2013 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
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2013 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation

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See the winning photos, stories, designs and online entries from SCPA's 2014 Collegiate Meeting and Awards. Here are the winners from the 2013 S.C. Press Association Collegiate Contest.

See the winning photos, stories, designs and online entries from SCPA's 2014 Collegiate Meeting and Awards. Here are the winners from the 2013 S.C. Press Association Collegiate Contest.

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2013 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation 2013 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • NEWS STORY Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Peter Elbaum Back to the Future Math professor wins Google Glass competition by Peter Elbaum,, senior writer Dr. Anne Catlla has brought the future of computing to Wofford’s cam- pus. Catlla, assistant professor of math- ematics, won a competition to become part of a small group of people with the rights to buy a prototype version of Google Glass, a pair of glasses with computational abilities. The glasses have a camera, video camera, and a crystal that allows the wearer to see images and use the Internet. In Febru- ary, Google released a limited amount of information about the glasses, which included a video shot using the Glass from the perspective of a ballerina, a figure skater, a gymnast, and a parent, among others. In February, Google also introduced a competition for their use. Users, called Explorers, had to write a twitter post of 50 words or fewer detailing what their plans would be if chosen. Catlla heard of the competition through her husband, who is a com- puter programmer. He encouraged her to apply after hearing her ideas for Glass use in educational contexts. “The way Glass could be used for education made me interested in it. I’m not a first adopter of technology for entertainment or personal use, but when it comes to use in class, I’ll do it quickly. The thing that made me most interested was its potential for use in an educational context,” says Catlla. She wrote her tweet, and was accepted a month later. After she was accepted, Catlla trav- eled to the Google office in New York to get fitted for and trained on her glasses. Although the glasses were not able to perform in the way Catlla detailed in her tweet — by providing her informa- tion about her students through facial recognition — she started using them in a variety of other educational and everyday contexts. “I went to a wedding, and I record- ed it through Glass. I was able to pay attention and make the recording at the same time,” says Catlla. This is one benefit of the glasses — that the wearer can record their sur- roundings hands-free while being fully present in the situation. Catlla has used this benefit in her classroom. “I’ve used it to record student pre- sentations, so for grading it’s a lot easi- er. To be able to give students concrete feedback is nice,” she says. Catlla also has used the glasses to make instructional videos for her stu- dents and to hold virtual office hours, in which students can email her ques- tions, which she then answers by mak- ing and posting a video of how the problem is solved. “If it’s complicated, I can write the response out as I’m talk- ing and post video for that. I’d love to do a video conference with students in the future,” says Catlla. The glasses, along with other tech- nology, have the potential to vastly change the classroom experience. One way this could be done, aside from using Catlla’s strategies, is to create a “flipped classroom” in which stu- dents spend their time away from class watching lectures and instructional videos, leaving class time for practice, discussion, or questions. “One of the things I like about the inclusion of a lot of technology is that it allows more time to actually work with students in class,” says Catlla. Although Catlla is primarily using Glass for educational purposes, she has heard, through her Explorers commu- nity on Google Plus, of a number of new ways to use the technology. Uses include an app with a sign language da- tabase that would allow people to sign by following the pictures that they see in the crystal. Catlla has also heard of paralytics using the glasses to experi- ence what it’s like to do certain activi- ties. The potential of the technology for diverse uses is great. In I Am Legend, the 2007 movie starring Will Smith, the protagonist uses a pair of glasses with a small video camera mounted on them to record as he does clinical trials to find a cure for a pathogen that has turned the whole Earth into zombies. Although the tech- nological aspect of the movie seemed fantastical at the time of release, we now live in a time where those glasses are a reality. Technology is increas- ingly gaining a central place in daily life, and its limits seem unbounded. Who knows, maybe the future could hold the tanning bed-like machines that cure people of all illness from this year’s Elysium. Only time will tell.
  • NEWS STORY Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Patriot Francis Marion University Nisheeka Simmons SEE INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING... PAGE 3 Industrial engineering program to be offered Nisheeka Simmons
  • NEWS STORY Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Paladin Furman University Stephanie Bauer “Inside the Presidential Transition: Kohrt takes over as interim president” This writer’s engaging lede is what grabbed me. It was easily the best of the many fine entries. From there, she gave a concise representation of Kohrt and his plans for FU.
  • NEWS STORY Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock USC Sarah Ellis and Thad Moore
  • NEWS STORY Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Tiger Clemson University Grace Greene
  • NEWS STORY Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock USC Thad Moore Thiswasafineexample ofan“important”story thatwasalsoreadable.Ileftwithasenseof whatisatstake. arris Pastides had been USC’s president three weeks when the first cut came. Another came in October. One more in December. There were five budget cuts that year, worth $36.9 million on the Columbia campus. More than 23 percent in a year. South Carolina’s tax revenue was falling in 2008, and politicians’ talk of austerity grew. USC’s cuts — real and rumored — formed a bleak backdrop for a budding presidency. “Those were scary times,” Chief Financial Officer Ed Walton said. “People did not know what was coming next.” To compensate, the university froze hiring, losing 273 employees to retirement and other jobs. It brought in extra students: about 5,000 more in five years. It raised tuition: more than 22 percent for in-state students and nearly a quarter for everyone else. Pastides, 59, is credited with navigating the Great Recession, improving key measures of academic quality and posturing it to improve more. But staying afloat had consequences, and the university will feel them for years, officials say. Five years later, USC is forced into a corner. It can’t raise tuition any more, and an already-packed campus can’t handle more students. USC is at a pivot point: It faces big-picture questions of what it wants to be — and what it can afford. How big should it be? How can it grow more? Whom does it serve? And mostly, what’s next? Spencer Scott Nelson / THE DAILY GAMECOCK Thad Moore TMOORE@DAILYGAMECOCK.COM H PASTIDES • 2 Years Statefunding($) Source: USC Budget Office Years Studentenrollment Source: Institutional Assessment & Compliance Years Tuition($) Out-of-state In-state Source: USC Budget Office
  • FEATURE STORY Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Patriot Francis Marion University Nisheeka Simmons Nisheeka Simmons Holden secures career on camera
  • FEATURE STORY Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Cistern Yard News College of Charleston Nicole DeMarco
  • FEATURE STORY Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Old Gold and Black Wofford College Anna Aguillard Amidst the Beacon Drive-In adver- tisements, coeducation debates, and glee club performance reviews found in the 1974 Old Gold & Black lies a jaw-drop- ping front page news story that many of us here at Wofford have never even heard about – but I think it’s about time that we did. “Wofford streaks its way to glory,” reads the headline, buried in the archives for some 30 years, alongside an actual picture from March 4, 1974 of the streak- ers in action. According to the article, for reasons unknown 125 Wofford stu- dents (all males, as Wofford did not allow women to attend until 1975) “entertained a crowd of 700 Converse spectators by running nude across the Converse cam- pus.” About 60 masked men began the show at 8:15 p.m., and the Converse girls had such a “positive” reaction that multiple groups began following in their footsteps. Local radio coverage arrived at the scene, followed shortly by the Spar- tanburg Police department and even am- bulances. While it lasted Converse girls admittedly did enjoy themselves because the article states, “for once, the usually dull campus came alive” (this sounds a little bit like an understatement to me). The general consensus on Wofford’s end was that it had been “great fun” – fun that incidentally included one dislocated shoulder, one sprained ankle, and one broken toe… thank goodness for that ambulance. Despite the injuries, this unprec- edented display resulted in, when the Wofford men’s pants hit the ground, Wof- ford laying claim to two national records: the first time one college had streaked another and the first all-male college to streak an all female college. When the Spartanburg news media widely broadcasted claims of a return streak by Converse girls, more than 2,000 spectators lined up on Wofford’s campus to watch the “show.” When no girls ar- rived, the Wofford men did not want to let down the Spartanburg community so they disrobed yet again in “an effort to please the Spartans.” This resulted in hate mail. Wofford professor of psychology James Bruce attributed the crowd’s be- havior as, “a collective behavior episode,” proving that educational lessons can be taken from pretty much any event – even naked college boys running rampant. He supports this event as “healthy both physically and psychologically” – an- other round, for the sake of learning, of course? Any volunteers? Ironically, nowhere in this article is the administration mentioned seriously. Wofford security official Chuck Darnell is quoted as jokingly warning, “Three streaks and you’re out!” but apparently this event did not cause too much con- cern with higher-ranking officials at Wofford. In later articles the Converse president reportedly viewed the streak- ing incident “with no particular feeling of alarm.” Which begs the question: can you imagine this happening today, and the participants getting away with it? Say 125 fraternity men were to streak through campus – they would probably be de-chartered, or at least closed down for a year, probably not allowed to have their formals for the next four years. Wofford has been cracking down lately, and when compared to this mini- mal response to such a brazen act dur- ing the 70s, it’s obvious that many things have changed. Raise a glass for that brave group of 125 Wofford men of the past – and ask your dad what he was doing on March 4, 1974. VINTAGE OG&B: A look back at the Streakin’ Seventies by Anna Aguillard, contributor Photo from the March 4, 1974 Old Gold & Black. Veryoriginalingoing backtothearchivesand combiningtheoldwith anupdate.Effectiveflow ofstoryline.Writtenwith agoodfeatureapproach andwasslightlytongue-in- cheek(nopunintended). PhotofromMarch1974 addedtothestory.
  • FEATURE STORY Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock USC Sarah Ellis here’s not much day-to-day bustle at S&S Art Supply on Main Street. On a weekday last month, owner Eric Stockard helped a handful of customers who dropped in throughout the afternoon — a mother and son buying art supplies to make crafts for their home-school lessons, a retired art teacher looking for some frosted mylar sheets. Swing music plays on a Pandora radio station while Stockard’s wife, Amanda Ladymon- Stockard, amuses their 1-year-old daughter, Lily, near the cash register. Rows of colorful art supplies line the walls below local artists’ paintings. But there are gaps on the shelves left by many of the store’s last remaining items that have been sold at T Main Street mainstay to close Leah Grubb / THE DAILY GAMECOCK S&S Art Supply owner Eric Stockard helps a customer choose supplies. The store will close this month. S&S Art Supply’s last big hurrah will be at First Thursdays on Main this week. Since moving to Main Street in July 2010, S&S has hosted local artists for showings at First Thursdays every month. This Thursday will feature eight local artists on display at the store. The downtown festivities kick off Thursday at 6 p.m. on the 1400, 1500 and 1600 blocks of Main Street. — Compiled by Sarah Ellis, Assistant News Editor S&S Art Supply will shut its doors after 4 years Sarah Ellis SELLIS@DAILYGAMECOCK.COM S&S • 3
  • FEATURE STORY Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Kristyn Winch Tucked in a strip mall beside a Dollar General and a barber shop, 20 teenagers are spending eight hours of their Saturday in a classroom — willingly. They are learning to drive with 911 Driving School, a private drivers education school in Columbia. Classes like this one are quickly changing the way teens learn to drive, which used to mean 30 hours of classroom instruction through the public school system. Two years ago, the state allowed high schools to drop their drivers education programs. Many high schools decided to provide it anyway, but in a survey a year after the change, 18 of the state’s 85 districts acknowledged that they had stopped offering drivers education. Other districts may have dropped it, but no further surveys have been done. By Kristyn Winch Staff Writer Drivers ed. takes new directionAs high schools eliminate courses, private schools profit from a rite of passage Kristyn Winch / The Carolina Reporter Please see DRIVERS ED page 11
  • FEATURE STORY Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Thad Moore and Colin Campbell Keenly observed, funny, insightful. I could read another 2,000 words of this.
  • SPORTS STORY Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Evie Kytan SoCon Mixup Staff WrterEvie Kytan The future of the South- ern Conference is unclear. Within the past year, the Southern Conference has lost three of its 12 member institutions. In October, the College of Charleston accepted an in- vitation to join the Colonial Athletic Association. Then in March, both Appalachian State and Georgia Southern announced their departure to the Sun Belt Conference. So why have three schools left the SoCon in the past year? The answer is simple. The moves will generate more money and publicity for each school. For Appalachian State and Georgia Southern, two of the conference’s top foot- ball programs, the switch will catapult the two schools from the FCS, or the Foot- ball Championship Sub- division, to the top tier of Division I football, the FBS, or the Football Bowl Subdi- vision. Now, App State and Georgia Southern will com- pete in a bowl postseason, rather than a playoff series. “Absent the lure of FBS football, those two schools would not have left,” says Mark Line, Wofford’s as- sociate athletic director for sports programs. “The move was fully football driven.” Moving to the FBS brings not only increased revenues and television exposure; the chance to play in a bowl game offers the schools an advantage in recruiting, as both schools will have a hypothetical shot at the na- tional championship. FBS schools distribute 85 schol- arships to 85 different play- ers. FCS schools, on the other hand, only have 63 scholarships to spread out over 85 players, distributed however their coaches deem appropriate. With more ex- posure and higher competi- tion in the FBS, players also have a better chance of being seen by NFL scouts during their college careers. The Southern Conference is typically viewed as one of the toughest conferences in the FCS. Now with the loss of two of the league’s stron- gest teams, many speculate how the loss will shape the future of the conference. “Ultimately I think that it’s bad that Georgia Southern and App are leaving the So- Con,” says sophomore inside linebacker Kevin Thomas. “They are both very good football programs that com- pete for championships year in and year out, which adds to the prestige of the confer- ence. With them both leav- ing, many of us are afraid that the SoCon’s reputation will be viewed as a weaker conference.” From Wofford’s point of view, it’s a tough loss. Ap- palachian State and Georgia Southern are typically the two biggest games of the year for the Terriers; not only be- cause of the excitement and build up surrounding the game, but also because of the high attendance levels at those games. “We are definitely go- ing to miss the rivalry that Wofford has shared with App and Georgia Southern,” says junior tight end Mi- chael Harpe. “Usually when we played one of those two teams, the game was deter- mining who was going to win the SoCon that year. With these two teams leav- ing it will leave a consider- able gap in the SoCon, and now we are the team that has the target on its back.” Both Appalachian State and Georgia Southern will be leaving the SoCon after the 2013-14 academic year, meaning they get one more round in the Southern Con- ference. But for football, neither school will be eligi- ble for the FCS playoffs this coming fall, as both have added scholarship players in order to meet FBS require- ments. Should either Ap- palachian State or Georgia Southern finish with the top league record in the SoCon in the fall, they won’t receive the league’s automatic berth to the FCS playoffs. Instead, the team that finished with the next best record gets the automatic berth. App State and Georgia Southern will be eligible for NCAA berths in all other sports since the same scholarship rules ap- ply. “I do believe that it will give other schools that have been in that third and fourth place slot over the past few years a chance at making the playoffs, which is good for them,” says Thomas. Wofford players still be- lieve that the SoCon’s repu- tation will withstand this conference realignment. “It’s still going to be a very competitive conference with new teams coming in, and Samford, Furman and Chat- tanooga are still here,” says Harpe. “We will not take these teams lightly, and we will continue to work for our third conference title in four years.” The transition for App State and Georgia South- ern was a long time com- ing. For several years, both schools fan bases expressed interest in moving to the FBS. It wasn’t until three years ago that the Eagles and the Mountaineers both stated their interest in leav- ing the conference. Until their announcement, FBS conferences didn’t know the schools were available. Both schools had to wait to re- ceive an invitation from an FBS conference. “The only reason the Sun Belt invited these schools is because they had holes they needed to fill,” says Line. “This is all wrapped up in the expansion of the ACC and the Big 10. Those chang- es have changed the entire landscape of college foot- ball. It’s all interconnected.” For College of Charleston, the motivation to leave the Southern Conference was the same as App State and Georgia Southern - money and publicity. However un- like App and Southern, Charleston does not have a football program, meaning the athletic department re- lies on men’s basketball to bring in the majority of the revenue. The Cougars are joining a league that some say “puts basketball first.” The CAA is a conference that has be- come a household name in men’s basketball after George Mason and VCU’s runs to the NCAA Final Four in 2006 and 2011 re- spectively. The move gives Charleston higher name op- ponents that they hope will increase their performance and thus exposure. Unfor- tunately the problem with the CAA is the traveling. The league includes mostly northern schools, so virtu- ally every game is a plane ride away. That’s not just basketball that has to travel that far, it’s all sports. “If Charleston moved to the CAA thinking the bigger TV contracts would make them more money, they’ve made a mistake,” says Line. “Their travel budget is going to be off the charts. Yes there will be some money, but it won’t be as much as they thought it was, or it won’t cover what they need it to cover.” A switch to the CAA means a likelier chance of making it into the NCAA A look at what it could mean for Wofford and the conference’s future tournament as an at-large bid, a difficult feat to achieve in the SoCon. While the Southern Conference has been striving to become a conference that sends two teams to the NCAA tour- nament, the conference has remained a one-bid league. The Cougars are also ex- pected to make the move to the CAA after the 2013-14 academic school year. Now, it’s up to Southern Conference commissioner John Iamarino and the col- lege presidents to rebuild the conference. “The good thing is that the SoCon has the right people working down at the conference office. The com- missioner is really smart and balanced. He really knows this level of athletics,” says Line. “We have a lot of con- fidence that he’ll do the right thing.” The future of the confer- ence though is really up to the presidents of each mem- ber institution. The confer- ence holds a spring meeting each year attended by the president and athletic di- rector of each school. Those leaders hold the vote as to who to invite to the confer- ence. For now, there is only speculation about who will join the remaining nine Southern Conference schools. With three leaving now, it’s likely the confer- ence will want to replace those with three more. The schools many people are talking about include VMI, Mercer, Coastal Carolina, Belmont University, Stetson and East Tennessee State. “For Wofford, we’re in the right spot. We’re at the center geographically, and we are surrounded by simi- lar institutions that we can compete with,” says Line. “Our job is to find the right pieces to this puzzle in order to make our league as strong as possible.” While there hasn’t been much movement in the SoCon during the past 10 years, the conference has historically had to reinvent itself. The Southern Confer- ence was at one time home to many current ACC and SEC schools. “Iamarino has been ter- rific,” says Line. “We have to give him credit because he’s working really hard to try and hold this league to- gether.”
  • SPORTS STORY Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Cistern Yard News College of Charleston Chopper Johnson “Hustle not enough as App ousts Cougars”
  • SPORTS STORY Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Paladin Furman University Bryan Betts “The search for the perfect walkout song” As good writers do, Betts went beyond the box score to find an interesting little story. Well-written and funny and probably the only sports story I’ve read that quotes Taylor Swift. Well done!
