Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

2013 SCPA Weekly Newspaper Awards Winners

5,103

Published on

See the winning photos, stories, designs and online entries from SCPA's 2014 Annual Meeting. Here are the Weekly Newspaper award winners from the 2013 S.C. Press Association News Contest

See the winning photos, stories, designs and online entries from SCPA's 2014 Annual Meeting. Here are the Weekly Newspaper award winners from the 2013 S.C. Press Association News Contest

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
5,103
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Welcome!
  • 2. Bronze Sponsors MICHAEL S. SMITH AUTHOR
  • 3. John Miller 1744-1807 Hall of Fame South Carolina Press Association
  • 4. Lee Bandy Rusty Boggs William Bradford, Jr. Sara Bruner Barry Byers Andy Cole Corny Cornwell Mary Davis Wilbert T. Fields Jane Green Bob Chatham Harris Carl Kilgus Jane Lareau Vii Leinfelder Buddy McCarter Johnny McCracken John Lewis McDonald Steve Porter William Rickenbaker Bud Shealy Ruth Ragsdale Sitton Mac Thrower William Young Warren Ripley Remembering Those We’ve Lost... See Page 8 for full necrology
  • 5. Enjoy Lunch!
  • 6. There’s still time to enter the iPad Mini raf e! South Carolina Newspaper Network iPads donated by: $5 each or $20 for 5 tickets. Cash, credit & checks are accepted. Tickets will be sold until the awards presentation starts. See any SCPA staffer to support the Foundation! Winner will be drawn at the end of the presentation!
  • 7. SERIES OF SPORTS ARTICLES Open Division FIRST PLACE: Fort Mill Times Mac Banks “Charlotte Knights Baseball” This is Part I of a series look- ing back at Knights Stadium during the final month of the team’s existence in Fort Mill. By Mac Banks mbanks@comporium.net FORT MILL — The Charlotte Knights have a rich history in Fort Mill, and Beverly Burnette has been there for every pitch. Burnette, who works in guest s e r v i c e s, h a s been with the Knights since day one. Scratch that. Burnette hasbeenwiththe Charlotte O’s since day one when the club started in 1976. She seen the resurgence of mi- nor league baseball in the Queen City and she was there when it left to come across the border to Fort Mill. And God willing, she will be there when the moving vans load the last item up and take the Knights back to Char- lotte after this season. “I have outlasted every gener- al manager we have ever had,” Burnette joked. Burnette has always worked intheguestservicesdepartment. ShegotstartedwiththeO’sbyac- cident; she was going to try it out for a summer and ended up stay- ing for 37 seasons. “My sister and I were going to the Olympics that year and I was going to be gone half the sum- mer, and Frances [Crockett, for- mer O’s general manager/own- er]said‘Tryitandseeifyoulikeit and you will know,’” she said. On a typical work day for Bur- nette, she guides people through Knights Stadium, telling them where the bathrooms are, where they can get a program, where to buy peanuts and things like that. The guest services window is located on the main concourse, so Burnette gets to see some ac- tion in left field, unless a vendor sets up in front of her. “Idon’tgettoseeawholelotof thegame,”shesaid.“Iftheyputa cart there, I don’t have a clue.” A retired art teacher from Cen- tral Cabarrus High School in North Carolina, Burnette has seen thousands of minor-league players pass through Charlotte Please see KNIGHTS 2B Beverly Burnette After the Knights Burnette has been the one constant This is part II of a series look- ing back at Knights Stadium during the final months of the team’s existence in Fort Mill. By Mac Banks mbanks@comporium.net FORTMILL—Knightsplayers have come and Knights players have gone, and through it all have been Gene Fortner and John Ansell. Die-hard Charlotte Knights fans, both were season ticket holders before the team arrived in Fort Mill in 1989, back when when the team was still called the Charlotte O’s. Fortner has beenaseasonticketholdersince 1978 and Ansell since 1986. And nothing will change next yearwhentheKnightsmoveinto a new, 10,000-seat, $54 million stadium in uptown Charlotte. When the Knights, the Tri- ple-A farm club of the Chicago White Sox, move, so will Fortner and Ansell. They have secured seats next to each other, just like they currently have at Knights’ home games in Fort Mill – right along the first base dugout in the front row. Thetwo arenotjustfans, they are Knights loyalists. So much so, that by the end of the season, Fortner will have seen his 1,620th Knights game. “I was in the hospital two weeks (in 1995), my father-in- law died, and I missed one game because it was the last game the Charlotte Checkers played in the old Coliseum,” he said. “Other than that, I have seen every game.” 1,620 games later ... Please see KNIGHTS 2B MAC BANKS - SPECIAL TO THE FORT MILL TIMES Gene Fortner (left) and John Ansell take in one of many Charlotte Knights games together. Long-time Knights fans reflect on team’s time in Fort Mill Part III of a series looking back at Knights Stadium dur- ing the final months of the team’s existence in Fort Mill. By Mac Banks mbanks@comporium.net FORT MILL T he second time around, the Charlotte Knights are hoping the saying, “if you build it, they will come” lives up to its meaning. Because the first time around, that didn’t happen. And one thing that has hurt the Knights’ chances of stay- ing in Fort Mill has been attendance, which in turn has hurt the bottom line of the team for years. According to final attendance reports from the Internation- al League website, the Knights finished either second to last or last in attendance in the 14-team International League every year since 2002. Since the Knights joined the International League in 1993, they have always finished in the lower third of attendance. In their first year in the league, even when they won the In- ternational League championship, they finished seventh out of 10 teams in attendance. They did the same in 1994 and they dropped from there. In 1999 after the expansion of the league to 14 teams, and after claiming their second International League championship, attendance did rise slightly, up to 12th. This year, the Knights are on course to finish last in the International League in attendance, having drawn 218,821 fans through 61 of 68 potential home games. Their average attendance this season is 3,587 people per game. They have six more scheduled home games left from Aug. 28-Sept. 2. However, the attendance woes should change for them next year as they move into the brand new $54 million BB&T Ballpark in Uptown Charlotte. The 10,000-seat stadium is expected to help not only in attendance, but make up for the financial struggles the Knights have had in Fort Mill. “You look at the demographics of it,” said Knights’ Execu- tive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Dan Rajkow- ski. “You got a city with over 80,000 people working in the center city. I think there are over 20,000 that live in the cen- ter city. The difference in our business is that Monday through Wednesday night here in Fort Mill we may draw 1,500 to 2,000 people here. There you will be able to draw 4,000 to 7,000 people, depending on the weather. And that is the ability to make money or not make money. It still cost the MAC BANKS - SPECIAL TO THE FORT MILL TIMES A sparse crowd of 3,711 watches the Charlotte Knights in the first game of a doubleheader Sunday against the Durham Bulls at Knights Stadium. Low attendance key factor in relocation DEEP-SEATED PROBLEM: Knights Stadium Please see KNIGHTS 2B This is the final installment of a four-part series looking back at Knights Stadium during the final months of the Charlotte Knights’ existence in Fort Mill. By Mac Banks mbanks@comporium.net FORT MILL — Call it fate, call it what you will, but sometimes when a relationship starts, things just aren’t meant to be in the long run. That can be a summation of how the relationship between the Charlotte Knights and York County unfolded over the past decade. The relationship wasn’t bad, according to both Knights’ executive vice president and chief operat- ing officer Dan Rajkowski and former York County Manager Jim Baker, who now works in Virginia as City Manager for the City of Chesapeake. However, it was a relationship where the Knights, the Triple-A farm club of the Chicago White Sox, knew where they wanted to be in the future and York County didn’t stop them from trying to get there. “My relationship with Jim Baker and council members was a positive relationship,” Rajkowski said. “We did have an extension and put some money into the ball park and enhanced it for the fans. Our relationship wasn’t negative. I think from our pro- spective, I kind of looked at it as what is best for this franchise. And what I think our organization and our ownership looked at it, what was the long term viability of the team in Fort Mill under the current circumstances and lease.” Rajkowski said it came to down to making a decision in the team’s economic survival. “What we did, was look at it from a financial perspective and can we survive the way things are and the answer is no,” he said. “At that time, we had some conversations with elected officials about what the future was; that this franchise needed enhancements, some incentives to The BB&T Ballpark, under construction, will be ready for opening day next year. Queen City too much to resist KNIGHTS MOVE: Fort Mill couldn’t compete Charlotte Knights Executive Vice President Dan Rajkowski: ‘Development didn’t happen around [the Fort Mill] facility like many had anticipated.’ Share your thoughts, memories What will you remember most about the Knights? Do you plan to see the team play in Charlotte? Stop by our website or Facebook/FortMillTimes, or email ballpark photos to news@fortmilltimes.com. All submissions become the property of the Fort Mill Times and can be reproduced in any format. .com Please see KNIGHTS 2B PHOTOS BY DIEDRA LAIRD - dlaird@charlotteobserver.com
  • 8. ILLUSTRATION Open Division THIRD PLACE: Charleston City Paper Scott Suchy “Doomsday kit”
  • 9. ILLUSTRATION Open Division FIRST PLACE: Free Times Jason Crosby “Our Dumb State. Vol. 9”
  • 10. EVENT MARKETING Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE: Charleston Regional Business Journal Jane Mattingly Influential Women in Business
  • 11. PUBLIC RELATIONS PROGRAM Associate/Individual Division SECOND PLACE: S.C. Farm Bureau Bill Johns Member Benefits Campaign
  • 12. PUBLIC RELATIONS PROGRAM Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE: S.C. Farm Bureau Bill Johns Member Recruitment Campaign
  • 13. E-NEWSLETTER/PUBLICATION Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE: Charleston Regional Business Journal Daily Journal
  • 14. EDITORIAL/COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOIA AllWeekly Division HONORABLE MENTION: Greenville Journal Susan Clary Simmons FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK Call out the hypocrites A bill intended to make citizen access to public records easier and less costly is once again headed to a vote in the S.C. House, where it is expected to pass as handily as it did last year. The question is whether the state Senate will balk – as it did last year – at Rep. Rick Quinn’s last-ditch amendment to make the law apply as equally to the law- writers as it would to the rest of government. A similar version of H. 3163, which aims to strengthen the state’s notoriously weak Freedom of Information Act, was derailed last year in the Senate – in re- taliation for the self-same “poison pill” amendment that seeks to open legisla- tive email and internal correspondence (now exempt from the FOIA) to public inspection. “Poison pill” is not Quinn’s choice of adjectives. His point is fair play. He said then, as now, that legislators are hypocrites to demand transparency from oth- ers and shield themselves. No other state in the union “has a South Carolina- style ‘special’ exemption for state politicians. It truly is outrageous,” he wrote in a Greenville News guest column. Quinn is correct, of course. What gives the bill’s supporters heartburn is the threat of losing all its other reforms should his wholly justifiable amendment sink the bill again. While legislative transparency is definitely a bonus, the changes this bill envi- sions are tilted toward the secretive and obstructive behaviors common to state bureaucrats, school boards and city and county governments, the far greater of- fenders of open records laws. South Carolina’s FOIA is one of those laws that looks good until you realize how easy it is to circumvent. All H. 3163 would do is edge its provisions from ridiculous to tolerable. The bill proposes to cut from 15 to 10 working days the time allowed govern- ment agencies to say if they will even comply with a request for public records; compel most documents (if the answer is yes) to be turned over within 30 days (currently there is no deadline); reduce the costs public bodies may charge for providing said documents; and establish an Office of Freedom of Information Act Review to hear appeals should records be denied (now the only recourse is to hire a lawyer and go to circuit court). That this is even considered “reform” explains why the Palmetto State ranked 50th in the nation for access to public information in a study released last sum- mer. South Carolina’s failure to provide an appeal process or impose penalties on agencies that violate FOI laws was a prime factor in the high “corruption risk” awarded South Carolina by the State Integrity Investigation, a project of the Cen- ter for Public Integrity, Global Integrity and Public Radio International. That rating played a sizable part in the governor’s decision to create an inde- pendent Ethics Reform Commission chaired by former attorneys general Travis Medlock and Henry McMaster, who, as luck would have it, share Rick Quinn’s view of legislative hypocrisy. Their report recommends that comprehensive eth- ics reform include the deletion of the FOIA exemption for “memoranda, corre- spondence, and working papers in the possession of individual members of the General Assembly or their immediate staffs.” Elected leaders and government bureaucrats forget too easily whom they serve; all this legislation seeks to do is remind them. As Quinn said, lawmakers have had a year to think it over. Only the basest hypocrites will vote “no” this time around.
  • 15. EDITORIAL/COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOIA AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Union County News Graham Williams Had they obeyed the law, Union County's school trustees could have avoided the embarrassing situa- tion they've created for themselves in recent weeks. Two months ago, Columbia attorney David Duff briefed board members about the Freedom of Information Act and how it applies to their meet- ings. He reminded them about what can and cannot be discussed in exec- utive session and told them not to change their agenda during a meet- ing. He also warned them to stick to the issue they are discussing in exec- utive session and avoid “topic drift.” His words apparently fell on deaf ears. Trustees violated the state's Freedom of Information Act at least three times in their attempts to pre- vent Jessica Sherbert from speaking to them in open session about incon- sistent policies. Not only did the school board stifle public discus- sion about district policies, they tried to switch Sherbert's place on the agenda from “public com- ments” to executive session. Even worse, a board member confirmed that they discussed Sherbert's request while they were behind closed doors for an unrelated contractual matter. The board's initial concern about allowing Sherbert to speak was that she might mention some- one's name or that a person could be identified by their title. Then how do they explain the email released by the school district when Chris Booker was pulled from the North-South All Star Game? Since Booker was the only Union County High School athlete chosen to play, the email all but called him by name. When reporters' protests prevented them from having their way, trustees voted to table the issue until their next meeting. Last summer, each trustee was provided a copy of the Freedom of Information Act, courtesy of the S.C. Press Association. Had even one of them taken time to read it, they would have realized that their actions violated the law. Instead, board members acted blindly, like lem- mings following each other over a cliff. As a result, the public is left with the impression that trustees feel like they are above the law. Voters elected these board members with the hope that each one would do what's best for their chil- dren. Disregarding the law is probably not what they had in mind. Graham Williams Trustees’ actions set bad example
  • 16. EDITORIAL/COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOIA AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The News & Reporter Travis Jenkins StopThe folks that make the rules are not exempt from following rules that apply to them. In June, the South Carolina Court of Appeals ruled that amending the meeting agenda of a public body once a meeting has begun does not jibe with the state’s Freedom of Information Act. The court’s ruling stated, in part “To allow an amendment of the agenda regarding substan- tive public matters undercuts the purpose of the notice requirement.” That ruling certainly makes it tougher for government bodies to carry out their business. Some things do come up between the time an agenda is set and a meeting is held. The court touched on that in its ruling, saying matters of convenience and timeliness do not matter where the Freedom of Information Act is concerned. “We recognize our decision may be inconve- nient in some instances, but the purpose of FOIA is best served by prohibiting public bodies governed by FOIA from amending their agendas during meetings.”
  • 17. EDITORIAL/COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOIA AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The Independent Voice of Blythewood and Fairfield County James Denton The Price of SecrecyT h e r e ’ s no substi- tute for disclosure. The more the people know about what their government is doing, how they’re doing it and why, the more perfect is our union. After all, let us not forget that the people are, essentially, the government. That was true in the beginning of this great experiment with Democracy, some 230 years ago, and it remains true now. Those venerated halls of power, from the White House to the County Courthouse, belong to the citizens. So whether it’s something as complex as domestic spying with an army of Orwellian robots or as seemingly simple as emails transmit- ted by a county administrator, all of those things belong to all of us. The circuit board inside a government drone, the computer used to transmit emails, even the internet bandwidth through which those emails were transmitted – all of it, and more, was paid for with your tax dollars. Therefore, you already own all of that information. So there should be no additional cost associated with a citizen getting access to any of that information. Fairfield County, however, appears to have a different point of view; at l h d The Voice Speaks James Denton editor hardline stance with the Columbia TV station is baffling. To attempt to charge anything, let alone the ex- orbitant amount of $29,000, flies in the face of the very spirit of the FOIA. That the County was willing to spend $12,000 in an attempt to obfuscate these records only casts a dark cloud of secrecy over the whole email affair. The Fairfield County School Dis- trict, on the other hand, was hit with a similar FOIA request by a local news outlet not too many years ago. While the District, at the time, was not in its best days of compliance and openness, they did indeed comply, hand-delivering a large cardboard box of paper copies of six months’ worth of Board member emails. And at no charge to the local media. If the School District can handle such a request, what could the Coun- ty’s argument be? When the County first got into this ugly staring contest with the broadcast media last spring, our unsolicited advice to them was simple: Just give them what they’re asking for. If you fight them, you lose; even if you win. The Freedom of Information Act is not just a tool for the news media. It is for everyone. But in reality, it is a law that should be obsolete. Public records are public. You’ve paid for them. You own them outright. Get- h h ld b
  • 18. MAGAZINE OR SPECIAL PUBLICATION Associate/Individual Division THIRD PLACE: GSA Business Market Facts 2013 2012 Sponsored by MARKET FACTS2013 SPONSORS
  • 19. MAGAZINE OR SPECIAL PUBLICATION Associate/Individual Division SECOND PLACE: SCBIZ Fall 2013 SCBizNews 1439StuartEngalsBlvd. Suite200 Mt.Pleasant,SC29464 CHANGESERVICEREQUESTED Fall 2013 Economic Development in S.C. | Special Section: Cities Mean Business | S.C. Delivers Brewing industry S. C. beer makers help craft favorable laws Jaime Tenny and husband, David Merritt, co-owners of COAST Brewing in North Charleston.
  • 20. MAGAZINE OR SPECIAL PUBLICATION Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE: Lake Wylie Today Fall 2013, Issue 3 LakeWylie Fall 2013 | Issue 3 The Green IssueReduce your footprint and save money by using tips from our local experts Alpaca Farming A pack of alpacas makes a family farm complete Chamber Spotlight Lake Wylie Chamber of Commerce news and information TODAY
  • 21. FEATURE SPECIALTY PUBLICATION OR MAGAZINE AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The Press & Standard 2013 Lowcountry Rocks try2013 Taking Flight The Lowcountry Regional Airport isn’t just a blip on the radar for aviators. Rice Festival Revived How Colleton’s premier festival ascended back to prominence. Kickin’ Back with Kevin A conversation with Colleton County’s affable administrator. Old 21 Journey down the road that connects the rural communities in the heart of Colleton County.
