members of a public body may not commit the public CODY SOSSAMON body to a course of action by a polling of the mem- PUBLISHER bers in executive session.” The school board and its attorneys have become quite adept at doing end runs around the FOIA and I’m lli h h d i i h li f
  • EDITORIAL OR COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOI/GOVERNMENT ISSUES Open Division There Oughtta Be A LawFIRST PLACE The S.C. Freedom of Information Act is not a cumbersome tome of From the Editor legal gibberish. This James The Herald-Independent Denton, isn’t the Patriot Act or Editor/GM the Obama health care bill. The entire law, James Denton along with helpful, plainly worded explanations of each article, can be found in a light-weight 14-page booklet, available, among other places There Oughtta Be a Law from the S.C. Press Association’s Web site (www.scpress.org). It should be the responsibil- ity of every member of any public body to fa- miliarize themselves with and adhere to this simple code of laws. Perhaps it was simply an oversight, or perhaps it is that business has been done this way for so long, no one even realizes the wrong in it What’s worse even much of the public whom
  • ONLINE COLUMN WRITING Open Division THIRD PLACE Lake Wylie Pilot John Marks On Your Marks - Catfight Ends
  • ONLINE COLUMN WRITING Open Division SECOND PLACE Carolina Gateway Reece Murphy How I learned to stop worrying and love Christmas
  • CARTOON Open DivisionTHIRD PLACEThe Dillon HeraldBetsy FinkleaNo More;No County Crews;Dillon City Council Trips (104) Cartoon-Third Place-Betsy Finklea/The Dillon Herald
  • MIXED MEDIA ILLUSTRATION Open Division TAKING FLIGHTTHIRD PLACEThe Greer CitizenMandy Ferguson Southwest lands at GSPTaking Flight
  • ILLUSTRATION Open DivisionTHIRD PLACEFree TimesWilbert T. Fields
  • ILLUSTRATION Open DivisionFIRST PLACE Myrtle Beach Herald Chris Mowder
  • INFORMATIONAL GRAPHICS PORTFOLIO Open DivisionTHIRD PLACEMyrtle Beach HeraldChris Mowder
  • SINGLE ONLINE PHOTO Open DivisionHONORABLE MENTIONThe SummervilleJournal ScenePaul ZoellerFamily Circle Cup
  • SINGLE ONLINE PHOTO Open DivisionSECOND PLACEThe SummervilleJournal ScenePaul ZoellerMud Run
  • INNOVATIVE CONCEPT Open Division he Sponsored in part by T Summerville Elementary School • February 25, 2011 Turtle Times Newspaper Project Offers Hands-On ExperienceFIRST PLACE By Karen Thompson s the Adopt-A-Teacher program from the Chamber of Commerce got into high gear at Summerville Elementary this past fall, I was so in hopes that I could ers for the year to aid in many different ways. Since I teach English-Language Arts to fifth graders, I wanted a business that would help make writing meaningful. I have a very strong reading and writing class this year and felt they would benefit from publishing their own newspa- per. This year’s paper exceeded my expectations The next week, Ashley Krejci- Shaw and Laura Patterson helped the students with advertisements for THE TUR- TLE TIMES. participate with The from last year. I was proud of my students from They learned how Summerville Journal Scene last year and all their efforts; our paper was mag- to draw an ad in a The Summerville once again this year. But I nanimous! This year, however, it was taken to very small or thought,”Could I be so lucky to work with them another level. large space. The AGAIN? Was I being greedy? Did they want We started out the project with reporter Leslie students were ME?” Well, thankfully, Chris Zoeller and her Cantu helping our students brainstorm writing able to figure out crew did want to work with us again. Boy, was I topics. Executive Editor Judy Watts and Editor the appropriate thrilled. Adopt-A-Teacher is a program where Frank Johnson, along with reporters Roger Lee, print style and art- businesses in the Summerville area adopt teach- Stefan Rogensmoser, and Jim Tatum, visited our work to make Photos by Chris Zoeller class to help students write their articles. That their ads pop! JournalS cene For the last two months, the staff of the Journal Scene Staff has worked with If you want a definition of a one-on-one attention was invaluable. The There was just a reporters really helped the students take their arti- deeper under- the students on writing stories, taking photographs and designing advertise- leader, it’s Mrs. Thompson. Mrs. Thompson loves to spend cles to the next level. Also, how lucky were they standing of what ments. Top left, reporter Stefan Rogenmoser works with students on their time with her family – Henry, to have “real” reporters be their mentors! THE TURTLE story. Top right, Ashley Krejci-Shaw and Laura Patterson teach the class about husband, and her sons Our next project was the photography compo- TIMES should advertising. Harrison and Dale. Some of nent. Photographer, Paul Zoeller, along with be about this year. Independence reigned their help and guidance, the paper would not have her favorite interests are to Holly Harrison from the paper helped the stu- supreme in 5C! The students wrote articles with- been successful. I want to thank my colleagues, cook, walk and shop. Her dents take pictures around the school. It was a out my prompting; interviewed students and Michelle Kieber, Cornelia Castleman, and Lynn favorite books are amazing drizzly, rainy day…a great opportunity for some teachers as needed; and wrote and edited their Ryall for being so flexible with schedule changes. Karen Thompson biographies and truthful non- unique pictures. We even had Chris Zoeller own articles without my help. I want to thank all I feel so blessed that my students could learn and fiction. It’s no doubt that she is jumping in mud puddles! They learned how to of the Journal Scene staff and Paul Zoeller for grow from this wonderful experience. My only By Courtney a sweet, knowledgeable and edit and write cutlines. their extreme dedication to this project. Without regret is that our time together is over. Fox loving teacher. ABOUT REFLECTIONS ADOPT-A-TEACHER Mission: • Broaden our students’ learning opportunities and experiences • Get the community involved in the lives of our students and their education • Share your skills with our teachers and our students • Build confidence in our students and provide an environment of hope for their future • Provide financial support for our educational endeavors What is the purpose of the Adopt-A-Teacher Program? • To raise the level of involvement of local businesses, organizations, and community members in the classroom • Opportunity to relate to our students in a manner that explains the "why" they need to learn certain things and "how" those skills will be utilized • Provide an environment of creative learning where all students can be engaged Photo by Faith Walker • Erase some of the financial burden of teachers • Help students understand and become more The Turtle Times staff was assigned weather-art by photographer knowledgeable about our community and our workforce Paul Zoeller. Students returned with fun and creative photos on a How to Adopt-A-Teacher at SES? cold, rainy day. Call Shannon Raglin at 873-2373 Photo by Harper Lybrand
  • NEWS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Weekly Division THIRD PLACE The Clinton Chronicle Veterans Salute 2011
  • NEWS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Weekly DivisionSECOND PLACEThe Press & StandardColleton Magazine -Fall 2011
  • NEWS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Weekly DivisionFIRST PLACE ClarendonC itizen Classic Clarendon: Citizens Remember Citizens it Rememb Remember 9/11