  • SPORTS STORY Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock USC Isabelle Khurshudyan Site of USC’sSite of USC’s women’s basketballwomen’s basketball NCAA Tournament 1st &NCAA Tournament 1st & 2nd round games2nd round games BARRED& The Confederate flag is not part of Dawn Staley’s history, but it’s become a major issue in her present. The South Carolina women’s basketball coach will never play in Columbia during the NCAA Tournament as long as the flag hangs atop a 30-foot pole in front of the State House. Since 2001, the NCAA has banned the state of South Carolina from hosting postseason events whose sites are predetermined. Because Columbia is not a host, the Gamecocks will travel 1,620 miles to Boulder, Colo., Saturday for their first-round matchup with South Dakota State, despite being the best seed among the four teams assigned to Boulder. Just as Staley’s team loses a competitive advantage, the state misses out on the millions in economic impact that would come with hosting men’s NCAA Tournament games. Even as the national economy has sagged in recent years, cities similar to Columbia’s size have enjoyed financial benefits from hosting. “I understand the history here in South Carolina,” Staley said. “It’s not my history, but it’s somebody’s history. I think it prevents us and it prevents me from doing my job in a place that I choose to call home. If it creates an opportunity for us not to have (an NCAA Tournament game at home), then yes, I’m offended.” ‘Man, that sucks’ Former USC point guard La’Keisha Sutton remembers thinking it was weird South Carolina still flew the Confederate flag prominently, but the New Jersey native had a more animated reaction after hearing USC could not host because of it. “My feeling was like, ‘Man, that sucks,’” Sutton said. “We wanted to play in the South. Columbia has great support, but they can’t come see us play for what we worked so hard for during the season because of the Confederate flag.” Women’s basketball teams that make the NCAA Tournament and were previously awarded a host site are almost always placed at that site. The Gamecocks traveled to West Lafayette, Ind., last season for their first NCAA Tournament trip under Staley. Were Columbia eligible to host first- and second- round games, it wouldn’t be guaranteed to get them. But with the $64 million, 18,000-seat Colonial Life Arena, a nearby airport and ample hotel accommodations, Columbia would have been a strong candidate. The NCAA highly values all three of those factors when picking host sites, said Old Dominion Athletics Director Wood Selig, whose school hosted first- and second-round games last year and will host a Sweet 16 and Elite Eight site this year. If USC makes the Sweet 16, it would play at ODU. “Our philosophy at ODU is we want to host as many NCAA championship events as we possibly can because it’s good for our teams if they are fortunate enough to be participating and able to play on campus,” Selig said. “It’s great for our fans who have been following the team or the sport all year long. We feel it’s good for our community because it brings a lot of economic impact to the area that would not otherwise occur.” Selig said the NCAA gets the “lion’s share” of ticket revenue from host sites, though ODU usually breaks even or makes a small profit from hosting. But he doesn’t mind the NCAA taking a big cut from tickets because hosting allows ODU to enjoy visibility on a national stage. Though USC’s women’s basketball team is most directly disadvantaged by the NCAA’s policy, cities in South Carolina suffer most from not being able Isabelle Khurshudyan IKHURSHUDYAN@DAILYGAMECOCK.COM 1,6201,620 milesmiles Boulder, Colo.Boulder, Colo.** ** Columbia, S.C.Columbia, S.C. STARRED Brian Almond THE DAILY GAMECOCK In the spring of 2000, legislation was passed to remove the Confederate battle flag from the State House dome. FLAG 2 Austin Price THE DAILY GAMECOCK
  • SPORTS STORY Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Tiger Clemson University Gavin Oliver
  • SPORTS STORY Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Erin Shaw Allyoueverneed/wanttoknowaboutthelifeofabaseball! PAGE LAYOUT BY ERIN SHAW Well, you made it this far. You are nestled in a glove, the pitcher’s fingers placed perpendicular to your seams for a four-seam fastball. He winds up and hurtles you toward an aluminum bat. In an instant, you are flying in the opposite direction, landing in the stands. A USC student could pick you up and return you for a free $5 gift card to McAlister’s Deli. Or a child could race to you and claim you for his own. If this happens, you are not coming back. But don’t fret. You are one of about 660 dozen baseballs the University of South Carolina Gamecocks go through each year. One of 7,920. If all of you were lined up end to end, it would be enough to get a batter from home plate to first base more than 20 times. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the No. 1 team in Baseball America’s preseason ranking, goes through half that amount each year. “We do order a lot of balls,” said Kyle Lipsey, the director of baseball operations at USC. “I don’t know if anyone orders the amount that we do.” The reasoning is twofold. For one thing, Lipsey said, Carolina Stadium is not designed for retaining baseballs. If you are rocketed over the third base fence, you will land on a grassy hill and roll toward the Congaree River. Gone. If you are popped on the right side of first base or anywhere over right field, you will smack into the asphalt on Williams Street and become too scuffed and dented to return to play. Gone. And if you are fouled back onto the roof of the press box or coaches’ offices, you will most likely end up stuck in the gutter. See ya. The second reason rests with athletic director and former head coach Ray Tanner, who started the custom of ordering substantially more game balls than practice balls. Generally, teams order lesser- quality practice balls for scrimmages and batting practice, saving the official Rawlings R1 balls for games. “I’m of the mentality that you want to play and practice with the ball you’re ultimately going to use,” Tanner said. “We want players to adjust to real-life conditions, so when you practice, the ball should be new.” The athletics department orders an average of 110 dozen practice balls and average of 550 dozen game balls, according to Lipsey. At around $5 each, the baseball budget for the university would be nearly $40,000, but the SEC gives the university a significant subsidy, Lipsey said, because the balls are mandated by the conference. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. A lot has to happen before you make it into a game. The beginning You start life as a small rubber ball with a cork center. A machine wraps you in four layers of wool yarn to fatten you up and enable you to bounce back after being hit repeatedly. Two figure-eight pieces of leather are then hand- stitched together with exactly 108 stitches to form your recognizable red and white cover. For the Major Leagues, this happens in one special factory in central Costa Rica. You, like the majority of other baseballs, are made in China. By boat, you sail from China to Washington, Mo., a city just outside St. Louis. Around Thanksgiving, you make your way to South Carolina via FedEx truck. You arrive at T and T Sporting Goods, a family- owned establishment across the street from the state fairgrounds. All the Gamecock baseballs are stored here for the year. Carter Ellis, Jr. has been working at T and T for 23 years and stringently monitors the baseballs that come in and out of the store. “Baseballs have a tendency to grow legs,” he said. Lipsey usually keeps one to two cases of baseballs at Carolina Stadium at a time and gets more from Ellis on an as-needed basis. This way, there is more space in the Gamecock equipment rooms and coaches and players are deterred from using more balls than they actually need. The arrangement between the sporting goods store and the university–call it a gentleman’s agreement– has been going on “since forever” according to Ellis, and he alone gives permission for balls to leave the facility. “Nobody knows this little brick building does what it does, but we take pride in doing it,” Ellis said. “We love each and every one of our baseballs.” The middle Once you make it to the stadium’s equipment room, it’s time to get rubbed up with baseball mud. This is meant to remove your raw slickness and pearl-white sheen. Carter Scheetz, a sport and entertainment management student at USC, carefully removes your plastic wrapper. Then he dips his fingers in a tub of Lena Blackburne Rubbing Mud, a unique muck that comes from a secret spot on the banks of the Delaware River in Delran, N.J. It is dark brown, odorless and much more sophisticated than the infield dirt used on baseballs in the old days. At $43 for a standard tub, it’s expensive mud. But a little goes a long way. It only takes a small dab of mud mixed with water to rub up a ball. Normally, Scheetz will rub up five to six dozen baseballs before a game. So now you are game-day ready. You are off-white and smooth, sitting in ball bags in the dugout waiting to be warmed up. This is it. Well, maybe. Sometimes game balls don’t even make it into play. Both pitcher and umpire can throw out balls during play if they don’t like the way they feel. On this season’s team, sophomore relief pitcher Evan Beal considers himself the pickiest about the baseballs he throws. Even the most minor imperfection in a ball can bother him, he said. “If I throw a ball in the dirt and it skips or gets scuffed, I’ll usually throw it to the dugout,” said Beal, who usually tosses out two to three balls per inning. It helps him handle the unpredictability of pitching. Being able to change the balls out “mentally makes me feel more in control.” If you feel OK to the pitcher, there’s still a good chance you won’t last long. In the Majors, the life of a game ball is about six pitches. At Carolina Stadium, a game ball could last one pitch or a whole inning. You never know for sure. But let’s say you make it through a game. Now you become a practice ball. As a practice ball, you are a little damaged and worse for wear, but still valuable. Your job is to help players perfect their throwing and catching. Coaches hit grounders and pop flies to infielders and outfielders to sharpen their skills. You get grass stains. And dirt scuffs. Your ink starts to smudge. The end Eventually, you become too worn to be a practice ball. Your next stop is the batting cage, where baseballs go to die. Every day players come in for hitting time, using you until you start showing your age and fraying at the seams. The synthetic turf grass of the indoor facility is harsh on your already shabby leather exterior. The lip on the aluminum bat slices into your loosening cover. The pitching machine plucks at your red stitches. Such is the life of a baseball. You may be able to endure this for quite some time, but you finish your days scratched, scuffed and busted. They throw you away. You’re out. WEEK OF APRIL 22, 2012 PAGE 5Carolina Reporter The SouthCarolina Vanderbilt NorthCarolina Louisville MississippiState Oregon 7,920 6,000 3,900 2,400 4,500 1,800 5,400 Arkansas 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 7th6th State The University of South Carolina baseball team uses more balls per year than most top-ranked teams in Baseball America’s 2013 preseason poll. Baseball usage Preseason rank Source: Directors of baseball operations at each university Erin Shaw / The Carolina Reporter Thousands of USC baseballs travel a long road before they are used, lost and tossed at Carolina Stadium Behind Seams the By Erin Shaw Staff Writer From start to finish, the lifespan of a University of South Carolina baseball can be long or short, but one thing is for sure: there is no shortage of them. The two-time national championship team orders an average of 7,920 baseballs per season. Life of a Carolina baseball SPECIAL DELIVERY Baseballs are rubbed with special mud prior to play. Doing this reduces the ball’s shine and slickness. Carter Scheetz, a student at USC, has been rubbing up baseballs for the past two years. GETTING MUDDY READY FOR PLAY DEATH BY BATTING CAGE PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT Damaged game balls are reused during practices. Lesser-quality practice balls and recycled game balls are eventually taken to the batting cage, where they fall apart. Gamecock relief pitcher Evan Beal shows how to hold his favorite pitch, a four-seam fastball, which he can throw between 90 and 93 mph. Beal admits to being picky about the feel of the baseballs he throws. Erin Shaw / The Carolina Reporter Baseballs are stored at a local sporting goods store under lock and key before the season. The SEC mandates that all teams use baseballs made by Rawlings. Source: USC Athletics
  • ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT STORY Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Elaine Best If you’re like me and are bad about planning ahead, then you’ve re- alized that Thanksgiving break is farther away this year than it was last year. I know many students are kicking themselves for not bringing more items from home to school, such as more cold-weather clothes, more shampoo, or — perhaps the most important item of them all — more food. Like me, we were all planning on having break to pack up the shorts and bring back the sweatpants. But, seeing as we have to wait until the end of the month and the temperature is dropping like your expectations for your future, I’ve come up with some foolproof ways to survive until Thanksgiving break: 1. Drown your miseries into a Pumpkin Latte. Much like your straight-A midterm grades, they aren’t here to stay: enjoy them while they last. 2. Befriend the squirrels on campus. They have much experience in the art of surviving winter and they are just furry rats. You’re a human — surely you can pick up on some tips from them (if you’re allergic to nuts, you may want to skip this step). 3. If the dining area is chilly, make yourself a napkin blanket. Ca- sually do this by asking someone to pass you a napkin. Continue to do this throughout the meal. If anyone questions what you’re doing, spill his or her drink. Proceed to take more napkins to help clean up the spill, slipping one onto your lap throughout the chaos. If they do not have a drink, randomly tell them a story from your childhood. Tell them your grandmother used to be so poor she would make quilts out of napkins. Your napkin blanket reminds you of your grandmother. How dare this person judge you! 4. Being cold in the classroom is a different story: if you’re in Mil- liken, try to avoid the tears of Bio Majors for those will only make you freeze faster. In Olin, attempt to sit directly under the fluorescent lights — who knows, maybe you’ll get a tan out of it! In Old Main, constantly move in your desk to warm yourself up. The old wooden furniture may make obnoxious creaking noises that could distract your classmates, but it’s only you we care about. Disregard their learn- ing experience for your own personal interests. 5. Constantly borrow items from people without the intention of ever returning them. Do nice things for them on occasion, such as giving them a set of monogrammed coasters or telling them their Sperry’s look extra nice that day. This way, you can keep the Keurig you borrowed for “just that one week” until break. 6. Go to the gym so that you can fit into the only pair of jeans you packed that you haven’t worn since last year. 7. If number 6 doesn’t work out, see Step 1. 8. Find your secret twin from England whom you met at camp and make them go to your classes while you hibernate until break. 9. Print off some power point slides for your class to make yourself feel productive. Quickly grab the warm papers from the printer and place them on your arms and face. Ignore the judgmental looks from your peers — they are simply jealous of your ingenuity. Enjoy the heat while it lasts! 10. For those of you who didn’t pack rain gear and have now dis- covered Wofford’s lovely rainy season, make yourself a raincoat out of plastic bags. Not only will you have a thrifty, recycled raincoat, you will also have endless pockets. Now when your friends want to go frolic somewhere, they will hand all their belongings to you, making you stand off to the sides, covered in plastic bags. In the rain. Watch- ing your friends feel the freedom of packing appropriately. Singing that one part of Katy Perry’s song to yourself: “Do you ever feel like a plastic bag?”… Follow these steps and you’re sure to make it to break! November may seem like the month that will never end, but now there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. And don’t worry — at least if you don’t survive, you don’t have to worry about exams. The foolproof guide for the unprepared student: getting by until break by Elaine Best, contributing writer
  • ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT STORY Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Carlie Maldonado A group of contestants prepares to perform during the prejudging round of competition on Feb. 16. Photo: LukeCleland What would you like to see at the tal- ent show? “Are they gonna have magic tricks?” said Dr. Dan Olinger, chair of the Divi- sion of Bible. “Good juggling is always nice.” Seniors on Stage, the first student event of its kind, will take place Satur- dayat 7 p.m. in Stratton Hall.Olinger, one of the event’s judges, is just one of many people on campus who wonder what to expect of the show. He said he will have to get a sense of how to judge the talents as the competi- tion progresses and as he sees just what students have to offer. Dr. Stephen Jones and Miss Jane Smith, a professor in the School of Edu- cation, will also be judging the contes- tants. Olinger wants to see something other than what can be found in a fine arts com- petition. “Creativity is part of the image of God,” he said. “The first thing we learn about God is that he is a creator.” But while Olinger would like to see a talent that is completely out-of-the-box, it would still require some skill and practice to truly impress him. “My inclination is to give out awards that actually mean something,” Olinger said. “Somebody gets to go to Disney World. He ought to have brought the ‘stuff’ to earn the trip.” As for his own secret talent, Olinger said he throws a football left-handed and It’s time for talent Students to contend for“magical” prize in Seniors on Stage By: CARLIE MALDONADO Staff Writer Imagine for a moment that you are a soldier in combat during wartime behind enemy lines. You’re lost from your unit, and you don’t know your exact location. Night is falling, and the enemy is sur- rounding you. It seems like there’s no- where to turn. What should you do? At this point there is only one thing you can do -- or continue to do. Call for help. As Christians constantly engaged in warfare, there are times when we may feel deserted or surrounded by the enemy, but University to break from routine for Day of Prayer we often neglect what should be our greatest asset: communication with our leader. God has promised to deliver his people when they call upon him. He has promised to hear our prayers. Each semester, the University sets aside one day to devote to prayer. On Tuesday, Feb. 19, the university family will begin the day by hearing a challenge from Dr. Bob Jones III. Then the student body will break into groups for a more focused time of prayer, first by society, and then by mission team interests. To end the scheduled activities for the day, faculty and students will reconvene for a time of worship and praise. A half-day of rest will follow this last scheduled meeting. Mr. Kyle Wilcox, special assistant to Dr. Stephen Jones and one of the coordinators of the day of prayer activities, said this day is important to the University’s mission and that prayer is important in every believer’s life. “We’re training students to be disciples of Christ,” he said. “Having a day focused on [prayer] highlights the fact that as disciples, as followers of Christ, communication with our Father is critical. A disciple has to be See TALENT SHOW p. 8 » Janelle Claypool, Rebekah McAnally and Catherine Cleland pause for a word of prayer. Photo: EmmaKlak By: ERIN KIMBRO Staff Writer See PRAYER p. 8 »
  • ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT STORY Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Cistern Yard News College of Charleston Christina D’Antoni The writer drew me in from the start and made me desperately want brunch in Charleston, right now! 23232323232322322323232333232333232323332333noveoveoveenov mbermbermberbermberbember 2122121221212121221 here’s to brunch: by CHRISTINA D’ANTONI FlFlFlliiip the page to read about some oooofff Charleston’s best brunches! Lowcountry Style
  • ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT STORY Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Tiger Clemson University Savannah Mozingo
  • ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT STORY Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University Jennifer Brown Jennifer Brown brownj@mytjnow.com Winthrop’s rendition of the Broadway musical, “Urinetown,” opened last Wednesday night to a full house, and despite the odd name, actually did involve urine. The play, directed by Stephen Gundersheim, marks the theatre of the year. The Araea Group and Dodger Theatricals produced the play on Broadway in September 2001. The title “Urinetown” creates some uncertainty. “I know nothing about this. I read the description of what it was about – they have to pay to pee,” sophomore psychology major Mari Reeves said. Some students in the audience, such as junior sociology major Eboni Ford, came as event credit. “I came to the play tonight because it is required of my class, and I’m in script analysis,” Ford said. “In my class, they’ve been hyping the play up a lot, so I’m expecting the play to go really well.” Reeves, however, came out of her pure enjoyment of all things musicals. Despite the advancements made with technology entertaining. “I love musicals,” Reeves said. “I still think live performances like this are awesome.” “Urinetown” gives the audience a glimpse into a small town. President Caldwell B. Cladwell funds his own luxuries by charging his citizens a fee to use the public amenities. Any rebellion, or illegal urinating, is met with a trip to the dreaded and mysterious Urinetown, from which no one returns. Cladwell faces a rebellion from the citizens of the town when his daughter Hope falls in the love with the leader of the pee-for-free rebellion, Bobby Strong. In addition to the unique name, another characteristic sets this musical apart from Lockstock and Little Sally, talk to the audience about the play throughout the entire show, even mocking the name and, at times, the characters’ actions. In theatre, this method of addressing the audience is referred to as breaking the fourth wall. “Urinetown” generated an almost constant laughter from the audience. Cast members told the story of Urinetown through over-the-top, loud songs, paired with choreographed dance routines and facial expressions, ultimately poking fun at the play and giving the audience members even more of a reason to chuckle. Freshman elementary education major Anne Marie Maghakian said she has always had a great appreciation for the arts, but the actors and actresses themselves caught her attention. “The actors and actresses were phenomenal and exceeded all of my expectations,” Maghakian said. “I loved “Urinetown.”’ Although he admits that the play “kinda had a weird name,” sophomore Travis Baccene was surprised by his peers’ performances. “It gives me hope for my generation,” Baccene said. “There’s a lot of talent at this school. It was cool to actually learn that.” The overall consensus from the audience was that “Urinetown” was a hit, or as Reeves said, “I thought that it was freaking amazing.” “Urinetown” wins over audience with royal flush Graphic by Tracy Anderson
  • ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT STORY Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Hannah Jeffrey Star-crossed strangers now connected on Twitter We’ve all been there. You’re walking to class, and you happen to make eye contact with some cutie coming your way, and under your breath you mutter, “Well, hello there.” And then you never see that person again. The soul mate you thought you had for about 30 seconds has exited your life, never to return. All hope is lost. Abandon ship. Your life is over. But before you throw yourself out of your dorm window, you may want to check out a mysterious new Twitter account called @USCCrushes, launched this week. This anonymous account puts the power in Twitter users’ hands when it comes to expressing their true feelings to their secret crushes. The two anonymous founders said they do not wish for their identities to be revealed and would only share that they are both female and both attend USC. They asked to remain nameless and would not disclose any other identifiable information. The Twitter handle was born Tuesday night after one of the founders saw an anonymous crush account from another Hannah Jeffrey NEWS@DAILYGAMECOCK.COM Users voice secret attractions anonymously via @USCCrushes CRUSH ● 2 “To the Amanda in my math class, lord forgive me for the sins I will commit for you” “the little cute in cola hall with the freckles, keep doing what ur doing girl” “The guy that was wearing orange nikes and walking from bates this morning...you can get it #hellohottie” “Ashton. Kutcher. Lookalike. Don’t pretend we didn’t make eye contact and don’t pretend you didn’t love it.” @USCCRUSHES Enjoyed this smart, witty writing. Sidebar with tweets is a good addition to the story. Story has depth and detail without running too long and exhausting the humor of the topic.