  • 22. FEATURE SPECIALTY PUBLICATION OR MAGAZINE AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Greenville Journal TOWN COMPLIMENTARY COPY T O W N C A R O L I N A . C O M N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 3 CONNECTION IS THE HEART OF COMMUNITY T O W N C A R O L I N A . C O M of Essence Giving The
  • 23. FEATURE SPECIALTY PUBLICATION OR MAGAZINE AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Myrtle Beach: A Retrospective 75th Anniversary of Myrtle Beach $495
  • 24. NEWS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Greenville Journal Upstate Business Journal SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 How the law is shifting the insurance landscape and bringing new players to the field THE BUSINESS OF OBAMACARE
  • 25. NEWS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Lancaster News Discover Lancaster County
  • 26. NEWS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The Clinton Chronicle Horizons 2013 The Clinton Chronicle’s 2012 Citizen of the Year is Rev. Mims Camm Page 3 Horizons2013A progress edition of The Clinton Chronicle Together Inside 3 :: Rev. Mims Camm, Citizen of the Year 4 :: Adair Rogers 5 :: Amanda Munyan 6 :: Harry Agnew 7 :: Joey Meadors 8 :: Melvin Bailey 9 :: Stephen Taylor 10 :: Erin Frost Advertisers 2 :: PRTC Forest Hill Funeral Home 3 :: Amedisys CNNGA 4 :: Founders FCU 5 :: Laurens County 6 :: Epting Turf & Tractor 7 :: Town of Gray Court The Kennedy Mortuary 8 :: CeramTec 11 :: Aaron Industries Sadler Hughes Apothecary Wilson Tractor 12 :: AT&T Working Signs of Progress. Heavy machinery sits on a tract in Owings between the ZF Transmissions building (background) and the land where Uniscite has broken ground for its Laurens County location. Its proximity to the Greenville-Spartanburg I-85 Cor- ridor is making the Gray Court, Owings, Fountain Inn area of northern Laurens County attractive to investors and to the SC Department of Commerce for sites visits by potential manu- facturing partners. - Photo by Vic MacDonald Harry Agnew Page 6 at Laurens County Chamber of Commerce banquet with Miss SC Ali Rogers
  • 27. SPORTS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The News & Reporter The Greatest Season THE GREATEST SEASON Chester County Football 2013 THE GREATEST SEASON A Special Supplement of NEWS & REPORTER THE
  • 28. SPORTS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Independent Voice of Blythewood and Fairfield County Fall Sports Preview 2013
  • 29. SPORTS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Union County News UCHS Football: A work of art UCHS FOOTBALL A WORK OF ART Season preview TJ Foster Jordan Spencer Team photo Roster, Schedule &More Jamarcus Henderson Monday, August 26, 2013
  • 30. REVIEW PORTFOLIO AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The News-Era Joseph Garris Jr. By Joseph Garris Jr Entertainment Editor Olympus Has Fallen hits some good marks here and there but ulti- mately ends up falling apart in the later moments of the movie. Still, it’s probably the film February’s Die Hard should have been. The comparisons to the John McClain action films are unavoid- able. Those movies were always known for placing the main hero in situations where the fate of the coun- try rested squarely on his shoulders. Though McClain is missing and secret service agent Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) doesn’t have nearly the cool catch phrases, it feels a bit famil- iar. Considering A Good Day to Die Hard completely bombed at the the- ater, Olympus might have been the better Die Hard. Olympus opens with an introduc- tion to Banning and several other secret service agents in charge of pro- tecting the President. It is made pret- ty clear that Banning is the cream of the crop when it comes to protection personnel for the headman and not too long into the movie, the audience finds out way. Faced with an emotional situation in which Banning has to choose between saving President Asher (Aaron Eckhart) or First Lady Margaret Asher (Ashley Judd), he makes the right decision – even if it has terrible consequences. He loses the President’s trust and eventually decides to step away from his job. Banning seems pretty comfortable with his new situation until terror strikes the White House at the hands of North Koreans in a heavily planned sneak attack. Feeling obligated to save the President, Banning rushes to assist. The first quarter of the movie is well paced and developed with nice detail. Viewers get the opportunity to learn a little bit about the President and his connection with Banning. Add that to the quality depth given to Banning, and the movie immediately gets a shot of genuine sentiment. But that’s where it stops. There are a couple more characters that slip through the cracks when it comes to providing the audience with an interesting back-story. Morgan Freeman as Speaker of the House Allan Trumbull seemed interesting and the dynamics of assuming the Presidency after the capture of President Asher could have been a worthy exploration. Where Olympus doesn’t live up to the Die Hard comparison is the impact of North Korean villain Kang (Rick Yune). As a bad guy, he only feels mildly menacing and wasn’t able to bring the terror the part needed to balance out Banning’s ultimate action hero persona. In the second half of the movie, much of the bad begins to outweigh the good. There are so many glaring- ly implausible moments that audi- ences will begin to labor through the rest of the movie. As the writing gets clumsier and the script begins loading up on clichés, Olympus doesn’t just fall, it plummets. Easily the worst scene of the movie comes when one of the American hostages begins reciting the Pledge of Allegiance as she’s being dragged from the room. The moment is cringe-worthy and many viewers during this particular showing began to laugh. Unfortunately, comedic relief was not what Director Antoine Fuqua was going for during this moment. Fuqua does a good enough job with the attack sequences and most are fun to watch despite lacking believability. Olympus Has Fallen starts off pretty strong but quickly falls apart faster than a wet tortilla. The few bright spots aren’t nearly enough to justify viewing this movie. The good news is a film based off the exact premise is due out this summer and it stars Channing Tatum. [Cue to the screaming girls] Olympus doesn’t just fall, it plummets Olympus Has Fallen DIRECTOR: Antoine Fuqua CAST: Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, Ashley Judd, Morgan Freeman RUNNING TIME: 1 hour 59 minutes RATING: R for strong vio- lence and language through- out. GRADE: C- By Joseph Garris Jr Entertainment Editor Gravity is this year’s film to mar- vel just as 2009’s Avatar had people rushing to the theaters to see what the fuss was all about. Technically and visually, the movie s masterful and flawless – truly one of hose once in a lifetime theater experi- ences that you just can’t afford to miss. Director Alfonso Cuaron hits he viewer with stunning imagery and he most realistic and effective tension o reach the big screen maybe ever. Gravity opens with three U.S. astronauts floating around in space, asked with repairing the Hubble Space elescope. We meet Matt Kowalski George Clooney) and Dr. Ryan Stone Sandra Bullock). They make small alk as they do some routine mainte- nance but a sudden warning from NASA quickens their pace. We learn that the Russians have destroyed one of their own satellites and the debris is rushing towards Ryan and Matt at super speeds. The quiet and peaceful existence in space now becomes chaotic and terrifying. The telescope is suddenly destroyed by fast-moving debris and the third astronaut that the audience is never ntroduced to is killed. Ryan becomes detached from her ether and floats away from Matt into open space with diminishing oxygen. Matt rescues her a short time later but he danger is far from over as the two are left to figure out a way back home. Tension is the name of the game with Gravity, which utilizes the tool o carry the audience from one moment to the next. At times, it’s exhausting but so well done that it’s hard to find fault with the over-flowing suspense. It’s troublesome to find a period in the film where breathing happens more than a few consecutive minutes. In fact, Cuaron could probably market the heck out of this movie as the most effective cure for the common hiccup. Gravity is one of those movies that tickle so many fears at once. A viewer can anticipate feelings of claustropho- bia, vertigo, agoraphobia, and mono- phobia in the 90-minute runtime. This isn’t to suggest that these issues are likely to have people rushing for the exits in repulsion. The point is that the movie is so effective in what it wants to accomplish, audiences will be incredibly absorbed into the experi- ences. Dialogue is limited in the film and for good reason. A greater overall appeal can be had when audiences are able to enjoy just seeing and experi- encing the film. Conversation between characters in this movie is about as necessary as it was for Chuck Noland in 2000’s Castaway. It’s all about the situation and try- ing to capture audiences to the extent that they feel like they’re truly going through these experiences right along with the character. Gravity shoots for that and nails it. Bullock and Clooney turn in great performances but as good as Clooney is, his part could have easily been played by anybody else alongside Bullock and it wouldn’t have made the slightest difference. She commands the screen with her greatest individual performance to date, putting her entire collection of talents on full display. You breathe as she breathes, you sweat when she sweats, and the adrenaline that rushes through her body bursts right off that screen into your own body. Cuaron should get a lot of the cred- it for pulling that off but Bullock makes it happen with a truly gripping performance. Gravity isn’t just a film. It’s a cin- ematic experience. You will walk away exhausted and relieved all at once but more importantly than anything, you’ll be completely enthralled by one of the best films in years. Gravity is a cinematic experience not to miss Gravity DIRECTOR: Alfonso Cuaron CAST: Sandra Bullock, George Clooney RUNNING TIME: 1 Hr, 31 mins RATING: PG-13 for intense perilous sequences, some dis- turbing images and brief strong language. GRADE: A By Joseph Garris Jr Entertainment Editor Predictable plotline aside, what Prisoners does so effectively is it takes the audience and throws them right into the middle of emotional interactions from the grief stricken parents involved, creating incredible realism. Add to that the ferocious perform- ance of Hugh Jackson and Prisoners truly is a well-crafted psychological thriller that evokes all the targeted emotions it aimed to get from the viewer. The film opens with a Thanksgiving celebration between two families, Keller and Grace Dover (Hugh Jackman, Maria Bello) and Franklin and Nancy Birch (Terrence Howard, Viola Davis). It’s a fairly normal day between the two close- knit families but all that changes when their youngest daughters go missing. A big search gets underway for the girls, led by Detective Loki (Jake Gyllenhaal) and the first break leads law enforcement to an RV that had been parked nearby. Inside the RV is mentally challenged Alex Jones (Paul Dano). No physical evidence turns up to suggest Alex was involved but Keller has a hard time accepting that. He decides to kidnap and imprison Alex in order to beat any information he can out of him. Along the way, Detective Loki uncovers numerous details through a slue of twists. All the while, Keller is pushed to his breaking point and wonders if he’s making the right decisions. Parents should beware because the level of anxiety created surrounding the idea of a missing child really does work successfully. The reason is, Director Denis Villeneuve and writer Aaron Guzikowski decide to unfold the suspense in a steady and effective manner. The result is panic amongst the parents involved, which is easily felt throughout the film by the view- er. Prisoners has audiences question- ing their own rational. Would you react with the same “whatever it takes” approach as Keller? Would you fall into a dangerous level of depres sion like Grace? It’s tough to get an audience to buy into a story enoug to develop those kinds of thought but Prisoners manages it without an trouble. We’re introduced to the vigilant torture angle midway through th movie and while at first many wil understand Keller’s actions, mor viewers will begin to questio whether Keller has gone too far. It’ an intriguing aspect for a movie t force the audience to question whethe they should continue to pull for th good guy or whether his actions ha gone too far to accept. To make this film stand out abov similar crime stories, it is cast with some of the best actors in the busi ness. Gyllenhaal, Howard, and Davi all turn in powerful performances bu it’s Jackman’s Keller that hits it hard This performance is unlike any thing we have seen out of Jackman Keller is emotionally derailing righ before your eyes. His actions ar extreme and while some would ques tion his decisions, the vast majority of viewers will be able to sympathiz with Keller throughout. The charac ter’s determination will consume th audience and total credit for that has t go to the acting chops of Jackman. Prisoners is gripping and force audiences to go through some interna questioning. The suspense and charac ter development provides good eye candy but the most evident reason t see the movie is to enjoy the excep tional acting of everyone involved. Jackman impresses in well-crafted thriller Prisoners DIRECTOR: Denis Villeneuve CAST: Huge Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Viola Davis, Terrence Howard RUNNING TIME: 2 hours 33 minutes RATING: R for disturbing vio- lent content including torture, and language throughout. GRADE: B+
  • 31. REVIEW PORTFOLIO AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Greer Citizen William Buchheit Rating: 7 out of 10 W hen it comes to being depend- able, Scott Weiland is about as low on the ladder as Axl Rose, Jim Morrison and Sid Vi- cious. You never know if he’s going to show up to a gig at all, and if he does, it’s anybody’s guess what shape he’ll be in. I remember I bought some tickets to see his band, Stone Temple Pilots, in Simpsonville a few years ago, but it was cancelled due to Weiland’s recur- rent substance abuse problems. Indeed, few singers have battled addiction as long and hard as the 45-year- old STP/Velvet Revolver singer. Though Weiland reportedly gave up her- oin years ago, he is still known for being sloshed during performances and going on drunken rants between songs. For those reasons, his solo club tour with sup- porting band The Wild- abouts has received very mixed reviews. Up until 3 p.m. on Sunday, I was checking the Fillmore’s website to make sure the show wasn’t cancelled. I went to the club that night hoping for the best but fearing the worst, expecting a washed-up grunge star fading into the sunset of his career. I don’t know if he recently cleaned up his act or if we just caught him on a good night, but Weiland was on top of his game Sunday night. Following a spirited set by hard rocking blues band “The Last Internationale,” he came on stage wearing a dark vest, white shirt and black tie. With sun- glasses on and a cigarette dangling from his lips, he had the rock star look down pat. But as he bent forward and blew the crowd a kiss, the jury was still out on what kind of shape he was in. Within a minute of the opening track, “Cracker- man,” however, it was apparent that his voice had the same legendary force and range of two decades ago. His energy was impressive as well, as he danced across stage during songs like he was having the time of his life. Billed as the “Purple to the Core” tour, the concert featured mostly songs from STP’s first two albums, with a few solo tunes and covers thrown in. “Vaseline,” “Unglued” and “Big Empty,” all hits from the “Purple” record, provided the best mo- ments of the night, taking fans on a loud and grungy trip down memory lane. The “Core” songs were also pretty good, although early ‘90’s anthems, “Creep,” “Plush” and “Sex Type Thing” were sorely missed. Weiland’s best solo song of the night was “Paralysis,” a breezy and bittersweet rocker from his 2008 “Happy in Galoshes” album. As for the covers, the band’s renditions of Bow- ie’s “The Jean Genie” and the Doors “Roadhouse Blues” were both first- rate, the latter bringing the packed club to a froth for the encore. The only song of the night that seemed completely out of place was a cover of The Libertines’ 2004 new-wave number “Can’t Stand Me Now,” which featured Wei- land trading vocals with his rhythm guitarist. The backing band, like Weiland, were charismatic and energetic throughout, leaving a pool of sweat behind them when they exited the stage for the final time. What will become of Weiland is anybody’s guess, but Sunday night’s show at the Fillmore proved he still has plenty left in the tank if he can keep his health intact. That may be a big “if,” but I’m grateful I got to see him in top form on this particular night in such an intimate venue. Indeed, he still has the stage presence, charisma and vocal delivery of a liv- ing grunge legend, but all the humility and gratitude of a middle-aged perform- er who still appreciates his fans. “WEST OF MEMPHIS” OFFERS FINAL LOOK AT INFAMOUS CASE Rating: 8 out of 10 The West Memphis Three murder case is one of the most compelling and troubling in modern US history. If you’re not familiar with the crime, here are the essential details: In May, 1993, the bodies of three 8-year-old boys were found near a creek in the Robin Hood Hills section of West Memphis, Ark. The police quickly arrested three teenage outcasts known primarily for dressing in black and listening to heavy metal music. The teens, who quickly became known as the “West Memphis Three,” were found guilty of murder after being subjected to a modern- day witch trial. Prosecu- tors convinced both the jury and public they had tortured and killed the boys as part of some satanic ritual. Two of the defendants, James Bald- win and Jason Miskelley, got life sentences, while a third, Damien Echols, was scheduled to be executed. Three years later, Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinof- ski made an HBO docu- mentary called “Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills,” that revealed major discrepan- cies in the case, open- ing a can of worms that would garner widespread media attention. Soon, thousands of people were writing Arkansas lawmakers and demand- ing a retrial, as stars like Eddie Vedder, Patti Smith and Johnny Depp raised money to provide them legal assistance. In August, 2011, follow- ing 18 years behind bars, the West Memphis Three were finally released from prison after issuing an Alford Plea, an absurd legal option that allows a defendant to plead guilty while somehow maintain- ing their innocence. It was an outlandish end to a case that will be writ- ten about for decades to come. Produced by Echols and Peter Jackson (“The Lord of the Rings”) and directed by veteran docu- mentarian Amy Berg (“De- liver Us from Evil”) “West of Memphis” provides a gripping and articulate overview of the case. It should be noted, however, that the film is more a supplement to its three “Paradise Lost” predeces- sors than a substitute. Spanning 15 years and running over eight hours, Berlinger’s and Sinofski’s trilogy had the advan- tage of depicting case events as they happened, showing a vast amount of courtroom footage and personal interviews. In comparison, Berg’s work fails to convey the intensity of paranoia, rage and terror that perme- ated West Memphis in the wake of the triple murder. Yet, while the “Paradise Lost” films did a wonder- ful job introducing and developing all of the case’s relevant players and suspects, they also led the viewer down quite a few dead-end roads. The second one, for instance, pointed to Mark Byars as a likely culprit despite the fact that even the West Memphis Three now proclaim his inno- cence. In “West of Memphis,” Berg convincingly points the finger at another sus- pect, Terry Hobbs. The film spends about half an hour chronicling Hobbs’ history of domestic vio- lence and inability to pro- vide a satisfactory alibi for his whereabouts on the evening in question. Hobbs, the stepfather of one of the murdered boys, was never even interro- gated by police, even after a 2007 DNA test linked him to a hair found at the murder scene. Ironically, he voluntarily opened himself up to question- ing in 2009 when he sued Dixie Chicks singer and West Memphis 3 advocate Natalie Maines for defa- mation of character. The footage of that deposi- tion is featured here and certainly doesn’t do any favors for Hobbs’ cred- ibility. But the sad fact is that Hobbs will likely never endure further question- ing. By pleading guilty via the Alford plea, the West Memphis Three effectively closed the case. That means neither the judge nor the West Memphis PD ever had to admit fault or wrongdoing, and that the real killer (or killers) may never be known. The thing “West of Memphis” does exception- ally well is debunk much of the testimony that swayed jurors in the 1994 trials. As it turns out, some of those witnesses were in trouble with the law themselves, and lied on the stand simply to avoid jail time. Berg even includes a segment on turtle bites in order to disprove some of the original medical testi- mony about the victim’s injuries. There is a lot more to the documentary, howev- er, than a hodgepodge of information. Berg pres- ents everything through a very human scope. She spends a lot of time on Echols, the falsely presumed ringleader and the most articulate of the three defendants. Echols’ relationship with his wife, a pretty and intelligent landscape architect who began writing him when he was on death row, could have made a docu- mentary by itself. At nearly two-and-a-half hours, the film is long but never tedious. It explores many of the failings of our justice system, both in Arkansas and across America. In essence, the trial and imprisonment of the West Memphis Three has become a microcosm of the class warfare that has permeated our courts and prisons for decades. If you are poor and uneducated, guilt and in- nocence don’t always mat- ter. “West of Memphis,” like the three wrongly accused men it depicts, owes its entire existence to the three “Paradise Lost” films that came before it. Without them, there would have been no reviewing the case, no criticism and no grass- roots pursuit of justice. And that’s the most sig- nificant and redemptive lesson of Berg’s docu- mentary – the power of investigative journalism to triumph over prejudice and injustice. Weiland comes correct to Charlotte ENTERTAINMENT REVIEW WILLIAM BUCHHEIT PHOTO | SUBMITTED ‘West of Memphis’is a documentary about a 1993 crime in West Memphis, Ark. I started reading Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged” a few weeks ago; a book many people say has changed their outlook on things. The novel and its cult status got me thinking about the books I have read and which ones have taught me the most. The follow- ing, listed chronologically, are the five novels and nonfiction books that I’ve found the most important and educational over the years. FICTION 1. “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” by Robert Louis Stevenson (1886) What it’s about: Lawyer John Utterson learns that his client, Dr. Henry Jekyll, has entered into an acquaintance with a mysterious man named Hyde. The former is a highly esteemed middle-aged doc- tor while the latter is a revolt- ing, sinful and violent fiend. Ultimately, Utterson discovers they are the same person. What it taught me: Steven- son’s timeless novella gives a chilling yet eloquent account of man’s duplicitous nature. It’s influence on Freud and much of 20th Century psychology is inescapable, but the book also serves as a perfect allegory for alcohol- ism and drug addiction. On a surface level, it is a universal morality tale warning against the dangers of surrender- ing to our most primitive impulses. Similar books: Bram Stoker’s “Dracula,”(1892) Oscar Wilde’s “The Picture of Dorian Gray” (1890) 2. “An American Tragedy” by Theodore Dreiser (1925) What it’s about: Dreiser’s nearly 1,000-page work is in many ways the great American novel. It tells the tragic story of Clyde Griffiths, who is born and raised poor then goes to live with his rich uncle in Chicago. There he must choose between the rich girl he loves and poor girl he’s knocked up. What it taught me: There are a lot of themes to chew on here but the heaviest is the author’s fierce determinism – the belief that a man’s fate is determined primarily by his environment. The novel is also a meditation on the internal struggle between conscience and desire that plagues us all, especially young and impressionable men like its protagonist. Similar books: Richard Wright’s“Native Son”(1940), Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s“Crime and Punishment”(1866) 3. “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1925) What it’s about: A young man named Nick Carraway ventures to the Big Apple where he meets up with his cousin Daisy Buchanan, a pretty but flaky socialite. Un- knowingly, he rents a cottage right beside the mansion of Jay Gatsby, a rich and colorful man of the same age who has made his money illegally. Soon, Nick finds himself in the middle of both Daisy’s and Gatsby’s torrid romance and the alcoholic drama of the rich and careless. What it taught me: Ever heard the phrase“Love is blind?” Fitzgerald’s master- piece beautifully depicts the American tendency to idealize what we can’t have. More specifically, it shows our inclination to see people not as they really are, but as what we want them to be. Daisy thus becomes a symbol of the American dream, outwardly beautiful and allur- ing yet ultimately empty and destructive Similar books: Fitzgerald’s “The Beautiful and Damned” (1922), John O’Hara’s“Ap- pointment in Samarra”(1934) 4. “1984”by George Orwell (1949) What it’s about: In this, the ultimate dystopian novel, Orwell creates a London where the government has complete control of its citizens. History books are rewritten and people can be arrested just for thinking anarchic thoughts (thought crimes). Surveillance cameras are everywhere and children will even turn their parents over to the authorities should they say something wrong about Big Brother (the gov- ernment). Our protagonist, Winston Smith, eventually becomes fed up with this way of life and revolts. What it taught me: It’s no coincidence that the novel was published right after WWII, as Orwell’s setting re- sembles the Nazi Germany of the 1940s. The book explores the power of brainwashing and intimidation and warns of the perils that occur when a government becomes too powerful. In this new cen- tury, Orwell’s novel remains relevant as our government uses“the war on terror”to ramp up surveillance and monitoring programs. Similar books: Aldous Huxley’s“Brave New World” (1932) 5. “Deliverance”by James Dickey (1970) What it’s about: Four middle- aged friends from Atlanta head into the wilderness to kayak a river. The trip becomes a life-or-death struggle when hillbillies at- tack them. What it taught me: Much like Joseph Conrad’s“Heart of Darkness”and William Golding’s“Lord of the Flies,” Dickey’s work is a testament to man’s savagery when removed from civilization. Horrific but poetic, grotesque yet beautiful,“Deliverance”is one of the best-written books you’ll ever read. Think of all those movies where the char- acters’vacation turns into a nightmare. It all started with this original, which inspired a pretty terrifying film adapta- tion of its own. Similar books: William Golding’s“Lord of the Flies” (1954), Jack Ketchum’s“Off Season”(1980) NON-FICTION 1.“The Bible” What it taught me: This timeless work has given pur- pose to billions. The history of God’s relationship with mankind is full of valuable lessons and unforgettable characters. Most significant, of course, are the four gos- pels of the New Testament, which lay the foundation for the entire Christian faith and provide dramatic examples of God’s love, power and mercy through Jesus. 2.“The Road Less Traveled” by Dr. M. Scott Peck (1978) What it’s about: Peck’s superb work begins with the sentence,“Life is difficult.” The licensed psychiatrist then instructs the reader how to live a life of fulfillment and meaning. Perhaps the ultimate self-help book, the author provides important lessons about love, faith and discipline. What it taught me: Much like his esteemed predecessor C.S. Lewis, Peck teaches that spiritual growth is necessary to human development. Unfortunately, he also sug- gests that such growth can only come through a certain amount of suffering. In try- ing to avoid that inevitable suffering, humans fail to grow and subject themselves to what he calls“neurotic suf- fering.” Peck further insists that love is not a feeling but an action, and that delayed gratification is fundamental to both mental and spiritual health (which he insists are the same thing, anyways). All in all, a wonderful roadmap to life. 3. “The Devil’s Butcher Shop”by Roger Morris (1983) What it’s about: Ever wonder what hell is like? It’s probably not too different from the events depicted in this book. In 1980, prisoners took over the maximum-security state penitentiary of New Mexico and killed over 30 people in the bloodiest prison riot in American history. What it taught me: Probably the most horrific book I’ve ever read, Morris’work ex- plores man’s capacity for both extreme evil and surpris- ing mercy. The murderous inmates aren’t the only bad guys here, as governmental neglect, severe overcrowding and sadistic guards made the bloodbath all but inevitable. The author uses compelling journalism and chilling prose to depict the atrocities that can result when men are stripped of their humanity. 4.“Fire and Fear: The Inside Story of Mike Tyson”by Jose Torres (1989) What it’s about: Torres’book was the first biography of one of the most exciting and con- troversial athletes of the 20th Century. Published about six months before Tyson’s first loss, Torres’biography brilliantly examines the early life that made his subject the most intimidating and self- destructive fighter of all time. What it taught me: I read this one when I was 13-years-old and had just fallen in love with boxing. As a former light heavyweight champ, Torres certainly knows the ins and outs of the sport. But it is his psychological portrait of the then 22-year-old champ that forms a modern-day argument to the powers of determinism and the irrevers- ible damage created by child- hood neglect. In hindsight, the book could be called “Prelude to a Fall,”as Tyson would lose his title and be convicted of rape in the years that immediately followed its publication. 5.“Great White Shark” by Richard Ellis and John E. Mc- Cosker (1995) What it’s about: A fascinating history and study of one of the world’s oldest and fiercest animals. What it taught me:“Jaws” author Peter Benchley called this work“the most enter- taining and comprehensive book ever written about the world’s most fascinating predator.” Indeed, Ellis’and McCosker’s landmark publica- tion tells you everything you need to know about the great white, covering everything from why the sharks attack to their mating behavior. I’ve been obsessed with this animal since the second grade and have read dozens of books about it. With it’s fabulous illustrations, photography and research, this is the one I always come back to. The 10 books that taught me the most THE BUCK STOPS HERE WILLIAM BUCHHEIT Rating: 7 out of 10 Run time: 133 minutes Rated:‘R’for language, vio- lence and nudity F or the most part, British filmmaker Steve McQueen was an excellent choice to direct “12 Years a Slave.” His nationality will keep the American media from politicizing the work, keeping the focus on what’s really important – the story. And what an amazing one it is. Based on the real-life 1853 memoir by Solo- mon Northup, the movie details the nightmarish plight of a free black man living in New York who is kidnapped and shipped to a slave market in the South. There, he is sold, torn from his family and forced to endure a dozen years of interminable labor and torment. Known for such no- holds-barred character studies as “Hunger” and “Shame,” McQueen has directed his most visually and emotionally arrest- ing film to date. Yes it is brutal and tough to watch at times, but that’s what makes “12 Years a Slave” so moving – its realism. Every detail, from the masters’ clothes to the slaves’ scars rings true. Most significantly, so do the performances. As Northup, Chiwetel Ejiofor is a perfect blend of expression and restraint, while Lupita Nyong’s char- acter, Patsey, illustrates slavery’s psychological toll with remarkable grace. As the villainous slave driver, Michael Fass- bender is also magnetic. He deserved an Oscar nomination for his last McQueen film, “Shame,” and will likely receive one for his performance here. As far as the screenplay goes, “12 Years a Slave” unfolds more like a col- lection of short stories than a complete tale. More than anything, it’s a character study of three people who administered and suffered unspeakable real life horrors. It is also an intriguing look at how man can mold religion to meet his own desires. But apart from being a visceral condemna- tion of slavery and tribute to human will, it’s hard to discern what McQueen’s work is trying to teach us. The scenes of Northup with his fam- ily feel comparatively flimsy, and the end of the film seems more like a Hallmark moment than it should. Also, I found it strange that children are so conspicuously absent from the story. It’s hard to believe they didn’t play a larger role in plantation life. Of course, keeping children out of the mix could have been McQueen’s one act of restraint in this otherwise merciless look at a the darkest chapter of US history. ‘12 Years a Slave’ a rough ride through a dark chapter PHOTO | COURTESY OF FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES ‘12 Years a Slave’ tells the story of a man who has his freedom taken away through kidnapping and slavery. MOVIE REVIEW WILLIAM BUCHHEIT
  • 32. REVIEW PORTFOLIO AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Free Times August Krickel film clips of New York to wigs that perfectly capture the appropriate vintage look, to natty suits and hats that place the characters right in the middle of the Cotton Club. The musical direction by Walter Graham is superb, and it’s clear that the band is hav- ing a blast. So much fun is going on, in fact, that one easily forgets the segregation that caused Harlem to create its own social and cultural scene until “Black and Blue.” Here the cast members are all seated, as they sing the plaintive lyrics: “I’m so forlorn / Life’s just a thorn / My heart is torn / Why was I born? / What did I do? / To be so black and blue?” The moment just breaks your heart, but then the tempo livens and the fun starts back again.  Ain’t Misbehavin’ undeniably delivers the goods — just as long as you aren’t expecting dialogue, or a plot. The energy and vitality of director Terrance Henderson’s cast is infec- tious. So be forewarned, but then just sit back and enjoy.  Will local audiences tire of musical re- vues and cabaret shows, no matter how well done? As a wise man once observed, “One never knows, do one?” The production runs through July 20 at Trustus Theatre; tion, or visit trustus.org. This is an edited version of a THEATER REVIEW By August Krickel arts&culture Ain’t Misbehavin Delivers the Goods Y ou always have to be careful how you describe a performance. I learned that as I took a break from writing this review and joined some friends for pints and trivia at the Publick House. One asked me about Ain’t Misbehavin’, the musical running at Trustus Theatre. I explained how well done the production was and how much fun I had, but also made sure she realized that the show is essentially a revue of hit songs from Fats Waller. “So there’s not much of a plot?” she asked. “No, there’s no plot, no dialogue — it’s just a cabaret show, like a Vegas-style show,” I clarified. “So it wasn’t that good?” Mortified, I tried to explain that it was re- ally well done — but ultimately, one’s enjoy- ment depends on what one is looking for. Ain’t Misbehavin’ (originally conceived by Richard Maltby Jr. and Murray Horwitz) offers two hours of upbeat jazz, blues and swing, performed by five of Trustus’ finest. The play won three Tony Awards in 1978 for its tribute to the music of the irrepressible composer, pianist and bandleader Thomas “Fats” Waller. As such, it perfectly recreates the vibe of the posh clubs of the Harlem Renaissance, a time when African-American artists were finding both a musical and creative voice, and increasing acceptance and popularity.   Designed by Brandon McIver and Ter- rance Henderson, the set is basic, suggesting the interior of a nightclub. A seven-piece jazz combo, led by Camille Jones on piano, performs from a bandstand in the center, flanked by a sweeping staircase. On either side are a bar and a lounge area. Most songs are performed in front of these, while any performer not in the number carries on naturally in the background, pouring a drink, watching (or ignoring) the singer, or whispering to a girlfriend.  Director and choreographer Hender- son has wisely cast some familiar faces, singers who can really bring out the nuances of each song. Each singer develops a sort of persona that carries through from song to song. Kendrick Marion becomes a smooth, slick, rascally hustler; Samuel McWhite dons the role of the earthier, worldlier man-about- town, and is an occasional surrogate for the impish, extravagant Waller himself, still remembered for his catch phrase, “One never knows, do one?” Devin Anderson finally gets a chance to be beautiful and sexy on stage, having had several other roles requiring drab or tattered clothes. Katrina Blanding represents a forceful and sometimes-comic diva, and Avery Bateman most often seems the sassy youngster within the group.  Each gets one or more solos to showcase their vocal skills, with Anderson probably the best at capturing the sound and feel of the 1920s and ’30s, especially in “Squeeze Me.” McWhite gets to show off his impressive vo- cal range. Bateman is cute and appealing on “Keeping Out of Mischief Now,” while Mar- ion makes a great jazz-age hipster extolling the virtues of some late-night reefer in “The Viper’s Drag.” Blanding hits rich operatic alto notes in a number of songs, and everyone, especially Marion and Bateman, gets to show off dance skills in variations on the Charles- ton, the Big Apple and other dance crazes of the era.  With no real script, director Henderson ensures that everything else serves to en- hance the period feel, from black-and-white A talented cast brings out the nuances of Fats Waller’s hits in Ain’t Misbehavin’. Courtesy photo Epic Ragtime Opens Trustus Season T rustus Theatre kicks off its new season with a production of epic proportions: Ragtime: The Musical, Terrence McNal- ly’s adaptation of the acclaimed 1975 novel by E.L. Doctorow. By squeezing 32 perform- ers onto the tiny Trustus stage, Director Chad Henderson delivers an approximate 1:4 ratio of cast members to audience, and in doing so creates a textbook example of how to create a memorable show with limited resources but unlimited talent.  Set in early 20th century New York, Ragtime follows the intersecting lives of three families: a ragtime piano player from Harlem, his sometime girlfriend and their il- legitimate child; an upper-class white family in suburban New Rochelle; and a Jewish im- migrant and his young daughter. Historical figures are woven in and out of the story. The show is a kaleidoscopic and some- times dizzying tour through themes, characters and settings, so just enjoy the first few panoramic scenes until it becomes clear who the protagonists are, and who is simply background color. The story is told from the perspective of the young son of the white family (Luke Melnyk), but with other performers voicing the lines, in third person, that pertain to their characters. As pianist Coalhouse Walker Jr., Terrance Henderson begins as a smooth-talking, smooth-singing charmer, courting Sarah (Avery Bateman) after she tries to abandon their child. Events turn him into a tragic figure, and Henderson is up to the dramatic challenge. His duets with Bateman inspired the most applause on opening night, and their scenes together are touching. New Rochelle family, G. Scott Wild sports an authentic period mustache, a nice command of the formal speech of the era, and he man- ages to find a sympathetic, human side to a character intended to represent the rigid social structure of the establishment. Kevin Bush uses no more than a goofy grin and a hesitant stammer to clearly depict the fam- ily’s younger brother as an impressionable innocent who finds meaning in the midst of political upheaval. Marybeth Gorman as the unnamed mother joins most of the principals on “New Music,” where ragtime music is used as a metaphor for societal change. Chip Stubbs is also effective as the Jewish immi- grant Tateh, conveying how far a parent will go to protect a child. By my count, at least 16 of the remain- ing 25 cast members have played lead roles locally within the last year or two. Vicky Saye Henderson is particularly impressive as fiery activist and anarchist Emma Goldman, and Elisabeth Baker is adorable as scandalous party girl Evelyn Nesbit, the Lindsay Lohan of her day. Daryl Byrd, as Booker T. Wash- ington, interacts meaningfully with several protagonists in a pivotal scene, while Scott Vaughan, as Houdini, is enjoyable but under- used. A subset of the men’s ensemble, com- prised of Bobby Bloom, George Dinsmore, Mark Zeigler and Jason Kinsey, shows up as scary and menacing racists, then as lovably raucous baseball fans in “What a Game.” Director Henderson’s biggest challenge was how to best showcase all this talent. His set design wisely leaves most of the stage open, with the simplest suggestions of props and locations wheeled in as needed. Random objects (ladders, trombones, a washboard) adorn a rear wall along with images from turn-of-the-century pop culture. The overall effect establishes setting and tone, yet alerts the audience that we have to fill in the blanks via imagination. Music Director Jeremy Pol- ley conducts seven musicians who are largely hidden from view. Costumes by Alexis Doktor and one wig in particular by Cherelle Guyton are well done and appropriate for the time period. Doctorow’s book is often hailed as one of the great American novels; this stage adaptation ran for two years on Broadway and won four Tony Awards. That said, I don’t entirely understand what all the fuss is about. The music is pretty, and the character vignettes are interesting, although surely condensed from the novel (which I’ve never read). Sadly, I didn’t take any particularly uplifting message with me, beyond a vague hope for a better America. Still, I enjoyed the performances of the tremendously talented cast, and was particularly impressed at how skillfully Henderson has managed to scale down a blockbuster for a smaller venue, while sacrificing none of its spectacle or entertain- ment value. Trustus Theatre is at 520 Lady St. Ragtime runs through Oct. 5. Visit trustus.org for showtimes and ticket information. Terrance Henderson and Avery Bateman Courtesy photo by Jonathan Sharpe Tarzan is First-Rate Children’s Theater H e’s from a gang of free spirits who live for the moment. She’s from a structured, repressed society, and is frightened — yet also intrigued — by the wild abandon he displays. That could be the plot of Twilight or High School Musical, but it also describes Tarzan: The Stage Musical, currently running at Town Theatre. Based on the animated film, this Tarzan is more Disney than Edgar Rice Burroughs; the romance between Tarzan and Jane is empha- sized, the action and violence are downplayed, and there are clear messages about cross- cultural acceptance and tolerance. Thanks to rich production values and plenty of stage magic, young audiences are sure to embrace this timeless tale of jungle adventure. The ensemble, including many children, portray apes and other jungle denizens, and are costumed with only the suggestion of ani- mal features: multicolored streamers of fabric hint at fur, while exotic makeup usually found at a rave gives an indication of a nonhuman face. Most of the gorillas look like cavemen playing backup for David Bowie during the Ziggy Stardust era, with subtle and occasional chest-beating or knuckle-dragging. Grace- ful dancers in beautifully patterned leotards represent other animals. Costumer Lori Step and Wig Mistress Cherelle Guyton have done an excellent job at channeling the original production design from Broadway.  Director and choreographer Shannon Willis Scruggs includes other dancers in cha- otic shades of blue to represent choppy ocean waves, and young performers in bright hues of green and yellow spring to life as flowers discovered by budding botanist Jane (Celeste Morris). Danny Harrington’s set becomes an organic part of the story, with every inch a new part of the jungle containing a potential friend or foe. Constantly changing projected patterns enhance the mood and setting, casting shadows as sun peeks through thick foliage, and is reflected back from running water. It’s just about the lushest, most visually appealing set for a children’s production that I’ve ever seen. Tarzan (Parker Byun) swings into this tropical paradise right over the heads of the audience, zooming in on a zip line from the light booth, and keeps that level of vigorous athleticism all the way to curtain call. When hanging with his simian pal Terk (an impish Jackie Rowe) or his adoptive gorilla parents Kala (Laurel Posey) and Kerchak (Scott Stepp), THEATER REVIEW By August Krickel Tarzan speaks in contemporary English, but when encountering humans, they all revert to grunts and hoots. When Jane and Tarzan duet, only the audience is able to understand his thoughts, expressed in English. It’s an os- tensibly complex narrative device that works effectively. Morris bears a resemblance to her cartoon counterpart; she and Byun harmonize well together, as do Jane and her father (Frank Thompson, playing an appropriately hearty and somewhat befuddled professor.)  Lib- erty Broussard and Jadon Stanek show a lot of spunk and energy as the young Terk and Tarzan in “Who Better Than Me,” and have strong, clear voices that rival those of the adult performers. (They alternate in these roles with Caroline Quinn and Luke Melnyk.) The script, by David Henry Hwang (a Tony winner and Pulitzer nominee for more serious fare like M. Butterfly) is full of metaphors that are obvious but not intrusive. When Tarzan sings, “Will someone tell me where I belong?” the character is talking about being a human among gorillas, but the loneliness is universal. The issues he faces with his adop- tive family are those faced by children in any nontraditional family, and when he embraces his identity as human, not ape, we also see a transition from adolescence to adulthood. The singers perform to a recorded track (ensuring that they can be heard, an important factor to consider with lots of young voices on stage) and the sound design by Matt Mills largely flows smoothly. Younger theatergoers will be mesmerized by the spectacle on stage and the kaleidoscop- ic visuals; older children may enjoy the actual stagecraft on display. Teens will likely develop a crush on the attractive Tarzan and/or Jane ... or who knows, perhaps even the slinky Leopard or the devilish Clayton, if they’ve got a thing for bad boys or girls. Tarzan: The Stage Musical isn’t exactly Burroughs, but it’s first-rate children’s theater, done with excellent production values and a talented cast, and you owe it to the child in your life to check it out. Tarzan runs Wed-Sun through July 28 at Town Theatre (1012 Sumter St.). Tickets are $25 for adults; $20 for seniors, military and college students; and $15 for youth 17 and younger. Call 799-2510 to order or visit towntheatre. com for more information.