  • EDITORIAL WRITING Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Skyliner North Greenville University Chelsea Ferguson Call me emoji: Moby Dick More than 160 years after its initial publication, Herman Melville’s iconic novel Moby Dick has been restyled for a younger, more technologically-savvy generation. The 135-chapter novel is still a staple in American literature classes at the high school and college level. Sitting down and reading classic literature word-for-word requires a If actually reading the book does not appeal to you, there is a somewhat pricey alternative. Moby Dick is in the public domain, so the entire text is available online for free. However, you can pay $40 for a softcover black and white or $200 for a hardcover color version of Emoji Dick. This version is comprised completely of emojis. An emoji, according The New Yorker, is a Japanese pictograph that can be used in place of letters or entire words. The whole novel is written in tiny pictures rather than in actual words. It is no secret that the younger generation is glued to technology. Phones, tablets and laptops are almost a part of us, and our social lives hinge on a screen in our hands. Our communication has changed drastically over the last decade, but does it need to extend to literature as well? More importantly, what is the point? The founder of the Emoji Dick project, Fred Beneson, explains his motivations in an email to The New Yorker, “I’m interested in the phenomenon of how our language, communications, and technology. Emoji are either a low point or a high point in that story, soIfeltIcouldconfrontalotof our shared anxieties about the future of human expression (see: Twitter or text messages) by forcing a great work of literature through you have it. The project founder himself is not sure whether or not this is a high or low point for technology and literature. founder should be telling. Taking a greatworkof literatureasBeneson said and forcing it through If readers are not even capable of reading the actual words of a novel in English, then an emoji version does one of two things. If you actually understand them, they dumb the literature down to what is, at best, a massive picture book. If you do not understand them, then the task of translating them is certainly more as they were actually written. of Moby Dick reads, “Call me has a phone, a man’s head, a sail- boat, a whale, and a hand. Even looking at the English next to the pictographs is confusing. If you are going to read the novel, the original version would be easier to understand and certainly cheaper than the emoji translation. Other than being an interesting — if not puzzling — technological experiment, what does a book translated completely into picture-sentences say about the intelligence of this generation? weary argument, “If it leads one kid to pick up some classic Later, in the same article, Ron Hogan writes, “People these days just don’t read much anymore. That’s why newspapers are dying, magazine circulation is drying up, and writing is on the decline. There’s got to be some way to make Herman Melville’s dense, modernist tome Moby Dick appealing Hogan and many others are simply missing the whole point of reading classic literature. The point of reading is not only for entertainment, but also for education. Pictographs simply do not cut it. Yes, reading a long book is time-consuming. So are school, work and relationships. We do not stop relating to people, getting college degrees or working just because it takes up time. If we did, we would have no friends or income, much less be able to speak and write like intelligent human beings. Reading is no different. Dumbing down books and new generation gives people yet another reason to be lazy and attached to technology. Herman Melville was not writing for this generation, he was writing for people in 1851. That does not excuse us from taking time to understand any piece that shaped the landscape of American literature. It is not any more or less important than other classics, but it does not deserve to be watered-down to such a base level. If you are going to take the time to read, do yourself a favor and read the original. You might the words of Herman Melville, “It is better to fail in originality Chelsea Ferguson Assistant Editor
  • EDITORIAL WRITING Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Paladin Furman University Jacob Zimmerman “Community, cooperation and the presidential search”
  • EDITORIAL WRITING Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Cistern Yard News College of Charleston Chopper Johnson Well-roundedcolumnwithstrong writingandastrongstance. Writteninawittymannerwithpoints madeinawaythatisnotoverly confrontational;yetthepointofthe editorialstanceisquiteclear. OPINION photo by Colin Johnson In the classic film “Casablanca,” Claude Rains’ crooked police captain shuts down Humphrey Bogart’s bar by announcing that he is “shocked – SHOCKED! – to find that gambling is going on,” as a croupier hands him a pile of money he’s just won at the roulette table. Sitting in a recent international symposium on the impact of cruise ships on local tourist economies, I was baffled at the number of Charleston residents who seem to be shocked – SHOCKED! – that cruise lines are in business to make money. The symposium, hosted by the Preservation Society of Charleston, invited speakers to discuss how cruise ship passengers differ from “land tourists,” and how cruise lines work to maximize profit. For a city like Charleston, which is contemplating footing the bill for a new terminal for Carnival Cruise Lines, the question becomes, “is it worth it?” That depends on who you want to believe. In a 2010 report, the State Ports Authority touted job growth, increased tourist spending and a chance of repeat visitors to the city as plusses for the proposed terminal. But most of the SPA’s math was based on estimates, best-case-scenario math and speculation. A 2012 report commissioned by the Historic Charleston Foundation argued that the SPA’s numbers were completely wrong, and that their estimates, worth-case-scenario math and speculation were much more accurate. What is the truth? Well, cruise lines have gotten rich by scaring cities into building and handing over terminals, with no long-term contracts in place, and then doing everything they can to keep their passengers on board. And, because they are not paying for hotel rooms, cruise ship passengers spend notably less per night than land tourists. But, there is a very good chance that the passengers who come through Charleston to board cruise would not otherwise be here at all, and money they do spend on food, drinks and Market Street souvenirs does not strain the limited number of hotel beds on the peninsula. The symposium did not address how much this actual effect has been, because to the best of my knowledge, no one from a downtown restaurants association, or a representative of the Market Street retailers, was invited to speak. If you live downtown in the summer, you know we have already mortgaged the city to the almighty tourist dollar. It’s interesting that the Preservation crowd draws its line in the sand at cruise ships, and not at, say, a Wet Willie’s in the historic district along East Bay. I have nothing against cruise ship passengers (well, no more than I have against the other 4.2 million tourists that walk past my front door in a given year), but I do believe Carnival wants something for nothing. Lock in a long-term contract, mandate that the ships not serve full meals while they are in port (which causes more money to flow into local restaurants and bars) and institute a voucher system in which each passenger receives, from and paid for by Carnival, a $25 or $50 voucher to spend at local shops. The cruise lines have acquiesced to all of these stipulations before, and they could all work for Charleston if the SPA isn’t afraid to take a hard line. The bottom line is simple: If the figures don’t add up in favor of the city’s economy, don’t be afraid to let Carnival sail its way down to Savannah or Jacksonville. But, in a town that has made its recent fortune by carving up and selling off little pieces of its own culture, don’t pretend to be shocked that other people are just as cut- throat about making a profit as you are. Carnival Conundrum: Who is shocked by the cruise ship debate? by Chopper Johnson
  • EDITORIAL WRITING Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock USC Max Stolarcyzk Student smokers need not worry about ban USC will be kicking off the New Year on the right note, or so it thinks, by helping everyone make the right choice. Come Jan. 1, 2014, Tobacco Free USC will take effect and all tobacco products will be banned from campus. The much-maligned ban has been in the works for quite some time now, as made evident by our near-weekly lambasting of it. But we have good news, the pitchforks can be lowered. USC left the policy to be communally enforced. In other words, you won’t be getting dragged away by the ear by any campus police or school officials. At least, not necessarily, provided your residual anger over the ban is kept in check. Moreover, there will be no tickets issued or changed patrol habits to enforce the ban. What a relief. This allocation of manpower leaves the enforcement — or complete lackthereof, as evidenced by the current policy — of the ban up to our peers. Should you disturb a fellow Gamecock, they may be inclined to ask you for your name and file a complaint via an online form. As long as smokers listen to their mothers and don’t talk to strangers, the only consequence will be identification of their favorite hang-out as a “hot spot” for smoking. Naturally, frenemies looking to give you a hard time can also covertly turn your name in, but Healthy Carolina is hoping college students will be a little more mature. So, against all odds, your name’s been turned in. Now what? First-time violators will have to report to a workshop for 30 minutes, offered by Carolina Wellness. Upon the second violation, you’ll be charged a $50 fine and have to write an essay regarding the future effects of their tobacco use. If you so happen to have particularly bad friends, or impressively obnoxious tobacco use habits, your third violation will necessitate a $75 fine, probation and required community service hours or a cessation program. That’s not all. If you’re reported, counselors will also ask if you plan on quitting. Should you say no, you’ll be required to begin a cessation program and perhaps watch a documentary that you’ll have to write an essay about. Thankfully, this isn’t anything an innocent smile and nod can’t handle. While all this fuss is a little troublesome, we’re happy USC found an thoroughly ineffective enforcement policy that students can completely ignore. Though they may be angry that the ban is on the books at all, students can rest easy knowing there’s no way they’ll actually face consequences for violating it. The school can tout its tobacco-free and progressive policy, and students just need to make sure they’re not with mixed company before lighting up. ISSUE USC’s tobacco ban will be communally enforced. OUR STANCE Consequentially, it won’t be enforced, so everyone can relax. “While all this fuss is a little troublesome, we’re happy USC found a thoroughly ineffective enforcement policy that students can completely ignore.”
  • EDITORIAL WRITING Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University Adarrell Gadsden Winthrop administration didn’t alert students to the discovery of a dead body onWinthrop campus. - dena@mytjnow.com Winthrop administration should have alerted students about corpse on campus On Sunday Nov. 7, 2013, the body of a Rock Hill man was found on the outskirts Winthrop near Cherry Road behind Lee Wicker Residence Hall. The man was not a student, and is reported to have died of natural causes after col- lapsing. While many Winthrop stu- dents learned about the discovery of the body through text messages and pictures from friends, Win- throp administration did not relay any message to students about the discovery of the body. While there isn’t much that administration could have done, alerting students later on in the day once the body was removed seems as if it would have been the more proper course of ac- tion. Students sent around - working over the body. This means that students did see the body, and for some, a traumatic experience. If someone did see or stumble upon the body, knowing that there is somewhere they can go to talk about what they saw is important. When the administra- tion elected not to alert students that this happened, students relied on information from friends who weren’t completely sure of what happened. Winthrop has set in place that alerts students via text and through phone calls of happenings on campus or around the campus 365 days a year, such as crimes that have happened on and around the vicinity of the Winthrop cam- pus. Sending out an email under system after the body was removed would have allowed students to receive accurate information on what happened just outside of Lee Wicker Sunday morning. Winthrop administration chose not to alert students for certain reasons unknown at this time about the discovery of the body on it’s campus. It is known that Win- throp campus police assisted Rock Hill Police in securing the area and removal of the body from the campus, so it seems that informa- tion should have been made more readily available to students. If stu- dents do want more information on the situation, they should con- Adarrell Gadsden
  • EDITORIAL WRITING Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Aaron McDuffie Scott’s case highlights government opacity “It’s critical moving forward that our government officials value transparency and remain accountable to the public.” Randy Scott’s tenure as Columbia’s police chief will end May 1, he announced Monday, but too many questions regarding his work and resignation remain unanswered. After three weeks of taxpayer-funded leave and a $50,000 state-sponsored retirement package, Columbia residents deserve more complete explanations than officials have provided so far. O f f i c e r s f i led l aw s u it s a g a i n s t S c o t t t h is year, and crime continues to plague Five Poi nt s. We’re worried there is more to Scott’s d e p a r t u r e t han has been announced so far. Though Scott’s t i m e s h e e t s , his application for retirement and several other documents were released, The Daily Gamecock’s request for emails sent to government officials regarding Scott’s conduct on the job were inappropriately dismissed. We understand some private information is excluded from the Freedom of Information Act, but officials should redact sensitive information, not reject requests altogether. With a First Amendment lawyer agreeing the public deserves to know more, our requests should be reviewed again, and more information should be released quickly so we can understand Scott’s situation. It’s critical in this case and going forward — government officials claim to value transparency, but they need to demonstrate it. Scott cited post-traumatic stress disorder for his departure, but we shouldn’t have to take his word for it. He was responsible for our safety for years, and he’s received lots of public money. He should be held accountable and so should public officials who are blocking information we deserve. The opacity is frustrating, costly and dangerous. This editorial epitomizes the newspaper’s watchdog role in the community. Well-written and straight to the point, the editorial makes a convincing case for why anyone reading the piece - student, faculty member or community resident - should care that government is not completely forthcoming about the police chief’s departure.
  • COLUMN Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Collegian S.C. State University Shanaya Edmunds Everyday some ordi- nary person comes up with a brilliant idea that could possi- bly change the world. Sadly, we never get to experience that life changing idea be- cause that ordinary person thinks they’re too ordinary of such a grand idea. This could not be anymore untrue. The Oprahs and Bill Gates of the world were once “ordinary” people, with a brilliant idea. The difference between them and you is a simple one. They did not let their fears, and the many no’s of others stop them from moving forward. We are so afraid to fail that we don’t even try. What’s the worst that could happen? Yeah, sure it could possibly not work out and you’d go back to liv- ing your normal life. Or, everything could work out and you’d be great! Its all in how you look at things. The one thing the world needs the most (besides love) is people willing to take risks and chances. There is no such thing as living safe. Either you’re living or you’re not. When you are called from this earth, how do you want to be remembered? What do you want the dash between ‘sunrise’ and ‘sunset’ to mean? Do you want to be able to say, “I made it” or “I lived like to the fullest extent?” You only get one chance to do it right. Go out and start that business you’ve always talked about. Apply for your dream job. Move to your ideal location. I intend to use the years that I am blessed with to the best of my ability. God has blessed each individual with a gift that we are obligated to use in positive effective way. Use it. Don’t look up one day and life has passed you by. Don’t be forced to sing your “shoulda, coulda, wouldas.” Get Out of Your Own Way Shanaya Edmunds, Columnist If you would like to contact Shanaya you may email her at sedmund1@scsu.edu or stop by the Student Media Office. Shanaya Edmunds, Columnist About the Columnist: Shanaya is a graduating senior double-ma- joring in Sociology and Psychology. She is a native Philladephia, PA. She has been a productive member of Student Media for three years seving in several capacities including a staff writer for Stated, The Collegian and General Man- ager of We’re Bulldog Television (WBTV). Currently, Shanaya serves as the presi- dent of Student Media, a columnist for The Collegian, a Resident Assistant for Hugine Suites and Vice President of Psi Chi Na- tional Honor Society in Psychology. Before attending South Carolina State University Shanaya graduated from Strat- ford High School in Summerville, SC. As you all may know I am a gradu- ating senior and like most seniors I am preparing plans for my future. My boyfriend and I decided to get our own place, which is a big responsibil- ity. I had been re- searching and finding out tons of in- formation that had never crossed my mind before. Last week, we decided to start shop- ping for furniture. Although a de- lightful experience, I couldn’t help but wonder, why do couches cost so much? Silly, I know, but it made me think of what my cousin describes as “growing pains.” As we grow and go through life, we will often encounter things that cause us discomfort and no matter how well you plan there’s really nothing you can do about it but deal. I’ve learned that most things in life are temporary; whether they are good or bad, they all have expiration dates. As I sat engulfed in my own thoughts, my mind drifted back to the furniture and I smiled. I smiled because I knew that right now the price of furniture makes my stomach hurt but it won’t always be this way. There will come a time when the price won’t matter and that’s what I look forward to. As we attempt to enter the work force, we will run into one problem after another. Some of us will be for- tunate enough to find work almost immediately, while others will be six months post graduation and still looking. This is all a part of the pro- cess. We must remain encouraged. I know that although the job offers are not rolling in for me just yet, soon they will. This too is temporary and will be overcome. Stay positive and stay open. Growing Pains, Shanaya Edmunds, Columnist I’m sure all of my loyal readers will read this and say hmmm, I’m sure she has said this before. This is true. As you know, I always address the graduates and try my best to give them encouraging words. Being that I will be participating in May graduation, I wanted to give the graduates words that I live by and I felt that the letter I addressed to the December graduates was just that. Forgive me if you feel I could have written something else but I wanted to share words from my heart: The time is nearing when you must leave what has been your confront zone of college and begin your journey through life. For the last 4 years or so, you have dedicated yourself to academics, social organizations, community development, etc. Now is the time to begin to create your legacy. Although the years here at South Carolina State University may have been challenging, you’ve overcome adversity and made to graduation. Say hello to the real world. In life there are no do-overs so might it count. No matter where your journey may take you, whether it be to graduate school or the work force remember to never stop fighting and to always give your best. You were designed to succeed. It’s in your DNA. On graduation date you may be caught in an emotional whirlwind. You will begin to think of all the memories you have created here at your beloved alma mater. You will remember your favorite things such as homecoming and spring break. You will laugh at the times you had to run to class in fear of Mr. Meyers locking you out of the class and when you tried not to laugh too hard as he told a student off because they wore shorts to his class. You will also remember the sad moments here when it was pertinent for the students to ban together. Take these memories and store them away. Do not be sad for friends you must leave behind. Just whisper in their ear, “you’re next.” Carry the values instill in you by your experiences at SC State and allow them to continue to mold you. Take this world by storm and when it comes to the success of your future always remember the words of James Baldwin, “Go for broke.” Give it everything you have. See you soon. To the May Graduates of 2013 2
  • COLUMN Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Adam Gingery COLUMN By: ADAM GINGERY Sports Editor “Anyone want to play goalie?” Coach’s query met his young audience like a profound question stumps the last section of History of Civ. We were the quintes- sential American junior high soccer team. We had the jocks wearing their Ronaldo jerseys, we had the video gamers who showed up to practice with Hawaiian Punch instead of water, we had those skinny guys whose voices hadn’t begun to change yet, and we had that fat kid whose only reason for being there was that he was the manda- tory 11th player. The fat kid raised his hand. The poor guy, he tried so hard to keep up in practice. He really did. His glasses kept sliding down his round sweaty face and his pink cheeks kind of bounced up and down while he chugged around the field. He would usually finish his half-mile about the time the other guys were getting rushed home by their stressed-out soccer moms who had for- gotten there was a casserole in the oven. I think he was the right choice to play goal- ie. He definitely couldn’t run up and down the field like the other players. I think we won one or two games that season, and I know one of them was against a school that had a carpet basketball court. We also got scored on by a girl. It happened during our first game, and one of our world-class fullbacks caught the ball with his hands in the box. I remember how scared our new goalie looked as he positioned himself for the coming pen- alty kick. The other team’s best player, a girl (who was taller than the rest of us seventh-graders, anyway), calmly stepped up and put the ball past him. He kind of dove at it, but I would put it more in the category of a stop, drop and roll. The thing that really amazes me about junior high sports is that someone had to coach those teams. Can you imagine volunteer- ing to do that? I’m so glad there are some good junior high coaches out there. I’ll never forget that soccer coach, either. He See COLUMN p. 3 »
  • COLUMN Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Samantha Loucks COLUMN By: SAMANTHA LOUCKS Editor “I’m dreaming of a white Christmas, just like the ones I used to know.” That’s great and all, but doesn’t this dream set you up for a whole heap of Christmas disappoint- ment? What if it doesn’t snow? And oh, how it teems with nostalgia! It’s notori- ous for making you think that the past was snowy and perfect and a scene from It’s a Wonderful Life. Before you think the Grinch and I are in ca- hoots, allow me to explain my bah-humbug comments with a few stories. Illustration No. 1: Every December, Santa comes to town and pays my family a personalized visit. So yes, I’m proud to say that Santa and I are pals, and I have a number of pictures as proof. For those who are wondering, Santa is tall, not-so-round, and his voice uncannily resembles my grandpa’s. Over Christmas break one year, I was deep in an attempt to be Betty Crocker, Martha Stewart and Rachel Ray by baking a pumpkin roll with peach h fill COLUMN By: SAMANTHA LOUCKS Copy Editor I’ve never been one to go on a “health kick.” I used to hold the impression that people who ate only organic, all-natural foods free of genetically modified organ- isms genuinely thought that high fructose corn syrup was nasty stuff killing our insides. I thought the all-natural idea was too exaggerated. Did it really make people that much healthier? I especially didn’t find this organic idea appealing because I really enjoy my favorite foods, like red velvet cupcakes from the Chocolate Moose and fried mozzarella sticks from a small drive-in back home in Indiana. But about six weeks ago, I was required to drasti- cally change my diet, per my doctor’s orders. I have an extensive list of 26 foods that I can’t even think about eating, ranging from wheat to citrus and from oats to coffee. So those cupcakes and cheese sticks aren’t an op- tion anymore. Neither are Starbucks stops on Sunday mornings or a pint of Ben and Jerry’s after a long day. But instead of pouting about the no-cupcake rule, I figured I might as well fully embrace the healthful side of life. In my six weeks of experience, I discovered a few things about so-called “health nuts,” who really aren’t so nutty after all. No. 1: It’s about knowing what’s good for you. True health-conscious eaters don’t eat a specific diet because they feel like denying themselves of all en- joyable food. It’s usually be- cause they have discovered what’s good for or harmful to their own bodies. Some people can eat all the Red Robin fries they want. Others just can’t. So a person who decides to forego the fries and eat all- natural isn’t on a healthier- than-thou kick. They may just want to take care of themselves. No. 2: It’s about research. If a particular food is harmful to you, you need to know if it’s in the food you eat. I’m now one of those pro food label readers who will pick up item after item from store shelves searching for a product with just the right ingredients. And some of those ingredients can be sneaky, like dextrose, maltodextrin or citric acid. People who have certain intolerances have to do their research about those easy-to-miss ingredients. No. 3: It’s about being adventurous. Admittedly, my desper- ate search for comfort food eventually turned into an adventuresome attitude. Like the time I really missed freshly baked cookies and tried vegan, dairy-free, gluten-free, non-GMO choc- olate chip cookie dough. But it actually did the trick. Now I’m willing to try just about anything. For lunch, sometimes I’ll drink a raw vegan rice protein shake that is free of gluten, solvents, GMOs, See COLUMN p. 3 » Thetwocolumnswere verywell-writtenand hadmehookedinthe firstparagraph.Gooduse ofhumorandpersonal storiestodrawthereader inandhelpthemrelate tothesubject.Keepup thegoodwork!
  • COLUMN Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Tiger Clemson University Robbie Tinsley
  • COLUMN Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Ross Abbott Why not ban students from eating fried fish, too? Ross Abbott Second-year business economics student Hypothetical scenario proves inanity of Tobacco Free USC Battles abroad deserve peace protests US citizens remain oblivious to war effort Ross Abbott First-year business economics student The year is 2008. Billions of American tax dollars are annually poured into military operations to “flush out” guerrilla fighters, but no matter how many of them we take out, more seem to always take their place. Even more importantly, thousands of U.S. s e r v i c e m e n h a v e been killed or injured by traps laid by the enemy in the form of improvised devices of death or manned ambushes. All this occurs while the local populous lives in crippling poverty, praying not for food but avoid getting caught in the crossfire. Too frequently, these prayers go unanswered as pictures of civilians maimed by violence on both sides are circulated daily by world presses. With each day that passes, the war on terror in Iraq and Afghanistan looks more and more like this generation’s Vietnam. And just like with Vietnam, there’s a strong anti-war sentiment, both internationally and stateside. Peace rallies are held almost weekly. Protesters march in Washington, D.C., as well as dozens of other locations across the country. People are tired of the incredibly high price they’re paying in a war that has no end in sight. A man runs for president and earns a Nobel Peace Prize, as well as widespread support from the peace movement, for his promises to bring the troops home and put an end to the war on terror. Fast-forward to 2013. According to data published by the Department of Defense at the end of 2012, the aforementioned man who ran for president has made some progress at following through on his promise to withdraw from Iraq — the 49,800 troops currently deployed there represent about 30 percent of the number deployed when President Barack Obama took office in 2008. Peace lovers should be happy some ground has been gained on that front (even if the complete withdrawal “within six months” that was promised still hasn’t happened). However, they should also feel betrayed. The troops removed from Iraq have not come home. They have been redeployed to Afghanistan (102,200 soldiers currently deployed, up 222.4 percent from 2008) and other countries throughout the Middle East in order to support a continually expanding war on terror. That last part should scare everyone. (Take a second to make a mental list of countries you think execute their citizens without trial. Do you want to be included on that list?) But the surge of troops in Afghanistan and other countries should especially upset those peace protesters who were so active before the 2008 elections. But there are no protests, no demonstrations, no marches — not so much as a rumble from the anti-war movement. Protesters, the war on terror isn’t over, and neither is your war to end the war. Where did you go?