  • 33. GOVERNMENT REPORTING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Free Times CoreyH utchins door neighbors described. Scott’s resignation is effective May 1. He’s been using paid leave, of which he has a bit more saved up, according to city documents. Former Deputy Chief Ruben Santiago, who’s been acting chief during Scott’s leave, will serve as interim chief. Wilson did not know what Santiago’s salary would be. Santiago will be the department’s seventh chief since 2007, counting interim chiefs. Many have left under a cloud. Tandy Carter was removed after he refused to hand over to another agency the investi- gation of a car crash by then-mayor elect Steve Benjamin. Immediately before Scott, interim chief Carl Burke resigned early after it was discovered he wasn’t certified to carry a weapon. Wilson and Columbia Mayor Steve Ben- jamin said the city will perform a nation- wide search for a new chief. Benjamin cited the city’s first-quarter crime statistics, which are lower than those of the first quarter last year, as evidence the city won’t have a hard time attracting a new police chief. “They will show a department on the rise,” Benjamin said. Earlier Monday, though, Councilman Moe Baddourah said he thought the city could have handled Scott’s leave of absence better. Baddourah is running against Benja- min for mayor. “The public is looking for a lot of an- swers,” Baddourah said. “The city could have been better at communicating.” Forecast for Open Solar Market in S.C. This Year: Mostly Cloudy By Corey Hutchins S outh Carolina will likely trail the na- tion in solar power for another year. In a subcommittee hearing last week, state senators asked for more time to review legislation that would allow third- party financing of solar power. South Caro- lina lags behind in sun-generated energy because it’s one of a few states that don’t allow third parties to freely sell electricity to consumers. In this state, it is illegal to buy solar energy from an entity that is not legally deemed a utility. What that means is if a company wants to install a solar panel on the roof of a house or a commercial building and sell electricity to the resident or the business it must be regulated just as if were SCE&G or Duke Energy. Installing solar panels is expensive, which is why not many do it in South Caro- lina under the current conditions. In the April 17 hearing, one speaker indicated that other than the house or a car, installing solar panels could be the most expensive thing for a homeowner in South Carolina, even though they’d save on power bills. But if a third-party company paid for the installa- tion, leased you the panels, and sold you the electricity the panels generated, solar power could be feasible. The company would then benefit from tax incentives and deductions for investment in solar power, while lower- ing your power bills. A bill to create such a model in South Carolina — one of the few states that doesn’t already allow it — died in the House earlier this year. Lawmakers in the lower chamber said they worried about how it would affect big utility companies, though a broad coali- tion of supports spoke in favor of the bill, from ministers to retirees. “The only opponent was a representa- tive of South Carolina’s influential utilities: SCE&G, Duke Energy and Santee Cooper, as well as the state’s electrical cooperatives,” reported The State at the time. Now the fate of solar energy rests in a Senate subcommittee. But legislation must pass out of such committees, get a vote from the full House or Senate, and cross over to the other body by May 1, or it is essentially dead for the year. “Looking at the Senate calendar and the ability to get the bill to the House before crossover is pretty much impossible,” says Hamilton Davis of the Coastal Conservation League, who supports solar leasing in South Carolina. “I don’t see a path for where it could actually get signed into law in 2013.” In the April 17 hearing in the Senate panel, many spoke in favor of third-party financing for solar power in the state. As has been the case in past hearings on the issue, though, one representative speaking on behalf of the state’s big utility companies was enough to block the bill. Mike Couick, CEO of the Electric Coop- eratives of South Carolina, spoke for much of the allotted time against the legislation. He said solar power is coming to the state, and utilities are gearing up for it, but such a bill is not the solution. Davis says he understands why big utili- ties would be concerned. “You’re introducing competition in their territories and they’re fundamentally op- posed to that,” he says. Lee Peterson, a Georgia tax attorney who deals with solar issues, told lawmakers that much of the country allows third-party leasing of solar, except some holdouts in the Southeast. He said lawmakers have been told by the utilities to study the issue more, but it’s not needed. He said the utilities are the problem, not the law being proposed. “You can’t be the holdout,” he said. “You can’t be the problem. You have to be the solution.” After the hearing, subcommittee chair- man Luke Rankin, a Republican from Horry County, said he wanted to hear more from utilities before moving on the bill. In an interview afterwards, he said he hadn’t researched the legislation that much. He said he hoped to have another hearing on it in a couple weeks. “There are questions on both sides of it,” he said. Let us know what you think: Email news@free-times.com. The Curious Case of the Super-Secret House Ethics Reform Bill By Corey Hutchins A mysterious ethics bill introduced last week would actually weaken ethics penalties — and the process by which it came about had those hoping for serious reform shaking their heads in disgust. On April 16, a mysterious bill deal- ing with ethics reform popped up on the schedule for two House committees on the same day. Sponsored by Republican House Speaker Bobby Harrell and other leaders, the bill did not explain what the new laws would do. It was what’s called a “shell bill” — when lawmakers introduce legislation with just a summary, but no full text for public viewing of what’s exactly in the proposal. They’re fairly common, but usually have to do with technical items, often in the bud- get, says John Ruoff, a budget analyst who tracks State House legislation. Not only was the ethics proposal introduced as a shell bill, but leaders put it on the fast track. Lawmakers debated it in a subcommittee hearing, even though members of the public there to watch didn’t know what lawmakers were debating. Of- ficials at the State Ethics Commission were there, but they hadn’t been given a copy of the bill. The lawmakers passed the shell bill on to the full committee the same day. State Ethics Commission officials only got a copy of the bill during that hearing after they begged for it, according to one official. “The secrecy of this bill was concern- ing,” says Tammie Hoy of the League of Women Voters of South Carolina, a group following ethics reform closely. Hashed out in secret in one day without public input, the ethics reform bill will be debated on the House floor this week. “I’ve been over there for 27 sessions and I never saw something like this before,” says John Crangle, director of Common Cause of South Carolina, which focuses on combating corruption in government. “It looked like they were trying to do an end-run around the normal policy-making process by denying the public the opportu- nity to participate in the conversation.” Eventually, lawmakers made the full text of the bill public — after lawmak- ers in both panels voted on it. Greenville Republican Rep. Bruce Bannister explained to The State that the bill was a mix of dif- ferent proposed measures in the House and Senate and had been negotiated behind the scenes with lawmakers in both chambers, as well as with the governor’s office. Once it became public, the bill shocked those who’ve been following ethics reform. The new law, it turned out, would decriminalize many ethics violations, such as public officials using their campaign accounts as personal piggy banks — con- verting them to civil rather than criminal violations, and reducing the associated penalties. It would also dissolve the House and Senate ethics committees, where law- makers police themselves, only to create a new ethics oversight committee appointed by lawmakers. The bill would actually raise the limit of campaign contributions lawmakers could take from an individual or business. Columbia Democratic Rep. James Smith says he isn’t happy about how the process turned out. He blamed it on law- makers waiting too long to deal with ethics reform and trying to cobble together too many different proposals that led to sloppy language. (If legislation doesn’t pass to the Senate by May 1, it is essentially dead for the year.) Smith says there is bipartisan support to fix the parts of the bill that decriminalize some ethics violations and raise campaign contribution limits. Lexington GOP Rep. Rick Quinn said decriminalizing eth- ics violations “was not the intent of the subcommittee,” according to The Nerve, the new media arm of the libertarian South Carolina Policy Council. Last year, state Attorney General Alan Wilson prosecuted ex-Republican Lt. Gov. Ken Ard for converting campaign money to personal use, because it’s against the law. House Speaker Bobby Harrell is currently facing a criminal investigation by state police into whether he broke any laws by reimbursing himself hundreds of thousand of dollars from his campaign account. The Senate Ethics Committee is currently in- vestigating whether Democratic Sen. Rob- ert Ford of Charleston used his campaign money for personal use. “In light of the recent allegations made against Sen. Robert Ford and past allega- tions against Rep. Bobby Harrell, the state of South Carolina needs ethics reform that will make violators accountable for their actions,” said Tammie Hoy of the state League of Women Voters. Lawmakers debated it in a subcommittee hearing, even though members of the public there to watch didn’t know what lawmakers were debating. knock down the building and replace it with a seven-building, 818-bed student housing com- plex. But a city design commission denied that plan, saying it doesn’t fit with the Innovista design guidelines. That decision is currently tied up in several layers of appeals. Group Shines Light on Shadowy Regulatory Commission By Corey Hutchins A group of conservationists is waging a campaign this legislative session to bring public awareness to an obscure process: how one gets a seat on a commission that regulates the state’s big private power companies, among other industries. That commission — called the Public Ser- vice Commission — is a seven-member body chosen by the state Legislature. “They actually have a lot of power over the future of South Carolina,” says Anne Tim- berlake, who runs a group called UPowerSC, about the commission members. The PSC regulates at least six different sectors that include utility companies like SCE&G, private water and sewer companies, the licensing processes of some for-hire trans- portation services, and nuclear rate hikes, among others. “The seven-member PSC functions as a ‘court’ for regulatory and rate cases involv- ing not only the generation of power from electricity and gas, but also water and sewer, oversight of taxis and charter buses and local phone service,” Timberlake wrote in a recent editorial. “The commission is charged with balancing the need for consumers to enjoy reliable services at fair rates with the need for corporate utilities to earn reasonable returns on their investments.” Timberlake’s group, UPowerSC, is shining a spotlight on the PSC with a website and public relations campaign. It’s trying to raise awareness about how South Carolinians end up on the commission, and who can apply. Basically, it goes like this: each candidate for the $102,000 job is elected by the General Assembly to serve four-year terms. Those candidates must come from each of the state’s different congressional districts and must first pass through a screening process. That process is overseen by the Public Utility Re- view Committee — or PURC — a bipartisan 10-member panel comprised of three Sena- tors, three House members and four citizens appointed by House Speaker Bobby Harrell and Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Larry Martin, both Republicans. Candidates must also take a written test. Once they make it through certain hoops they can approach lawmakers to try and secure enough votes to win a seat on the PSC. “There’s never been much public limelight or understanding about it,” Timberlake says about the process. That’s true. South Carolina government is peppered with hundreds of boards and com- missions — some positions are paid, some are voluntary — and how people end up on them happens largely out of the public eye even if it’s within the state’s public information laws. Orangeburg Democratic Sen. Brad Hutto, who sits on the PURC, made that clear in past minutes of the panel’s public meetings. “There’s no audience out there, but I think for the record we need to let everybody know that this is the PSC Screening Subcommit- tee Public Hearing and that this is a hearing to screen candidates for [the] Public Service Commission,” he said during a March 2010 hearing, the last time candidates were up for election. This time around, Timberlake and her group want the public engaged in the election process. Already she says there were at least 23 candidates who applied for positions on the commission. Those applicants have already taken the tests, and they testified in hearings in the past weeks. The field has narrowed to 14. UPowerSC stresses the group is not endorsing anyone for election to the commis- sion, but is trying to bring more transparency to the process. In truth, though, because of South Caro- lina’s uniquely murky campaign finance laws, if that group — or any, such as one tied to a certain industry or special interest — were pushing for the election of a certain candidate on the Public Service Commission, it would be hard to determine. Unregistered political groups can sprout up to influence elections here without having to disclose what they’re doing. In April, PURC’s full recommendation on the candidates will be made public. After 48 hours those candidates can begin to meet with lawmakers and seek their votes. “We think the more knowledge about this the better,” Timberlake says. “It’s appropriate for there to be a public dialogue about the kinds of people, the qualifications that are important for service on the Public Service Commission. The UPower campaign wants to help interested citizens follow the process and understand the process of what the PSC does.” Let us know what you think: Email news@free-times.com. 18 Months Later, S.C. Law Enforcement Closes Case on ‘Zombie Voters’, Finds No Fraud By Corey Hutchins A year and a half after Republicans were seized with zombie voter fever, a state police investigation found no indica- tion that anyone purposefully cast a ballot using the name of a dead person in South Carolina. But the news was not trumpeted on TV or elsewhere like the allegations were 18 months ago. Instead, the State Law Enforce- ment Division quietly wrapped up its inves- tigation and only released its file to media after Free Times submitted an open records request under the Freedom of Information Act. SLED released the report July 3, one day before a federal holiday. The agency found no indication of voter fraud. But don’t expect the officials — or media — who put fear in the minds of voters to try and correct the record to the extent they trumpeted the claims. According to Justin Levitt, a law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles who focuses on elections and is researching claims of voter fraud, the level of media attention hardly ever balances when it comes to allegations of such voter fraud and any eventual follow-up that might debunk it. For a while last year, you couldn’t turn on Fox News without seeing S.C. GOP At- torney General Alan Wilson saying things like, “We found out that there were over 900 people who died and then subsequently voted.” And Republican Gov. Nikki Haley said, “Without photo ID, I mean, let’s be clear, I don’t want dead people voting in the state of South Carolina.” The charges of possible voter fraud arose at the time the state’s Republican leadership was pushing an ultimately successful Voter ID law requiring voters to flash a photo ID at the polls. Wilson was unavailable for comment about the released report, but his spokes- man, J. Mark Powell, passed along a state- ment. “The initial claims reported to the Attorney General’s office were alarming,” Powell said. “They were not vague allega- tions, but contained specific information. The state’s chief prosecutor cannot stand by when presented with such a situation. So SLED was asked to investigate this matter. We appreciate SLED’s hard work in prepar- ing this report.” A spokesman for SLED declined to com- ment on the nearly 500-page report. House Democratic Minority Leader Todd Rutherford, a Columbia Democrat, on July 8 called on Republican Gov. Nikki Haley and other GOP officials to “acknowl- edge that they were being dishonest about voter fraud in South Carolina and apologize to the public for intentionally deceiving them for political gain.” Haley spokesman Rob Godfrey didn’t respond to emails seek- ing comment. “I see it all over the place,” Lovitt, the law professor, told Free Times about the disparity between voter fraud claims and follow-up. The launch of Wilson’s investigation was widely covered, he notes. “It turns out, the aftermath — in South Carolina, as I’ve seen most everywhere — is very rarely covered.” The zombie voter fire was kindled back in early 2012 by a list of some 950 names that Gov. Haley’s DMV director, Kevin Shwedo, said were those of dead people who appeared to have voted in recent elections. “Well over 900 individuals appear to have voted after they died,” Shwedo said at one House hear- ing on the matter. Horry County Republi- can Rep. Alan Clemmons, who took much interest in the dead voter drama, proclaimed gravely in another hearing, “We must have certainty in South Carolina that zombies aren’t voting.” (During the state’s battle over Voter ID legislation a year prior, Clemmons had sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice in support of the measure that read in part, “It is an unspoken truth in South Carolina that election fraud exists.”) At the time, State Election Commis- sion director Marci Andino said the agency had investigated a handful of cases where it appeared the names of deceased people had appeared on polling precinct signature rolls, but found no indication of fraud. She ex- plained that of the initial batch of six names of allegedly dead voters on the DMV’s list, one had cast an absentee ballot before dying; another was the result of a poll worker mis- takenly marking the voter as his deceased father; two were clerical errors resulting from stray marks on voter registration lists detected by a scanner; and two others result- ed from poll managers incorrectly marking the name of the voter in question instead of the voter above or below on the list. The agency went on to investigate more than 200 other names on the dead voter list and found zero cases of illegal activity. But the fever wouldn’t break. Eventually, the attorney general’s office announced that SLED would handle the rest of the names on the list. “No one in this state should issue any kind of clean bill of health in this matter until the professionals at SLED have finished with their work,” said an attorney general’s office spokesman at the time. Well, SLED has completed its work — and found nothing nefarious. Agents with SLED drove as far as Myrtle Beach to meet with allegedly dead voters, only to find clerical errors similar to those found by the State Election Commission. Commission spokesman Chris Whit- mire says there was a time when the agency would get daily calls from members of the public who believed people in this state were casting fraudulent ballots in the name of dead people. “It hurt the public confidence in South Carolina elections,” he says. He’s glad SLED’s report confirmed what the elections agency always believed: there was no fraud, merely clerical errors and genuine mistakes. Let us know what you think: Email news@free-times.com.