  • COLUMN Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Evelyn Robinson During an average week at my home university in England, I spend around £30 ($48) on alcohol and nights out. I’ll go on two nights out, one with my housemates and the other with my course friends and sports teams. We go to pre-drinks, or we “pre-game” as it’s called in the States, at around 9 p.m., drink for a few hours then pile into taxis that take us to our favorite club. Leeds University Union has a 1,000-person-capacity nightclub scene in the basement and two restaurants serving alcohol on site too. After my last second-year exam, I met the History Society at Terrace and relished the opportunity to let off steam over a glass of wine. Social events usually incorporate drinking, from nights out to pub quizzes to Otley Runs. The Otley Run is one of the country’s most famous pub- crawls that challenges its valiant participants to purchase a drink in every pub along the way. Spanning 16 pubs in just more than two miles, it’s not for the fainthearted. So it’s safe to say that ever since I became a university student in 2011, drinking has always been part of the social experience. Since becoming an honorary Gamecock at USC, I’ve had to find other ways to meet people, make friends and have fun. The legal drinking age in South Carolina is 21, meaning the prospect of venturing to Five Points for casual drinks is filled with the fear of getting arrested and charged $250. It’s not just an empty threat either, as “resident mentors” are employed in university accommodations to patrol the corridors and catch underage drinkers. I’ve heard stories about students jumping from balconies at flat parties to escape the police who were banging on the front door and of students who got caught and had to spend the night in a prison cell. In October, shockwaves rippled through the Carolinian community af ter USC st udent Mar t ha Childress was shot in Five Points and paralyzed from the waist down. It was a massive wake-up call to everyone about the reality of gang violence occurring just a few miles away from campus. Attempting to get involved with the limited nightlife scene in Columbia feels like constantly looking over your shoulder in fear of those on both sides of the law. It’s not an enjoyable experience and is something I ruled out pretty quickly following my arrival here. But despite the occasional pangs of jealousy I get hearing about all the crazy nights I’m missing back home, living a sober student life has opened my eyes to a new way of life at university. All the money I’ve saved from buying pre-drinks, club entrance tickets, taxi fares and drinks at the bar has gone straight towards weekend trips. It’s very easy to cushion the blow of losing nightlife entertainment when America is on my doorstep. I’ve visited Charleston and Alabama and I’m writing this from a 27th-floor hotel room in New York. I came to South Carolina wondering what I’d do about drinking, worrying that it would define my study abroad experience and impact my ability to meet people. In reality, it has defined my university experience, but it has expanded my horizons, forced me to meet more people and get out and about in the states. The nature of social events is also very different at USC. My first week here consisted of “pizza meet ‘n’ greets,” “ice-cream socials” and “sports day bonanzas,” compared to my first week in Leeds that I hardly remember because I was perpetually hungover, exhausted and drunk. But if it wasn’t for the drinking restrictions here, I probably would have been spending my time in bars rather than attending all the weird and wonderful events the university has hosted. I’ve watched live volleyball, American football, the Homecoming Showcase, the Step Show and live acoustic nights. I’ve also attended the 22nd Annual I Believe Anita Hill Party, Columbia’s Greek Festival, a gospel choir performance and had an enlightening evening watching a film about first wave feminism at my tutor’s house. I’ve completed my first Color Run, canoed on the Congaree River, learned how to rock climb and learned how to play volleyball. I’d rather be going home with these unique memories than a hazy blur of alcohol-induced images in my mind that I can’t quite piece together. At a simpler level, being sober has been fantastic for my health. My weight is constant and I’ve had no need for guilt-induced gym sessions. I don’t miss hangovers and get a lot more work done in the time usually spent shriveling up in bed the next morning. But my favorite benefit of sober student life is that I’ve actually become a morning person, waking up naturally at 7:30 a.m. every morning. My head is clearer, my bank account is healthier and I feel more in control of my life than I have for years. I’m going home for Christmas and I may well eat my words. The temptation of white wine, mulled wine and cocktails might just pull me back into that crazy, unpredictable drinking lifestyle. But I hope that at least some of the lessons I’ve learned about sober student life will remain. I’ve loved that the best memories I’ve had here haven’t depended on anything but new experiences, insightful conversations and great company. — Evelyn Robinson, second-year English and History international student Being sober can be fun, too Good memories made without alcoholic haze Since becoming an exchange student at the University of South Carolina, I’ve noticed profound differences between s t u d e n t l i f e i n E n g l a n d compared to the states. There’s been talk of a tobacco ban on campus, but no one has really been sure whether it’s already implemented or if it’s a definite proposal for the near future. Then on Tuesday, students and staff received an email from President Harris Pastides that confirmed our suspicions and brought the ban to fruition. As a non-smoker, I believe that the ban is a violation of rights and a worrying example of how paternalism will continue to encroach upon the experience of students at USC. I agree that USC has made positive changes to life on campus. I take advantage of the fantastic salad bar in Russell House and love working out at the Strom Thurmond Fitness and Wellness Center. I’ve been to the farmers market a couple of times and made some healthy home-cooked meals from the variety of food that it offers. But these changes are giving students the choice to opt in to living a healthy lifestyle, where imposing a ban is taking away their choice altogether. I don’t see how a tobacco ban is “the next step.” Rather, I see it as a step backwards from the positive measures USC has already made to encourage healthy living. I’m interested to see how USC is planning on implementing such an extensive policy. If it’s anything like drinking laws in the states, those who smoke already won’t stop smoking; they’ll just become more careful of getting caught. As a British exchange student, I’m even more shocked by the ban, because it is so alien c o m p a r e d t o e v e r y t h i n g I’m used to at home. If the University of Leeds tried to implement a tobacco ban there would be outcr y f rom t he student body, flyers plastered all over campus, protests outside the Parkinson Building’s steps and online petitions flying into inboxes everywhere. Going to university in the U.K. is about student-based decisions and student rights. The right to make choices defines our entire university experience, because it allows us to be accountable for our choices and learn about the consequences ourselves. Imposing a tobacco ban is taking away the right to choice, something I believe is a crucial aspect — if not the crucial aspect — of going to university in the first place. The ban seems even more nonsensical in light of South Carolina state laws. It will expect students to stop smoking on campus when they can legally light up a cigarette almost anywhere else in South Carolina. Banning the use of tobacco on campus is segregating the university from other aspects of adult life in the state and i s m a k i n g t he u n i ver s it y experience in Columbia even more of a bubble compared to the rest of the city. Going to university is meant to be the linchpin of transition to the real world, not a continuation of hierarchical, paternalistic protection from it. The expectation that students at USC are to stop smoking on campus is a violation of choice in the one place where independent choices are supposed to be nourished. If USC is going to respect their students as legal adults, this must include the right to smoke, regardless of its effects. — Evelyn Robinson, second-year international English and history student Tobacco ban unnecessary, paternalistic Sanction incongruous to college experience Study abroad experience unpredictable When I started applying to study abroad last October, many of my friends looked at me like I was mad. Some of them told me that they couldn’t have done it themselves because they’d miss their families and friends too much, and they couldn’t stop asking, “Won’t you get homesick?” It wasn’t until I attended a pre-depart u re informat ion session at my home university that I started to really think about how much I’d miss home. The Student Counseling Centre at the University of Leeds created a graph that predicted how study abroad participants would feel at various points in the semester, including illusively named “disintegration” phases. I left the lecture feeling pretty intimidated but largely skeptical that someone who had never met me had tried to predict how I would feel six months down the line. Today, I look back on the graph in light of how I experienced culture shock, and its dramatic suggestions still don’t resonate with me. It doesn’t do studying abroad any justice by referring to a brief post-arrival period as a “honeymoon stage.” With America on my doorstep, the buzz I experienced after I arrived lasted far longer than just a “honeymoon.” The prevalence of Southern hospitality in South Carolina has meant that a friendly face and pleasant conversation are always nearby, throwing the counselor’s graph for a loop. That’s not to say hospitality cures everything. I was taken over detail after detail of drinking laws, during which I was particularly shocked to hear I could even be fined $250 if I was stone cold sober but found in the presence of a drunkard. It was the second time I’d left a study abroad “orientation” feeling more like an outsider than ever. A s f o r m y a p p a r e n t “disintegration,” halfway through the semester I wasn’t bundled up in my room looking through nostalgic photos and pulling my hair out for want of a decent cup of tea. I was on a weekend away in the beautiful city of Charleston, sightseeing and sunbathing with a group of 15 internationals. Not once have I felt “disintegrated” or like I wasn’t part of the brilliant institution that’s taken me under its wing. But my biggest issue with the graph is that the “independence stage” is placed right before the coming home stage. The day I waved goodbye to my family and my boyfriend in August was one of the hardest days of my life, and it was from that day forward that the independence stage had already begun. What the graph doesn’t say is that culture shock, homesickness and feelings of independence collide and happen all the time. They never stop. I appreciate that the counseling center was trying to reassure us with the prospect of predictability, but I’ve since learnt that the greatest challenge of studying abroad is being open to the possibility of the unpredictable. I spent months watching YouTube videos of American football games and tourist information adverts in a futile attempt to prepare myself for what I was about to encounter. Little did I know that USC is actually nowhere near the beach and there isn’t a crazy “I’m Shmacked” party happening every weekend. How you feel when you study abroad will depend on who you are, where you go and the people you meet. Every study abroad experience is different, and getting used to its constant ups and downs is all part of the challenge, and part of the fun. The whole point of studying abroad is that it’s an unpredictable experience that will take you out of your comfort zone — one that can’t be plotted on a graph. — Evelyn Robinson, second-year English and history student Phases of assimilation blend together Evelyn’s columns were an exceptional example of using personal experience to not only entertain but also make the reader think - very well-written and insightful pieces.
  • PAGE ONE DESIGN Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Patriot Francis Marion University Tyler Pate Porter crowned Miss Greek 2013 in pageant SEE FAC TRIP TO GERMANY... PAGE 3 SEE NURSING DEPARTMENT... PAGE 2 Robyn McNeil NEWS 1-7 OPINION 8-9 SPORTS 10 SEE PATRIOTS WIN BIG AT SCPA... PAGE 5 Patriots win big at SCPA award ceremony Cameron Leyers Nisheeka Simmons Nefateda Harlee Students study art in Europe NEWS 1-5 OPINION 6-7 SPORTS 8 Bikers raise funds for charity SEE NEW PRINT BUILDING PAGE 3 SEE STUDY ABROAD PAGE 3 SEE MS BIKE RIDE PAGE 2 SEE MILITARY FRIENDLY SCHOOLPAGE 3 Joshua Lloyd Office Services building in full operation Connor Veasey Victoria Briggs Robyn McNeil Study abroad program crosses new border
  • PAGE ONE DESIGN Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Skyliner North Greenville University Artyom Chekmasov Nov. 6th, 2013 Index News........................2 Opinion..................3 Lifestyle..................4&5 Sports....................6&7 The Bitter End..............8 Issue 8, Vol. 119 Wednesday 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 11 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 00 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 11 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 11 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 00 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 11 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 North Greenville University’s new online degree program will be available in fall of 2014, if all goes as planned, and will educate students. The program, led by Vice President of Academic Affaris Randall Pannell, is geared for adult learners and will be age sensitive. This does not mean, however, resident and commuting students cannot take NGU classes online. They will just not be able to obtain an undergraduate degree from the program. A maximum number of credit hours online will be restricted to on-campus students. “Online degree programs usually consist of adults who want to go back to school or change careers,” said Pannell. For now, the university wants the program to allow opportunities for people who did not or could not receive a that goal, change their lives and further their careers. It will give people the chance to receive an education from NGU they could not obtain otherwise, whether it be because they live in other countries and getting VISAs are too costly or because they are on Pannell is excited that the program will be on-the-job training. Online students will not have to put a hold on their lives to accomplish a degree. “It increases accessibility for people who can’t leave their lives and come here,” he said. Pannell, however, warned that online schooling is not effortless. “The biggest fallacy of online education is that it’s light,” he said. Just because students are not present in a classroom does not mean the workload is easier. Online students usually have more responsibilities than only school, so they have around carpool, cooking dinner and working nights or weekends. Online professors also have to make up for time not spent in class by creating other means of class work or homework. “[This program] will require more motivation and experience,” said Pannell. “Online programs require more discipline because it’s done in the middle of lives.” The goal for the program next fall is to offer majors in criminal justice and legal studies, business administration, secondary and early childhood education, Christian studies and psychology. All general education classes will also be offered. Pannell hopes for the classes to be a total of six weeks each. A starting time will be designated every month, so online students will have 12 opportunities to start different classes. They will even have the option of completing a class and taking a break before beginning the next. For those who want to come back and get a degree, an about where they are in terms of education. The online program has access content in many different ways. The classes will include reading, podcasts, audio and a lot of writing. Professors can also teach through a s y n c h r o n o u s discussion boards and synchronous v i r t u a l c l a s s r o o m s , which are similar to Skype. The virtual classrooms, however, present a dilemma because of potential varying time zones. That is a quandary professors will have to take into account. onlineeducationisconstantaccess to the professors. Questions will not be limited to the classroom but rather can be answered any time, usually by email. NGU will be using professors on campus who want to teach online as well as employing new online faculty. “We want our faculty to develop our curriculum,” said Pannell.Hebelievesitiscrucialthe professors on campus be involved in the new program, especially since incorporating Christianity He wants to expand not only the reach of NGU’s education, but also its mission. Online students will be under the same rules as the Enlightener and will be held just as accountable as resident and commuting students. The biggest difference is that they are allowed to go to class in their pajamas. Pannell said the cost of the online education will be close to what is paid for on-campus education. Instead of paying per semester, however, students online will pay per course. Pannell expects a tremendous growth for NGU because of the program. “We are hoping to grow to as many as 10,000 online students,” he said. The marketing for the online program will also bring more students to campus and provide an additional stream of income. “It will help us stay as affordable as we are now,” Pannell said. Alex Kern Lifestyle Editor Online degrees bring new matrix Page 2 Social media is being used to evangelize Muslims. Page 3 Are millenials really just narcissitic and lazy? Page 4 Utilize the app store to become a better student. Page 7 Women’s soccer season endswithgameagainst Barton College. John 8:12 I am the light of the world. Whoever follows Me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life. 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 00 1 1 0 1 0 00 0 1 00 01 10 1 0 1 0 0 10 00 0 1 01 00 10 1 1 1 1 0 00 1 0 1 01 11 00 0 1 1 0 1 00 01 10 1 0 11 0 0 10 00 0 1 0 0 10 1 01 01 1 0 1 1 0 11 00 00 0 1 00 01 10 1 0 1 0 11 0 0 10 00 0 1 0 0 10 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 01 11 00 1 1 0 1 00 01 10 00 11 0 0 10 00 0 1 0 0 0 10 0 0 000 111 00000 1 011 0 100 100 0 1 0 0 1 1100111 0 r 0 1 0 0Th 1Pa 0 re 0 0 1 1100111 0 0 000 111 00000 1in 1 pl 0 1 011000 0gr 1 ec 0 0 1 1 0 100 0 0 1 0 0 11 0 0 1 100 1he 1 e 1 0 0 111 00000 1 w 011 100 011 0 100 100 0 1 c 0 0 1 1 0 100 0 d 0 1 0 000 111 0 0 111 1100111 0 0 111 00000 1r 1 cu 0 1 01 000 0ty 1 0 000 111 1to 0 id 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 11 0 1 0 0 1 1 00 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0fu 1 p ed 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 th on 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 000000000 0 1 0 000 0 1 Nov. 20th, 2013 Index News........................2 Opinion..................3 Lifestyle..................4&5 Sports....................6&7 The Bitter End..............8 Issue 9, Vol. 119 Wednesday Get ready to stand in line in the cold and spend a week’s pay on popcorn, it’s time for the holiday movie season to start rolling. Three upcoming movies in particular hope to top the methods for making money at the theater: two sequels, Catching Fire and The Hobbit: Desolation of Smaug, and an animated Disney musical, Frozen. Catching Fire and Desolation of Smaug bring something unique to the world of tired sequels, they are both part two of a trilogy. This could make it easier for moviegoers to immerse themselves in Panem or Middle Earth, respectively, since there will not need to be much background material. Frozen hopes to revive the Disney animated musical with an entirely new princess movie, hearkening back to classics like Beauty and the Beast and The Little Mermaid. Catching Fire Catching Fire, based on the Hunger Games trilogy of books by Suzanne Collins, is clearly targeted towards teens and young adults. The movie stars young, beautiful actors such as Jennifer Lawrence, Liam Hemsworth, Josh Hutcherson, and newcomer Catching Fire is a dystopian, which is enormously popular in Dystopian stories take place in dark, violent worlds where everyone is out to get the “good guys” and important characters bite the dust left and right, much to the horror of fans. Dave Astor, of the Post, explains, “We’re fascinated by the terrible things these characters face, and by how some react bravely and some react cowardly or with resignation.” F a n s installment and newbies out if Catching Fire lives up to the hype on November 22. The Hobbit: Desolation of Smaug While viewers of all ages Desolation of Smaug virtually guarantees its success. In the early 2000s, Peter Jackson’s vision of Middle Earth captured audiences with his adaptions of the Lord of the Rings trilogy by J.R.R. Tolkien. In 2012, he brought Middle Earth back to the silver screen with the which will also be a trilogy. Fans of the Lord of the Rings trilogy can look forward to the return of Orlando Bloom as Legolas, as well as a whole new set of characters, namely the Silvan elves. Katie Blagden of whatculture. com explains, “Certainly one of things that’s going to make the Desolation of Smaug fantastic is the fact that there are so many new characters to introduce, and most of them are awesome.” With a cast of new immortal elves and a legion of Lord of the Rings fans behind him, Peter Jackson should do well with Desolation of Smaug. His track record speaks for itself, last year’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey grossed more than $300 million in theaters, according to Box once again into Middle Earth on December 13. Frozen Hoping to draw in loyal fans of all ages, Disney’s newest animated effort, Frozen, could be the dark horse of the holiday movie season. wintry wonderland, peppered with catchy melodies and anthropomorphized animals, is not new or earth shattering, but that may be the point. Takingacuefromsuccessful princess movie musicals of Disney’s past, along with recent princess musicals Tangled and The Princess and the Frog, Disney is true method with a few modern twists. Frozen tells the story of two sisters (voiced by Kristen Bell and Idina Menzel) who are princesses in the Scandinavian kingdom of Arandelle, with musical numbers and love interests, of course. But the story focuses on the relationship of the two sisters rather than the romance, offerings. An early review on The Wrap, an online newsletter focused on movies, music, and TV, raves stirring, funny and catchy. Don’t be surprised if “Frozen” becomes yet another Disney animated feature to hit the Broadway stage; in this case, however, the transition promises to be fairly smooth, based on the strength of the material.” Sing along to Disney’s newest animated feature on November 27. Hitting the screen this season: Chelsea Ferguson Editor-in-Chief Page 2 Recovering from the storms in the Philippines will be a long road. Page 3 Should you date in college or wait until after graduation? Page 5 Juniors and seniors share and failures. Page 7 Meet new men’s volleyball Luke 6:31 Do to others as you would have them do to you. Check out showtimes at Regal Cherrydale Cinemas:
  • PAGE ONE DESIGN Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Erin Simmonds Good use of contrast in headlines. Easy to read and follow. Goodarrangement ofphotos. Old Gold & BlackFebruary 12, 2013 Wofford College Vol. 98 Issue 7 Since 1915 7 2 3 5 6 What’s Inside: NEWS FEATURES ARTS & CULTURE WHAT’S UP AT WOFFORD SPECIAL FEATURE Best Spartanburg Business Interim Photo Feature Valentine’s Day in France The Bernie Diaries Old Gold & Black Past Editors This Interim sophomore Natalie Hahn began writing a book about her personal battle, one that started when she was diagnosed with stage three ovarian cancer on July 24, 2012. Although pro- nounced cancer-free and cured on Nov. 16, Hahn continues the battle, at least for others. “I wanted to write a book because when I was receiving my treatments, I got so many books from family and friends that were written by breast cancer patients or parents who had chil- dren going through cancer, but none from teen- agers. As a 19 year old I want to help other 19 year olds who get to fight a similar fight as mine,” says Hahn. Hahn decided to turn the project into an inde- pendent Interim, during which she has been or- ganizing her thoughts with dozens of note cards. “I kept a journal during my treatments, so I am taking a lot of my material from that. But as of now, I am compiling all of my thoughts on the note cards, which is making it easier to organize all of my thoughts, because I get random thoughts throughout the day and writing them down quickly on a note card has been working well,” says Hahn. Hahn’s book does not have a settled date to be finished, but she projects it to be completed by the end of the upcoming summer. As for her long- term goals, she is determined for the book to be published and the proceeds donated, although she has not settled on the receiving organization. “I do intend to put the finished copy out on the shelves. Once the book is finished I know I will feel not only accomplished, but that I helped one more teen out there who is faced with a speed bump in life, like cancer. I don’t want another teen to have to wing it like I did,” says Hahn. Helping her along the process is Dr. Carol Wil- son, associate professor of English and coordina- tor of academic advising. “Dr. Carol Wilson was assigned to my project by Dr. Boyce Lawton, and she has been so will- ing to be of help and also a great mentor. I respect her not only as a professor on campus, but also as a friend who has been a great listener, which is something a young author needs when filtering new ideas,” says Hahn. Hahn offers a small taste of the tenacious spirit likely to be found in her upcoming book. “It feels great to be back at Wofford. Wofford now isn’t the same as it was pre-cancer, but I am trying to adjust as best as I can. It’s great to be back on campus with all of my friends. They make the tough days much easier. Some days I have flash- backs to those weeks in the hospital, but I can- not relive those memories every day for the rest of my life. Moving on is difficult, but as the semester goes on, I know it will get easier.” Senior Staff WriterJennifer Sellers Carlin Connelly Photo As any Wofford student making the pilgrimage to Yogurt Mountain or Publix might notice, the buildings and parking lots of Spartanburg play host to a wide variety of spray- painted hate messages and gang tags. One Interim class, armed with an arsenal of spray paint, seeks to turn these symbols of ignorance and violence into positive works of art. Professor Kristofer Neely created the Street Art Interim as a fusion of community service and creative exploration. Given the temporary nature and potentially controversial aspects of the medium, he saw the course as an opportunity to encourage broader thinking among the student artists. “Our work might not last long, but even that makes for a good lesson in exploring the difference between street art as democratic speech or social deviance,” he says. “It gave us a place to ask a bigger question: What is art?” The class, which started out with space for 20 students, became so popular during reg- istration week that 12 extra people ended up enrolling. While each new “project” came with a deadline, the course allowed for complete artistic freedom. Students welcomed the refreshing break from the rigorous structure of conventional classes. “[Professor Neely] lets us do whatever we want with our projects, and he’s always really encouraging,” says Erika Houmann, a freshman enrolled in Street Art. “I’m having a great time.” The class’s creative efforts focused on an old industrial site, the concrete surfaces of which bore years of vandalism. “It has become an eyesore with poorly done graffiti and lots of racial slurs, anti-police messages and general teenage hate speech. We had permission to cover any of that work with more thoughtful and positive messages,” says Neely. The class’s focus on community outreach through public works of art is a reflection of Neely’s own views on the role of street art in society: fine art in a gallery serves people who actively choose to view it, while street art takes a more evangelistic approach and makes an audience of people passing by. “I believe the most effective voices in street art today find unexpected and clever ways to cut through the intense visual noise in our contemporary cityscapes. These artists can catch us off-guard using written words, found objects, and visual language to juxtapose and blur art with everyday life,” Neely says. “They make us understand art, urban spaces, and property ownership differently. It is hard for a traditional gallery to have that same reach into the community.” Abigail Hartley Contributing Writer Photos courtesy of William Wilkins Natalie Hahn, Kayla Bethea Photo Old Gold & BlackMarch 12, 2013 Wofford College Vol. 98 Issue 9 Since 1915 7 2 3 4 6 What’s Inside: NEWS FEATURES ABROAD WHAT’S UP AT WOFFORD WHAT’S UP AT WOFFORD Trouble at the Row Need academic help? Danish Childcare Baseball The Bernie Diaries OG&B Speed-dating with Sari Imber Staff Writer The hard facts and the fun facts Majors: finance and computer science Hometown: Weatherford, Texas Age: 20 Dream Career: Being a CEO would be cool Favorite Burwell Food: “Diabetes cookies” (The two cookies with frosting in the middle) Favorite Interim: Chile. It was my first abroad expe- rience, so it was really eye- opening. Favorite Quote: “Success is when preparation meets opportunity.” Favorite Movie: Slumdog Millionaire Guilty Pleasure: “Thrift Shop” by Macklemore Embarrassing Story: I was jogging down the stairs and totally ate it in front of Twin Towers before my election spiel. If you were invisible for a day, what would you do? I would sneak into Dr. Dunlap’s office and sit in his chair, wishing I were him. Do you have Bieber Fever? No, but Beauty and the Beats is pretty catchy. Maybe just the sniffles. Majors: philosophy and biology Hometown: Spartanburg Age: 21 Guilty Pleasure: Singing in my car by myself Dream career: Dentist Favorite Burwell food: White chicken chili Favorite Interim: Belize. Snorkeling around the coral reefs was amazing! Fun Fact: I’ve always been involved with student government. One time in seventh grade, during my campaign, I did my name in an acronym with a different food for each letter and told the student body I would chug everything for their vote. If you could be any animal what would you be? Penguin, hands down. Favorite Movie: Shawshank Redemption Favorite Show: Dexter First Order of Business: My job would be to work very closely with student organizations, so my first order of business is to start a dialogue with the organizations and see what changes they would like to see made and to see how we can foster a sense of cohesiveness. Our biggest goal for this upcoming year is figuring out how to communicate to students what all Cam- pus Union can do for the student body, whether that is helping organizations or individual students. I think Campus Union has a lot more to offer than students realize. Majors: Spanish and biology Hometown: Greenville Age: 19 Dream Career: Geriatric medicine or family doctor Favorite Burwell Food: Mac n’ cheese Favorite Interim: Chile. The Chilean people were incredible. Everyone was so welcoming. Favorite Quote: “If your dreams don’t scare you, they’re not big enough.” Favorite Movie: Ferris Bueller’s Day Off Favorite Book: Pride and Prejudice Favorite TV Show: Seinfeld First Order of Business: My first order of business is to find a way to open up communication between students and representatives, faculty, the college and administration. We’re looking to work closely with other councils and branches of student government to improve our codes and guidelines. As secretary, I hope to facilitate discussion between the three branches of Student Government. “Obviously I’m really excited and eager to get started with getting stuff done and running the Campus Union meetings,” says Novak. “Thanks for everyone who voted, no matter for whom. I really want to say thanks to all the people who supported me. I had a lot of really good friends who helped me out, and I couldn’t have done anything I did without them.” Campus Union President Chris Novak Quick Facts “I’m very honored and privileged to be elected as y’all’s vice president, and I’m very excited to continue Wofford’s tradition and work with students to create some new things that hope- fully everyone will find very exciting,” says Oldham. Campus Union Vice President Tanner Oldham “I am so excited about this position,” says Ramsey. “I think it will be a great way to give back to this school that has given me so much, and I hope to be able to help in any way that I can.” Campus Union Secretary Elizabeth Ramsey Majors: accounting and economics Hometown: Maiden, N.C. Age: 20 Dream Career: Certified Public Accountant working at a tax firm Favorite Burwell Food: Chocolate chip cookies Favorite Interim: Sophomore year I went to Zimbabwe and Kenya. It was such an amazing and eye-opening experience, and I got to go on safari! Favorite Quote: “Do not worry about tomorrow, for tomor- row will worry about itself.” Favorite Movie: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Favorite Book: Little Women What’s your worst pet peeve? Groups who walk really slowly and take up the whole sidewalk. First Order of Business: As treasurer, I want to stretch our budget as much as we can. We’ve been able to sponsor some really great events this past year, and I would love to do even more great things with the Campus Union money. I also want to better publicize the money that Campus Union has available to clubs on campus, because I think a lot of organization lead- ers are unaware of this opportunity. I am most excited to work with the new Campus Union cabinet and implement some wonderful changes for the Wofford community. Campus Union Treasurer Mary Schronce “I’m so excited to be treasurer and serve Wofford College in this way,” says Schronce. “I am very grateful to the people who encouraged me to run for the position, and I’m looking forward to this year.” Congratulations to the new First, Second, Third and Fourth Order of Business: 1. Something that I think is kind of time sen- sitive that I’d like to see if I can take care of right off the bat is if we can arrange a Fun Funds rollover budget so that if we sold tickets this year, the money could roll over to fund a concert next year. 2. I also really want to continue the investiga- tion of using Terrier Bucks more widely, hopefully with administration on my side. If I can get Student Affairs and Food Ser- vices and Financial Affairs communicating, maybe we can expand the uses for Terrier Bucks. 3. I would really like to do “Taste of Home” in Burwell. Students could submit fam- ily recipes, the staff could make them for us, students could vote for their favorite. You could try your best friend’s grandma’s green beans, or your roommate’s aunt’s lasagna. I think it would shake up Burwell a little bit. 4. Another goal I have, from the Campus Union side, is to have guest speakers from around the campus or community – kind of a little forum for the Campus Union as- sembly to watch and ask questions. Closing Statements: I’m open to anyone’s ideas and please feel free to email me. Thanks to everyone for choosing me, I appreciate it! I want to prove to everyone that they made the right choice. Novakcm@email.wofford.edu
  • PAGE ONE DESIGN Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Kristmar Muldrow FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 VOL. 113, NO. 49 • SINCE 1908 dailygamecock.com UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA INSIDE B1 MIX Charleston band Dead 27s will play USC’s Young Alumni Band Party tonight at Tin Roof. 5 VIEWPOINTS Editorial Board: A recent MRSA infection warrants an improvement in everyone’s healthy habits. 4 SPORTS South Car- olina returns to Wil- liams-Brice stadium to face Missis- sippi State. WEATHER Friday Saturday High 73° Low 57° High 74° Low 44° C aroline Baity and another student had been “hitting the gym pretty hard” at the Strom Thurmond Wellness and Fitness Center for a few weeks when they found something to be amiss. Ba it y, a t h ird-yea r spor t a nd entertainment management student, began to find clusters of flesh-colored bumps on her inner thigh after using an inner thigh press machine four or five times a week. This was diagnosed as molluscum contagiosum, a viral skin infection that does not present many medical risks. Her friend, however, was not so lucky. The third-year exercise science student who had been accompanying Baity to the gym and also using the inner thigh press machine noticed a strange- looking bump on her inner thigh. She initially took it to be an ordinary razor bump. The next day, it began to hurt, so she scheduled an appointment at the Thomson Student Health Center. That “razor bump” was actually M R SA — Met h ic i l l i n-resist a nt Staphylococcus aureus — an antibiotic- resistant, potentially life-threatening and highly contagious Staph infection. It often emerges as this student’s did — small, red bumps — but quickly progresses into deep, painful sores that must be surgically drained. About one in three people carry MRSA on their skin or in their nose, according to Judy Chontos-Komorowski, the assistant medical director of the Thomson Student Health Center’s general medicine clinic. The MRSA often remains dormant until one of these “carriers” transmits it through personal contact or exposing any kind of open sore or wound to a surface. MRSA can live outside the body for weeks to months and can be transmitted from a surface to someone’s body through any kind of break in the skin, including a razor bump, like the infected student had. By the end of the week, the student was in emergency surgery. She could know within the next two weeks whether she’s rid of the infection for good, or if she could have to deal with it for the rest of her life. “It spread so fast, there was nothing Student contracts MRSA, suspects Strom equipment Amanda Coyne ACCOYNE@DAILYGAMECOCK.COM MRSA • 2 Graduate makes historic donation The College of Arts and Sciences received its largest-ever donation Thursday, a $10 million gift aimed at keeping rising-star professors on campus and allowing faculty to pursue new ideas. Peter McCausland, a 1971 history graduate and founder of Airgas Inc., a major gas distributor, and his wife, Bonnie, made the donation, which Dean Mary Anne Fitzpatrick called “very unique.” Most high-profile donations go to professional programs, not the liberal arts, she said. The gift will fund three initiatives, Fitzpatrick said — a fellowship program for young faculty, a visiting scholars program and a fund to promote new ideas and programs. “The big picture is (that) we can respond to the creative ideas that faculty have, to the new and exciting things they’d like to do in the classroom, things they’d like to bring to students,” Fitzpatrick said. The first four members of the McCausland Faculty Fellows Program were also named Thursday: Hunter Gardner, in classics; Blaine Griffen, in marine science and biology; Catherine Keyser, in English; and Joseph November, in history. The donation wasn’t the McCauslands’ first to USC. Since 2004, they had given $3.75 million, to establish a brain imaging center and to retain top professors. The program is planned to grow to 20 members and targets young faculty; only professors who have earned a doctorate in the last 10 years are eligible. Each will receive a $10,000 stipend, which will keep USC competitive nationally, Fitzpatrick said. That’s important, she said, because otherwise, they might be targeted by other universities. Keyser, who studies modern American literature, said the designation was a “wonderful affirmation” of her work that she thinks will provide her the inspiration and resources to experiment with how she teaches. The college will also bring in two visiting professors each year; departments will apply to host one, Fitzpatrick said. And departments will compete for grants worth $10,000 to $50,000 from a new “innovation fund.” Peter McCausland said he valued the ability to see the big picture and deal with multiple disciplines he gained from studying history. While growing Airgas to be the largest industrial and medical gas distributor in the U.S., he said those skills were useful. He h ad to reconc i le c hem i st r y a nd communications with business and human resources, he said, and he needed to step back from day-to-day work to see where the company was headed. “I think in life, it’s important to know your stuff McCausland gives $10 million, 4 named Faculty Fellows Thad Moore TMOORE@DAILYGAMECOCK.COM DONATION • 3 Kamila Melko / THE DAILY GAMECOCK ’Cocks create with cans giant germ’ ‘I feel like a 1 in 3 people carry MRSA, on average. MRSA stands for Methicil- lin-resistant Staphylococ- cus aureus. The bacteria can live outside of the body for weeks or months. USC VS. MISSISSIPPI STATETHE BLITZ The fifth day of Homecoming brought the Canned Creations competition, in which teams collected canned foods to build structures that went with the theme “United States of Carolina.” Greene Street was filled with creations that resembled Cocky, the American flag and even the South Carolina Statehouse. According to the USC Homecoming Twitter account, more than 12,000 cans had been collected at 10:30 a.m., only an hour and a half after the event began. All cans used were donated to the Harvest Hope Food Bank in Columbia. — Compiled by Hannah Jeffrey, Assistant News Editor S outh Carolina and Clemson enjoy a rivalry with roots deeper than the gridiron grass, its seeds sown by infamous state politics and nurtured by a never-ceasing struggle to claim recognition as the Palmetto State’s flagship educational and athletics program. In a football series that dates back 117 years, the competition has yet to grow stale. After 110 games played, including 104 in a row, the 2013 matchup is one of firsts and potential firsts for USC and Clemson. For the first time, both teams will boast a top-10 national ranking when they meet Saturday at Williams-Brice Stadium, with BCS bowls still in sight. For the entire Clemson roster, the game could be their first win against the Gamecocks — the Tigers haven’t won in the series since 2008, when most of the current players were still in high school. And for USC, a win at home could mark the team’s first five-game win streak in the series, topping its current longest streaks from 1951-1954 and 2009-2012. Both USC President Harris Pastides and Clemson President James Barker said they consider the schools’ football rivalry among the best, if not the best, sports series in the nation. “I mean, there’s no South Carolinian who doesn’t have a favorite,” Pastides said. “There’s nobody who’s not planning to watch the game. It comes on a holiday weekend, and it’s the last regular-season game — a particularly big game this year.” For Barker, the intensity of the rivalry and depth of the division between fans is actually a sign of “what a close-knit state we are.” “All South Carolinians are basically one big family,” he wrote in an email to The Daily Gamecock. “We play each other in sports and then pull together to improve our state.” When the 111th line is added to the South Carolina vs. Clemson series Saturday night, the entire state and much of the nation will watch to see which first will go down in the history books. Pastides, for one, isn’t offering any guesses. “I can get a little superstitious, so I don’t like to jinx anything,” he said. “I’m not going to make a prediction. I’m going to say I’m very hopeful that we’ll do well.” 2013 a year for firsts, potential firsts in 117-year-old USC-Clemson rivalry Sarah Ellis SELLIS@DAILYGAMECOCK.COM Tuesday, November 26, 2013 Photo illustration by Brian Almond / THE DAILY GAMECOCK
  • PAGE ONE DESIGN Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Kristyn Winch Carolina Reporter The The University of South Carolina, School of Journalism and Mass Communications www.datelinecarolina.org The week of April 22, 2013 Hairdoodles Salon helps make memories. Pg. 12 Baseball See where USC baseballs are born. Pg. 5 Tucked in a strip mall beside a Dollar General and a barber shop, 20 teenagers are spending eight hours of their Saturday in a classroom — willingly. They are learning to drive with 911 Driving School, a private drivers education school in Columbia. Classes like this one are quickly changing the way teens learn to drive, which used to mean 30 hours of classroom instruction through the public school system. Two years ago, the state allowed high schools to drop their drivers education programs. Many high schools decided to provide it anyway, but in a survey a year after the change, 18 of the state’s 85 districts acknowledged that they had stopped offering drivers education. Other districts may have dropped it, but no further surveys have been done. Susan Singleton admits to tearing up whenever she goes to the grocery store. Instead of lean proteins like fish or chicken, she goes for the meat that’s about to expire because it’s what she can afford. Instead of brand-name products, she fills her cart with knock- off items or whatever she has coupons for. The mother of three from Columbia worries about what she is feeding her family. “When I go to the store, I cannot buy healthy. I buy cheap,” Singleton said. She pays for her purchases with an EBT card, similar to a debit card, into which the government deposits once a month. Singleton is a recipient of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – formerly known as food stamps – that assists low-income individuals and families in affording nutritious food. Nutritious is the key word. The 18 percent of South Carolinians on SNAP benefits are restricted from buying alcohol, cigarettes and hot food prepared in the store, like rotisserie chicken. Junk food items like soda, chips and candy are fair game. That’s why Gov. Nikki Haley, flanked by public health officials, is pushing for a controversial adjustment to the SNAP program that would limit purchases to healthy items only. To do this, Haley needs a waiver from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Gaining approval to make an already More veterans than ever before are returning from war and heading to college, in large part due to the benefits of the Post-9/11 GI Bill. In just three years, it has helped 860,000 veterans go to school. The main provisions of the bill completely fund up to 36 months of higher education, including living allowances and book stipends. Veterans are also able to transfer their benefits to their spouse or children after serving or agreeing to serve 10 years in the military. At the University of South Carolina, the increasing number of student veterans mirrors the national trend. In 2009, there were about 400 graduate and undergraduate student veterans on campus. By 2012, that number doubled to approximately 800 student veterans, according to Jacob Rivers, director for veteran services at USC. Though the new GI Bill has motivated more veterans to pursue higher education, no one is keeping track of these veterans in terms of areas of study or graduation rates, said Paul Millard, coordinator of transfer and veterans programs. But there has been a national push for the discussion of the issue. “What is the actual portrait of the student veteran experience on campus? No one really knows right now,” he said. The senior journalism students at USC set out to find some answers by speaking to student veterans and recording their experiences. Haley Willard / The Carolina Reporter Chris Wilkie and Amber Olbon (top) and Junie and Ed Hickman (bottom) had different courtship experiences. S.C. seeks to reform food stamps Gov. Nikki Haley wants to introduce new regulations to crack down on obesity Life as a student veteran SPECIAL REPORT on pages 6 and 7 Dating across decadesHow technology changed the way we communicate By Erin Shaw Staff Writer By Kristyn Winch Staff Writer By Haley Willard Staff Writer Erin Shaw / The Carolina Reporter SNAP restrictions could eliminate junk food and sugary beverages from many diets. Drivers ed. takes new directionAs high schools eliminate courses, private schools profit from a rite of passage Kristyn Winch / The Carolina Reporter Boy meets girl. They accept each other’s friend requests on Facebook, chat via Facebook messenger. Boy and girl flirt and get to know each other via texting. Boy sends girl a text to ask her to hang out. Eventually, they declare their romance by changing their statuses on Facebook to “In a Relationship.” – Typical teen dating, Talking, Texting, Poking and Dating, 2011 Consumer Ericcson report In today’s fast-paced, technology- based world, relationships develop quickly. But 50 to 60 years ago, the world moved a little slower. The love stories of two couples from different generations tell how communication in relationships has changed. Courting, then: Junie Purrington-Hickman and Ed Hickman Junie remembers being 16 and waiting by the phone, hoping it would ring. Would Ed Hickman, the boy she was “going with,” call her up and ask for a date Friday night? Junie Purrington-Hickman, now 81, recalled the time when she was dating her husband Ed Hickman, 81, back in the 11th grade in Enfield, N.C. It was 1948, and for Junie to have called Ed for a date was unheard of. “You didn’t call the man. He called you,” Junie said as she described dating in the ’40s and ’50s. “And he made the decision when to call,” she said. The Columbia couple had met three years earlier when Ed transferred from another middle school into Junie’s 8th grade class of 29 students. With 23 girls in the class, Junie said, Ed was a Please see FOOD STAMPS page 3 Please see DATING page 11Please see DRIVERS ED page 11 “You didn’t call the man. He called you.” Junie Purrington- Hickman Autism Centers in the state aim to change education. Pg. 8 — By Erin Shaw