  • 34. GOVERNMENT REPORTING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Free Times Eva Moore Councilman Moe Baddourah has pro- posed that the city designate nine buildings on the Bull Street campus as historic land- marks. Some say his move could jeopardize the sale and development of the property, which has been under contract for nearly two and a half years to Greenville developer Bob Hughes. But some people in the historic preservation community think it’s about time. There’ve been painfully few concrete details about Hughes’ plan for the campus, a 181-acre expanse in the heart of the city. Hughes doesn’t speak to the press. It’s un- clear how many historic buildings he plans to preserve; in his planning documents, he names only four. In those same documents, he pitches a walkable, mixed-use urban development, possibly featuring a minor- league baseball stadium. But in recent months, Hughes got City Council to change the zoning to allow private dormitories at Bull Street — perhaps signaling a change in vision for the property. Columbians are fresh off the purchase of the Palmetto Compress warehouse, a cotton bale storage facility built around 1918. The city firmed up plans last week to spend up to $7 million to save it from demolition. Some people are thrilled; others are appalled; but it’s forced residents to take a hard look at which old buildings in the city are worth saving. Meanwhile, the next mayoral election is this November, with Baddourah challeng- ing Mayor Steve Benjamin for the top seat. A f d l B j i h h d t win the trust of the historic preservation community. Baddourah’s landmarking attempt could hit Benjamin where it hurts. Or it could backfire, scaring off the only developer who’s shown much interest in the property. At any rate, Baddourah is forcing a con- versation about Bull Street. “I’m glad we’ll be back in the news,” says Mark Binkley, deputy director of the Department of Mental Health, which still owns the Bull Street property. He’s not happy about the landmark pro- posal, which he fears could mess up the sale, but he’s happy for the attention. “Hopefully people will remember that this property has a lot more potential than the Palmetto Compress,” he says. Once, Bull Street seemed to hold a lot of promise: a massive expanse in the heart of the city, ripe for a vibrant new city-within-a- city. Has time dimmed that promise? Is this actually going to happen? And what’s the role of the campus’ existing rich history in that vision? This is our chance to find out. A Deal Years in the Making It used to be called the South Carolina Lunatic Asylum. State mental patients were housed first in the Mills building, built in the 1820s, and then in the Babcock building, built in several phases from 1857 to 1885. On the sprawling, 181-acre campus around those buildings, the asylum’s patients tended their own crops living in a self contained world surrounded by a brick wall. There were homes for the staff, a bakery, a chapel, a laundry facility — all of which tell the story of the Bull Street property. Eventually, the state moved its patients to other facilities, and in 2003 began trying in earnest to sell off the Bull Street property. In 2005, the state and the city teamed up to hire the famed Duany design firm to come up with a plan for redevelopment of the campus. The plan envisioned over 1,000 housing units, plus office space and retail — a community within a community. The developer isn’t bound by that plan, but it captured the imagination of Columbians, showing them the potential of the property. There were serious bumps along the way. In 2009, then-council members Belinda Gergel and E.W. Cromartie tried to put a historic overlay over the entire Bull Street campus to protect 17 historic buildings from demolition by its eventual buyer. The Department of Mental Health fought back, fearing the overlay would doom the sale. Council called off the overlay. Finally, in 2010, after years of negotia- tions and red tape, the state announced that Greenville developer Bob Hughes would buy the property for $15 million, in little pieces over several years. But Hughes has yet to actually fork over any cash for the property — that comes later. First, the city had to approve Hughes’ proposed zoning for the Bull Street site, which it did in October 2012; those are the rules by which he’ll redevelop the property. N t th ’ d t b d l t Baddourah’s List Columbia City Councilman Moe Baddourah has proposed that nine buildings on the Bull Street campus be named city historic landmarks: Babcock building. Currently, only its central section with the iconic red dome is a city landmark. in 1910 1880s 1960s factory African-American patients in the early 20th century If City Council votes to landmark these buildings, the city’s Design/De- velopment Review Commission would have to approve any future plan to alter or demolish the buildings. The Planning Commission will take up consideration of the landmark proposals at 5:15 p.m. on Monday, May 6. The Design/Development Review Commission will consider them Thurs- day, May 9 at 4 p.m. The Developer’s List In zoning documents filed with the city last year, Hughes Development lists four Bull Street buildings worthy of preservation: Babcock building building In addition, because the Babcock building’s central dome and the campus’ outer wall are already city landmarks, they are protected under existing codes Bull Street BluesWhat Could — Or Should — We Save? BY EVA MOORE. PHOTOS BY JONATHAN SHARPE. Right on the heels of the controversy over whether the City of Columbia should buy the Palmetto Compress warehouse, the city is facing yet another showdown over historic preservation. By Eva Moore growth&development C olumbia City Council wants to make it harder to open a liquor store in the city. And Council might take the city’s own Board of Zoning Appeals to court to do something about it. Council members are also considering a change to the zoning laws to place more emphasis on the potential negative effects of liquor stores on public safety. A business called One Love is just the lat- est liquor store to rile the community — but it could become a focal point for Council’s push. In April, a Council-appointed committee called the Board of Zoning Appeals granted a special zoning exception for Krunal Par- mar to operate a liquor store at his conve- nience store on West Beltline Boulevard. Parmar has actually been operating the liquor store there for a few years, he says. But when he applied recently to put in gas pumps, the city realized he didn’t have city permission to operate the liquor store, and he had to go before the zoning board. Since October of 2010, the city has required all liquor stores to receive special zoning board approval; Parmar’s store opened after that date. Some people are upset about the One Love liquor store. The neighborhood is struggling with “an overconcentration of alcoholic establish- ments in a low income area,” says Council- man Brian Newman. “I’m upset about it; the neighborhood is upset about it,” Newman says. According to Krista Hampton, the city’s director of planning and development services, there aren’t necessarily more new liquor stores than there used to be; it just seems like a lot because each new one now City Council to Take on Liquor Stores Upset About Beltline Liquor Store, City Plans to Appeal Own Zoning Board’s Decision has to go before the zoning board. Opponents — many from the adjacent Belvedere neighborhood, along with a city cop and a Richland County Sheriff’s deputy — packed out the zoning hearing on the One Love store. They complained about drop- ping property values, about people loitering at area liquor stores; they complained about convenience stores selling porn and pipes and rolling papers (all of which are legal). There were plenty of supporters at the hearing, too, though neighborhood leaders said they’d never seen any of them before. “Some of these folks may not have at- tended a community association meeting, but that doesn’t mean they’re not still human beings and not entitled to an opinion,” shot back Jake Moore, Parmar’s attorney. The board sees plenty of liquor store ap- plications. And it concluded in this case — as in many others — that the store fit the zoning criteria just fine: The liquor store wouldn’t alter traffic, safety or the aesthetic character of the neighborhood, among other things, and it would not adversely affect the public interest. “We’re not here to legislate morality,” said one board member as the discussion wandered. The zoning board is not allowed to con- sider the number of other liquor stores in the area in its decision, either. Council now plans to appeal the board’s decision in Richland County court. The zoning board will be represented in court by the city’s legal department — so to avoid a conflict of interest, City Council is hiring a Rock Hill attorney to handle the ap- peal on its behalf. The outside attorney will brief Council this week, says City Manager Teresa Wilson, and they’ll decide how to proceed. It’s unusual for Council to challenge its own zoning board in court, says Hampton, but it’s not unheard of. Neither Wilson nor Newman knows how much hiring the outside attorney will cost the city. Councilwoman Leona Plaugh was the lone vote against hiring the outside attor- ney, saying that although she supports the concerns of neighborhoods, in other cases neighborhood groups have raised issues and had to fund their own legal counsel. Parmar says he feels confident the zon- ing board’s decision will stand. Having too many liquor stores in an area isn’t one of the criteria the city is supposed to consider. And even if it were, Parmar says there aren’t too many stores in walking distance. “Most of the people who come to the store, they mostly are walking people,” he says. “For them, I’m the closest one. The other liquor stores, they have to pay extra for the ride.” He has 23 security cameras inside and outside his business, he says, and is happy to help the police and community. “I’m in the neighborhood — I’m ready to do whatever I can help,” he says. Meanwhile, as Council prepares to ap- peal the One Love case, council members are also planning to tighten up the zoning laws regarding special exceptions. Certain types of businesses — day cares, liquor stores, drive-thrus — require a special exception from the zoning board before they can open. Council hired another attorney to sug- gest some changes to the special exception language. He’s proposed allowing the zoning board to deny a special exception if the busi- ness might result in increased law enforce- ment activity. On May 21, the city’s Administrative Policy Committee recommended that Coun- cil move forward with those changes. Let us know what you think: Email news@free-times.com. A business called One Love is just the latest liquor store to rile the community — but it could become a focal point for Council’s push. parking garage at Sumter and Taylor. In general, he thinks older downtown businesses get short shrift. “I’d love the media to give attention to the fact that there was a downtown before Mast moved here,” he says. “Downtown was still a prime shopping area, [even though] the white middle class maybe didn’t shop here.” Though Zalkin is concerned about competition for street parking in general, the letter sent last week to the city is mainly concerned with the timing and location of meter bagging for First Thursdays, accord- ing to the city manager. Meters are usually bagged at 3:30 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month to clear out parts of the 1500 and 1600 blocks for that evening’s First Thursday events. Sometimes a few blocks are shut down entirely for street performances and a car show; other months, they remain open to through traffic. First Thursdays organizer Mark Plessinger owns Frame of Mind, an eyewear company on Main Street. He says most downtown businesses support what he’s doing because it drives up their business by bringing more people to Main. “I find it a little bit interesting that someone would draft a legal paper without the input of every single business on this street,” Plessinger says. “It’s not the heart of the merchants.” The event has drawn support from Co- lumbia City Council, and many businesses up and down Main Street participate, in- cluding Cowboy Brazilian Steakhouse, Wine Down on Main, S&S Art Supply, Tapp’s Arts Center, Paradise Ice, Sammi’s Deli and the Anastasia & Friends gallery in Free Times’ building, among others. As it turns out, Plessinger had already been moving to scale back meter bagging, and the city had been urging a new location for the car show that’s recently become part of the event. He’s been working with the city on those changes. The show will go on, he says. “First Thursdays are not in jeopardy, Plessinger says. “Anything that’s been said about First Thursday being killed — it’s not,” he said. And despite the threat of legal action, city leaders say they intend to keep events going. “The city’s very interested in events in the downtown area,” says John Spade, director of parking services. As for Soda City founder Emile DeFelice, whose farmers market shuts down the 1500 block Saturday mornings, he claims none of this is on his radar, saying, “This is a drama- free zone.” “There was a letter written. That’s all I know,” DeFelice says. “Nobody’s getting sued here. No one is telling me anything but happy things. The market is going forward.” S.C. Supreme Court Overturns Settlement of James Brown Estate By Corey Hutchins F or six years following the death of James Brown, the Godfather of Soul’s ghost has been haunting South Caro- lina’s court system. Much of the litigation centers on Brown’s multimillion-dollar estate plan. But the saga has also inflamed a debate over open government and freedom of the press. The latest chapter in the drama over Brown’s estate came Feb. 27 when the state By Eva Moore A n attorney representing a few down- town businesses has sent the City of Columbia a letter warning of possible legal action over certain street closures for events on Main Street. In the last few years, activity on Main Street has boomed. The First Thursdays on Main series spotlights the arts once a month, with businesses hosting art shows and performances spilling onto the streets. On Saturday mornings, the 1500 block is home to the Soda City market. And there are races, parades and festivals aplenty filling out the schedule. But not every business on Main Street is happy to see the barricades and bagged me- ters that come with these downtown events. Free Times has not yet seen a copy of the letter, but city manager Teresa Wilson con- fi d i i it d it t legal issues for the city. Wilson wouldn’t say which businesses had sent it. Several sources say King’s Jewelers is in- volved in the effort to halt the early closures. Owner Jeffrey Picow tells Free Times he isn’t at liberty to talk about the issue yet. Not everyone is so reticent. Andrew Zalkin, who runs The Army Navy Store, says he wasn’t in on the letter to the city. But he dislikes having the street shut down so often, saying it hurts business. “Any block that you close hurts every- body,” he says. He says there’s a shortage of street park- ing with so many new businesses downtown, and the cit sho ld better p blicize its ne newslocal & state Main Street Bustle Causes Tensions The Soda City market is one of an increasing number of events held on Main Street. Photo by Jonathan Sharpe. “First Thursdays are not in jeopardy.” — Mark Plessinger, Frame of Mind
  • 35. GOVERNMENT REPORTING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. Perry Countyunsureof callcenter’sstatus ProjectBluehaduntilNov.20 tomeetstate,localdeadlines BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD Project Blue’s future re- mains hazy. Horry County leaders don’t know if the county is still competing for the 1,020-job call center, and local eco- nomic development officials aren’t saying anything about the status of the project. However, records obtained by the Herald indicate that some key pieces of the deal have not come together and economic development offi- cials are already making a backup plan in case this proj- ect fails. Three months ago, Horry County Council members were ready to finalize a multi- million dollar incentives package for Covation, the call center company officials had dubbed Project Blue. Covation and the Myrtle Beach Regional Economic Development Corporation (EDC), the county’s industry recruitment arm, had negoti- ated plans for a call center in Carolina Forest. EDC officials had said the average wage of the center’s 1,020 jobs would be $14.36 per hour. Covation’s proposed in- centives package had an esti- mated value of $24 million and included a $750,000 state grant and $1.25 million in county cash. But county council mem- bers decided to postpone their final vote on the project after the Herald reported that Covation’s chief operating See BLUE, Page 3A THEGREAT RATEDEBATE Howasmalltaxincreasemayhelp somelocalsavoidbiginsurancebills BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD When Beth Anctil first glanced at her new insurance rate, she assumed there was typo. Surely her premium wasn’t going up $3,000. But after checking with her insurance agent, she discov- ered the paperwork was painfully correct. She also learned she wasn’t alone. Many of her neighbors in the Carolina Lakes communi- ty also saw their homeowners premiums skyrocket this year. “I was clueless that this was going on,” said Anctil, who has lived in the neighborhood for 20 years. “You expect a $100 increase, maybe. … Everyone went up thousands of dollars.” While that amount seems unusual, local officials say it could become more common if Horry County sees further cuts to its fire department. ASTRUGGLINGAGENCY During last month’s Horry County Council budget re- treat, fire chief Fred Crosby SeeFIREINSURANCE,Page3A Fire officials survey the damage of the Windsor Green fire in Carolina Forest. Horry County Fire Rescue Chief Fred Crosby is asking county leaders to approve a small tax hike to help him maintain the level of service his agency provides. HCFR has struggled with many issues in recent years. MICHAELSMITH|FORTHEHERALD Countysays councilman’s contractwas anoversight BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD HorryCountyofficialsshould nothaveawardedacontract worth$67,800to councilmanAl Allen’saerial sprayingbusi- nesslastyear becausehisfirm didn’tmeetthe qualifications fortheproject, accordingto countyrecords. Thatcontract,whichwasfor sprayingherbicides,wascan- celledinDecemberafteracot- tonfarmercomplainedthat Allen’scompanyhaddestroyed someofhiscrops.Thecotton farmerisnowsuingthecounty overtheallegeddamage. Emailsandlettersobtained SeeALLEN,Page3A Allen
  • 36. HEALTH REPORTING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The News & Reporter Nancy Parsons
  • 37. HEALTH REPORTING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Daniel Island News Jennifer Johnston
  • 38. HEALTH REPORTING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Lake Wylie Pilot JohnMar ks By John Marks jmarks@lakewyliepilot.com LAKE WYLIE — EliteTaekwondoAcademyisn’thalfayearold butalreadyithasmorethan100studentsand,soon,anewtrain- ing facility. The academy at Landing Station near Bi-Lo is opening a sec- ond center just down the sidewalk, in what was most recently a CurvesgymnearthePostOffice.Thenewspacewillbeforcom- bat defense tactic classes, mainly for adults. The move allows for more taekwondo programs and classes in the existing dojo and is close enough for parents who may drop off a child at the current space and head for a class at the new one. “Notonlyisitselfdefense,it’sagreatworkout,greatcardio,” said co-owner Josh Flamm. Owners expect to open the new center in January. Popularity of the combat classes led to the move. Classes at the new loca- tion will be “a little bit more aggressive” and will be tailored to students. “It’s a really good mix of martial arts,” Flamm said. “These defense tactics have to work.” EliteTaekwondoisastartupofFlammandFortMillresidents Chris Baker and Eric Schanno. The new space will mean one moreinstructor,Bakersaid.Thegroupalsowillcontinuetohold regular community service events, having already partnered with food drives and other efforts. They’ve collected several bags of items from students to be sent to the northeast, for dis- tribution to storm victims. The academy also is a drop-off for Toys For Tots. They’ve collected three boxes of toys and are donating MP3 players for older children. “A lot of people forget that there’s also the 13-year-old kid,” Schanno said. For more information, visit elitetkdacademy.net. JOHN MARKS - jmarks@lakewyliepilot.com Instructors Eric Schanno and Josh Flamm work out at Elite Taekwondo Academy in Lake Wylie. NEXT STEP: SECOND TAEKWONDO FACILITY ■ Opened six month ago, Lake Wylie center announces expansion By John Marks jmarks@lakewyliepilot.com LAKE WYLIE — If there’s such a thing as homecoming at a place they’ve never been, Tuesday was it for The Community Cafe. The free meal cafe opened at Lake Wylie Christian Assembly, where it will operate from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesdays. The cafe began as a Lake Wylie ministry and ran at River Hills Community Church for more than two years. Two cafes have been opened in Fort Mill – one being turned over to the church that started it and the other still a Cafe site – at Lake Wylie Lutheran Church. Billy Ginn, associate pastor for Lake Wylie Christian Assembly, was one of several excited diners at Tuesday’s opening. “They’ve done an amazing job,” he said. “All these volunteers are doing an amazing job.” Don Murfin has been the head chef for at least one Cafe site since its 2010 launch. Homecoming, he said, is a fitting word for the return to Lake Wylie. “To a lot of people, it is,” he said. “We’ve got lots of volunteers from the church here. We’ve got a lot of vol- unteers from back when we were at River Hills. We’ve got volunteers from Lake Wylie Lutheran Church. We’ve PHOTOS BY JOHN MARKS - jmarks@lakewyliepilot.com Cara Jackson and Helen Kropp serve up meals Feb. 5 at The Community Cafe as it returns to serving weekly lunches in Lake Wylie at Lake Wylie Christian Assembly. COMMUNITY CAFE SERVING AGAIN IN LAKE WYLIE Sharon and Dick McConnell greet guests Feb. 5 at The Community Cafe. See CAFE ■ 8A By John Marks jmarks@lakewyliepilot.com LAKE WYLIE — The Self family never had a dog before last week. Now they have a border- line “magic” one that parents Chris and Laura at first couldn’t believe, and still can’t quite ex- plain. They just know Signal could be a lifesaver for their daughter. Signal, a black Lab born six months ago, is a service dog for Hannah Self, 10. Hannah isn’t visually or hearing impaired. She doesn’t suffer from seizures. She’s a Type 1 diabetic. That means constant testing of her blood sugar levels can run dangerously high or low, at all hours of day and night. Signal is attuned to scents given off by changes in the blood sugar and can alert the family. Hannah, who counted her days waiting for Signal from the family’s decision to acquire the dog last June, is more excited about where the dog can go than what she can do. “I can bring it anywhere,” Hannah said. “They can’t say, no, you can’t bring it in here.” Signal hadn’t been in the yard but a few minutes before Cheri Campbell, a handler with Virginia-based Service Dogs by Warren Retriev- ers, asked if Hannah’s blood sugar might be a bit high. A test proved it was. The family will spend the next 18 months in training with Sig- nal to read cues as Campbell did, and to famil- iarize their daughter and new dog with one another. Eventually Signal will be able to detect blood sugar spikes from several miles away. There’s even an option to install a button in the home allowing Signal to alert emergency responders. Bringing a trainer back from Virginia every 90 days and constant online contact during train- ing won’t be simple, or inexpensive. Dogs like Signal can cost as much as a new car, but hav- ing her will, the family hopes, bring peace in JOHN MARKS - jmarks@lakewyliepilot.com Hannah Self plays with her new service dog, Signal, at home last week just after the two met. NEW DOG IS NO ORDINARY POOCH See DOG ■ 5A Does it work? This month’s Diabetes Care journal includes a preliminary survey of diabetic alert dog users to examine how effective the dogs are compared to other existing monitoring methods. The admittedly small sample size – 36 users in an online survey – showed “some encouraging evidence” of the benefits of the dogs, including: ■ 36 percent of respondents reported no instances of hypoglycemia without an alert in the past month, and 28 percent reported less than one such instance a week, compared to 36 percent reporting more than one per week. ■ 75 percent noted an improved quality of life and ability to participate in physical activities. ■ 61 percent noted decreased worry about hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. ■ Respondents reported significant decreases in severe and moderate cases of hypoglycemia.
  • 39. EDUCATION REPORTING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Union County News Graham Williams School district accused of discrimination U.S. Department of Education to investigate allegations By GRAHAM WILLIAMS The U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights will investigate allegations that the Union County School District treated a female athlete differently from male athletes. A complaint filed by Jessica Sherbert with OCR claims the school district discriminated against female student-athletes on the basis of sex with regard to athletic resources, such as funding, equipment and supplies, facilities and locker rooms, publicity, travel, medical and training services and the scheduling of games and competitions. In a letter to Superintendent Dr. Kristi Woodall dated April 19, Dale Rhines, OCR program manager, writes that the complaint was filed on March 25 against the school dis- trict, Union County High School, Lockhart Middle School, Jonesville Middle School and Sims Middle School on the basis of sex. The letter lists eight alleged violations: 1. The high school treated Sherbert's niece differently from male students who quit or were dismissed from teams when her niece was not allowed to participate in soccer fol- lowing her dismissal from the cheerleading squad. 2. Female athletes at the high school are denied access to equitable funding. 3. The high school and the middle schools do not provide equitable equipment, including uniforms and supplies for female athletes. 4. The high school and middle schools deny female athletes access to equitable facilities, including the high school's storage facilities, locker rooms, video rooms and coaches' offices and the middle schools' practice fields. 5. The high school fails to provide equitable publicity to female athletic teams. 6. The high school fails to provide equitable See DISCRIMINATION, Page 2 Monday, July 15, 2013 Union County News | 1-B SPACE ACADEMY By GRAHAM WILLIAMS Not many people can say they land- ed a lunar module upside-down on the moon's surface. Ginnie Ponder can. Ponder, who teaches fifth grade math and science at Monarch Elementary School, was chosen for the Honeywell Educators @ Space Academy program last month at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala. She participated in 45 hours of pro- fessional development, as well as an intensive educator curriculum focused on space science and exploration. Each teacher underwent simulated astronaut training including a high performance jet simulation, scenario- based space mission, land and water survival training and interactive flight dynamics programs. “It was amazing,” Ponder said. “It was one of the best experiences of my career.” Some 1,700 teachers from 27 coun- tries and 42 states applied for Space Academy, but only 210 of them were awarded scholarships from Honeywell. Last summer, Ponder attended the Mickelson Exxon/Mobil Teacher Academy, a science, technology, engi- neering and math (STEM) program for teachers. She wanted to do some- thing similar this summer and some of the teachers she was with last year recommended Space Academy. She applied, and three months later was accepted. “I wanted to do something for my children,” she said. “That is their future - there are jobs out there that have not been created yet.” Simulated space missions Ponder took part in two simulated missions at Space Academy - one on the Space Shuttle Atlantis and the other a lunar mission. During the space shuttle mission she was second in command (pilot) for Team Tranquility, whose 14 members were responsible for building solar panels on the moon. Ponder said the mission was very realistic, right down to the vibrations and noise during liftoff. “It was very exciting, very real,” she said. Ponder said the missions put her back in the position of her students - a learner with questions who experi- ences success as well as failure. The lunar mission was more futuris- tic, Ponder said. It involved going to the moon and fixing broken windows on the space station Aurora. Ponder was the mission specialist. “We wore the full space gear, including the white suit and the fish- bowl helmet,” she said. Honeywell has a contract with NASA for the design of the lunar module and her team used an actual replica for their mission. “Our module actually landed upside-down,” she said. “We experi- enced failure.” During their week at Space Academy, teachers visited the Saturn 5 hall, which houses a Saturn 5 rocket similar to the one used to launch the Apollo moon missions. “The rocket is the full length of the hall,” she said. “It brought it home to me how massive it was.” Planning for the missions involved a good bit of classroom experience, like using math to develop a budget, Ponder said. One of their challenges was to build an ablative heat shield - one centimeter thick - in 20 minutes. “We used aluminum foil, based on our knowledge of baked potatoes,” she said. The group also used spackling, cop- per wiring and cotton balls, she said. A propane torch was placed about two centimeters away from an egg with the heat shield in the middle and burned for three minutes. The temper- ature on one side of the heat shield reached 500 degrees while on the other side it was 70 degrees, Ponder said. Of the 10 teams participating in the experiment, hers was one of only two whose egg didn't explode. Another real-life scenario involved landing a simulated lunar capsule con- taining an egg from two stories high inside a hula-hoop lying on the ground. “I'm not sure if it was intelligence or luck, but our team was the only one with no points taken away,” she said. Next, the team had to roll their lunar rover down a ramp and received points based on how far it went. Although her team's project was built under budget, the group finished sec- ond because they used a plastic deter- gent jug for the rover while the win- ning team used a cardboard toilet tis- sue roll. Teachers also learned biotechnology using household products, Ponder said. “We used salt solution, water, meat tenderizer and baby shampoo and extracted DNA from a strawberry,” she said. “I can't wait to use this in the classroom.” Aviation challenge Astronaut training included an avia- tion challenge, where Ponder climbed a 200- to 300-foot wall and zip-lined backwards to a water landing. Then she swam across the pond and climbed in a basket similar to a heli- copter rescue. Later, she was in a sim- ulated helicopter crash where she was in a barrel that was dropped 10 feet into the water. She had to escape through a hatch while water was rush- ing into the barrel. A zero gravity chair was used to simulate walking on the moon, while a multi-axis chair flipped and spun Ponder for five minutes. “I was told one of the astronauts had been in it for four hours,” she said. Ponder said she didn't know much about space exploration before she attended Space Academy. NASA wants to return to the moon to devel- op zero gravity medical testing, she said. Even though America is the only nation to land men on the moon, they never claimed it for the U.S., she added. During her week at Space Academy, Ponder said, she was given access to all of the lesson plans and PowerPoint presentations there. “I'm excited to inspire my stu- dents,” she said. Space Academy was the opportunity of a lifetime, Ponder said. “I met some wonderful teachers,” she said. “We keep in touch, share ideas, resources to better our teach- ing.” Children as young as fourth grade can attend Space Academy, Ponder said. “I can't wait for my children to grow up and experience it,” she said. Ginnie Ponder slides backward down a zipline into a pond during astronaut training at Space Academy. Ginnie Ponder spent a week at Honeywell Educators @ Space Academy in June. Ginnie Ponder is pictured with other members of Team Orion. Teacher learns valuable skills, trains as astronaut