  • PAGE ONE DESIGN Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University David Thackham Good use of spot color, clip art and photo cut-outs. Good dominant main smoke-free story layout. A readable, catchy page. WINTHROP UNIVERSITY ROCK HILL, SOUTH CAROLINA Index News|3-4 Science&Tech|5 Opinion|6 Sports|7 Arts&Culture|8-9 Questionsorcomments? Wewouldloveyourfeedback. Contactusateditors@mytjnow.com Exclusive content at mytjnow.com Nowonyourlaptop,smartphone,andtablet Freshman phenom:‘Big South success attracted me to Winthrop soccer’ Talk about making an early impact and there’s Max Hasenstab. The 5-foot-9-inch striker from Idstein, Germany arrived on Winthrop’s campus this year and has already garnered nationwide attention for his clutch attacking play for the Eagles’ men’s soccer team (7-1- 1). Hasenstab has started all of Winthrop’s nine games (as of Oct. 7), scoring seven goals and his teammates with 19 points and an enviable shots on goal percentage (59.3 percent). Head coach Rich Posipanko attracted the forward to campus by espousing the team’s recent success in the 2012 Big South Tournament. Hasenstab says his coach had always expected him to have a bright career. “Maybe not so early in my career, but he always told me he brought me in to score,” he said. “His expectations are high for me. It’s a long season and there are a few more games, so I’m looking forward to scoring as many goals as possible.” Hasenstab says he’s experiencing a rare clean bill of health so far, and that he’s happy because he was often out injured for his German club teams. His health is essential for an Eagle squad hoping to keep the Big South Conference under wraps for a second consecutive year. “The expectations are higher and they expect to win,” Hasenstab said. “I think we’re a high quality team. Our record so far is a result of the games we’ve played.” Anna Jenkins swings into 2013 season see SPORTS pg. 7 Women’s health in Obamacare act see NEWS pg. 3 2013Wellness fair: revamped see SCIENCE &TECH pg. 5 see HASENSTAB pg. 7 By David Thackham thackhamd@mytjnow.com October 10, 2013 RMRRoddey McMillan Record INCLUDED INSIDE OPINIONNEWS Arts & Culture SCIENCE & TECH Issue 8 In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month and respect for those affected by breast cancer, The Johnsonian is painting our pages pink. Math professor competed with wife for WU position By Shamira McCray Special to The Johnsonian After competing with his wife, Kristen, for a position in the department, Zachary Abernathy, assistant math professor, got his start at Winthrop three years ago. The university hired them both soon after they completed graduate school. Originally from Winston-Salem, N.C., Abernathy completed his undergraduate education at Wake Forest University and graduate education at North Carolina State University. Like many students, he said he was originally unsure what career path he wanted to take in life. “I was procrastinating like crazy with what I wanted to do with my life,” Abernathy said. “I had no idea.” He said throughout school he had a “knack for math” and was naturally good at it. In college, he graduated with degrees in math and physics but was still unsure what he wanted to do in either area. “After I graduated from college I said, ‘I still don’t know what I want to do. I guess I’ll just go to school in math some more,’” he said. “So I went to go get my Ph.D. in math.” Abernathy realized his love for teaching while in graduate school. CSL will revisit smoke- free campus debate “Don’t try to tell me that Cam Newton is a better quarterback than Eli Manning.” That was part of a comment I received when my article “Cam Newton is not Superman” was published on The Johnsonian’s website two weeks ago. While I think the reader didn’t understand the point I was trying to make in my article, I accept the criticism with open arms. I grew up in a family full of opinionated men who were not afraid to tell me when they didn’t agree with me, especially when it came to sports. The truth is, I’m just a junior mass communication major who has a passion for sports and wants to make a career out of that passion. I don’t know everything about every sport there is. If somebody starts talking to me about NASCAR, it’s a safe bet that person isn’t going to be having a very insightful conversation with me about it. I do take pride in the fact that I know a lot about football—especially college football. I know holding when I see it, I know what a safety times in a game is not an impressive line. I’m used to people—men in general—not taking me seriously when I tell them that I want to be a sports reporter. It happens more than one would think. It’s a known fact that women are not respected in sports. Just turn on ESPN or Fox Sports for a minute or two. You will see the women on to grab the attention of the male viewers. The male viewers don’t actually care about what the pretty girl on TV is saying; they are just drawn to her because of her looks. Some of the most famous female sports broadcasters started from the bottom. seeWOMEN pg. 6 see PROFESSOR pg. 8 Editor rebukes double standards Council of Student Leaders chair Christopher Aubrie (right, wearing pink) listens to a speaker on Monday evening. CSL convened inThomson Hall Monday evening during a presentation fromWinthrop Dining Services, who were raising awareness to a new survey they hope to have students complete before Oct. 25. By David Thackham thackhamd@mytjnow.com Over a year after Winthrop’s Council of Student Leaders pledged to beef up enforcement, safety and regulation on smoking areas around campus, chair Christopher Aubrie announced Monday night that his student government intends to again tackle the question of whether Winthrop should be a smoke-free university. CSL stance and said he wishes to consult Winthrop’s President Jayne Comstock for advice before making any decisions or initiatives. He and vice chair Ian Deas will meet with Comstock on Wednesday. last week’s CSL meeting by inviting a volunteer from the Tobacco Free York County Coalition, to speak with the student government. “The main reason we wanted Dr. [David] Keely to come to campus was to make students aware of what’s happening outside of campus,” Aubrie said. “We’re hoping to see President Comstock’s stance on it and we’ll see where we should go from there.” Aubrie hopes to send a couple of his representatives to a summit on the campus of the University of South Carolina on Oct. 17, which will give attendees information on how best to implement tobacco- free campus policies. If Winthrop were to go tobacco-free, the school would be mirroring moves from local schools like Clinton Jr. College, York Technical College and the University of South Carolina (tobacco-free on Jan. 1, 2014). Aubrie says it will take serious research to determine a timeline for when Winthrop could potentially see changes. “The next step is meeting with the president,” he said. “We’re what we believe Winthrop should become. We’re just proposing the question out there and letting people know their options.” Christopher Aubrie CSL chair Emily Goodman Sports Editor Student government sending representatives to campus smoking forum in Columbia WU’s Earth Hour in honor of Common Book For exclusive photos of the U.S. Disc Golf tournament at WU, visit mytjnow.com By Casey White whitec@mytjnow.com Students are being encouraged to turn the lights out in their rooms and enjoy some outdoor activities for one hour as part of Winthrop Earth Hour. Chris Johnson, Winthrop’s sustainability coordina- cided that it was something that could be implemented at Winthrop. Since many Winthrop students live on campus, the hosts of the event are encouraging those more conscious about the energy they are using. Katarina Moyon and ACAD Director Leah Kendall said the event ties in with this year’s Common Book, “The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind,” by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer. see EARTH pg. 5 Zachary Abernathy Assistant professor of mathematics
  • SPECIALTY PAGE DESIGN Under 5,000 Division HONORABLE MENTION: The Collegian Bob Jones University Elizabeth Calavino NEWS The Collegian  Mar. 1, 2013 The Collegian  Mar. 1, 20134 NEWS 5 Premed Association to host ethics conference & In the late 1760s, this Irishman acquired 100,000 acres of land and built Green- ville’s first permanent settlement around the Reedy River. Prior to this time, the area was mainly occupied by the Chero- kee Indians. Pearis received the land because he was married to a Cherokee woman, and the Cherokee tribe admired him. During the American Revolution, Patriots took all of Pearis’ land because of his involvement with the Tories, Brit- ish loyalists in the colonies. Most of that land was bought by Lemuel J. Alston, who laid out a plan for a village called Pleasantburg, later renamed Greenville. Richard Pearis THEN:Opened in 1874, the Camperdown Mill was thefirstmoderntextilemilltoopenwithinthecitylimits of Greenville. It was located on the banks of the Reedy River on the south side of the Main Street Bridge. The mill shut down in 1956 and was demolished by 1959. 4 4 5 Source:MuchofthisinformationaboutthehistoryofGreenvillewasobtained throughtheUpcountryHistoryMuseumindowntownGreenville.Formorehis- toryaboutGreenville,visitthemuseum.Ticketscostonly$4forstudents. NOW: Although the building was demolished in the 1980s, a historical marker remains on its former site next to St. Mary’s Catholic Church on West Washington Street. In 1964 a “new” Textile Hall opened at its current location off Pleasant- burg Drive. This building has gone through sev- eral name changes, but today it is known as the TD Convention Center. 5 NOW: In 1925, “C arolina’s Finest,” the Westin Poinsett Hotel, was opened , an d it co ntinues to operate today. 1 3 THEN: In 1846, a 13-building complex, in- cluding the Greenville Coach Factory, Paint Shop and Blacksmith buildings, was constructed on the Reedy River. In 1904 a two-story brick paint shop was added as part of Markley Carriage Factory (Greenville Coach Factory). Later, the building was sold to Mrs. Eugenia Duke for the production of Duke’s mayonnaise. 3 T 2THEN:Between 1825 and 1851, Vardry McBeedonated land that enabled four churches to beestablished in Greenville. The Christ EpiscopalChurch relocated in 1854, and it is the oldest orga-nized religious body and the oldest church buildingremaining in Greenville. h latet 760s1760s,1760s, thi 1760s, thi 1760s, thi 1760s, thi Is Irishms Irishman acquired d and built Green- d THE donate 1 THEN:The Mansion House, constructed in 1824 on South Main Street, was Greenville’s premier hotel. Many notables, including John C. Calhoun and Wade Hampton, stayed there when in town. Exactly 100 years after its construction, the Mansion House was demolished to make room for the Westin Poinsett Hotel. N In 1816 Vardry McBee bought all of Alston’s holdings for $27,500. He moved to the little town in 1836, and by the 1850s he had transformed it into a flourishing city. Because of his contributions to the city — building a textile mill along the Reedy River, bringing the railroad to Greenville and constructing more than 100 buildings in Greenville County — McBee is considered to be the “Father of Greenville.” Vardry McBee est,” the ed , an d it 1 NOW:Backin2000,achurchcensusrevealed that more than 300 churches were in Greenville city proper, and more than 500 churches were in Greenville County. 2 as s y THEN: This building was erected in 1917 for the Southern Textile Exposition. These exposi- tions (held bi-anually from 1915 until 2005) helped Greenville receive the nickname “Textile Center of the South.” 5 NOW: Today, this building is known as Wyche Pavilion and hosts a variety of func- tions. 3 NOW: Today, the area where the Camper- down Mill once stood is known as Falls Park. And in 2004 the Liberty Bridge was erected in place of the Camperdown Bridge. 4 The Mansion House The ChristEpiscopal Church Markley Carriage factory Camperdown Mill TEXTILE HALL Healthcare changes are not the only issues facing the healthcare industry; the issue of medical ethics is also an important issue. To address the issues of ethics in the medical field, the University’s Premed Asso- ciation will be holding an ethics conference tomorrow, Saturday, March 2, from 9 a.m. to noon. Dr. Mike Gray, a PMA faculty advisor and head of the Department of Biology, said teaching ethical standards to undergraduate students is vital. “The ethical landscape is changing,” he said. According to Gray, there are ethical chal- lenges for Christians that are commonplace activities in today’s medical profession. “Medical schools don’t teach you medical ethics,” he said. The ethics conference will focus on issues such as maintaining a Christian testimony and being aware that there are physicians willing to cross an ethical line and make unethical decisions. According to the PMA secretary Grace Denton, a junior biology major, this year’s conference will focus on the importance of establishing a Christian worldview. Forum attendees will be guided through case stud- ies that will allow them to think through ethical principles and then implement a biblical worldview in those situations. This year’s conference speakers are Dr. Joy Roach Smith and Dr. Nathan Smith, who are both BJU graduates. Dr. Joy Smith is currently the Med-Peds chief resident for the Greenville Hospital System and received the 2010 Lily M and G.D. Jackson Award for most outstanding intern in the Green- ville Hospital System. Dr. Nathan Smith is serving his first year as a surgical resident in the Greenville Hospital System. While attending medical school at Wake Forest University, he wrote for the medical school newsletter with a Christian viewpoint. There is at least one PMA activity or event each month. Activities include forums featuring special speakers in the medical field, volunteering in the community, an annual banquet and a volleyball tournament against the University Nursing Association. According to PMA president Jonathan Fryml, a senior premed major, the PMA ex- ists to bridge the gap between the academic side and the medical side of the major. “What the PMA tries to do is to equip students with tools needed to get into med school,” Fryml said. The PMA helps students get connected so they can shadow professionals and get into med school, dental school, etc. The association also focuses on guiding freshmen through general biology class. “We review concepts that they’ve covered in gen bio, we review their tests, give them advice on how to study and just basically tu- tor the different students,” Fryml said. Currently, there are nearly 100 members of the Premed Association. Members pay dues to help cover costs including paying for forum speaker travel expenses. Students who are interested in joining can contact any of the PMA officers. By: LEE MILLER Staff Writer Premed Association members, seniors Anna Quantrille andWill Brodwater, conduct an experiment in the lab. Photo: EmmaKlak DESIGN:ELIZABETHCALVINO;TEXT:LEIGHKOSIN;PHOTOS:AMYROUKES,EMMAKLAK,SUBMITTED DO’S AND DON’TS OF SOCIAL MEDIA If you want to appear professional and hirable upon graduation, beginning to cultivate a personal online profile while still in college will maximize your chances of giving potential employers a positive impression. Your style of social media presence will greatly influence how you are perceived. “Branding — communicating who they are — is a very important learning process [for students],”said Dr. Steve Buckley, manager of Career Services. Here are some tips from several networking and recruiting publications for using your social media to boost your brand. DO’S “LinkedIn is where employers are looking for the right fit,” Buckley said. Here you should establish your credentials and show your professional potential. Buckley explained that while LinkedIn shows what you can do, Facebook tells how you live. More employers are using Facebook to weed out job candidates who are less than reliable. Twitter continues to grow as a social medium that canconnectpeoplebothcasuallyandprofessionally. Properly using yourTwitter account can expand your network and broadcast your brand. Use sufficient detail to give a clear impression of your background and abilities. Give honest, accurate information. Honesty is a Christian’s responsibility, and it pays off practically as well. Proofread your profile. Few mistakes look more unprofessional than sloppy spelling and grammar. Don’t wait to use LinkedIn until you’re looking for employment. It takes long-term investment in connections to establish a strong network. Don’t be too modest in showcasing your accomplishments. Recruiters expect to see the very best you can do. Don’t neglect your inbox. Failing to respond promptly comes across as rude and unprofessional. DON’TS Post about your career hopes and keep up conversations about the industry that interests you. Join groups related to your interests to stay up-to- date on the field and meet people who can help you or who need your help. Explore Facebook’s Social Jobs application to find new job opportunities. Describe yourself clearly and purposefully in your bio. Be deliberate in what you tweet. Have an idea of what image you want to project, and build up that image with what you say. Find a balance between personal and professional. Some parts of your life should stay private, but you still want people to see you as a person. Don’t post anything that might offend someone else. Pictures of partying or even firearms and politically incorrect statements can instill mistrust in a professional’s mind. Don’t join groups that make you sound irresponsible or antiestablishment. Don’t “spam” by reposting every joke and meme you see. Avoiding spam will make your profile look much more professional, and your friends will likely appreciate it too. Don’t become obsessed with tweeting. It’s advisable to tweet up to several times a day, but no one needs a running commentary of your whole life. Don’t automatically feed your tweets into your other social media profiles. The different styles of media often call for different presentations. Don’t simply aim for the highest possible number of followers. A smaller following of people who care about what you say and will retweet you can prove more valuable. DESIGN:JOSHFREDERICK;TEXT:KYLESEISS The Collegian  Feb. 8, 2013 NEWS 5 DESIGN:ELIZABETHCALVINO;TEXT:KYLESEISS
  • SPECIALTY PAGE DESIGN Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Cistern Yard News College of Charleston Gillian Spolarich
  • SPECIALTY PAGE DESIGN Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Panther Claflin University Jerilyn Gamble
  • SPECIALTY PAGE DESIGN Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Gabby Salter YEARin review THE Gold Rush Daze March 12 Lebron James is named NBA finals MVP for second year in a row June 20 George Zimmerman is aquitted of all charges in the shooting of Trayvon Martin July 13 Golf and Cross Country teams are introduced for their inaugeral seasons Fall Semester The newly designed $100 bill is released into circulation Oct. 8 Typhoon in Philippines kills over 5,000 Nov. 8 Bruins women’s soccer team wins NCCAA national soccer championship Nov. 16 Boston marathon bombing kills 3, injures 264 April 15 Edward Snowden Leaks NSA Documents May Prince George of Cambridge was born to Prince William and Catherine July 22 Nelson Mandela, former South African president and civil rights icon , dies At 95 Dec. 5 Boston Red Sox win third World Series title in 10 seasons Oct. 30 BJU’s newly renovated dining common opened Aug. 30. Margaret Thatcher, Former British Prime Minister, Dies At 87 April 8 American scientists create a living ear from collagen using a 3d printer February 21 Edward Snowden leaks NSA documents May The U.S. Supreme Court rules the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional, allowing same-sex marriages to receive fedral benefits June 26 15-day government shutdown Oct. 1-16 George Zimmerman is acquitted of all charges in the shooting of Trayvon martin July 13 Typhoon In Philippines Kills Over 5,000 Nov. 8 EmmaKlak,TheCollegian EmmaKlak,TheCollegian JasonBell/CameraPress EmmaKlakandLukeCleland,TheCollegian MollieWaits,TheCollegian YousufKarshFonds/LibraryandArchivesCanada CherlieRiedel AaronTang,Flickr KeithAllison,Flickr MargaretThatcherFoundation,ChrisCollins TEN Things to do before you graduate 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 7 DowntownGreenvillehasaspecialarchitecturalandculturalcitycenter.Withshopssuch asAnthropologie,andTheBeadedFrogandrestaurantslikeTupeloHoneyCafé,Spillthe BeansandBlueberryFrog,downtownGreenvilleisteemingwithdistinctivelocalshops.If youandyourfriendshaveafreeevening,godowntownandadmirethearchitecture,take pictureswiththestatues,visittheuniqueshopsthatcatchyourfancyandsoakinthecultur- allyrichatmosphere. GreenvillecontainssomeofthemostbeautifulparksinSouthCarolina.Oneofthe prettiest,however,isFallsPark.ConnectedtotheSwampRabbittrail,thisparksur- roundstheReedyRiverandhasastunningviewofitsfalls.Oneofthehighlightsof theparkisLibertyBridge,acurvedpedestriansuspensionbridge.Acombinationof beautifularchitectureandanevenbetterviewmakesthisbridgeamust-see. Forallthebaseballloversoutthere,Greenvillehasitsveryownminorleagueteam,the GreenvilleDrive.WhentheDrive'sseasonbeginsinthespring,takeyourselfouttotheball gameatFluorField,afantasticvenuethat'sactuallyaminorleaguereplicaofFenwayPark. TheprofessorshereatBJUaresomeofthemostcompassionateandinteresting peopleyoucanfindanywhere.Askoneofyourfavoriteprofessorsafterclassor viaemailtoeatlunchwithagroupofyouandyourfriends.Youwillbenefitfrom theopportunitytoheartheirstoriesandexperiences.Askyourinstructorabout histestimony,orhowhemanagedhistimeincollegeorevenforrelationship advice. Allthemenandwomenonfacultyheredesirebeagodlyinfluencein students’lives. Forallnatureloverslookingtoescapethemadbustleofdailylife,TableRockoffersanamaz- inghikingexperience.Withbeautifulvistasandavarietyoftrailsrangingindifficultyfrom easytochallenging,thisisamust-doactivityforalluniversitystudents.Approximately30 minutesawayfromcampus,TableRockmakesaperfectdaytripgetaway. IfyouloveliteraturebutaresometimesconfusedbytheloftylanguageofShake- speare,SummerShakespeareisawonderfulopportunity.IttakesShakespeare’s incrediblecomediesandtranslatesthemintomodernEnglish.TheCompany producesandperformsaproductioneverysummer,butshowsitatthebeginning offirstsemestersostudentswhoweren’tinGreenvillecanalsoenjoyit. Meetthemakersofjewelry,foodandclothingallcraftedbyGreenvilleartisans.Students lookforwardeveryfalltotheparadesotheycanbuy,andbecomeinspiredby,thebeauti- fuland-one-of-a-kindcraftsdisplayedattheparade.“It’sagreatplacetofinduniquegifts ordecorthatyou’llneverfindanywhereelse,”saidjuniorbusinessadministrationstudent BrittanyGibson.Theofficialwebsite,indiecraftparade.com,containsascheduleofwhen eachparadewillbeheld. Withaschedulefulloftests,friendsandwork,manystudentsfeeltheneedto relax.SomeBJUstudentshavefoundaninterestingwaytodothat:visitingalocal humanesocietyandtherapeuticallypettingthepuppies.“It’sagoodstressreliever foranycollegestudent,”saidsophomorenursingstudentDillonDoran. Withtheincreasingpopularityofrunninga5K,it’seasytojoininthefunwithBJU’svery ownracingexperience.Whilesomeraceentryfeescanrangefrom$30to$40,thisraceis only$10forstudents.Thecoursetakesyouallovercampus,andyougetacoolnewT-shirt forparticipating.ThisyeartheraceisbeingheldonNov.23,at9a.m.Runnersmayregister onlineatBJU’swebsiteorattheAlumniAssociationofficeintheStudentCenterbyNov.20. Needagoodwaytorelaxinthecrispfallweather?Loveapples?Thereareseveral appleorchardsnearcampus,suchasSkyTopOrchardinFlatRock,N.C.,or NivensAppleFarmsinSpartanburg,S.C.Theseorchardsoffernotonlythefun, traditionalapplepickingexperience,butalsoyummyfalltreatsincludingapple ciderdoughnutsandapumpkinpatchforanypumpkin-carvingenthusiasts. 1. Explore Main Street 7. Visit Falls Park on the Reedy River2. Hike Table Rock State Park 8. Go to Summer Shakespeare 3. Explore the Indie Craft Parade 9. Pet the animals at a humane society 4. Run in the Turkey Bowl 10. Go apple picking 5. Cheer on the Greenville Drive baseball team 6. Eat a meal with a professor 'S Stunning, clean design. Good use of space, color, fonts and graphics. Very well done. Draws in readers.
  • SPECIALTY PAGE DESIGN Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock USC Kristmar Muldrow B1 Chloe Gould CGOULD@DAILYGAMECOCK.COM smashburger Photos by Andrew Askins THE DAILY GAMECOCK Smashburger, the Denver-based burger chain, opened in front of Cross Hill Market Dec. 12. Its menu allows for custom creations. DG “You can find your way across this country using burger joints the way a navigator uses stars.” — Charles Kuralt 5Tuesday, October 15, 2013 Instagram The five people you follow on Selfies, food, pet fur clog newsfeeds Alex Buscemi MIX@DAILYGAMECOCK.COM PersonWhoUsesTooManyHashtags GirlWhoOnlyTakesSelfies LameQuoteKid TheFoodie PetPerson 87 likes PersonWhoUsesTooManyHashtags #Lightbulb #Burntout #IDGAF #SoCollege #Electricity #ThomasEdison #Inventions #CopperWire #Glass #Light #Illumination #Illuminati #Illest #INeedALadder #YOLO #YOLObulbs #Swag #YOLOSwagbulbs #AreYouSeriouslyReadingAllOfThese #INeedAHobby GirlWhoOnlyTakesSelfies Lying here in bed thinking of you <3. #TellMeImPretty #NeedValidationFromOthers #NoMakeUp LameQuoteKid #Truth #IReadPoetrySometimes #ImSensitiveAndStuff #CantThinkForMyself TheFoodie #NOMNOM #SoFat #NOM #LOL #NOMZ PetPerson My baby Jessica in her cute wittle tiara! DesperateDood You look even better without makeup. What are you doing 2nite? 3h 1h 2h 4h 5h WheresMyBig THIS IS PRESH. NotAVirus Claim your free iPad----->computercancer.com GirlWhoOnlyTakesSelfies Omigosh y’all so unexpected! HarryHipster Real progressive thinking, man. Wanna ride bikes to the record store later? Thick-rimmed glasses. Modest Mouse. JessikkahDawg Mom wear r u? I half go pawdy. Her bio says she loves to “meet new people and ride horses and dance like nobody is watching y’all :)” but it doesn’t include the thing she loves most: herself. Every picture on her feed is a close-up of her own face making a pouty-lipped, worried-eye expression — until she discovers how to combine multiple photos. Then every picture becomes 10 mini-close-ups of her own face making a pouty-lipped, worried-eye expression. Each pic will get hundreds of likes and dozens of comments telling her to stop being so gosh darn beautiful. Make sure you comment as well — it’s the only thing that gets her through the day. #See #How #Annoying #This #Is? On a perpetual quest to accrue as many views from strangers as possible, this person pushes every caption to its limit with hashtags because, apparently, people spend a good amount of time typing “swag” in their search bars. We have no one to blame but ourselves. Silver lining: more hashtags means a higher chance of getting spammed. This person can’t wait to show you the lasagna they made. That’s understandable. Lasagna is a complex and unforgiving tower to build — a true feat of meat and cheese architecture. But the true foodie also can’t wait to show you the ramen they microwaved. Or the slice of toast they buttered. Or the Pop-Tart they unwrapped. Notice an underlying trend with the foodie, as the number of cheese omelet pictures increases, so does the roundness of their selfies. live. laugh. love. There are three primary variations of the lame quote: the lame-quote-over-cloudy-sky-background, the lame-quote- over-ocean-horizon-background and the lame-quote-over- autumn-forest-background. The goal of every lame quote kid is the same — to convince followers that they are sooo freaking deep. Here’s a tip, lame quote kid: If you want people to believe that you’re a well-read intellectual, never repeat anything that has come out of Marilyn Monroe’s mouth. Or James Dean’s. Or anything that involves the moon or the stars or living like you’ll die tomorrow. Lame quote kid, let me to put this in a language you might understand: “Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else’s opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation.” — Oscar Wilde. JessikkahDawg Mom r u drink agen? Y u do dis? It doesn’t matter if pet person is in class all day and downtown all night. They are going to sweep the accidents under the rug (literally) and use Instagram to show you that they are the best pet owners ever. Look at that cat with its face stuck in a slice of bread. Look at how happy that dog is wearing a sweater. Pet person, that is so cute and you are such a fun owner. Now take it for a walk you heartless comment fisher.