  • 40. EDUCATION REPORTING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Lancaster News ChristopherS ardelli Christopher Sardelli csardelli@thelancasternews.com A bearded student strikes a pose, decked out in his cap and gown, as he waits in a nondescript hallway at the University of South Carolina Lancaster. Standing alongside him in the faded black and white photo, taken decades ago, is a long line of gradu- ating students. Though the event was most likely memorable in the minds of those students, their names have since been lost to the ravages of time. The same goes for another snap- shot of a group of students possibly registering for classes, many sport- ing belt buckles and long hair fash- ionable in the 1970s. But the exact event, the names and even the date have disappeared, leaving only the photo behind. It’s the same case everywhere Brent Burgin looks. As the archivist in charge of dig- ging through endless stacks of pho- tographs spanning decades of USCL events, Burgin is on a mis- sion to match every face with a name. For months, Burgin has been busy sorting through more than 50 boxes crammed full of black and white or color snapshots, as well as USCL-related correspondence, scrapbooks and newspapers clip- pings. In an effort to help identify the nameless faces, earlier this year Burgin teamed up with The Lan- caster News to begin running un- identified photos from his archives, hoping for names and dates. Days after the first batch of pho- tos ran, the responses began pour- ing in to his email inbox, he said. “It has been interesting and it’s gone well,” Burgin said. “So far the responses have been good.” One response stands out for Burgin, a reply from a Lancaster man who was quick to identify a photo of himself in a striped shirt sitting with a blond woman. “I think the best response I’ve heard is for the photo that ran of that couple sitting at a table,” he said. “As it turned out, those two ended up getting married and have been to- gether for years. He was excited to see it.” There are many other email re- sponses Burgin has collected, in- cluding one from resident Lisa Bobbitt-Lucas, who said the photos have conjured up many images from her childhood. “My father was a professor at USCL during the ‘70s and ‘80s. I have many many fond memories of playing in Hubbard hall as a young child,” Lucas said in her email. “Thanks for the trip down memory lane.” Though she was too young then to be able to match names and faces now, she plans on sending the photos to her father, who now lives in Georgia. An eagle-eyed Kershaw resident emailed Burgin to say that a gentle- man featured in a recently pub- lished photo bore more than a strong resemblance to a man he once knew named Frank Keen. “Frank was the food and dining manager for Springs Mills and op- erated the Springmaid Cafeteria for a good many years. He was also the first manager of the Carriage Inn,” the man said, though he cautioned Burgin to continue searching for information. “Wait for a few more votes for him before you take my word for it.” In another message, Susan Jones was excited to learn from a family member that her father was fea- tured in one of the archived pho- tos. “I was excited to find him stand- ing on the ladder. His name is Sam- mie Lee Watts,” she said. “He start- ed working as a baker at Lancaster Bakery on Main Street and then worked at Springs as a bakery for 30 years until Springs closed.” One email, from a man named Jim, simply thanked Burgin for tak- ing him back in time. “(They) really make you pause and reflect on those good days when we probably didn’t have quite so much on our plates, and the re- sponsibilities not so critical,” he said. Thousands to go Though his official title is direc- tor of archives for the Native Amer- ican Studies collection at USCL, Burgin’s responsibilities have since expanded to helping identify scores of unknown photos and documents related to the university. “I’ve got thousands more photos and I’ve been trying to draft former employees to come help identify them,” Burgin said. “I didn’t start out to be USCL’s archivist, I was supposed to be working for the Na- tive American Studies Center, but I noticed how many materials we had.” Those materials include every- thing from the official guest register that was signed when the school opened Oct. 20, 1959, at the old T.Y. Williams home on South White Street, to a copy of the first opera- tions budget ($19,700) and first led- ger from the local commission on higher education to photos of stu- dents who must be identified. “We’ve really got a lot of archive- able material, especially the early years of the school. I have every- thing from photos to scholarship applications from the early ‘60s. It’s really neat stuff,” he said. “We even have a couple of letters from gover- nors. One is burned on the edge and it makes you wonder what hap- pened, but if you look at the photos we have, the school used to have ashtrays all over the place.” Burgin hopes to receive more re- sponses and says the more infor- mation people can send, the bet- ter. “When someone can give me the exact date of a photo, that really helps, because then I can track down more information about it,” he said. Each month, The Lancaster News publishes several photos from the USCL archives that need to be iden- tified, including the two photos above. If someone recognizes who is in the photos, they should email a response to Burgin at wbburgin@ sc.edu. He will also email digital copies of photos at no charge, if requested. Despite the backlog of photos left to identify, Burgin is excited to be involved. “I like working with the public and this project is really nice,” he said. Contact reporter Chris Sardelli at (803) 416-8416 USCL archivist continues search for photo IDs Burgin Christopher Sardelli csardelli@thelancasternews.com Books can whisk readers away to other worlds or inform on any number of subjects, but for the students of A.R. Rucker Middle School, books hold another meaning altogether. For them, books, and the impor- tance of learning, remind them of their former North Elementary School classmate, 9-year-old Mary Olivia Pettit, who died March 22, 2009, of viral myocarditis, an in- flammation of the heart. Angela Vaughan, one of two as- sistant principals at A.R. Rucker Middle School, said Livi, as she was known, had a great passion for learning through books and a desire to share what she had with others. In honor of that passion, A.R. Rucker’s Beta Club recently spon- sored a book collection for Livi’s Library, an initiative named in her honor and designed to share books with children. The book drive collected 4,061 books over the course of two weeks and another 19 books soon after, for a total of 4,080 books. “Olivia would have been an eighth-grade student at A.R. Rucker Middle School this school yearandhasmany friends at school who helped with this project,” Vaughan said “We were excited to collect books this fall, so that we can share the joy of reading with other children this holiday season.” Adding to the excitement, Vaughan said students were able to earn awards for collecting books. “The grade that collected the most books, each student in there that donated at least one book can dress down one day. For teachers who brought in 10 books or more, they’ll be able to dress down one day too,” she said. Students were also able to win a free ticket to the school’s Hal- loween dance if they brought in 10 books for the drive. “About half of the students who went to the dance got in for free,” she said. Also notable, Vaughan said one of the school’s “home bases,” or morning classes, collected 400 books in the two-week time span. “They did a great job,” she said. She praised all those who helped make the book drive a success and said it was heart- warming to see Livi’s Library come full circle. “We have a very giving school community,” she said. “And a lot of the kids donating books this year are recycling books they got from Livi’s Library.” Vaughan credited the Beta Club students as “instrumental” in spearheading the book collection in honor of their friend. The drive culminated Nov. 5 when Livi’s parents, Bryan and Lisa Pettit, visited the school to meet the students, including one boy who collected 100 books for the drive. “They were so gracious to the kids and thankful for what they did,” Vaughan said. An ongoing initiative The book drive was just one of many held throughout the state for Livi’s Library, which was launched in 2010. “Livi’s Library started when many of Livi’s mother’s friends were trying to help her cope,” Vaughan said. “Livi loved to read and liked school, so a year after she died they started this orga- nization in her memory.” Book donations with Livi’s Li- brary allow for free book fairs at local schools, where children can “shop” for two books each and keep them free of charge. The goal is to provide greater ac- cess to books for local children. There are also several Livi’s Library custom-made bookcases in designated locations through- out the county, which are stocked with donated books. Those locations include HOPE in Lancaster, Family Promise, Lancaster Literacy Project, Jack- ie’s Place and Southside Early Childhood program. Contact reporter Chris Sardelli at (803) 416-8416 Remembering Livi PHOTO SUPPLIED Lisa and Bryan Pettit, center, visit Nov. 5 with A.R. Rucker Middle School students who helped collect books more than 4,000 books for Livi’s Library. The initiative is named for their daughter, Mary Olivia Pettit, who died March 22, 2009, of viral myocarditis. A.R. Rucker students collect 4,000 books Pettit Christopher Sardelli csardelli@thelancasternews.com A zip line is the last place most people would expect to see Anita Har- ris. Dangling on a sus- pended cable almost 1,000 feet above a canopy of treetops, waterfalls and coffee groves in the forests of Guatemala seems like something from a thrill-seeker’s dream, but for Harris it was just another case of “challenge accepted.” The Lancaster High School graduate and ris- ing junior at Winthrop University, who lost most of her sight after battling cancer as a child, tackled the treacherous zip line, along with boat rides and steep mountain treks as part of an international studies class trip to Gua- temala May 5-12. “I didn’t even have time to be scared,” said Harris, 19, of her zip line adven- ture. “I went tandem with a guy. I heard him say ‘go, go’ and then we went.” Joining her on the jour- ney were six other Win- throp students, their in- structor/study abroad coordinator, Jennifer Sandler, and Kelsey Tim- merman, author of last year’s Winthrop common book “Where Am I Wear- ing?” The common book is a shared reading expe- rience for incoming freshmen, transfers, fac- ulty and some upper-lev- el students. In fact, the whole trip was based on the themes of Timmerman’s book, which describes the au- thor’s experiences travel- ing the world to see where his clothes were made and who made them. The trip was arranged with help from The Vil- lage Experience, an orga- nization that designs and hosts trips to impover- ished areas in developing countries, with a focus on economics and volun- teer work. During their week-long trip, Harris and the group strolled the ancient, cob- blestone streets of the city of Antigua to learn about weaving and coffee harvesting; toured mar- ketplaces in Guatemala City; met with residents of the mostly poor, rural villages in the region of Escuintla; and took in the sights surrounding pic- turesque Lake Atitlan, in- cluding three volcanoes. The group also blogged about their adventures on Timmerman’s web- site. Harris had a blast ex- periencing the area’s cul- ture and following in Timmerman’s footsteps. “It was a great experi- ence,” Harris said. “You never really think about how your clothes are be- ing made.” She recalled witnessing Timmerman speaking with a factory owner, try- ing to gain access to a clothing factory so the classcouldseehowcloth- ing is made. “He asked if we could go in, of course the man said no, but just seeing what (Timmerman) did on a daily basis to get his book written was amaz- ing,” she said. “Seeing those factories...you hear about it, but seeing them and the people lined up outside waiting for food, it was pretty sad.” Harris was amazed by the culture, from the prevalence of horse-and- buggy taxis to the mas- sive amounts of people selling items in market- places and along streets. “In Antigua, if you ask the price of something they will follow you around until you buy it,” Harris said. “I asked about a scarf and this girl who was selling it fol- lowed us around and said ‘no, you buy, you buy.’” Also shocking, she said, was seeing the living con- ditions and malnour- ished children inside the rural villages they visited, especially those near Es- cuintla, which is about an hour south of Guate- mala City. “In the villages we saw lots of children and we helped fix bags filled with cookies, beans, shampoo. Then we walked to some of the houses in the vil- lages and gave them out. We saw one lady’s house had collapsed from the rain,” she said. Though the conditions weren’t always favorable for someone who is le- gally blind, Harris said her fellow students and instructor had her back the entire way. “Some of the roads were bumpy, but they held on to my arm on the road and also when we went into caves and walked up steep rocks,” Harris said. “The whole team was there helping me.” Sandler was impressed with Harris’ tenacity and willingness to learn and try new adventures. “She’s so intrepid, like when she went zip lining. She was so amazing. She participated and tried ev- erything and it was really inspiring,” Sandler said. “The entire group did re- ally, really well.” Sandler said the pur- pose of the class, the book and the trip was to explore a broad social commentary about how and where clothing is made and how it affects people’s lives. She pointed out several important parts of their trip, including meeting with representatives from an export organization that works with the ap- parel sector in Guatemala City. Also notable, she said, were their meetings with members of local fair trade groups, where they learned about textiles and artisans, and their visits to fishing villages and plantations. “We saw Guatemala through the lens of peo- ple who are workers there,” she said. As for the rest of the class, she said the group exemplified the trip’s motto of “Bringing the world to Winthrop, and Winthrop to the world.” “I’ve traveled quite a bit and it was interesting to see travel through the eyes of those who aren’t road weary,” she said. “They were all really ex- cited. It was a great group of girls and it was neat to see them experience it.” Sandler said the stu- dents were exposed to many new experiences, ideas and people. “Guatemala exceeded their expectations. They went from seeing a KFC and having wireless ac- cess in one area to spend- ing a day in some rural villages,” Sandler said. She said it was a reveal- ing experience for stu- dents to witness the dif- ferencesbetweentouristy towns and their rural counterparts. “It was good for them to see that,” she said. The trip left its mark on the students, particularly Harris, Sandler said. “It was great to see her blossom. Now she’s ask- ing where can I go next,” Sandler said. “As a study abroad co- ordinator, that’s what I want to see.” Next up, Harris is hop- ing to join another school-sponsored inter- national excursion. “I always said I didn’t want to go to Africa, and now here I am, looking to go to Kenya,” she said. Contact reporter Chris Sardelli at (803) 416-8416 MAP BY GOOGLE AND INEGI; PHOTO AT LEFT SUPPLIED Aboveistheroutethestudentstookduringtheirweek- long trip in Guatemala. Stops along the way included Guatemala City, the ancient city of Antigua, the rural region of Escuintla,picturesque LakeAtitlan inthe area of Panajachel, the city of Chichicastenango, the area around San Juan La Laguna and the Reserva Natural de Atitlan, where students experienced a zip line over a forest and coffee groves. At left, students pose during a day of sight-seeing, along with Kelsey Timmerman, center, author of “Where Am I Wearing?” The group of students included Anita Harris of Lancaster, Marie Rose Tumaniec of Fort Mill, Fatima Castro of Charlotte, N.C., Brianna Williams of Easley, Lauren Miller of Summerville, Alexandra Lee Jensen of Des Moines, Iowa, and Callan Gaines of York. Also joining them on the trip was their instructor/study abroad coordina- tor, Jennifer Sandler. The students also blogged their adventures on Timmerman’s website. AT TOP, FILE PHOTO; PHOTO ABOVE SUPPLIED At top of page is a view of Lake Atitlan and its three volcanoes, one of many stops a class of international studies stu- dents from Winthrop University made during a trip in May. The lake is about two hours northwest of Guatemala City. Above, Lancaster High School graduate and rising junior at Winthrop University Anita Harris speaks with a woman from one of the many rural villages her class visited during the trip.
  • 41. EDUCATION REPORTING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The Lancaster News ReeceM urphy Above, from left, S.C. Governor’s School of Science and Mathematics students, Cormac Kelly, William Saylor, Surya Veerabagu and Lauren Ambuhl watch as classmates, Sid Bhadauria and Christopher Steele glide overhead at Bermuda High Soaring in southeast- ern Lancaster County. Left, Bermuda High Soaring instructor Ledell “Sonny” Steele gives Ambuhl point- ers after one of her flights. photos by REECE MURPHY/rmurphy@thelancasternews.com Above, S.C. Governor’s School of Science and Mathematics senior Christopher Steele glides in for a smooth landing Tuesday, Jan. 8 under the watchful eye of a Bermuda High Soaring instructor. Course combines academics, fun, with life lessons Governor’s school students take wingat Bermuda High Soaring Reece Murphy rmurphy@thelancasternews.com JEFFERSON – Think back to high school physics. Admit it, even if you enjoyed sci- ence, sitting in a classroom study- ing concepts and formulas for hours could sometimes be a bor- ing bummer. That’s definitely not the case for a group of students from the S.C. Governor’s School of Science and Mathematics this week whose classroom is the wide open skies above Lancaster County. Thanks to the sailplane experts at Bermuda High Soaring in Jefferson, the students are experiencing some of the concepts they learned in class by learning to fly – and having a heck of a good time doing it. The class is a two-week interim, or“mini-mester,”coursetheschool offers students between semesters. This year, students had 15 courses to choose from, ranging from a trip to Europe to forensic chemistry and origami. “I got a little motion sickness at first, but it’s most definitely differ- ent from anything I’ve every done before,” senior Surya Veerabagu said. “I really didn’t know we would go so high (3,000 feet). There’s so See WING | Page 2 Keeping our children safe Connecticut school shooting aftermath Reece Murphy rmurphy@thelancasternews.com It’s been five days now since the shooting at Sandy Hook Elemen- tary School in Newtown, Conn., left 20 children and six educators dead, news that struck the nation like a slap in the face. Until Friday, Dec. 14, many Americans had become numb to news of mass shootings; shock and sadness, at first, quickly pushed to the back of the nation’s collective mind in a fatigued response to an all-too common crime. But this was different, a crime of unimaginable evil in a place as- sumed to be among the last truly safe institutions in society. The tragedy has been especially heartbreaking for parents of ele- mentary school-age children such as Brandy Moreland. Moreland’s two children attend Indian Land Elementary School. “My heart was torn out of my chest,” Moreland said of hearing the news. “Who’s going to shoot a child like that, whose biggest con- cern is butterflies and rainbows? They’re so innocent you can’t wrap your brain around it.” A former classroom assistant at ILES, Moreland has better insight than most parents into the policies School officials assure parents in wake of Newtown incident See SAFE | Page 2A Reece Murphy rmurphy@thelancasternews.com The Lancaster County school board has upheld a recommen- dation to fire Andrew Jackson High School science teacher Doug Elder for what is deemed as a pattern of inappropriate behavior. The disciplinary action, taken Thursday, June 6, against Elder followed deliberations in a rare open termination hearing, a quasi-judicial disciplinary pro- ceeding similar to a trial. Most often heard in closed session, Elder’s hearing was held in open session at his re- quest with him acting in his own defense. During testimony, district of- ficials said the decision to ter- minate Elder came after multi- ple failed attempts to address complaints of inappropriate language and interactions with students, staff and parents. The action culminated in an allegation that Elder showed his ninth-grade biology students a sexually suggestive drawing. Former AJHS Principal Dr. Mary Barry said during testi- mony her concerns with Elder’s behaviorbeganduringthe2009- 10 school year, Elder’s second year at the school after transfer- ringfromLancasterHighschool, where he had taught for three years. Barry said she met with Elder in March 2010 to address con- cerns brought to her attention by students and staff members. Both groups, she said, reported, among other things, they felt un- comfortable around Elder and REECE MURPHY/rmurphy@thelancasternews.com Doug Elder speaks at his termina- tion hearing on Thursday, June 6. School board approves teacher’s termination See TERMINATION | Page 3A
  • 42. FAITH REPORTING Associate/Individual Division THIRD PLACE: Murrells Inlet Messenger Tim Callahan Martha’s House: miracles do happen By Tim Callahan Susan Tyler had a vision in 2005. She envisioned a Christian halfway house in Georgetown County for women coming out of jail, a gateway to spiritual, emotional and edu- cational success and productivity. But, that’s all it was, a great idea. Her needs were great and seemed impossible to fulfill: land, a building, a vehicle, furniture, office supplies, time, prayer and money. Miracles happen. Last month, after eight years of working and waiting, Martha’s House was dedicated to the Lord. “The Lord kept me going,” Tyler said. “When God gives you a vision, he gives you the provision for that vision,” Tyler said. “It is a double wide mobile home on 12 acres, which were both donated. The inside was re- decorated by an interior designer who also donated their time, and all the furniture was donated.” She said they have room for three women but are hoping to expand the trailer to accommo- date seven women. The house is needed, Tyler said, because without it many women will return to an envi- ronment that got them in jail in the first place, surrounded by temptations to drink or drug again. Tyler was never in jail but she was a drunk, she said, and “certainly did enough things to get me in jail.” She has been involved for years in a prison ministry. She watched some women give their lives to the Lord, get out of prison, but then do something to be put back in prison. She wondered how that could be. Continued on page 11
  • 43. FAITH REPORTING Associate/Individual Division SECOND PLACE: S.C. United Methodist Advocate Jessica Connor Modern-day circuit riders GILBERT – How do we reach out to the unchurched and bring them to Christ? For a group of bikers in the Colum- bia District, you start by revving up the engine and hitting the open road. Through a brand new motorcycle ministry called the United Methodist Circuit Riders, these open-air riders are hoping to turn biker neighbors into Christian brothers and sisters by relating to them through their shared interest. “I relate to people who ride motor- cycles, so I can talk to people who ride motorcycles,” said John Barnett, an ac- tive member of Beulah United Method- ist Church, Gilbert, who founded the district-wide ministry. “You don’t bring unchurched believers in by staying in the church. You’ve got to get outside the walls of the church, go out and talk to people at their level, and you can’t go say, ‘Hey, have you got a minute to talk District’s motorcycle ministry reaches out in Christ See “Circuit Riders,” Page 19
  • 44. FAITH REPORTING Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE: S.C. United Methodist Advocate Jessica Connor
  • 45. FAITH REPORTING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Union County News AnnaB rown By ANNA BROWN David Arnold says he doesn't remember much about Dec. 10, 2012, but that date will always have a spe- cial significance to him. That was the day he went into car- diac arrest and almost died. He credits God, his girlfriend Suzette Edenfield and Union County 911 dispatcher Tyler Shugart for saving his life. Arnold is a newspaper carrier for the Spartanburg Herald-Journal and Union County News. On Dec. 10 he was on his Union route delivering in the Browns Creek Community when he began having symptoms of a heart attack. He called Edenfield. "He said he was having chest pains, was sweating and his arms were numb," she said. Edenfield met Arnold at the inter- section of Brown's Creek Road and Brown's Creek Church Road. They planned to park his truck and drive back to town in her vehicle. They knocked on the door of a home, but no one answered. They decided she would follow him to the Dollar General store in Monarch, where she works. Instead, Arnold kept driving to their home on Lower Eison Road. There, his condition worsened. "He laid down on the couch for a couple of minutes and then got in bed," Edenfield said. "He rolled over on his back, his hands clenched real tight, his eyes rolled back in his head and he started breathing erratically. I called 911 and told them I thought he might be having a heart attack." While Edenfield was on the phone with dispatcher Tyler Shugart, Arnold stopped breathing and his face turned dark purple. Shugart began instructing Edenfield in CPR. Edenfield and Arnold said they can- not thank Shugart enough. "He was very calm," Edenfield said. "I was emotional and yelling, asking what I should do next. He helped me through a lot." Edenfield's 4-year-old nephew, Colin, led paramedics from Union County EMS into the house. "They worked with David for nine or 10 minutes," Edenfield said. "They got a pulse and left with him." Arnold was transported to Wallace Thomson Hospital and then flown by helicopter to the Spartanburg Regional Medical Center Heart Center. Before Edenfield and other family members arrived, Dr. Nalin K. Srivastava had already installed a stent to open a blocked artery. "He was an awesome doctor," Edenfield said. Edenfield said Arnold was the first person to be placed simultaneously on a heart pump and a "freeze machine," designed to lower his body tempera- ture, prevent his brain from swelling and give his heart a rest. They have nothing but praise for the staff at CCU at Spartanburg Regional. A nurse named Sherry remained with Arnold the entire 12-hour day shift. A nurse named Amber remained with him all night. Edenfield said after 24 hours Arnold's body temperature was gradu- ally warmed. She said those attending him were surprised at how quickly he responded. When former Hebron Baptist Church pastor the Rev. Larry Padgett came in and spoke, Arnold opened his eyes. "He has a voice that is real distinct," Edenfield said. "He said, 'David, this is Pastor Larry,' David opened his eyes and followed his voice." Edenfield said she and Arnold's daughter, Amanda, were relieved when Arnold seemed to recognize them and his sister, Pam. "She asked him if she was his favorite sister," Edenfield said. "She told him to blink if she was and he did." Arnold's condition continued to improve and he was released from the hospital on Dec. 20. "But even when I got home, things seemed so strange," he said. "I was still so disoriented." Arnold and Edenfield said they feel like God was with them. Arnold said one of his doctors asked if he saw any bright lights, talked to Jesus, or saw anyone else who had already died. "He said, 'Then it's not ready for you yet,' Arnold said. "He made it sound like the majority of people who go through this see one of the three." Edenfield said she used to take life for granted, but no more. "I never would have dreamed in a million years I would have experi- enced what I experienced," she said. At 6 feet 2 inches tall and 130 pounds, 50-year-old Arnold did not look like a heart attack candidate. Heart disease runs in his family. His father died at 49. His mother lived to be in her 70s after undergoing bypass surgery. Arnold also was a two pack a day smoker, but no more. He has stopped smoking and is radically changing his diet to exclude fat, salt, sweets and bread. "We want to thank everyone for their prayers, donations and gifts," Edenfield said. "Prayer goes a long way," Arnold said. "David is a miracle," Edenfield said. David Arnold and his girlfriend, Suzette Edenfield, say they feel like God was with them during David’s hospital stay after a heart attack on Dec. 10, 2012. ‘Prayer goes a long way’ Union man credits God, his girlfriend and 911 dispatcher for saving his life after heart attack By ANNA BROWN In 2008 Sherry Sizemore was about to undergo very serious chest wall surgery in her long, ongoing battle with cancer. Taped to her finger was a tiny mustard seed, like the one men- tioned in Mathew 17: 20. He replied, "Because you have so little faith. I tell you the truth, if you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, 'Move from here to there' and it will move. Nothing will be impossible for you." Sherry found that the mustard seed was both a comfort to her and a way to open the door to witness about Jesus to someone else. “A nurse asked me what was taped to my finger,” said Sherry, now 44. “We got to talking about the Lord and she had never heard that verse before. I was shocked.” Sherry's sister, Crystal Adams, bought a container of mustard seeds and all of Sherry's family members wore them taped to their clothes dur- ing her surgery. Before she was wheeled into surgery, Sherry asked those in the room, including a surprised doctor who evidently was not a believer, to join hands and pray. In a follow-up visit, he men- tioned this to Sherry and her husband, Tim. After the surgery, doctors couldn't believe how quickly Sherry recovered, said Sherry's daughter, Whitney Sizemore Smith. “She was supposed to be on a ventilator for a couple of days and she was never on a ventila- tor,” she said. “She was sup- posed to be in ICU for about a week and she was in there two days. Overall, they expected Mama to be in the hospital for four or five weeks. She was only in the hospital for two.” Since then through a variety of medical procedures and tests, Sherry and her family have held on to their mustard seeds. So, when her family decided to design a bracelet to sell as a fund-raiser for Sherry, they knew the mustard seed had to be incorporated some way. “Pray for Sherry,” reads the bracelet. “Mustard seed faith.” “We put it on Facebook, told all of our family and friends, told our church members and now they are gone and we've ordered some more,” Whitney said Church members at Putman Baptist give Sherry mustard seed jewelry when they come across it. “It has become Mama's little trademark,” Whitney said. “In the world as big as it is and as hurried as we get, if we would stop and realize how big God is and what he is doing for us that we don't even recognize most of the time because we are so busy, sometimes a mustard seed can remind you how small and insignificant we are,” Sherry said. Whitney and her sister, Jordan, said their mother's battle with cancer has influenced their career choices. Both are study- ing to be nurses. Whitney, 22, is in her last semester at USC- Upstate in the Mary Black School of Nursing. Jordan is in her second semester at USC- Union taking nursing prerequi- sites. “The impact some of those good nurses had on us taking care of Mama, we want to do that for other people,” Whitney said. Crystal and Sherry's other sis- ter, Tammy Phillips and Tammy's daughter, Olivia, have been a great help to Sherry dur- ing her illness, house cleaning and cooking and being compan- ions. Sherry's father, Gerald Graham, said Sherry's illness has brought the family even closer together. He bragged on his son-in-law, Tim Sizemore. “He is amazing,” Gerald said. “He is the most humble, gra- cious, loving, giving person I ever met in my life and how blessed I am to have him as a son-in-law.” When chemotherapy caused Sherry to lose her hair, Tim shaved his head, as did Crystal's husband, Steven Adams. Gerald said Sherry has been an inspiration throughout the 14 years she has battled cancer. “There have been a lot of dif- ferent people who have been touched and who have recog- nized that it's not about us, it's all about God, he is the only one who can take care of this and he has answered many, many prayers.” Sherry urged women to be preemptive and particular about their health. When she first dis- covered a lump in her breast at 29, doctors told her there was no cause for concern at her age- she had a” bone deformity.” By the time it was determined the lump was cancerous, the cancer had spread into Sherry's lymph nodes. Doctors have determined Sherry has the breast cancer gene. “Cancer is so prominent everywhere in every family nowadays,” she said. “Everybody needs to be on guard. It is a very vicious dis- ease and has no mercy seed on it.' (Praying for Sherry/Mustard Seed Faith bracelets are avail- able for sale for $5. For more information, call the Sizemores at 429-5544, Whitney Smith at 441-7521 or Jordan Sizemore at 441-8200. All money raised go towards Sherry Sizemore's med- ical bills.) Sherry Sizemore holds one of the "Pray for Sherry/Mustard Seed Faith" bracelets. She is shown with her husband, Tim, and their daughters, Whitney Smith and Jordan Sizemore. Cancer strengthens family’s faith By ANNA BROWN Even when he was a little boy playing Stinger foot- ball, Todd Davis had a dream. His goal was to be one of the guys playing on Sunday - a professional football player. He's busy on Sundays now. But instead of trying to win football games, he's trying to win souls for Jesus. Davis, a former Union County High teacher and coach, recently was ordained a minister at New Life Baptist Church and assumed the role of associate pas- tor of education and students. Davis said he knew for years that he wanted to play college football at the University of South Carolina, where his older brother, Brian, had attended. “He's a mechanical engineer and I wanted to follow in his footsteps,” Davis said. Now 34, Davis did well in high school football as an offensive and defensive tackle. During his junior year then-Carolina Coach Brad Scott offered him a five-year full scholarship. Davis reported to the campus in August of 1997 and made the football team's travel squad - a big accom- plishment for a freshman. “I was prospering,” he said. “I was 6 foot 5, 270 pounds. I went from being the biggest lineman on the team in high school to being the smallest lineman at Carolina. Everything was going good and then I start- ed having problems.” Each time Davis made contact with his head he temporarily lost his vision, his legs would burn and he had no strength in them. He would have to brace himself on whomever he had hit or fall. Davis was afraid to tell his coaches. “I knew if I got pulled because of injury it would be hard to get back to where I was at,” he said. “So I tried to hide it. As the year progressed it started get- ting worse. It went from being a hard hit to someone just coming by and smacking my helmet and saying 'Good job.' That feeling and those sensations would come back.” Davis mentioned the problem to his girlfriend, Amy Eaves - who would later become his wife - and his mother, Elaine Pettit. Without telling him, his mother called USC athletic trainers and told them to keep an eye on her son. “They started paying attention to it,” he said. “During the Clemson game we were warming up in the end zone. The offensive linemen always went through a drill they called 'Bull in the Ring.' All of the linemen get in a circle with one lineman in the mid- dle. That one lineman would find another lineman, they would take off and have contact. It was some- thing to wake you up, get your pads loose and get ready to start hitting. Ed Rubiack was the lineman in the middle. He came toward me and I came toward him. When we made contact it happened. Coach Mark Salva was assistant offensive line coach. He noticed it and got Dr. Rod Walters, our head doctor at Carolina at the time.” Walters asked if Davis was okay. “I told him what was going on and they pulled me like I knew they would,” Davis said. “The next morn- ing they had me at Richland Memorial doing all these tests, all these scans.” It was time for classes to break for Christmas. At a team meeting, Walters told Davis there was something “squirrely” in his test results. He told him not to worry about it; they would discuss it when he came back in January. “I came home, deer hunted and spent time with my family,” Davis said. “It never crossed my mind that it might be something serious.” Walters made Davis an appointment with a neurolo- gist at Baptist Memorial Hospital. He went, accompa- nied by his mother, stepfather Andy Pettit, and Amy. “We walk into this room and the lights are out,” Davis said. “There is a big board with a light in it and they have all these pictures of my head on the board. The doctor comes in and tells me, 'This is your brain and the different parts of the brain' and he tries to help me understand what we're looking at it.” Pointing to one particular X-ray the doctor told Davis he had been born with Arnold Chiari Malformation. The spinal cord is supposed to sit in the middle of an opening in the bottom of the skull, with room around it. Davis' opening was too large and his brain stem and the tip of his cerebellum all were try- ing to fit in the opening, causing a lot of pressure. When he made contact with his head, his brain was recoiling off his forehead, going in a downward motion and trying to push all three “items” into the opening and pinching the cerebellum, which affected his senses. Davis told the doctor he had never experienced problems before in 15 years of playing football. “He said, 'Son, you are lucky. The best case sce- nario for someone in your situation is that you end up paralyzed from the neck down. The worst case sce- nario is that you make that contact, it pinches it just right and it kills you instantly. With that being said, you will never play football again.'” Davis sought a second opinion from a sports neurol- ogist in Winston-Salem. “He was almost verbatim with what the first doctor told me,” Davis said. There was no surgical procedure available to correct Davis' problem. Be thankful you are not dead, the doctors said. Be thankful you are not in a wheelchair. At the age of 19, Davis said he felt like everything he had ever worked for was gone. “It was hard,” he said. “I struggled with it. I didn't go to another game for probably about two years.” Davis' athletic scholarship was converted to a med- ical scholarship. He fulfilled its requirements by working in the sports information department. He and Amy married during his junior year. He graduated in 2001 with a degree in retail management and went to work for Sherwin-Williams in its management pro- gram. He initially worked in Sumter before the man- ager's position at the Union store came open and he and Amy moved back home in 2002. At his and Amy's home church, Tabernacle Baptist, Davis began working with the AWANA program. He said he could feel God working in his life. He decided he wanted to get into coaching. “I wanted to help young football players that had the same dreams as I had who had to deal with injuries,” he said. Davis obtained his teaching certificate and began teaching and coaching at Union High. He said he could feel God calling him to do an outreach ministry. The church advertised for a summer youth worker. Davis took the job and began SCOPES - Southside Community Outreach Program for Eternal Salvation. “We went into the Chambertown Community, the Horseshoe Circle Community and tried to draw the children and young people into the gym of our church,” he said. “On Saturday we would have two or three hours blocked off and they could play ball. About halfway through I would stop and give a devo- tional and do a Bible lesson. I fell in love with those children. The summer ended and I didn't want it to end. I think that is when God started changing me, working on me and calling me into the ministry.” Tabernacle was in the process of establishing a per- manent part-time job for a children's ministry worker when New Life Baptist offered Davis a job. His pas- tor, the Rev. Robert Chapman, encouraged him to at least listen to what the folks at New Life had to say. He did and was excited about the plans the church had. But he had misgivings about leaving Tabernacle. Amy had been going to church there since she was born and he had built so many good relationships with the children over the summer and many were still attending church. “Amy and I prayed for what seemed like months,” he said. New Life invited Todd and Amy to come see the facilities they had for children. Davis said during the visit they both experienced a sense of peace that told them New Life was where God wanted them. But they continued to pray about and struggle with the decision to leave. In December of 2010 Davis became part-time chil- dren's director at New Life. He continued teaching in the business department at Union High. At various times he coached ninth grade football, varsity defen- sive line, Jonesville Middle School football and varsi- ty wrestling. Later, Davis began working with the youth at New Life, too. He began feeling God wanted him to surren- der to the ministry full time. “To preach His word,” he said. “To stand behind the pulpit and tell people about His forgiveness and His love and the sacrifices He made for us that we might have forgiveness. I struggled with that. I was very quiet, reserved and didn't like to stand up in front of people and talk. But I guess when God calls you to do that, he gives you the ability to do that. I wanted to do it. I wanted to be obedient. We teach our children and youth to be obedient to God, to follow God. In a sense I felt like I was preaching one thing to our children and youth but struggling myself to follow God and what He has called me to do. I was burdened. I strug- gled severely with that.” After the Rev. Shannon Faulkner became pastor, Davis was offered the position of full-time youth min- ister at the church. “I told Amy this was it,” he said. “There was no way I could tell God no again. This may be the last chance he gives me to follow Him. I can't not do it.” The Davises have two children, Luke, 9, and Caroline, 5. Davis said they are trusting God to take care of them and their family as he takes the step of faith into the ministry. He resigned from Union County Schools on Aug.1. He was ordained as a min- ister on Aug. 18 and he assumed the role of associate pastor of education and students. Davis said he sees now that God always had a plan for him. When he was 8, Davis' family was attending Welcome Baptist Church. He remembers the Rev. Bill Cole gave an invitation to accept Jesus Christ as his Lord and Savior. He knew God was calling him, but he held on to the pew and didn't walk down the aisle. “I was scared of what my friends would think or what some other people in the church would think,” he said. That night he got into the top bunk of the beds in his room. He felt God pulling on him. He began to cry and his mother came to check on him. He told her if he died that night he would go to hell. “Fortunately for me I had a mother who is a godly woman,” he said. “She knew Jesus and talked to me about what it meant to be saved. Sitting there that night I prayed and asked God to forgive me of my sins and told Him I would follow Him.” He remembers being so excited and calling his father, Otis Davis, and his grandparents, Catherine and Joe Todd, and telling them he had been saved. “But it didn't take long that the excitement was overtaken by wanting to play football,” he said. “That was my goal, my focus, my vision. I replaced God with football. I let football become God to me.” After his football career was cut short, Davis said he questioned how a loving God would take his dream away. He didn't do drugs and go to nightclubs but other athletes who did seem to prosper and some went on to NFL careers. “I asked God, 'If this is what you are doing, if you are taking football away from me, at least let me know why. And I never got the answer until 15 years later. Leading up to my ordination and surrendering to God to go into the ministry full time and going to seminary - thinking about all that it became apparent why God had done that. I was going on my own little path. I think God used that injury - that point in my life to pull me back to where I was supposed to be. God's plans for me involve Sundays, too. But instead of winning ballgames on Sunday, my goal is to win lost souls for Christ.” Davis said in those days after his football playing Todd Davis is shown with his wife, Amy, and their chil- dren, Luke and Caroline. (Pete Cochran photo) His plan wasn’t God’s plan See DAVIS, Page 5 Todd Davis wanted to be professional football player - the Lord wanted him to be a minister
  • 46. FAITH REPORTING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Lancaster News Gregory A. Summers A s a journalist, some things, you never forget. These are the heart- felt stories we have the privilege of sharing with our readers. I guess you would have to be there to fully understand what I’m talking about. These are the days when you’re staring at a keyboard silently praying, “God, you’ve given me a good un’ to tell. Please help me to not screw it up.” I was reminded of that Monday, Jan. 7, when I checked my voice mailbox to see who I had ticked off since Friday night. I had two messages, both from people I enjoy hearing from. One was from Robin Hunter, the daughter of Mildred Cameron. The other one, I was grateful to hear from. I just wish it wasn’t under the cir- cumstances. As soon as I heard her voice, I knew the news wasn’t good. “Hey, Greg, this is Charlene,” she tear- fully said. “I just wanted you to know that Jayme died Friday.” I knew this day was coming for Char- lene and Jayme Easler. We all die. After all, it’s part of living, isn’t it? But this isn’t about the Easler family’s loss of a husband, dad and granddad. It’s about his living life to the full. I learned that in March 2009 when I was invited to chronicle Charlene and Jayme’s 24th wedding anniversary at Lake Wateree. Theirs is a story within a story and it’s worth repeating. Just passing through GREGORY A. SUMMERS Features Editor Some stories worth repeating FILE PHOTO Charlene and Jayme Easler celebrate after renewing their wedding vows in March 2009. Charlene’s brother, Mike Sutton is behind them in the afro wig. See STORIES | Page 2A Gregory A. Summers gsummers@thelancasternews.com ome say you can no longer pray in a school building. Sure you can. Just ask Skip Stutts. He does it every Tuesday afternoon after the final school bell rings in the McDonald Green Elementary School auditorium. Sometimes he bows his head to pray for a child. Sometimes, well, it might be for that child’s sick cat. The circumstances don’t matter one bit to Stutts. Just ask him. Besides, “Mr. Skip” has the OK to pray for that under-the-weather cat. He also has paren- tal and administrative permission to share the good news of Jesus Christ for 60 minutes one day a week in that school auditorium. Stutts is a trained teacher in the non-denom- inational Good News Club, an after-school min- istry of Child Evangelism Fellowship (CEF). And Stutts isn’t shy when it comes to sharing that gospel with about 30 students, from kin- dergarten through fifth grade, each week with Scripture, songs, stories, games and other kid- friendly activities. Nope, Stutts isn’t worried about it one bit. If you have a problem with what he’s doing, don’t talk to Stutts.Take it up with the one who respon- sible for the 66-book Bible within his reach. For Stutts, his words don’t matter. The only thing that matters in the end is teaching this young flock to heed the voice of the shepherd whose words are written in red. – Mark 10:14 AARON MORRISON/amorrison@thelancasternews.com From left, Cavin Grant, 9, and Zy’keim Williams, 6, play a game during the Good News after-school program at Brooklyn Springs Elementary School on March 21. The program is one of three in Lancaster County led by Child Evangelism Fellowship volunteers. The after-school good news club stays true to its name From left, Keleigh Chandler, 11, and Ashton Neal, 10, along with Raylee Cook,8, back row, are among the students who attend the Good News Club after-school program each work at McDonald Green Elementary School. See GOOD NEWS | Page 8A “Isn’t it amazing how different things look when you walk instead of ride? You see things you wouldn’t normally notice. You see people.” – Reggie Lowery, a member of Landmark Pentecostal Holiness Church BURNING THEIR PLOWS photos by GREGORY A. SUMMERS/gsummers@thelancasternews.com New mom Brandy Wrede, left, introduces her son, Jesse Wade Parker,toLandmarkPentecostalHolinessChurch’sJessicaHancock on Oct. 2, during the congregation’s Wednesday prayer walk through Kershaw’s mill village. Jesse was born Sept. 27. The Rev. Larry Hancock, Landmark pastor, left, stops to visit with Frankie Stover on Oct. 2. Landmark takes message of love to Kershaw streets Gregory A. Summers gsummers@thelancasternews.com KERSHAW – For Landmark Pentecostal Holiness Church, there is no going back. If you look for cars in the parking lot of the Kershaw Camden Highway Church on Wednesday evenings, there will be none. Those cars are parked in a small lot near East Fourth Street on the edge of Kershaw’s once-thriving mill village. The church lights won’t be burning on Wednesday, either. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t shining. They shine every week when Landmark’s T.A.R.G.E.T. (Teaching and Restoring God’s Eternal Truth) Outreach Ministries team takes God into neighborhoods where few would venture during daylight, much less dusk. See MESSAGE I Page 10A PHOTO SUPPLIED Samaritan's Purse started Operation Christmas Child in the United States in 1993, collecting just 28,000 shoe box gifts. Since then, OCC has collected and hand-delivered more than 94 million shoe box gifts worldwide. onesmileatatime Operation Christmas Child delivers God’s love Gregorio thinks inside, outside the shoe box Gregory A. Summers gsummers@thelancasternews.com Darwin Gregorio just can’t help it. Every time he sees a photo of asmilingchild receivingashoe box gift through Operation Christmas Child, Gregorio in- evitably smiles, too. Love given in its purest form, when nothing is ex- pected in return, he said, is contagious. Yes, Grego- rio knows what it is to be on the send- ing end of a shoe box gift. But he also knows what it feels like to get one. And his shoe box story is one the 33-year-old father of two, who came to this country in 1998 from Honduras, loves to share. Telling it, he said, shares the love. “It’s a smile of happiness,” he said. “To get a gift when you were expecting nothing? There is really nothing else to compare it to.” About 20 Christmases ago, a then 13-year-old Gregorio, who was growing up with his sisters and parents in the Darwin Gregorio See BOX | Page 2A
  • 47. FAITH REPORTING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Tina Graham Anderson BYTINAGRAHAMANDERSON THEHERALD John and Mary Long have the per- fect life. John’s an attorney and works for a prestigious law firm. His roots in Horry County law run deep. After all, he is John Reuben Long II, descen- dent of J. Reuben Long, for whom the county jail is named. Mary is a devoted community vol- unteer and is currently employed at a popular church daycare. They have been married nearly 20 years and have three beautiful and smart children. The family lives in a spacious and lovely home in a wonderful Conway neighborhood, are good churchgo- ers and always have a smile and friendly face to share. They are living the American dream, and you’ll never meet nicer folks. The Longs have what most people want — good, stable and happy lives. For most of his life, John agreed. But a couple of years ago, he read “Radical: Taking Back Your Faith from the American Dream,” a book by pastor David Platt that made him question his middle class lifestyle. “The book talked about the im- portance of sacrificing your life for Jesus,” John said. It was the first time he ever ques- tioned the notion that the American dream was the pinnacle of life. “I thought life should revolve around family and work,” John said. “You work and have fun and that is all you can ask for. Now, I realize there’s a lot more to do than that.” While reading “Radical,” John said God began to work on his heart and take him from being self-centered to being Christ-centered. Then, in the spring of 2012, John got his burning bush call from God. That’s when Dean Herman, See JOHNLONG, Page 10A Attorney lives out faith in Africa COURTESYPHOTO Horry County attorney John Long washes the feet of a boy in Tanzania. BYTINAANDERSON THEHERALD At least one local church is practicing what it preaches. When folks from The Chris- tian Church of Myrtle Beach learned the federal govern- ment’s shutdown may cut off the state’s Women, Infant and Children’s (WIC) program, it took quick action. This past Sunday, the church began collecting baby formula in response to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control announcing it would be forced to discontinue the state’s WIC program by the end of the month. “We’re just trying to look ahead,” Tina Wilson said. “Hopefully, it won’t be sus- pended. That’s our prayer.” Wilson is the wife of Matt Wilson, the church’s youth minister, and can empathize with young mothers needing to feed their small children. She was 18 when she mar- ried her husband, and the couple soon had a daughter. With money tight, Wilson was grateful assistance was avail- able for them. “My husband and I started out early,” she said. “I relied on WIC to provide for my daughter. It made a huge dif- ference.” Wilson received WIC assis- tance for about two years and understands the dent feeding a baby can put in a tight budg- et. “Formula is very expensive,” she said. “I just remember what a need formula was when I had young children.” DHEC announced earlier this month that the WIC pro- gram is considered “non-es- sential,” and under the federal shutdown, it would not be re- ceiving federal funding. DHEC initially said it would be able to continue WIC through Oct. 15 using some reserve state funding, but then later extended that cutoff to Oct. 31. “To make sure that the 122,000 low-income families that we serve through WIC continue receiving essential nutritional services during the federal shutdown, DHEC is dipping into agency savings and asking our employees to See WIC, Page 3A Churches, charities ready to help those hurt by shutdown KEITHANDERSON|THEHERALD The WIC program is in danger of being shut down in South Carolina. BYTINAGRAHAMANDERSON THEHERALD Louise Smith believes America is changing and not for the better. “I’m concerned about our nation and the direction it’s headed,” Smith said. “I think that we, as a nation, have turned away from God and aren’t con- cerned about the foundation.” The 64-year-old believes God has blessed this nation, but its people have taken that for granted. “We’ve gone our own way,” she said. “That’s a very sad place to be.” That concern is why Smith and a growing group of Horry County Christians are meeting on the first Friday of each month to pray for America. The First Friday Day of Prayer puts the practice of prayer and patriotism together in three gather- ings held each month. “The most important thing we can do for our nation is to pray for it,” Smith said. She and others will do that Aug. 2 at the next First Friday Day of Prayer. The 7 a.m. prayer meeting will be held in the Kingston Room at the Conway Recreation Center. A noon meeting is at Westminster Presbyterian Church, and the final Friday assembly is at 7 p.m. at Bethany Bible Chapel. The morning prayer meeting focuses on II Chronicles 7:14, “If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.” The noon gathering entitled “Remembering Our God and Country Heritage,” is designed to provide information on the connection between God and country. This month will include the special feature, “Tyranny — The High Cost of Forgetting God.” A light lunch is provided for those who call the church at 248-4140. The evening assembly concentrates on 1 Timo- thy 2:1-2. It reads, “I urge, then, first of all, that pe- titions, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for all people — for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness.” Smith said the community prayer meetings See PRAYERMEETINGS, Page 2A IMAGECOURTESY OFMETRO CREATIVEGRAPHICS Local initiative blends patriotism, prayer