  • SPECIALTY PAGE DESIGN Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Cassie Cope PAGE LAYOUT BY CASSIE COPE WEEK OF April 22, 2013PAGE 12 Carolina Reporter The The first haircut the owner of Hair Doodles re- ceived from her inexperienced uncle when she was 3 made her look like a little boy. “I remember my bangs being in the middle of my forehead,” said Kelly Rister, who has worked at the salon for 17 years. In that time she has gone from a kid with a bad haircut to cutting and styling children’s hair. The 30-year-old salon, tucked away in a corner of a shopping center on Forest Drive, has a multicol- ored sign on its exterior hinting at fun. Inside, the walls are painted bright green with big blue polka dots; along one of the walls is a shelf with rows of bows. A playroom replaces the typical waiting room. Instead of month-old gossip magazines, a flat-screen TV, bucket of toys and a bookshelf with authors like Dr. Seuss entertain customers, some of whom can’t reach the cash register, let alone pay for their own haircut. Children can munch on animal-shaped cookies while their hair loses either an entire ponytail or just an inch for a regular trim. But for some younger customers, toys and treats do not distract from the trauma of a haircut. A place to conquer fears A challenge for a salon that caters to kids is handling the terrified customers. Rister does not know why children can be terri- fied of getting their hair cut. She said boys typically are more afraid because girls like being pampered while boys don’t like being held down. Some people think the scared children relate getting their hair cut to visiting the doc- tor, but doctors have told Ris- ter that the children are worse at Hair Doodles than they are in the doctors’ offices. One Hair Doodles cus- tomer, Scotty Radeker, ex- ercises his lungs by screaming and cry- ing every time he visits Hair Doodles. Even though Scotty has been to Hair Doodles every two months in the two and a half years he’s been alive and needed haircuts, he still gets very upset when the shears snip away his locks. In a recent visit, Scotty’s mom, Adriane Radeker, held him down to minimize his jerking and crying while Yolanda Henry, a Hair Doo- dles stylist for almost 10 years, patiently cut his hair. “If they wiggle and scream, we’re prepared for that,” Rister said. When Henry finished Scotty’s haircut, he realized the terror was over, relaxed and headed to the playroom. He trans- formed into a golden child, not even wanting a sucker as a reward be- cause he does not like sweets. Most children grow out of being afraid, Henry said, and one day they come in and sit in the chair and behave. That transition can be one of the most rewarding parts of the job, Rister said. She had one customer with special needs who would throw a fit every time he got a haircut but kept telling her that he would be good when he turned 7. He came in after his seventh birthday and sat in the chair and behaved as he said he would. A place where girls become princesses Some of the girls and boys Rister watched grow up have now become adults who bring their own children to Hair Doodles. “This is where I spent almost every one of my birthdays,” said Maggie Allen, who brought her daughter Bella for her friend Emma Har- rell’s birthday. Allen remem- bered getting her hair and nails done and feeling like a princess for a day. The new birthday prin- cess Emma wanted a haircut like her mom’s, which happens to be one of the more popular cuts requested—a bob. Some girls ask for the hairstyle by saying they want their hair like Kit Kit- teridge, an American- Girl doll, Rister said. Henry chopped off a 6-inch ponytail from Emma’s mane. Then Emma took her time choosing a hairstyle from a book of pictures showing various braids and twists. The hairstyles range from a heart braid to a spider web design where colorful bands link together small portions of the hair forming what resembles a net. Emma settled on a small braid on the top part of her head that fell by her right ear and her spe- cial day of spoils continued with a kid’s version of a manicure. She selected green for her nail polish because it’s her favorite color. After Bella’s nails were painted too, the girls modeled their new hairstyles and manicures radiating like royalty. A place for a creative barber Rister’s creativity extends from cut- ting and curling to cooking and crocheting. She owns a catering company, Southern Belle Chef Services, and when she’s not doing hair for kid’s parties she prepares all kinds of food for grown- up events like weddings, showers, Christ- mas parties, funerals, even a divorce party. But her day job keeps her going. The kids are always happy, and she doesn’t have the stress of a regular office job, she said. She thought about being a nurse at one point, but that job would be more stressful too, she said. So she learned how to cut hair by attending beauty school to earn money through college. She then went to Midlands Technical College and the Uni- versity of South Carolina for a culinary arts degree. She earns extra income through the catering company, but Hair Doodles has done well, despite a bad economy. Hair Doodles has kept its prices the same for about three years, Rister said. Even though she has cut, braided, shampooed and styled thousands of children’s hair, Ris- ter has been ready for her own chil- dren for a while. Now preg- nant with her first child, she is ecstatic, thinking about when she will style her own kid’s hair, especially if it is a girl. Her kid will never have to worry about bad bangs. Local salon caters to pampered princesses, scared little boys with creative styles Photos by Cassie Cope / The Carolina Reporter Kelly Rister, Hair Doodles owner, cuts 4-year-old Luke Stanek’s hair as he munches on cookies. By Cassie Cope Staff Writer Cassie Cope / The Carolina Reporter The Columbia children’s hair salon has been offering a fun experience for over 30 years. Tradition of fun at Hair Doodles Source: Hair Doodles Kid’s haircut prices Boys: $18 Girls: $20 (includes hairstyle) The salon accepts walk-ins when scheduling allows. Services First haircuts, braids, nail painting and party packages Hours Tues. to Fri.: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Contact 4600 Forest Drive, Suite 7 Web: myhairdoodles.com 803-787-5904 Six-year-old Em m a Harrell went to Hair Doodles to celebrate her birthd ay. Scotty Radeker, 2, gets upset every time he gets his hair cut. E m m a selects nail polish for her birthday m anicure.
  • SPECIALTY PAGE DESIGN Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Erin Shaw I was impressed with the design elements - a cut-out, a photo story and an infographic piece. Long copy is broken up cleverly with subheads - punchy even without use of color.
  • SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE ONLY: The Pacer Times USC Aiken 4 | P acer fans had plenty to cheer about during the 2012-13 seasons, as USC Aiken assembled one of its finest athletics campaigns in school history. Multiple individual and team honors were earned between August and April, maintaining USCA’s reputation as one of the top athletics departments in the Peach Belt Conference, finishing fourth in the PBC Commissioner’s Cup race, as well as all of Division II. A nother strong baseball season by the Pacers led to plenty of milestones, the most noteworthy achieved by head coach Kenny Thomas. USCA’s skipper, in his 14th year at the helm, tallied his 500th win as the Pacers’ coach as well as the 1000th victory of his career during the regular season. USCA reached the top spot in the national rankings before bowing out in the NCAA Division II Southeast Regional. The Pacers eclipsed the 40-win mark for the first time since 2009, easily clinching the Peach Belt regular season title. Ty Barkell, Ryan Metzler, Bill Gerstenslager, Bryce Baur, Derek Beasley and Taylor Grover were all chosen First Team All-PBC. Shortstop Sean Miller secured the league’s Freshman of the Year award and Gerstenslager, Grover and Baur also earned All-America recognition for their play during the season. C onsider Aiken’s history and its rich golf culture, and it comes as no surprise that USCA is one of the nation’s best on the links, year after year. The 2012- 13 Pacers soared to as high as No. 3 in the country en route to reaching the national quarterfinals. USCA brought home a pair of tournament titles, one each in the fall and spring. The first, a victory at the ninth annual Kiawah Island Invitational, was spearheaded by Andrew Ward’s top-three finish. Three other Pacers finished in the top 15 as USCA edged North Alabama by one stroke to take home the trophy. USCA’s next title came at the Peach Belt Conference tournament, with Matt Atkins claiming individual medalist honors by four strokes. Atkins and JP Solis each earned First Team All-Peach Belt selections, with Atkins leading the way as the PBC Player of the Year. Atkins and Solis were also named to PING All-American teams for the second time in their careers. The conference named Michael Carlisle its top coach for the seventh time in his 23 years as USCA’s head coach. E ntering the 2012- 13 season, USCA’s women’s basketball team was expected to compete for a national championship. For the first three months of the season, it looked like head coach Mike Brandt’s bunch would do just that. The Pacers opened the season 12-0, climbing as high as No. 3 in the national rankings, before a devastating knee injury to All-American forward Kayla Harris briefly stalled their momentum. Senior Daniela Tarailo led the charge from there, guiding the Pacers to the semifinals of the NCAA Division II Southeast Regional. A season of tremendous highs and arduous struggles reached its apex in Christenberry Fieldhouse on Augusta State’s campus. A Mackenzie Reese 3-pointer at the buzzer completed a comeback that saw the Pacers program history. Many of the players are returning for the 2013-14 season under Head Coach Vince Alexander, front center. Photo by Joseph Johns In Elite company: 2012-13 athletics review Kyle Dawson Sports Editor Continued on page 5 Clear winner in this contest. Good copy, photos and design.
  • SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina
  • SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina
  • SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Well done. This section is a stand-out in a highly competitive contest. Interesting to read. Great mix of history and present day.
  • HUMOROUS ILLUSTRATION OR CARTOON Open Division THIRD PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University Althea Holenko Political cartoon of government shutdown.
  • HUMOROUS ILLUSTRATION OR CARTOON Open Division SECOND PLACE: The Skyliner North Greenville University Linnea Stevens
  • HUMOROUS ILLUSTRATION OR CARTOON Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Loren Crisp Laugh-out-loud funny. I enjoyed the different writing styles. The squirrel one is VERY clever.
  • ILLUSTRATION OR INFORMATIONAL GRAPHIC Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Josh Frederick It’s that time of year when germs seem to be present everywhere. Dr. Mike Gray, chair of the biology department, has some tips for students who want to fight off the flu virus. According to Gray, students can do a few crucial things during cold and flu season. When you rub your eyes, germs are likely to enter your body from your hands. Avoid touching or rubbing your eyes. Wash your hands. Be aware. You touch many different surfaces during the day, so be sure to frequently lather your hands. “The gold standard is still washing your hands thoroughly with hot water and soap,” Gray said. Wet your hands first, and then wash both hands thoroughly for 30 seconds. Hand sanitizers do work, but should not replace hand washing. If you use hand sanitizer, let it dry completely on your hands before touching anything. Eat well and drink water. Eat a well-balanced diet full of fruits and vegetables. Drink up! “Staying hydrated is part of the picture.” Gray said.
  • ILLUSTRATION OR INFORMATIONAL GRAPHIC Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Charis Marshall DESIGN:CHARISMARSHALL;TEXT:CAITLINALLEN THRIFTY Republic of Tea Travel Tins are great for your tea-drinking friend; six teabags per tin and over 20 flavors to choose from. www.repu- blicoftea.com $8-$10 Starbucks VIA for the coffee lover — each package comes with five instant coffee pack- ages, just add water. www.starbucks.com $7 A Talking Tardis Mini Keychain for the Dr. Whovian in your life. www.toysrus.com $10 Try the Luxeffects glitter top coat nail polish from Essie for the girly-girl on your list. Glitter is all the rage. www.ulta.com $8.50 Amazon.com: easiest online purchasing with free ship- ping for students. Its prices are almost always unbeatable. Target: Target has it all and at great prices. From the One Dollar Spot to video games to jewelry to food, there’s some- thing for everyone. Dollar Stores: Believe it or not, dollar stores are a great place to do stocking stuffer shopping and to get the items you need to make your own gifts — cheap and easy. A. $770Average amount each American spent on Christmas in 2012. B. $271Average amount parents spent per child on Christmas in 2012. C. $30-$200 Average Christmas budget for college students. (University of Nebraska)$0 $200 $300 $400 $500 $600 $700 $800 A B C Spending Stats (According to the LA Times, Nov. 2012) Gifts under $10 Shop online: most online stores have better deals and it’s easier to keep track of the money you are spending. Or, use cash-only: it can be easier to stay on budget, and no matter where you go, the vendor will accept cash. Use social media to keep track of deals in your fa- vorite stores. SAVVYSHOPPING TIPS Handmade gift tips Use everyday items to create your own gifts (i.e. paper, beads, pictures). Check out Pinter- est for hundreds of easy gift ideas, even if you aren’t the crafty type. Always be on the lookout for interesting mugs or teacups. It’s super easy to add hot chocolate or tea and a ribbon to finish the gift. Where to shop for the Deals With Christmas around the corner, many of us are searching for last-minute gifts and are counting our pennies. Here are some simple ideas to shop wisely and save money during the holidays. SHOPPING CHRISTMAS (According to the LATimes, Nov. 2012) As the story goes, St. Valentine was executed on Feb. 14 about 270 A.D. for performing Christian marriages against the decree of Roman Emperor Claudius II, who believed single men made better soldiers. Valentine’s Day is the second most popular card-giving holiday after Christmas. Accord- ing to the Greeting Card Association, about 190 million cards are sold on this holiday. For Valentine’s Day 2012, an estimated $17.6 billion was spent in jewelry sales nationwide. Because of increased demand, roses are usually sold at 200 percent the usual retail value on Valentine’s Day. However, these prices don’t seem to stop most men. Typically 60 percent of flowers purchased on this day are roses. The New England Confectionery Com- pany produces eight million Sweethearts Conversation Hearts each year. Richard Cadbury developed the first boxed chocolates for Valentine’s Day in 1868. Men spend twice as much on this holiday as women spend. While 45 percent of men think flowers mean“I love you,”only four percent of women agree. Author Geoffrey Chaucer was one of the first to associate Valentine’s Day with romantic love. In his story, Parliament of Fowls, he wrote about birds choosing their mates on Valentine’s Day. Approximately 220,000 wedding proposals take place on Valentine’s Day. This constitutes 10 percent of yearly proposals. ESIGN:CHARISMARSHALL;TEXT:CARLIEMALDONADO
  • ILLUSTRATION OR INFORMATIONAL GRAPHIC Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Cistern Yard News College of Charleston Colin Johnson Strong, simple image. Great use of color and visualization of liquor from party words and emotions.
  • ILLUSTRATION OR INFORMATIONAL GRAPHIC Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Erin Shaw PAGE LAYOUT BY ERIN SHAW Well, you made it this far. You are nestled in a glove, the pitcher’s fingers placed perpendicular to your seams for a four-seam fastball. He winds up and hurtles you toward an aluminum bat. In an instant, you are flying in the opposite direction, landing in the stands. A USC student could pick you up and return you for a free $5 gift card to McAlister’s Deli. Or a child could race to you and claim you for his own. If this happens, you are not coming back. But don’t fret. You are one of about 660 dozen baseballs the University of South Carolina Gamecocks go through each year. One of 7,920. If all of you were lined up end to end, it would be enough to get a batter from home plate to first base more than 20 times. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the No. 1 team in Baseball America’s preseason ranking, goes through half that amount each year. “We do order a lot of balls,” said Kyle Lipsey, the director of baseball operations at USC. “I don’t know if anyone orders the amount that we do.” The reasoning is twofold. For one thing, Lipsey said, Carolina Stadium is not designed for retaining baseballs. If you are rocketed over the third base fence, you will land on a grassy hill and roll toward the Congaree River. Gone. If you are popped on the right side of first base or anywhere over right field, you will smack into the asphalt on Williams Street and become too scuffed and dented to return to play. Gone. And if you are fouled back onto the roof of the press box or coaches’ offices, you will most likely end up stuck in the gutter. See ya. The second reason rests with athletic director and former head coach Ray Tanner, who started the custom of ordering substantially more game balls than practice balls. Generally, teams order lesser- quality practice balls for scrimmages and batting practice, saving the official Rawlings R1 balls for games. “I’m of the mentality that you want to play and practice with the ball you’re ultimately going to use,” Tanner said. “We want players to adjust to real-life conditions, so when you practice, the ball should be new.” The athletics department orders an average of 110 dozen practice balls and average of 550 dozen game balls, according to Lipsey. At around $5 each, the baseball budget for the university would be nearly $40,000, but the SEC gives the university a significant subsidy, Lipsey said, because the balls are mandated by the conference. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. A lot has to happen before you make it into a game. The beginning You start life as a small rubber ball with a cork center. A machine wraps you in four layers of wool yarn to fatten you up and enable you to bounce back after being hit repeatedly. Two figure-eight pieces of leather are then hand- stitched together with exactly 108 stitches to form your recognizable red and white cover. For the Major Leagues, this happens in one special factory in central Costa Rica. You, like the majority of other baseballs, are made in China. By boat, you sail from China to Washington, Mo., a city just outside St. Louis. Around Thanksgiving, you make your way to South Carolina via FedEx truck. You arrive at T and T Sporting Goods, a family- owned establishment across the street from the state fairgrounds. All the Gamecock baseballs are stored here for the year. Carter Ellis, Jr. has been working at T and T for 23 years and stringently monitors the baseballs that come in and out of the store. “Baseballs have a tendency to grow legs,” he said. Lipsey usually keeps one to two cases of baseballs at Carolina Stadium at a time and gets more from Ellis on an as-needed basis. This way, there is more space in the Gamecock equipment rooms and coaches and players are deterred from using more balls than they actually need. The arrangement between the sporting goods store and the university–call it a gentleman’s agreement– has been going on “since forever” according to Ellis, and he alone gives permission for balls to leave the facility. “Nobody knows this little brick building does what it does, but we take pride in doing it,” Ellis said. “We love each and every one of our baseballs.” The middle Once you make it to the stadium’s equipment room, it’s time to get rubbed up with baseball mud. This is meant to remove your raw slickness and pearl-white sheen. Carter Scheetz, a sport and entertainment management student at USC, carefully removes your plastic wrapper. Then he dips his fingers in a tub of Lena Blackburne Rubbing Mud, a unique muck that comes from a secret spot on the banks of the Delaware River in Delran, N.J. It is dark brown, odorless and much more sophisticated than the infield dirt used on baseballs in the old days. At $43 for a standard tub, it’s expensive mud. But a little goes a long way. It only takes a small dab of mud mixed with water to rub up a ball. Normally, Scheetz will rub up five to six dozen baseballs before a game. So now you are game-day ready. You are off-white and smooth, sitting in ball bags in the dugout waiting to be warmed up. This is it. Well, maybe. Sometimes game balls don’t even make it into play. Both pitcher and umpire can throw out balls during play if they don’t like the way they feel. On this season’s team, sophomore relief pitcher Evan Beal considers himself the pickiest about the baseballs he throws. Even the most minor imperfection in a ball can bother him, he said. “If I throw a ball in the dirt and it skips or gets scuffed, I’ll usually throw it to the dugout,” said Beal, who usually tosses out two to three balls per inning. It helps him handle the unpredictability of pitching. Being able to change the balls out “mentally makes me feel more in control.” If you feel OK to the pitcher, there’s still a good chance you won’t last long. In the Majors, the life of a game ball is about six pitches. At Carolina Stadium, a game ball could last one pitch or a whole inning. You never know for sure. But let’s say you make it through a game. Now you become a practice ball. As a practice ball, you are a little damaged and worse for wear, but still valuable. Your job is to help players perfect their throwing and catching. Coaches hit grounders and pop flies to infielders and outfielders to sharpen their skills. You get grass stains. And dirt scuffs. Your ink starts to smudge. The end Eventually, you become too worn to be a practice ball. Your next stop is the batting cage, where baseballs go to die. Every day players come in for hitting time, using you until you start showing your age and fraying at the seams. The synthetic turf grass of the indoor facility is harsh on your already shabby leather exterior. The lip on the aluminum bat slices into your loosening cover. The pitching machine plucks at your red stitches. Such is the life of a baseball. You may be able to endure this for quite some time, but you finish your days scratched, scuffed and busted. They throw you away. You’re out. WEEK OF APRIL 22, 2012 PAGE 5Carolina Reporter The SouthCarolina Vanderbilt NorthCarolina Louisville MississippiState Oregon 7,920 6,000 3,900 2,400 4,500 1,800 5,400 Arkansas 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 7th6th State The University of South Carolina baseball team uses more balls per year than most top-ranked teams in Baseball America’s 2013 preseason poll. Baseball usage Preseason rank Source: Directors of baseball operations at each university Erin Shaw / The Carolina Reporter Thousands of USC baseballs travel a long road before they are used, lost and tossed at Carolina Stadium Behind Seams the By Erin Shaw Staff Writer From start to finish, the lifespan of a University of South Carolina baseball can be long or short, but one thing is for sure: there is no shortage of them. The two-time national championship team orders an average of 7,920 baseballs per season. Life of a Carolina baseball SPECIAL DELIVERY Baseballs are rubbed with special mud prior to play. Doing this reduces the ball’s shine and slickness. Carter Scheetz, a student at USC, has been rubbing up baseballs for the past two years. GETTING MUDDY READY FOR PLAY DEATH BY BATTING CAGE PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT Damaged game balls are reused during practices. Lesser-quality practice balls and recycled game balls are eventually taken to the batting cage, where they fall apart. Gamecock relief pitcher Evan Beal shows how to hold his favorite pitch, a four-seam fastball, which he can throw between 90 and 93 mph. Beal admits to being picky about the feel of the baseballs he throws. Erin Shaw / The Carolina Reporter Baseballs are stored at a local sporting goods store under lock and key before the season. The SEC mandates that all teams use baseballs made by Rawlings. Source: USC Athletics
  • ILLUSTRATION OR INFORMATIONAL GRAPHIC Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Austin Price Site of USC’sSite of USC’s women’s basketballwomen’s basketball NCAA Tournament 1st &NCAA Tournament 1st & 2nd round games2nd round games BARRED& 1,6201,620 milesmiles Boulder, Colo.Boulder, Colo.** ** Columbia, S.C.Columbia, S.C. STARRED Austin Price THE DAILY GAMECOCK
  • ILLUSTRATION OR INFORMATIONAL GRAPHIC Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Kristmar Muldrow Timeline graphic was very strong. Design shows creativity and skill. MIX@DAILYGAMECOCK.COM While it looks like a place where you buy home goods and kitchen supplies, The Gourmet Shop actually boasts phenomenal breakfast and lunch food, and you can choose to either eat inside the shop or outside on the street, where the people-watching is prime. It’s a great place to catch up with friends over a Sunday brunch or grab a quick lunch! If you aren’t from around here, there’s a good chance you’ve never heard of Groucho’s Deli. But take a trip down Harden Street and your life will be forever changed. Sandwiches overflowing with different meats and melted cheese, served with a side of special dipping sauce and a complimentary bag of chips, make this the best $6 you ever spent. If you don’t stop here at least once during your freshman year, you haven’t lived. While there are lots of late-night options, only Grilled Teriyaki continues to serve huge plates of teriyaki chicken and steak and even sushi until 3 a.m. And after midnight, those heaping mounds of fried rice come half-priced. If you find yourself in Five Points with the late night munchies, Grilled Teriyaki is the way to go. If you’re 21 and looking for something fun to do at night, Jake’s is always a great option. Shuffleboard and pool tables decorate the inside of the bar, while there is an expansive back porch area with a space for live music, which they host frequently, a spot to play corn hole and a tiny putting green to practice hitting your hole in one. There is a bar on the back porch as well, so you never have to go back inside for drinks. Specials depend on the night you go, but the staff is friendly and always willing to help. Petal is a boutique with great clothing and a great location. It’s right next to Starbucks and one of the first stores you see walking along Saluda Avenue. The store’s appearance is clean and neat, and the fashionably dressed employees make you feel warm and welcome. Petal also has a somewhat small collection of merchandise. This keeps the store from being overwhelming and helps to streamline shopping. Though it’s a little pricier, Petal is the top of the line. THE DAILY GAMECOCK
  • PHOTOGRAPH Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Kayla Bethea
  • PHOTOGRAPH Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Molly Waits Production of French drama to tell classic tale of love, intrigue
  • PHOTOGRAPH Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Luke Cleland www.collegianonline.comBob Jones University Greenville, SC www.collegianonline.comBobobBobobBobbbbb JoneJoneoneneoneoneneoneoneoneoneoneon s Uns Uns Uns Uns UnUnUnivivververververververereriv sitysitysitysitysitysityysityyss GreGreGreGreGreGrereGrereGrereGreGG eeeenvieeeeee lle, SC Red Lightning and GreenThunder are ready for a battle on the athletic fields during Gold Rush Daze. Photo: LukeCleland Gold Rush Daze 2013Superior use of strobe lighting technique and balanced ambient light. Excellent composition and compelling subject. A well thought out image.