  • 48. SPORTS BEAT REPORTING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The News & Reporter TravisJ enkins BYTRAVIS JENKINS tjenkins@onlinechester.com It turns out that the old saying about defense win- ning championships is an old saying for a reason. The Lewisville Lions hit lots of big shots and scored lots of points on the way to winning a state champion- ship on Saturday. Still, coach Larry Davis and his players all contend that their ability to keep the other team off the score- board is what elevated the team. Davis was hired as Lewisville’s coach in June of 2011. He still holds the sin- gle-season record for points scored in South Carolina prep history and was a pro- lific scorer at the college level too. It came as a sur- prise, then, when he spent more time talking defense than offense at his introduc- tory press conference. “I’ll kind of look and see the strength of the team andseewhatpieceswehave to put on the floor. But I do want us to be a tough-mind- ed defensive team,” Davis said on the day he was introduced as coach. His imprint was notice- able immediately. In his first season, Lewisville was in nearly every game it played in because of tena- ciousdefense.Injuriesshort- circuited that team late in the season and the team bowed out of the playoffs in the first round. Even when the season ended, the hard work didn’t stop. His team put in hour after hour doing grueling conditioning drills. They got in top shape, but the work continuedtoplayaphysical, wear-you-down style of defense. Davis said that onlymakessense.Thereare nights when shots just aren’t falling, but you can always play defense and keep yourself in a game, Davis said. Sometimes playing defense has less to do with pressing and more to do with standing perfectly still. Lewisville players took pride all season in drawing charges, sometimes collect- ing as many as 10 a game. After a playoff contest when his team drew six charges, Davis noted that his team was getting extra posses- sions. “Six steals is as good as getting six turnovers. It’s extra possessions either way,” he said. Drawing a charge does a lot more than just get the ball out of the hands of an opponent. It clearly frus- trated opposing teams and often made them hesitant to try to come inside, for fear of drawing a foul and turning the ball over. Lewisville was actually trailing at half-time of Saturday’s state title game against Whale Branch. The real difference in the second halfwasthedefensiveinten- sity of Lewisville. They started to wear down Whale Branch’s backcourt and force turnovers. Those turned into easy baskets andtheLionstookcontrolof the game and erased the deficit they faced less than two minutes into the second half. “Defensewonthatgame,” said Lions starter Qua Walls. Mardarious Bailey said the formula used to take the win was the same one the team had used all season. “Defense,” he said. In case you hadn’t heard, it does win championships. BYTRAVIS JENKINS tjenkins@onlinechester.com The Lewisville Lions saved their biggest bucket for after the state championship game ended. The Lions erased a half-time deficit and rolled to victory over Whale Branch 64-54 on Saturday. The victory gave Lewisville its first boys basketball crown in 37 years. The Lions opened the contest at Columbia’s Colonial Life Arena by attacking the Warriors from out- side the arc. Qua Walls opened the scoring with a three-pointer and Mardarious Bailey buried a pair of treys early on. Aside from a single long-distance shot, Whale Branch did its damage exclusively under- neath, with guard Justin Rhode driving to the basket for a pair of backdoor lay-ups and Denzel DanielandNyQuanGumbs-Smith eachscoringoffoffensiverebounds. The game was tied at 13 after one. Offensively, Lewisville strug- gled badly in the second quarter, not logging a single point for 4:30 and not converting a field goal for nearly six minutes. The team missed open looks (including a lay- up) on it first three possessions. Whale Branch scored the first seven points of the frame. Devonta’ Delaney stole a pass near mid- court and took it the other way for a slam dunk. After a pair of free throws, they turned Lewisville over again and converted that into an easy basket. The Warriors seemed on the verge of taking com- plete control of the game after swiping another Lewisville pass. Whale Branch had a three-on-one break, but Rhode gave up an easy lay-up opportunity, opting instead to bounce one high off the glass for a put-back dunk opportunity. His trailer was a little too far behind him, though, and the ball went out of bounds. That would have made it a nine-point game and the Warriors managed only one field goal the rest of the quarter. The Lions could only muster two field goals in the second, one on a Walls lay-up and another on a put-back by Cody Montgomery. The latter portion of the half was a free-throw shooting contest and Lewisville trailed 28-23 at the break. Lewisville coach Larry Davis felt like his team took Whale Branch’s best punch in the first half. Even though his team strug- gled for offense in the second quar- ter, they managed to hang around. “Just like all year, our defense kept us in it,” Davis said. He also saw an encouraging sign that most in attendance may have missed. “We had a possession at the end of the half with 15 passes,” Davis said. “People in the stands were screaming for them to shoot it, but you love that as a coach. We didn’t rush things and looked for our shot. Kids don’t want to play defense that long anyway. That set the tone for the second half.” Lewisvillewasonly7-of-26from the floor in the first half and was out-rebounded 20-11. The instant the Lions stepped on the floor in the second half, they looked like a different team. After forcing some shots and not always getting good ball movement in the first half, the team spread things around, with seven different play- ersrecordingbaskets.KaleWorthy went for eight early points, knock- ing down a jumper, going 4-for-4 from the line and recording a steal that he took the distance for an uncontested lay-up. Whale Branch coach Linc Lyles took a timeout after Walls hit a three from the corner to help his team regroup, but in just over two minutes, the Lions had an 11-1 run and a 34-29 lead. The teams traded baskets over the next few possessions. It was 43-37 when the Lewisville put together a quarter-closing run that all but ended it. Off a turnover, Bailey drove to the basket (draw- ing a pair of Warriors defenders) and pulled up for a short jumper when Montgomery caught his eye. He made a perfect pass to the Lions big man, who banked it home. Bailey swiped the ensuing inbounds pass and converted a lay- up, then logged another theft that turnedintoaneasybaskettomake it 49-37 going to the fourth. Lewisville built a lead as large as 16 in the final stanza before Whale Branch began a bit of a comeback. The Warriors connected on pair of threes, the team’s first since the opening quarter, but by that time it was too late. The Lions were able to spread the floor and milk the clock in the final three minutes. When the final buzzer sounded,the crowd couldn’t rush the floor, since security at the Colonial Life Arena won’t allow for that, so players rushed them instead. The entire team made its way into the stands to celebrate with the huge throng of Lewisville faithful on hand. After the game, Davis wanted no credit for helping the program to its first title since 1976. “The kids played hard. They’ve played hard all season. I don’t Defense does it for the Lions Kings of the Jungle Lions claim first state basketball crown in 37 years PHOTOS BY HOLLY HINDMAN/THE N&R Players scramble for a loose ball during Saturday’s state title game between Lewisville and Whale Branch. Qua Walls and Kale Worthy celebrate following Lewisville’s victory. See CHAMPS, Page 9-A BYTRAVIS JENKINS tjenkins@onlinechester.com The first live action of the 2013 football season commences today as local teams begin their slate of scrimmages. Lewisville will hit the field first, facing off against Blacksburg High at 10 a.m. this morning. The Lions will stay busy for the next week, head- ing to Wingate College for a scrimmage with Monroe High School and Central Academy starting at 8 a.m. Mid-Carolina comes to town at 5:30 p.m. this coming Wednesday, then Lewisville takes on Garinger High School nextFridayintheChester County Football Jam- boree. Great Falls will have a couple of tune-ups ahead of the regular season. Ridge Spring-Monetta will come to Great Falls for a scrimmage Tuesday at 6 p.m. The Red Devils will face off against Alleghany High in the jamboree next Friday. Chester was to have taken on West Meck- lenburg High Thursday, but the scheduled oppo- nent was unable to make it. Instead, they will come to Chester Monday, along with Lancaster and Westwood,forafour-team scrimmage starting at 6 p.m. The first action for the Cyclones will actually be Saturday, when the team goes to Laurens for a multi-team scrimmage. Chester is paired up against Lancaster at the jamboree next Friday. BYTRAVIS JENKINS tjenkins@onlinechester.com The Lewisville football team is breaming with confidence as the regular season approaches. “That can be good or bad,” said coach Will Mitchell. Mitchell said he’ll have a better idea about where his team stands after today. The Lions have a scrimmage at home at 10 a.m. against Blacksburg High School, then head to Wingate College Saturday at 8 a.m. for a pair of scrimmages against North Carolina schools. Actually getting to compete against another team instead of each other will be a wel- come change and an important one. Mitchell said. “Because of our num- bers, we don’t have the luxury of being able to get quality 11-on-11 repeti- tions in practice,” Mitchell said. “I don’t like ninth graders going against juniors and seniors. We have to get as much out of everything as we can. These scrimmages are important.” Mitchell has been gen- erally pleased with the first week of practice. He said the defense has looked especially good, a positive sign since he’s made some tweaks from last year’s scheme, put- ting more emphasis on speed than size. That plays to his personnel and their strengths. There is a fast tempo to what the defense is doing. That creates pressure, Mitchell said, the same type of pressure that Lewisville’s up-temp offense created on teams last year. This year’s squad is dif- ferent than the one he put on the field last year. The approach and the attitude are a little bit different. “A team always has to find its own way. This is a moreconfidentbunchthan we had last year. Last year’s senior class had an air of desperation about them. That’s the best way to say it. They had strug- gles through three losing seasons,” Mitchell said. Mitchellsaidbeingsure of yourself is fine, so long as you work just as hard and pay attention to the details as much as when you were trying to reverse the trend of losing. Mitchell’s coaching staff has gotten bigger since his debutseasonin2012,when Lewisville was 8-3. That hasmeantamoredemand- ing and challenging off- season and practices. “We’re pushing them harder. We don’t want the season to end after 11 games this year,” Mitchell said. The team is concluding a three-day camp today. Confidence growing as Lions break camp Pre-season action starts today for local teams Friday Night Lights The Lewisville football team will have its second annual “Friday Night Lights” event tonight. The event is a two-hour mini-camp for boys and girls between the ages of six and 12. Participants will have their names announced over the stadium PA sys- tem and go through drills and activities on the field. The LHS cheerleaders will be on hand and there will be music and food. The cost is $10, though parents and siblings will be admitted for free. Registration will be at 6:30 p.m., the event starts at 7 p.m. For more informa- tion, contact coach Will Mitchell at 704-641-8709. Volleyball Lewisville High School will have volleyball tryouts Aug. 12-14 at the school. Tryouts run from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m. each evening. SPORTS IN BRIEF BYTRAVIS JENKINS tjenkins@onlinechester.com The best wide receiver at Lewisville’s football practices is not going to take a single snap on the field this season. Gene McCaskill, the former Chester High and University of Kentucky standout has joined the Lions coaching staff as the new receivers coach. McCaskill is best remem- bered locally for being one of the key players on Chester’s 2007 state runner-up team. That year, the Cyclones won the school’s first region title in foot- ball in 10 years, advanced past the first round of the playoffs for the second time in four decades and made it to the state title game for the first time since 1963. That academic year was one of the best on record for boys athletics at the school, with the basketball team making its third-ever trip to the upperstate title game and the track team finishing second in the state. McCaskill had a hand in all threeaccomplishments.Football was his first love, though, and his on-field accomplishments as a quarterback and wide receiver made him a candidate for the state’s “Mr. Football” award as a senior. He said he’s known for a while what his post-playing career would be. “I’ve always known I’d go into coaching when I was done with playing football,” McCaskill said following a recent Lewisville practice. “I want to be a head high school coach. I want to help young people succeed the same way people helped me.” McCaskill said his high school coach, Victor Floyd, has been a big influence on him, as has his current boss, Lewisville head coach Will Mitchell. Mitchell was Chester’s defen- sivecoordinatorforallfouryears McCaskill was in school. He said his former player has adapted to his new role well. “It would be easy for someone who just played four years in the SEC to talk over kids’ heads, but he doesn’t do that. He does a great job of communicating with players,” Mitchell said. McCaskill didn’t necessarily expect to be standing on the sidelines this soon, however. At Kentucky, he played as a true freshman and improved a great deal during his sophomore year with increased playing time. He was set to start as junior. “I was destined to have a break-out year,” McCaskill said. In an early pre-season prac- tice, McCaskill was blocking on a play when someone rolled into him. He knew his knee was hurt, but he stayed on the field long enough to return a kickoff. By then, though, the pain was unbearable and he knew some- thing was wrong. He’d torn his anterior cruciate ligament, had to have reconstructive surgery and was out for the season. “Not everybody knows this, but I ended up having to have my knee operated on three time,” said McCaskill. The initial injury was deflat- ing but the second one, which occurred on the first day he was cleared to run again, was even worse. During the entire time he was hurt, he actually felt he was letting his team down. “It was really hard on my conscience. I never got a major injury in high school. Watching from the sidelines was really hard. That was a tough year for me,” McCaskill said. He fought his way back and was a contributor for the last two seasons. Some NFL teams had interest in him, impressed with his hands and route-run- ning. When they did medical checks on his knee, however, the interest dried up. McCaskill says he does ponder the “what ifs” sometimes, but believes that God has put him where he is for a reason. He said coaches have always told him he possessed leadership skills. He is now put- ting those to use on-and-off the field. “They always told me if you can get people to follow you, use it to an advantage. Lead the people to something positive,” McCaskill said. In addition to working at the school and coaching football, McCaskill will help with other sports as well. That means he’ll have multiple opportunities to face his old alma mater. The first chance will come on Aug. 30 when Chester and Lewisville face off. “It’ll probably feel a little weird until the game is started,” McCaskill said. “I still have friends there and there is no hard feelings at all, but I want to beat them like I want to beat every other team. I’m paid to coach at Lewisville.” McCaskill likes the group of receivers he has to work with and likes the team’s potential a great deal, saying that Mitchell has done a tremendous job instilling discipline and a desire to succeed. He thinks the exper- tise that he, new staff addition Sheldon Brown (an 11-year NFL veteran) and former Clemson and NFL player Wardell Rouse possess is an asset to the team. Often times, he and Brown will put on cleats and show players the correct way to jam a receiver or run a route. McCaskill leads by example, just like he always has. McCaskill joins Lewisville coaching staff BY TRAVIS JENKINS/THE N&R Gene McCaskill has joined the coaching staff at Lewisville High School, where he will work with wide receivers. BYTRAVIS JENKINS tjenkins@onlinechester.com The swim team season in Chester County has started with a splash. TheChesterWavesum- mer aquatic league swim team began their season at the YMCA in late May and transitioned to the city pool, preparing for the competitions against other teams in the league. This season, the team has 35 swimmers, with the youngest being just five years old and the oldest being 18. Coach Jessica Hutto remains confident thatherkidsarethebestin the league. “We lack certain age groups, therefore other teams automatically get points, but if that wasn’t the case, I know my kids would win every meet. It’s sad that our disadvantage is a lack of participation,” Hutto said. Hutto encourages all parentstostarttheiryoung children in lessons and then let them contin- ue receiving training and exercise through the sum- mer team. Chester’s first match was a home meet against Kershaw, June 4. Kershaw took the win but it was close, with less than 20 points separating the teams. Again, the number of automatic victories Kershaw received in some events helped secure the win. The top three place- ments per age in each race is listed below. INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY 9-10 G: 1st Emory Beer 1.46.66 2nd Ashlynn Bolin 1.52.59 9-10 B: 2nd Jeremiah Days 2.04.69 3rd Whugray Clack 2.08.10 13-14 G: 3rd Jenna Cok 1.38.69 13-14 B: 1st Hunter Root 1.09.09 2nd Cole Bell 1.12.03 15up G: 1st Caroline Crowder 1.14.28 2nd Sloan Caldwell 1.22.71 15up B: 3rd Daiveon Lindsay BACKSTROKE 6under G: 1st Josie Lancaster 38.18 2nd Sarah Ashley 2.12.39 6under B: 2nd Darby Clack 33.93 7-8 G: 1st Casmyn Wilmore 24.62 2nd Lauren Owens 25.12 3rd Madi Reed 39.10 7-8 B: 3rd Kyan Kennedy 33.27 9-10 G: 2nd Ashlynn Bolin 23.17 3rd Emory Beer 24.89 9-10 B: 2nd Whugray Clack 25.94 13-14 G: 3rd Jenna Cok 46.04 13-14 B: 1st Cole Bell 33.79 2nd Kenneth Caldwell 40.29 15up G: 1st Caroline Crowder 35.10 2nd Sloan Caldwell 36.99 3rd Kirstan Ellis 38.96 15up B: 1st Daiveon Lindsayt 33.17 2nd James Commodore 35.53 BREASTSTROKE 6under B: 2nd Tyler Williams 52.93 7-8 G: 1st Casmyn Wilmore 24.69 2nd Jessica Jolley 27.56 9-10 G: 2nd Emory Beer 24.59 3rd Anna Taylor Mathias 25.17 9-10 B: 3rd Jeremiah Days 30.80 13-14 G: 2nd Jenna Cok 46.72 13-14 B: 1st Hunter Root 34.76 2nd Cole Bell 40.81 3rd Kenneth Calwell 45.84 15up G: 1st Kirstan Ellis 42.82 2nd Sloan Caldwell 42.99 BUTTERFLY 6under G: 1st SarahAshley Owens 1.16.34 6under B: Darby Clack 33.06 7-8 G: 1st Lauren Owens 20.58 2nd Jessica Jolley 27.77 3rd Jacey Evans 32.30 9-10 G: 1st Layla Morgan 22.18 9-10 B: 3rd Jeremiah Days 25.22 15up G: 1st Caroline Crowder 32.90 15up B: 2nd Daiveon Lindsay 31.27 3rd James Commodore 34.02 FREESTYLE 6under G: 1st Josie Lancaster 31.21 2nd Sarah Ashley Owens 1.03.99 6under B: 1st Darby Clack 26.55 7-8 G: 1st Lauren Owens 18.96 2nd Casmyn Wilmore 20.40 3rd Jessica Jolley 20.73 9-10 G: 1st Ashlynn Bolin 18.93 2nd Emory Beer 19.79 3rd Anna Taylor Mathias 20.66 13-14 B: 1st Hunter Root 26.30 2nd Cole Bell 29.13 3rd Kenneth Caldwell 33.43 15up G: 1st Caroline Crowder 28.90 2nd Sloan Caldwell 30.65 3rd Kirstan Ellis 31.60 15up B: 1st Daiveon Lindsay 36.48 BYTRAVIS JENKINS tjenkins@onlinechester.com An urgent phone call brought a party going on in the Bumgardner house- hold to a screeching halt. It started another celebra- tion, however. Gaither Bumgardner, the Great Falls native that recently graduated from USC-Upstate, was a 23rd round selection of the New York Mets last weekend in the annual MLB draft. Within a few days, Bumgardner was on a plane to Florida to begin his professional baseball career. “It’s something I’ve always wanted to do,” Bumgardner said. “I’m ful- filling a lifelong dream.” The 6-foot-7 Bumgard- ner has come a long way since making his prep debut as a skinny seventh grader. The Great Falls baseball program had actually gone dormant for a few years and the pro- cess of building it back to respectability took some time. Then-coach Brett Blackmon started with a young team and let them grow together over time. There were some lopsided losses early on, but the teamcontinuallyimproved, eventually becoming a playoff regular and two- time participant in the upperstate title bracket. Bumgardner was a key part of the program’s growth, blossoming into one of the state’s best play- ers by his senior year. Billy Keels, coach of Great Falls rival Lewisville, was impressed with every aspect of Bumgardner’s game. “He is the best all- around player I’ve ever coached against. We’ve played against two guys that signed with South Carolina, one from Clemson and several that signed with Coastal and he’s a better pitcher than all of those. I’m shocked he didn’t get a bigger offer coming out of high school. As a hitter, he was pretty much impossible to strike out,” Keels said. His high school statis- tics confirm every compli- ment Keels paid him. As a senior, Bumgardner had an ERA under 1.00, hit over.500anddidnotstrike outinasingleplateappear- ance. When most athletes get to college, that level of versatility isn’t normally taken advantage of, with players either settling in as a pitcher or position player. Bumgardner had the opportunity to do both. He pitched and played some first base as a fresh- man, but an injury limited his ability to pitch for most of his sophomore and junior years. That didn’t affecthisbatatall,though. He closed his sophomore year on a 13-game hitting streak, he just missed set- ting national records as a junior with a late season 11-for-11 streak and had 17 hits in a six-game stretch late this season. Bumgardner ended the 2013 season with a .354 batting average, 34 RBI and 44 runs scored. He hit .376 as a junior and is ranked in the top 10 of several all-time Atlantic Sun Conference statistical categories, including base hits and triples. His eye-popping offen- sive numbers aren’t what got him drafted, though. He was selected as a pitch- er after putting together a 6-2 record with a 3.57 ERA and 52 strikeouts against only 24 walks this past season for USC-Upstate. In fact, none of the teams that considered drafting him were looking at him as a position player. “They were all primari- ly interested in me as a pitcher. All of my discus- sions with teams, though, weren’t about why I wasn’t a position player, they were about why I was a pitcher,” Bumgardner said. Bumgardner doesn’t mind working from the mound on a full-time basis, saying he sees it as his best chance to make it to the majors one day. Since the Mets are a National Leagueteam,Bumgardner noted that he’ll still have the chance to swing the bat once-in-a-while. Bumgardner didn’t really know what to expect heading into the draft. He’d heard from a dozen or more teams interested in drafting him and was get- ting positive feedback. “They saw me as an older guy, more mature, but with more upside. They like my frame, they think I can put on a few pounds and they think I haven’t peaked yet,” Bumgardner said. Bumgardner didn’t fig- ure he’d be an early selec- tion, so he didn’t follow the draft’s proceedings too closely. Last Saturday, he was at his family’s home to celebrate his graduation and the high school gradu- ation of his younger sister. His father, Gaither Sr., was parked in front of a computer watching each selection as they were made. Gaither didn’t think that was necessary, since he knew he’d get a call from a team before they announced their selection. “I saw his name pop up, then his phone went off so much it almost fell out of his pocket,” Bumgardner Sr. said. Needless to say, the party was redirected. “It was pretty special,” Bumgardner said. “Espe- cially when you think about how slim the odds are.” Within two days, Bumgardner was in Port St. Lucie, Fla., filling out paperwork and learning the way his new employers want things done. “You have to learn all thelittlethings,likethrow- ing the way they want you to in their organization. I’m working out my daily routine. It’s different now because I don’t have to go to school, this is my job,” Bumgardner said. Keels thinks Bumgardner can be a suc- cess, not only because of his physical talents but because of his attitude. “He was a heck of quar- terback in high school and he probably could have played basketball,” Keels said.“Butthemostimpres- sive thing about him is the kind of person he is. Honor roll student, high morals, always says ‘yes sir’ and ‘no sir.’ I think he would make a great coach one day.” That could be true, but for right now, Bumgardner is still celebrating. “This is such a well-run organization. I’m just proud to be a part of it,” he said. Bumgardner expects to start off with a Gulf Coast team, made up primarily of recently drafted players. He thinks he’ll begin as a relief pitcher. The party has only started for Bumgardner Chester swim team off to a hot start this season Bumgardner Summer work PHOTOS BY TRAVIS JENKINS/THE N&R Chester and Lewisville faced off in a 7-on-7 competition on Thursday.
  • 49. SPORTS BEAT REPORTING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Free Times Charlie Bennett
  • 50. SPORTS BEAT REPORTING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The Gazette RobG antt Rob Gantt/Gazette Goose Creek coach Chuck Reedy (center) and running back Tyrik Johnson (right) were all smiles after being presented a trophy folowing the Gators’ win on the Thursday Night Lights televeision broadcast. ROB GANTT The Gazette It’sanunwrittenruleatGooseCreekHigh School. The second man on the depth chart is expected to compete like the top guy. Clearly, Tyrik Johnson was ready. In place of injured Shrine Bowl selection CalebKinlaw,Johnsonrackedup222yards and five touchdowns in the Gators’ 49-21 winovervisitingWestAshleyonThursday night. “Heisaspecialguy,”GCHScoachChuck Reedy said. “He’s done this all year. It was interesting to see what he was going to do when he got a lot of carries. He showed to- night he’s a guy that can break the game open.” Johnson,ajunior,carriedtheball20times and scored on runs of 42, 22, 59, 6 and 2 yards in leading the Gators to their 36th straight victory overall. A handful of his totes featured some slick moves to elude would-be tacklers. He has shined in other appearances this fall but hadn’t been asked to carry the ball more than nine times in one game. A ma- jority of his previous 48 carries came in the second half of blowouts and he torched second-team defenses. He has racked up 995 yards this season in sharing a spot with Kinlaw, who has 1,066 yards. “He’s an exciting player,” Reedy said. Goose Creek improved to 10-0 overall and 3-0 in Region 7-AAAA heading into Friday’s epic showdown at rival Stratford. Johnson was one of four backups thrust into a starter’s role. Defensive end Kalan Ritchie, fullback Evan McField and defen- sive back Andre Rhodes also missed the game. “Theguyswhosteppedindidagreatjob,” Reedysaid.“Wechallengedthemtostepup and play like champions, and that’s what they did. That’s what we expect.” McField’s backup, Darin McNeal, rushed for 55 yards on nine carries. TheGatorsfinishedwith510yardsoftotal offense,with410comingintheirtrademark runninggame.QuarterbackDantezBenna- Still perfect ROB GANTT The Gazette Charleston Southern running back Christian Reyes became the program’s first 1,000-yard rusher and the Buccaneer de- fense blanked Presbyterian in the fourth quarter of a tight game as CSU beat PC, 27-16, Saturdayafternoonontheroad. The Buccaneers picked up their ninth win of the season to match the school record and move to 2-0 in Big South play. CSU is now 9-1 on the year and equals the 2006 squad, which went 9-2, for wins in a season. PCfallsto3-5and1-1intheBig South on the year. The win sets up one of the biggest matchups in Big South Conference history as the Bucs host rival Coastal Carolina next Saturday at 1 p.m. CCU is ranked No. 3 in a number of national polls, while the Bucs entered Saturday at No. 18 in the FCS Coaches Poll. “I’m sure it will be an excit- ing week,” CSU Coach Jamey Chadwell said following the Bucs’ win. “Every game is im- portant and kids aren’t naive. They can look at the rankings and schedules and they know what’s at stake. Charleston Southern Bucs 9-1 heading into Coastal showdown ROB GANTT The Gazette Any chance Cane Bay High School had to make the play- offs this football season went out the window when Wando finished strong in the second half on Friday night. The Warriors pulled away over the final two quarters for a 34-13 victory in Mount Pleasant. The Cobras (0-10, 0-3 Region 7-AAAA) needed the victory to have a chance to make the postseason but now will only suit up one more time this fall. They host West Ashley in the final regular season game on Friday. It’s Cane Bay’s last chance for a victory celebra- tion this season. The Cobras didn’t help them- Cobras down to last chance for victory “Every game is important and kids aren’t naive. They can look at the rankings and schedules and they know what’s at stake.” CSU COACH JAMEY CHADWELL See GOOSE CREEK,Page 4B See COASTAL,Page 4B See COBRAS,Page 4B ROB GANTT The Gazette As far as showdowns go, it’s difficult to imagine one being more epic than the Stratford- Goose Creek football game that’s about to be played on Friday night at Stackley Field. Bragging rights, a region title and perhaps a No. 1 seed in the playoffs all hang in the balance when the two powers collide. The Gators are 10-0 and Stratford 9-1 as they renew the rivalry. “Iwoulddaresayit’scertainly thebiggestgameeverforGoose Creek (in the regular season),” Gators coach Chuck Reedy said. In addition to those afore- mentioned things, the Gators’ 36-game win streak is on the line. “All of those things play into it,” Reedy said. “They’ll be as good a football team as we’ve played in our 36-game win streak.” With both teams likely head- ed to the Div. II bracket in the ClassAAAAplayoffswhenthe pairings are announced on Sat- urday, the possibility exists the two could hook up again in the postseason. AGooseCreekvictorywould give the Gators the No. 1 seed and Stratford would likely fall back to at least a No. 4 or No. 5. Either seed would place the KnightsandGatorssquarelyon anothercollisioncourseinthree weeks. “There’s a chance we’ll see them again,” Reedy said. “If we’re the top seed and they’re the fourth seed, we could play in the (state semifinals).” The Gators have won six straight in the series, including last season’s 31-23 victory at JohnFulmerField.TheKnights (9-1) have not won in the city rivalry since hammering the Gators 45-14 in 2006. The closest game during Goose Creek’s current stran- Electric atmosphere awaits Goose Creek, Knights See ELECTRIC,Page 2B BY ROB GANTT The Gazette Fought cancer. Beat rival. Honored seniors. The Stratford High School soccer teams raked in the perfect hat trick last Thursday on Pink on the Pitch night, winning a pair of games over rival Goose Creek High School. After the girls coasted to a 9-0 win, the Knights boys recorded a 5-0 victory. Proceeds from the event will go toward the fight in the ongoing battle with can- cer. “It’s a special occasion,” Stratford coach Alister DeLong said. “We’re very proud to be a part of it and we really appreciate Goose Creek being a part of it with us.” Rob Gantt/Gazette Stratford’s Taylor Atwood gains control of the ball in front of the net before taking a shot against Goose Creek. The Hat TrickStratford soccer teams sweep rival on special night Rob Gantt/Gazette Goose Creek’s Uriel Martinez (left) and Stratford’s Tyler Tekac battle for the ball during the first half of the Knights’ 5-0 win. BY ROB GANTT The Gazette Kiki Rivers leaves behind a colossal chasm for the Goose Creek volleyball program to fill. The senior signed a national letter of intent last week and will further her career at Claflin. “Kiki was a big, instrumen- tal part of why we’ve been to the playoffs the last three years and made it to the sec- ond round in each of those,” Goose Creek coach Jay Watterworth said. “… Losing her nearly 