  • PHOTOGRAPH Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University Brandy Brogden
  • PHOTOGRAPH Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Chloe Gould
  • PHOTOGRAPH Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Andrew Askins This is a photo that ‘stands out.’ It breaks a few rules (which is good), it combines shape (the peak action ‘hair shape’), lighting (dark and highlights to add to the shape), and last, peak actions done well!
  • SPORTS PHOTOGRAPH Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Trent Brock
  • SPORTS PHOTOGRAPH Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Paladin Furman University Neely Wood “Rugby”
  • SPORTS PHOTOGRAPH Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Trent Brock Great shot - looks as if it’s football and weight lifting combined!
  • SPORTS PHOTOGRAPH Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Jeffery Davis
  • SPORTS PHOTOGRAPH Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Austin Price
  • SPORTS PHOTOGRAPH Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Tiger Clemson University Nathan Pretonius “A ... price” The moment sets this photo apart from its peers. This person can see, “A slice of time as it happens.” You can’t teach that!
  • WEBSITE Open Division THIRD PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University
  • WEBSITE Open Division SECOND PLACE: Cistern Yard News College of Charleston
  • WEBSITE Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina What made this entry stand out above the others was the volume of fresh, quality content across all sections. This website is attractive, user-friendly and offers a variety of videos, photo galleries and blogs that are both informative and entertaining.
  • MULTIMEDIA STORY Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University Jacob Hallex
  • MULTIMEDIA STORY Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Paul Critzman III “Color run”
  • MULTIMEDIA STORY Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Paul Critzman III, Renee Cooper and Danielle Barilla Excellent interviews captured variety of perspectives on an unusual event (at least to the unacquainted)
  • USE OF TWITTER Open Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Amanda Coyne
  • USE OF TWITTER Open Division SECOND PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University Staff @TheJohnsonian
  • USE OF TWITTER Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock USC Danny Garrison Good use of personality and humor to share links to his own sports articles and to add context to his own and other articles of interest published not only by The Daily Gamecock, but other local and national articles of interest to USC students.
  • FACEBOOK PAGE Open Division THIRD PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University
  • FACEBOOK PAGE Open Division SECOND PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University
  • FACEBOOK PAGE Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Thiswasadifficultcategorytojudgebecauseallof thenewspapersthatsubmittedanentrybrought aqualityproducttothetable.Thedifferencemaker forTheDailyGamecockwastheconsistencyoftimely posts. Weespeciallylikedthisprefacetoalink:“Trying tofigureoutwhat’sopenoncampusandwhat youcandoduringthesnowday?We’vegotyou covered.Showingagoodmixoflinksand discussion-generatingposts,lotsofphotosanda professionaldemeanor,it’sclearthattheDaily Gamecockgetssocialmedia.Welldone.”
  • SINGLE ADVERTISEMENT Open Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Spenser Weeks
  • SINGLE ADVERTISEMENT Open Division SECOND PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Spenser Weeks Thursday April 25th • 9 PM BREAKER’S BAR AND GRILL PRESENTS CarolinaCarolinaCarolina PROCEEDS BENEFITING PALMETTO HEALTH CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL BALL $65 $75 ADVANCE DAY OF BLACK TIE @TheCarolinaBall /thecarolinaball L I V E M U S I C B Y BLIND MANIFEST OPEN BARD E L E C T A B L E T A S T E S LOCATED AT 701 WHALEYwww.thecarolinaball.com tyler@thecarolinaball.com
  • SINGLE ADVERTISEMENT Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Pacer Times USC Aiken Eleanor Prater Good use of typography; integration of images inside of the text works seamlessly! Contemporary style with nice clean lines; visually pleasing to the eye. November 19, 2013 | 8 AIN ORD RYNovember 21st - 24th 7:30 p.m. $8 for students with ID Design by Eleanor Prater
  • GENERAL EXCELLENCE Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Pacer Times USC Aiken Vol. 50 | No. 5September 10, 2013 University of South Carolina Aiken C elebrating 50 Yea rs ALTERED DECALS CONCERNCAUSE for Story, Page 3 Vol. 50 | No.8October 1, 2013 University of South Carolina Aiken C elebrating 50 Yea rs See P. 3 S e PPPPP.PP 333333333333 ICECalendarp.8TownHallMeetingwiththeChancellor,Wednesday2p.m.SACMezz
  • GENERAL EXCELLENCE Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University www.collegianonline.comBob Jones University Greenville, SC A group of contestants prepares to perform during the prejudging round of competition on Feb. 16. Photo: LukeCleland What would you like to see at the tal- ent show? “Are they gonna have magic tricks?” said Dr. Dan Olinger, chair of the Divi- sion of Bible. “Good juggling is always nice.” Seniors on Stage, the first student event of its kind, will take place Satur- dayat 7 p.m. in Stratton Hall.Olinger, one of the event’s judges, is just one of many people on campus who wonder what to expect of the show. He said he will have to get a sense of how to judge the talents as the competi- tion progresses and as he sees just what students have to offer. Dr. Stephen Jones and Miss Jane Smith, a professor in the School of Edu- cation, will also be judging the contes- tants. Olinger wants to see something other than what can be found in a fine arts com- petition. “Creativity is part of the image of God,” he said. “The first thing we learn about God is that he is a creator.” But while Olinger would like to see a talent that is completely out-of-the-box, it would still require some skill and practice to truly impress him. “My inclination is to give out awards that actually mean something,” Olinger said. “Somebody gets to go to Disney World. He ought to have brought the ‘stuff’ to earn the trip.” As for his own secret talent, Olinger said he throws a football left-handed and It’s time for talent Students to contend for“magical” prize in Seniors on Stage By: CARLIE MALDONADO Staff Writer Imagine for a moment that you are a soldier in combat during wartime behind enemy lines. You’re lost from your unit, and you don’t know your exact location. Night is falling, and the enemy is sur- rounding you. It seems like there’s no- where to turn. What should you do? At this point there is only one thing you can do -- or continue to do. Call for help. As Christians constantly engaged in warfare, there are times when we may feel deserted or surrounded by the enemy, but University to break from routine for Day of Prayer we often neglect what should be our greatest asset: communication with our leader. God has promised to deliver his people when they call upon him. He has promised to hear our prayers. Each semester, the University sets aside one day to devote to prayer. On Tuesday, Feb. 19, the university family will begin the day by hearing a challenge from Dr. Bob Jones III. Then the student body will break into groups for a more focused time of prayer, first by society, and then by mission team interests. To end the scheduled activities for the day, faculty and students will reconvene for a time of worship and praise. A half-day of rest will follow this last scheduled meeting. Mr. Kyle Wilcox, special assistant to Dr. Stephen Jones and one of the coordinators of the day of prayer activities, said this day is important to the University’s mission and that prayer is important in every believer’s life. “We’re training students to be disciples of Christ,” he said. “Having a day focused on [prayer] highlights the fact that as disciples, as followers of Christ, communication with our Father is critical. A disciple has to be See TALENT SHOW p. 8 » Janelle Claypool, Rebekah McAnally and Catherine Cleland pause for a word of prayer. Photo: EmmaKlak By: ERIN KIMBRO Staff Writer See PRAYER p. 8 »
  • GENERAL EXCELLENCE Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University WINTHROP UNIVERSITY ROCK HILL, SOUTH CAROLINA Index News|3-4 Science&Tech|5 Opinion|6 Sports|7 Arts&Culture|8-9 Questionsorcomments? Wewouldloveyourfeedback. Contactusateditors@mytjnow.com Exclusive content at mytjnow.com Nowonyourlaptop,smartphone,andtablet Freshman phenom:‘Big South success attracted me to Winthrop soccer’ Talk about making an early impact and there’s Max Hasenstab. The 5-foot-9-inch striker from Idstein, Germany arrived on Winthrop’s campus this year and has already garnered nationwide attention for his clutch attacking play for the Eagles’ men’s soccer team (7-1- 1). Hasenstab has started all of Winthrop’s nine games (as of Oct. 7), scoring seven goals and his teammates with 19 points and an enviable shots on goal percentage (59.3 percent). Head coach Rich Posipanko attracted the forward to campus by espousing the team’s recent success in the 2012 Big South Tournament. Hasenstab says his coach had always expected him to have a bright career. “Maybe not so early in my career, but he always told me he brought me in to score,” he said. “His expectations are high for me. It’s a long season and there are a few more games, so I’m looking forward to scoring as many goals as possible.” Hasenstab says he’s experiencing a rare clean bill of health so far, and that he’s happy because he was often out injured for his German club teams. His health is essential for an Eagle squad hoping to keep the Big South Conference under wraps for a second consecutive year. “The expectations are higher and they expect to win,” Hasenstab said. “I think we’re a high quality team. Our record so far is a result of the games we’ve played.” Anna Jenkins swings into 2013 season see SPORTS pg. 7 Women’s health in Obamacare act see NEWS pg. 3 2013Wellness fair: revamped see SCIENCE &TECH pg. 5 see HASENSTAB pg. 7 By David Thackham thackhamd@mytjnow.com October 10, 2013 RMRRoddey McMillan Record INCLUDED INSIDE OPINIONNEWS Arts & Culture SCIENCE & TECH Issue 8 In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month and respect for those affected by breast cancer, The Johnsonian is painting our pages pink. Math professor competed with wife for WU position By Shamira McCray Special to The Johnsonian After competing with his wife, Kristen, for a position in the department, Zachary Abernathy, assistant math professor, got his start at Winthrop three years ago. The university hired them both soon after they completed graduate school. Originally from Winston-Salem, N.C., Abernathy completed his undergraduate education at Wake Forest University and graduate education at North Carolina State University. Like many students, he said he was originally unsure what career path he wanted to take in life. “I was procrastinating like crazy with what I wanted to do with my life,” Abernathy said. “I had no idea.” He said throughout school he had a “knack for math” and was naturally good at it. In college, he graduated with degrees in math and physics but was still unsure what he wanted to do in either area. “After I graduated from college I said, ‘I still don’t know what I want to do. I guess I’ll just go to school in math some more,’” he said. “So I went to go get my Ph.D. in math.” Abernathy realized his love for teaching while in graduate school. CSL will revisit smoke- free campus debate “Don’t try to tell me that Cam Newton is a better quarterback than Eli Manning.” That was part of a comment I received when my article “Cam Newton is not Superman” was published on The Johnsonian’s website two weeks ago. While I think the reader didn’t understand the point I was trying to make in my article, I accept the criticism with open arms. I grew up in a family full of opinionated men who were not afraid to tell me when they didn’t agree with me, especially when it came to sports. The truth is, I’m just a junior mass communication major who has a passion for sports and wants to make a career out of that passion. I don’t know everything about every sport there is. If somebody starts talking to me about NASCAR, it’s a safe bet that person isn’t going to be having a very insightful conversation with me about it. I do take pride in the fact that I know a lot about football—especially college football. I know holding when I see it, I know what a safety times in a game is not an impressive line. I’m used to people—men in general—not taking me seriously when I tell them that I want to be a sports reporter. It happens more than one would think. It’s a known fact that women are not respected in sports. Just turn on ESPN or Fox Sports for a minute or two. You will see the women on to grab the attention of the male viewers. The male viewers don’t actually care about what the pretty girl on TV is saying; they are just drawn to her because of her looks. Some of the most famous female sports broadcasters started from the bottom. seeWOMEN pg. 6 see PROFESSOR pg. 8 Editor rebukes double standards Council of Student Leaders chair Christopher Aubrie (right, wearing pink) listens to a speaker on Monday evening. CSL convened inThomson Hall Monday evening during a presentation fromWinthrop Dining Services, who were raising awareness to a new survey they hope to have students complete before Oct. 25. By David Thackham thackhamd@mytjnow.com Over a year after Winthrop’s Council of Student Leaders pledged to beef up enforcement, safety and regulation on smoking areas around campus, chair Christopher Aubrie announced Monday night that his student government intends to again tackle the question of whether Winthrop should be a smoke-free university. CSL stance and said he wishes to consult Winthrop’s President Jayne Comstock for advice before making any decisions or initiatives. He and vice chair Ian Deas will meet with Comstock on Wednesday. last week’s CSL meeting by inviting a volunteer from the Tobacco Free York County Coalition, to speak with the student government. “The main reason we wanted Dr. [David] Keely to come to campus was to make students aware of what’s happening outside of campus,” Aubrie said. “We’re hoping to see President Comstock’s stance on it and we’ll see where we should go from there.” Aubrie hopes to send a couple of his representatives to a summit on the campus of the University of South Carolina on Oct. 17, which will give attendees information on how best to implement tobacco- free campus policies. If Winthrop were to go tobacco-free, the school would be mirroring moves from local schools like Clinton Jr. College, York Technical College and the University of South Carolina (tobacco-free on Jan. 1, 2014). Aubrie says it will take serious research to determine a timeline for when Winthrop could potentially see changes. “The next step is meeting with the president,” he said. “We’re what we believe Winthrop should become. We’re just proposing the question out there and letting people know their options.” Christopher Aubrie CSL chair Emily Goodman Sports Editor Student government sending representatives to campus smoking forum in Columbia WU’s Earth Hour in honor of Common Book For exclusive photos of the U.S. Disc Golf tournament at WU, visit mytjnow.com By Casey White whitec@mytjnow.com Students are being encouraged to turn the lights out in their rooms and enjoy some outdoor activities for one hour as part of Winthrop Earth Hour. Chris Johnson, Winthrop’s sustainability coordina- cided that it was something that could be implemented at Winthrop. Since many Winthrop students live on campus, the hosts of the event are encouraging those more conscious about the energy they are using. Katarina Moyon and ACAD Director Leah Kendall said the event ties in with this year’s Common Book, “The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind,” by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer. see EARTH pg. 5 Zachary Abernathy Assistant professor of mathematics
  • GENERAL EXCELLENCE Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Tiger Clemson University Opinions: Halloween: A culture, not a costume please recycle THE TIGER First Copy Free First Copy Free please recycle THE TIGERplease recycle THE TIGER November www.facebook.com/thetigernews EST. 1907, SOUTH CAROLINA’S OLDEST COLLEGE NEWSPAPER ROARS FOR CLEMSON Volume107 Issue20 www.thetigernews.com TIGER THE 12013 see page C1 see page D4see page B6 TimeOut: Hobbits are the answer to Botan renovations Sports: Lady Tigers back in action on the hardwood Opinions News Say What? Crossword Sports TimeOut A A4 B C D D8 in this issue This Week In News: see page C1 After Oct. 19’s high-profile football game against Florida State, university personnel and students alike have raised protests against a growing number of Clemson students reselling football tickets. This year, because Clemson has hosted both Georgia and FSU, two-highly anticipated match-ups, student ticket demand has reached an all-time high. Despite the increase in demand, the number of tickets distributed remains the same as it has in past years. There are only 12,000 student tickets available for distribution to just under 18,000 students, and between 4,000-5,000 of those 12,000 available tickets are set aside for block seating for organizations. This limited number of tickets has made some students desperate in their search for a seat, which in turn has caused many to buy tickets from other students at extremely high prices. Some students sell their tickets through Craigslist ads or posts on Facebook, and prices have sometimes reached into the hundreds, depending on whether the seat was lower deck, hill or upper deck. Graham Harris, the president of the IPTAY Student Advisory Board, admits that though it is not a new thing for students to resell their football tickets, it has never reached this extreme extent before. “Obviously that kind of stuff probably has gone on in the past, and maybe a student has pocketed $50 or $60, but it’s an entirely different ball game when a student can sell a lower deck ticket for $250. It is a huge problem.” Some students are not just selling their tickets to other Clemson students. Some sold their tickets to FSU fans, which angered many Clemson students, including freshman Charles Simmons, who asked “Do you care that little for our school that you’re okay with replacing our student section with fans from the opposing team that won’t support us and help our team win?” and senior Karl Lykken, who GRACE GREENE STAFF WRITER see TICKETS page A4 NATHANPRETORIUS/photoeditor Award of the rings Seniors receive their class rings. The Clemson ring is one of the school’s most recognizable trademarks and is recognized across the world. An important part of this tradition is the Ring Ceremony, where students with 90 hours completed receive their rings in Littlejohn Coliseum, where only a few months later they will return to graduate. Following the Clemson Ring Ceremony on Oct. 24, senior Logan Riley was able to share a special bond with her parents. “Growing up, I was a child of two Clemson alumni parents. I would always see them wearing their Clemson Rings and talking with friends about their amazing experiences here at Clemson University,” Riley said. “Getting my ring is so special to me because, not only does it symbolizes the achievements I’ve made in reaching my dream to be a Clemson graduate, but it is also a tradition I am blessed to share with my parents.” Another special tradition about the Clemson ring is the direction it is worn. Current students who have their ring wear it so the “C” is facing them. Upon graduating, the ring is turned around so that the “C” faces out toward everyone else. KATHERINE SCHENCK STAFF WRITER see RINGS page A4 New sustainability minor to be offered Next semester will see the arrival of Clemson’s latest minor. It is time for spring 2014 advising at Clemson University. Students are starting to meet with their academic advisors starting in October and early November. While at their advising appointments, students will be talking with their advisors about picking classes for next semester, but more important decisions will be made such as changing majors or deciding a minor. Including all of Clemson University’s minor choices, there will be a new choice for a minor for the semester of spring 2014. This KATE THOMAS STAFF WRITER The sustainability minor will focus on the conservation of the natural economy.see MINOR page A5 A7 - Shag for Safe HarborA6 - Hispanic Heritage Month celebratedA5 - Digital Resources Lab opens Graphicby:MeganMatthews