400 kills, her blocks and her attitude at the net is going to hurt us… I’m going to miss her a lot.” Rivers helped lead the Lady Gators to 23 wins and a sec- ond-place finish in Region 7- AAAA this past fall. She capped the season with an appearance in the North- South all-star volleyball matches. Rivers finished her senior season with 363 kills, 219 digs and 68 blocks. Her versatility and athletic ability made her a corner- stone for the Lady Gators. When they needed something good to happen, she was often there to make it happen. “She’s primarily a middle blocker but when we are in serve receive, we line her up all over,” Watterworth said. “Some times she’ll outside for one. She’ll hit middle. She’ll hit on the right side. She’ll run different things like slides and quicks. She can hit from anywhere she wants.” Claflin has plans to use Rivers at middle blocker. “But I told them that if they really needed a right-side hit- ter, she’d be great at that because she’d be blocking their best player,” Watterworth said. The Lady Panthers finished 21-13 last season and fin- ished third in the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association. They are set to return all but one senior for the 2013 campaign. “The biggest difference (between high school and college) is that she’s been the best without having to really work at it here,” Watterworth said. “There, all the girls are good or they wouldn’t be playing college volleyball. She can’t say I’m tired today or I don’t feel good. She’s going to have to work her butt off. If she does what she’s supposed to do, I have no doubt she’ll start as a freshman.” SIGNING MOMENT: Kiki Rivers GCHS standout takes versatility to college level Lady Gators’ Rivers signs with Claflin Rob Gantt/Gazette Goose Creek senior Kiki Rivers had 363 kills this past season for the Lady Gators’ volleyball team. Picked to finish fifth in the preseason, the Cane Bay High baseball team clinched second-place in the region 7- AAAA standings with a 2-0 win over Wando in the regu- lar season finale last Wednesday night. Senior right-hander Austin Timm allowed two hits and won his third consecutive start to pace Cane Bay, which improved to 10-12 overall and finished region play with a 5-3 record. Timm improved to 3-2 and extended his scoreless innings streak to 19 1/3 innings in Cane Bay’s second win over Wando this season. West Ashley won the Region 7-AAAA title with a 6-2 record. Cane Bay and Wando finished with 5-3 records but Cane Bay earned the second seed by virtue of the season sweep. Stratford and Goose Creek failed to qualify for the post-season. In the win over Wando, sen- ior rightfielder Blaine Peck had two of Cane Bay’s three hits against Wando ace Michael Carpin, who struck out 11 hitters in the complete game effort. Senior leftfielder Justin Shelton had the other hit, a single in the fourth, and scored the first run of the game on a wild pitch. Cane Bay scored again later in the fourth as Michael Morris crossed the plate on another wild pitch. Timm made the early lead stand, retiring the last nine hitters he faced. He finished Cobras make playoffs; Ashley Ridge first foe Rob Gantt/Gazette Trey Burdette was the win- ning pitcher in the season finale. See COBRAS Page 3B BY ROB GANTT The Gazette Stratford’s track and field teams swept the Berkeley County championships last Wednesday at Cane Bay High School. Both were dominant on their way to the crowns. The Lady Knights finished Stratford dominates county track championships Both teams peaking heading into stretch Rob Gantt/Gazette Stratford’s Destiny McKnight won both the 100-meter and 400-meter hurdles.See STRATFORD Page 2B See HAT TRICK Page 2B Rob Gantt/Gazette Wando’s Darren Scott pins Stratford’s Cole Walker in the 106-pound match on Monday at SHS. BY ROB GANTT The Gazette Goose Creek linebacker Jalen Stevens had options closer to home but he saw a distant opportunity as a better fit. The senior all-star line- backer committed to UConn on Friday, choosing the Huskies over North Carolina, Southern Miss, Appalachian State and Georgia State. “It was all based off getting my degree first and playing time,” Stevens said. “Education is first. You can’t play football forever. If I’m not able to go pro, then I’ll always have a degree from U C o n n . That’s going to look good on a resume.” Stevens (6- 3, 216) fin- ished the sea- son with 147 total tackles, seven sacks and eight quarterback pressures for the Gators. “(UConn coaches) treated me like I was a (Jadaveon) Clowney at South Carolina,” he said. “They were on me every week checking to see how I was doing.” The move to Connecticut takes him 14 hours away from his current home but it sets him up about two hours from his father and that side of the family in Bronx, N.Y. “I have to leave my mom but you’ve got to grow up and be a man some time,” he said. The Huskies posted a 5-7 record this past season for the second year in a row, but did have a notable victory over Louisville, which went on to defeat Florida in the Sugar Bowl earlier this month. They last won the Big East Conference in 2010, advanc- ing to the Fiesta Bowl. Goose Creek stalwart Stevens headed to UConn Stevens See STEVENS Page 3B BY ROB GANTT The Gazette With three bouts to go, it was either team’s match to win. And Wando won all three en route to a 40-26 victory over Stratford on Monday night at SHS, climbing into the driver’s seat for the Region 7-AAAA title. “This was a big step for us,” Wando coach Adam Schneider said. “With Stratford, it always comes down to those last couple of matches. Both of these teams get up for this match. “Thankfully we came out on the winning end.” Stratford came back from a 25- 14 deficit to lead 26-25 after Noah Shuler’s 8-3 win in the 182- pound match but Wando locked it up with pins by Brennan Medders and Aaron Anderson in the next two matches. Anderson’s win gave the Warriors an insurmount- able 37-26 lead heading into the final bout, a 2-0 victory at heavy- weight by the Warriors’ Hunter Allen. “They wanted it more than we did,” Stratford coach Willie Nearhood said. Wando will try to lock up the region championship on ‘They wanted it more’ Strong finish propels Wando past Stratford in key region match BY ROB GANTT The Gazette Death. Taxes. Goose Creek’s girls basketball team wins at home. One of those is no longer a given. The Lady Gators’ home streak ended on Friday night with a 48-40 loss to West Ashley at GCHS in a key Region 7- AAAA contest. “It was gut check time and we didn’t answer it,” Lady Gators coach Tim Baldwin said. “They wanted it. They won. Period.” West Ashley became the first team to cel- ebrate on Goose Creek’s floor since January of 2008, a span of almost five years. The Lady Wildcats, ranked No. 3 in the state, rode the play of junior Dekeiya Cohen, one of the state’s top players. She finished with 20 points and 20 rebounds in front of a crowd that included University of South Carolina coach Dawn Staley. She also had five blocks, two steals and two assists. Jue McElmore added 10 points while Keosha Hardaway chipped in eight points for the Lady Wildcats (14-1, 2-0 region). Junior Jhanice Stokes had eight boards for West Ashley and blocked three shots. Ashley Fields had 18 points to lead Goose Creek (15-3, 1-1) but missed Rob Gantt/Gazette Goose Creek’s Shakeia Joy (right) puts up a shot over West Ashley’s Jhanice Stokes. Rob Gantt/Gazette Goose Creek’s Jordan McElveen goes up for a shot over a West Ashley defender on Friday. Goose Creek swept by WA Setback at home first in five years by Lady Gators See SWEPT Page 3B Cane Bay’s basketball teams both fell to 0-2 in Region 7-AAAA play on Friday night, getting swept by Wando in Mount Pleasant. After the Lady Cobras dropped one 40-33, the Cane Bay boys lost 62-45. The girls dropped to 6-8 while the boys fell to 4-9. In the first region games earlier in the week, Cane Bay was swept by West Ashley. Cane Bay was set to travel to First Baptist for a non-region game after press time on Tuesday before hosting Goose Creek on Friday in region con- tests and traveling to Stratford on Jan. 22. In the girls game on Friday, freshman Shameque Robinson and junior Makayla Dudley scored eight points each to pace the Lady Cobras. Senior Brookelynn Doctor chipped in seven points while junior Adriana Barkley scored four points. Doctor was the top rebounder with nine boards followed by Robinson with six and senior Kabreea Howell with four. Dudley had five steals and three assists. Rob Gantt/Gazette Freshman Shameque Robinson had eight points and six rebounds for the Cane Bay girls on Friday in a loss to Wando. Cane Bay teams fall to 0-2 in region See CANE BAY Page 3B See KNIGHTS Page 3B
  • 51. FEATURE HEADLINE WRITING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Greenville Journal Jerry Salley GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, May 24, 2013 • Vol.15, No.21 GREENVILLEJOURNAL CONTINUED ON PAGE 8 Still sites are a remnant of Greenville County’s hardscrabble past SPIRITS OF THE DARK CORNER An illegal distillery found in the woods of northern Greenville in 1955. PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE JAMES G. WILSON COLLECTION, UPCOUNTRY HISTORY MUSEUM-FURMAN UNIVERSITY THE MYSTERIES OF GREENVILLE County’s Dark Corner are legion when it comes to moonshining as a cash lifeline for hardscrabble settlers in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Recently, a new one unraveled in a gated upscale community built among those stills of yesteryear. Who stripped clean the remnants of several still sites along about 12 miles of a hiking trail at the Cliffs community of Mountain Park? And why? The cleansing escaped the attention of the partnership that owns unsold land in the community and controls the property owners’ association. Upon some checking, Richard Hubbell, a Cliffs employee and a member of the Mountain Park POA board, learned the historic sites were cleared by a landscaper under direction of Carlton Property Services, the paid manager of the POA. That cleared up who ordered the scrubbing. The “why” was not explained. Scott Carlton, president of Carlton and presidentoftheCliffsClubs&Hospitality Group, did not return telephone requests for comment. BY DICK HUGHES | contributor This Halloween, the search for the perfect costume may take partygoers to a pop-up shop that will be open for a few weeks, or a permanent store that sells costumes year-round. Halloween Highway has been making and supplying costumesintheUpstatefor17years.Thecompanystarted out as a manufacturer and then opened a small store inside its North Pleasantburg Drive location. The store gotbiggerovertime,saidKarenMcCollum,storemanager. In addition to its mainstay Halloween season, the store also rents some costumes, such as Easter Bunny outfits, throughout the year, said McCollum. Another permanent costume store, Costume Curio on Laurens Road, finds most of its sustainability in renting costumes year-round. “Rentals have always been a staple of Costume Curio’s transactions; however, at Halloween, rentals and sales turn out to be fairly even,” said Lydia Latham, costume designer and manager. “People learn that we have a good quality of sale merchandise and keep our prices low, so they even end up getting a combination of rental and sale things to complete their look, when it’s im- portant to them.” CostumeCuriorentstothepublic“allofthetime,”said Latham – for occasions such as school projects, Fear and Clothing in the Upstate Year-round costume shops can find seasonal pop-up competition tricky By Jeanne Putnam | contributor | jputnam@communityjournals.com COVER STORY EXTRA >> Masks for sale at the Halloween Highway costume store in Greenville. The year-round store faces competition from pop-up stores this time of year. CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF clandrum@communityjournals.com Neil Armstrong might not have walked on the moon if it hadn’t been for a group of Slater Mill workers and Snoopy, the beloved cartoon character created by Charles Schulz. The contributions both made to the space program are featured in a special exhibition on display through Dec. 29 at the Upcountry History Museum. “To the Moon: Snoopy Soars with NASA,” an exhibit developed by the Charles M. Schulz Museum in Santa Rosa, Calif., explores the cartoon charac- ter’s association with NASA, a relation- ship that began four decades ago with the Apollo 10 mission and continues to- day with the “Silver Snoopy Award.” The exhibit also looks at the pivotal roles the Upstate and South Carolina played in the space program. Upstate History Museum Executive Director Dana Thorpe said the exhibit will appeal to those with interest in NASA and the space program, fans of Schulz’s comic strip, “Peanuts,” and people interested in the Upstate’s textile heritage. That textile heritage traces back to a specialized Beta-Fiberglass fabric produced in a cordoned-off area of a northern Greenville County mill where fewer than three dozen plant employ- ees had special clearance to go. The material was used to make the 23-layer protective fabric in the moon suits worn by the country’s first astro- nauts, including Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon. But Armstrong’s historic feat may not have become reality if it hadn’t been for Charles M. Schulz and his beloved car- toon character, Snoopy. The month before their scheduled launch, the flight crew of Apollo I, the first manned Apollo mission, was con- ducting a simulated countdown to test the command/service module and the launch vehicle. The hatch was locked, the power on and the internal atmosphere was pure oxygen. Astronauts Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee were in their space suits performing the normal se- quence of prelaunch activities. Snoopy and Slater Mill both played big roles in space program, Upstate History Museum exhibit shows THE BEAGLE HAS LANDED SNOOPY continued on PAGE 36 Artwork autographed by Charles Schulz is part of the exhibit, as well as a moon rock from the last of the Apollo moon missions. Snoopy and Charlie Brown dolls similar to these were in Mission Control during Apollo 10. On Apollo 10 the lunar module was called “Snoopy” and the command module was called “Charlie Brown.” GREG BECKNER / STAFF
  • 52. FEATURE HEADLINE WRITING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Island News Pamela Brownstein Lighthouse pizza; Fat patties; Moondoggies
  • 53. FEATURE HEADLINE WRITING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The Moultrie News Sully Witte Two hot dogs, hold the flies JoeHamondhangsZiplocbagsandplasticbottlesfilled withwater,becausehesaidtheykeepfliesaway. Ham- ond,theownerofJohnny’ssinceitopenedin2005,tacksthebagsandhangsthebottlesaroundtherestaurant. When they had to be taken down for store painting, flies became an unwanted visitor, he said, adding that when the bags returned as restaurant decor, the flies went away. Are you among those who believe in the bags? STAFF PHOTOS BY TYLER HEFFERNAN Condensation consternation Slippery when wet Thewomen’sgameoftheCarrierClassicbetweenNotreDameandOhioStatewasplayedwithoutanyissues.The men’s game pitting Ohio State and Marquette against each other could not be played because of condensation on the court. Despite the cancellation, Morale Entertainment President Mike Whalen said Monday that he and the Patriots Point Development Authority have agreed to hold the event again next year on the USS Yorktown, citing an engineering solution to keep the court dry. See more photos and a recap of the event on page 2A and online at www.moultrienews.com. STAFF PHOTO BY TYLER HEFFERNAN The Mellow Mushroom in Mount Pleasant hosted the fourth annual Mount Pleasant Beerfest on Saturday at its location on Highway 17 North. After establishing itself among beer aficionados as one of the best craft beer festivals in Mount Pleasant, the Mount Pleasant Beerfest topped itself again with more than 30 lo- calandnationalbreweriesservingupover70craftbeersfor unlimited tasting to benefit the Ronald McDonald House of Charleston. There was live music all day on center stage by two local bands, Schema and Wadata, in addition to the tasty Mellow Mushroom food experience. Sponsors include the Man Cave of Mount Pleasant and Phillips Industrial Services. Beerfest crafts day of fun Sarah Zacharias and Bekah Huie enjoy the tasting. STAFF PHOTOS BY SULLY WITTE Steph Cory, Jina Crane and Josh Byler ran the VIP beer tasting tent.
  • 54. SPORTS HEADLINE WRITING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. Perry Waterfowl whisperer Horryboy,10,winsstatewideduckcallingcompetition Ben Biddle, 10, shows off his state championship trophy and the duck call he used to win it. Ben will compete in the world contest this fall. CHARLESD.PERRY|THEHERALD BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD BenBiddleisafreckle- facedassassin. Forthelasttwoyears,the Conwayboy—adeadringer forAlfalfa,minusthesprout —hastakentothewatersof theLowcountryinsearchof ducks. “Ijustlikehowtheyfly,”he said.“It’sdifferentthanother birds,andIcanspotthemfar away.” The10-year-oldisalso skilledatcallingthebirdsto hishuntingsite.Thiswater- fowlwhispererissofluentin quackingthatherecently wonastateduckcallingcon- test.Thevictoryqualifieshim tocompeteinaninternation- aleventthisfall. Notbadforakidwithsuch ashorthuntinghistory. Readytohunt Lastyear,Beninformedhis fatherthatheandhisblack lab,Ace,werereadytohead tothewater. “Iwanttoduckhunt,”Ben toldhim.“I’mgivingupbas- ketballforduckhuntingthis year.” MarshallBiddlehadn’t beenduckhuntinginyears, butheagreedtogowith somefriendsfromPawleys Islandwhoalsohadyoung boys. “Wegenerallyhuntdads andsons,”MarshallBiddle said.“It’sjustsomethingwe wanttopassonlikeourdads passedontous.” TheBiddlesarealsofansof theA&Erealityshow“Duck Dynasty,”whichchronicles thelivesoftheduck-hunting Robertsonfamilyin Louisiana’sbayoucountry. TheRobertsonssellduck callsandotherhuntinggear. TheBiddlesaresuch See DUCKCALLS,Page2A CHARLESD.PERRY|THEHERALD Ben likes to hunt ducks with Ace, his family’s black lab. Roller derby teen BYHEATHERGALE FORTHEHERALD Lined up behind eight other roller derby skaters, decked out in a brightly-colored outfit with skates strapped to her feet and a helmet on her head, Lainey Lewis is ready to jam. She works her way through the pack on the first loop un- harmed and now the Horry County Scholars Academy sophomore is ready to pour on the points. She sprints around the track, catching up with the other eight skaters, weaves her way through the pack while ab- sorbing hits to the midsection from opposing players and somehow man- ages to avoid crashing to the floor. She earns one point for each opposing team member she passes. “It is definitely exhilarating,” the 16-year-old roller derby enthusiast said. “To have the ability for you to get through a pack without falling over or getting hit or just taking a hit and getting past it is amazing. You say to yourself, ‘Wow, I just passed eight girls without falling over.’ It is an amazing, intense feeling.” Lewis, who goes by the roller derby name “Ming Chung Chow,” has worked her way up the roller derby ranks through hard work and dedication and is now an assistant coach of the local Palmetto State Roller Girls team. See ROLLERDERBY, Page 3A Horrystudent balanceslife ofschoolwork andskating Rollerderby isjustsome thatIloveit. LaineyLewis Rollerderby skater| PHOTOCOURTESYOFLOUISKEINER Lainey Lewis, a 16-year-old Scholars Academy student who goes by the roller derby name“Ming Chung Chow,”has worked her way up the roller derby ranks through hard work and dedication and is now an assistant coach of the local Palmetto State Roller Girls team. Her mother is also a roller derby enthusiast and the two hope to someday skate in competitions together. St.Jamessoccerstar tohelpfootballsquad BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD Mark Fischer was standing on the practice field last fall when he heard an unusual noise. “The football just sounded like the air was getting knocked out of it,” the St. James coach said. “I turned around and it was Nicole kicking.” That would be Nicole Meyers, star of the girls soccer team and the newest member of the Sharks football squad. “She’s got a lot to learn,” Fischer said. “But she’s got a thun- der foot.” Meyers first displayed her kicking power while working with the school’s athletic trainers last fall. They were goofing around with the kickers when she decided to try her foot at an extra point. “I just wanted to see what it was like, to see if it was anything like kicking a soccer ball,” she said. “I didn’t think anybody was paying at- tention.” Without any coaching, Meyers backed up, charged forward and pounded the ball between the uprights. “Everyone kind of stopped and looked,” she said. “I thought I was going to get yelled at because I wasn’t supposed to be over there.” Instead of a rebuke, she heard something else. “Do it again,” they said. “Everybody was like, ‘You should come play for our team,’” Meyers recalled. “I was like, ‘I would. What do I care?’” What began as a casual invitation grew more serious when the team’s regular kicker tore his ACL in the offseason. That’s when Fischer asked Meyers to attend a summer kicking camp so she would be ready to play this fall. “I thought it’d be fun,” she said. “It wasn’t really pres- sure on me because it’s not like I wanted to come and was like ‘Let me kick for the team.’ So I know there were really no expectations.” That could soon change. This summer, she placed second in a kicking contest at Myrtle Beach High School. Her best boot was good from 35 yards. “I couldn’t make the 40,” she said, as though that’s a common skill. Although she’s enjoying her new sport, Meyers admits learning the technique has been difficult. She’s played soc- cer every year since she was four and the differences be- tween kicking styles are stark. “With soccer, it doesn’t really matter where your plant foot is as long as you follow through wherever you want,” she said. “There’s a lot of forgiveness on a soccer ball as opposed to a foot- ball.” See SOCCER STAR, Page 2B A LEG OF HER OWN A LEG OF HER OWN
  • 55. SPORTS HEADLINE WRITING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Laurens County Advertiser Nick Herman Blue Hose guaranteed top-5 finish By Nick Herman Sports Editor It has been a season that has surpassed outsiders’ expectations but not those of the members of the Presbyterian College women’s basketball team. And it keeps getting better. Karlee Taylor and Dria David each scored 20 points Saturday and Mariah Pietrowski added 17 as the Blue Hose knocked off High Point at the Templeton Center, 71-69. The victory kept PC in a tie for second place with Winthrop at 11-4 and moved the Blue Hose to an overall mark of 17-10. The victory solidified PC’s standing in the Big South confer- ence race with one week to go. Coupled with a Radford loss ear- lier in the day, the Blue Hose clinched no worse than fourth place in the standings — guaran- teeing a first-round bye at the Big South tournament next week in Conway. One victory this week will net PC no worse than the No. 3 seed. The Blue Hose have an outside shot at clinching the No. 1 seed (needing two losses by Liberty and one by Winthrop combined with a PC sweep of Radford and Longwood), but can get the No. 2 seed by winning out and having Winthrop lose once. It is an amazing accomplish- ment for a team that was picked to finish eighth in the Big South at the start of the year. But to the players at PC, it’s not a surprise. “It’s more surprising to every- body else in the Big South. We knew we were good. We’re a very veteran team. We had something to prove, especially being picked eighth,” said David, one of six seniors honored Saturday, along with Pietrowski, Shonda Burnside, Devin Fothergill, Chelsea Parker and Olivia Towers-Solis. “We don’t put a lot of stock in preseason polls, whether good or bad, because they don’t mean anything,” PC head coach Ronny Fisher said. “It doesn’t surprise me that we’re having success because we had a great core of seniors that are great leaders, and they’ve come to get better every day.” PC had to earn the victory Saturday against a High Point team that came in at 9-6 in the Big South and was also fighting for a first-round bye. High Point’s threat came in the form of center Cheyenne Parker. Standing 6- foot-4, Parker entered the game averaging a double-double (18 points, 13.5 rebounds) and led the nation in blocks per game at 4.54. Parker turned in a quality stat line for the Panthers, scoring 19 points, grabbing nine rebounds and blocking three shots. Parker fouled out with 28.6 seconds to go but she had to earn everything against a stout PC defense. “She’s so darn quick it was hard to get there fast enough. She made some unbelievable plays but I thought Shonda, Mariah and Keyonna did a decent job on her,” Fisher said. PC appeared to have the game in hand, holding a 41-28 lead with 14 minutes, 11 seconds left in regulation, but High Point rallied with 13 straight points, capped off by two foul shots from Stacia Robertson with 10:42 left, to tie the game at 41-all. After Cheyenne Parker put High Point ahead at 44-43, a determined PC pulled back in front for good on two free throws from David with 6:43 to go. The PC defense bent but never broke against High Point, holding the Panthers to 40.7 percent from the field, including 8 of 25 in the first half, and forcing 14 turnovers. “We are a very defensive-ori- ented team. We knew we had to give that little bit extra because it’s Senior Night and we never had beaten High Point before,” said Taylor. PC secured the victory in the late stages of the game with its foul shooting. After a sluggish first half from the charity stripe (5 of 12), the Blue Hose found their touch by hitting 21 of 24 attempts from the line in the final 20 minutes. The 26 made foul shots by PC were a season-high, topping the 25 made two nights earlier against Charleston Southern. High Point 23 46 — 69 PC 29 42 — 71 High Point (3FG-2FG-FT-TP): Tremblay 0-0-2-2, Patterson 4-2- 0-16, Robertson 2-5-6-22, Puckett 1-1-0-5, Parker 0-6-7-19, Richard 0-1-1-3, Cromartie 0-0- 2-2. Totals: 7-15-18-69. PC: David 1-4-9-20, Parker 0- 1-1-3, Fothergill 0-1-2-4, Burnside 0-1-0-2, Pietrowski 0-6- 5-17, Carter 0-1-0-2, Taylor 4-0- 8-20, Allen 0-1-1-3. Totals: 5-15- 26-71. PC women say hello to bye 9th-grader amasses 388 yards in Raider rout of Woodmont By Nick Herman Sports Editor If you take away the rushing plays in which D.Q. Floyd scored touchdowns, the running back for the Laurens ninth-grade team rushed 10 times for 101 yards. Not a bad night by any means. Add the six touchdown runs he had that tallied a whopping additional 287 yards and you have an unbelievable night. Floyd rushed for 388 yards and six touchdowns as the Raiders roughed up Woodmont, 42-24, at K.C. Hanna Stadium Thursday. Laurens is now 2-4 on th “He’s run the ball well for us all year long. He’s our go-to guy,” Laurens head coach Dale Nelson said. “He does a good job of, when he gets the football, of getting north and south.” Floyd had touchdowns runs of, in order, 1, 81, 57, 1, 75 and 72 yards. His last touchdown, in the fourth quarter, came as Floyd went into “Beast Mode,” a phrase made famous by Seattle Seahawks’ back Marshawn Lynch. After running over a defender at the 50-yard line, Floyd went full speed down the sideline for the score. Floyd also had three two-point conversions in the game but gave credit to the offensive line for helping him get the yards he did. “They did a pretty good job,” Floyd said. They blocked well.” Laurens JV 21, Woodmont 8: Shaking off a rough start, the Raiders rebounded with two fi t t t hd t t k the lead for good against the Wildcats. Graydon Hamby threw two touchdown passes in the first quarter – a 35-yard pass to Desario Whitmore that cut an early deficit to 8-7 and then a 14- yard pass to Kiante Boyd that gave the Raiders the lead for good with 2 minutes, 22 seconds left in the first quarter. Kee Whitmore added a 7-yard run in the third quarter to wrap up the scoring. Clinton JV 34, Broome 0 (Thursday): Clinton rolled to the shutout victory, knocking Broome’s JV team from the ranks of the unbeaten at Wilder Stadium. The ground game picked up a lot of yards on the night, sparked by the play of offensive linemen Daniel Moore, Tyson Evans, Anfernee Gary, Thad Birchmore, Logan Lanier, Jameel Evans, Devin Francis and Ch dl T dd Tyshamen Boyd scored the first two touchdowns of the game – one offensive, one defen- sive. Tra Jones added a 15-yard run to boost the Red Devils’ lead 22 0 at the half Boyd added another touch- down on the first series of the second half and Tra Jones tacked on the final TD, a 45- yard run to finish the scoring for Clinton (3 3) A S S S S O O O O N N A S S Photo by Nick Herman NO DILLY-DALLYING HERE — Laurens ninth-grade running back D.Q. Floyd ran wild for the Raiders against Woodmont Thursday at K.C. Hanna Stadium, gaining 388 yards and six touchdowns, along with three two-point conversions, in the Raiders 42-24 victory over the Wildcats. D.Q. unleashes rushing blizzard
  • 56. SPORTS HEADLINE WRITING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The Berkeley Independent Frank Johnson Hurta so goodHurta so good Damian Hurta’s 13 points led St. John’s in its recent game against Christian Academy. For all of the details, see Sports. Dan Brown/Independent BHS gets Funk-yBY DAN BROWN The Independent Wins have come as a premi- um for the Berkeley Lady Stags this season, and region wins had been non-existent. Not anymore. Rallying to overcome a 10- point second quarter deficit the Lady Stags won a second half battle of scoreboard leapfrog to pick up their first Region 8AAA win of the 2012-2013 season, 31-26 over James Island on Jan. 16. “Any win is a good win,” said Lady Stags Coach Crystal Peace. “We’re learn- ing and they’re working hard.” The Lady Stags put together a 6-0 run to win the game behind Jill Funk’s go-ahead layup with 1:35 remaining in the game and a pair of free throws as time expired. In the game’s first eight minutes the night looked like more of the same for a strug- gling Berkeley team, as the Lady Stags fell behind 11-4. Donni Robinson accounted for the only points of the quarter with a pair of field goals. In the second quarter Berkeley clamped the lid on the James Island basket and returned the favor, riding an 11-point second quarter behind Ashlynn Smalls’ five points. In the second half Priscilla Washington took the game to the paint as Berkeley and James Island traded buckets until late in the fourth quarter as eight of Washington’s game-high 12 points came in the second half. “Nobody can do it inside like Priscilla can,” Peace said. “Right before Christmas she decided to bring her game and she has been a dominant player inside ever since.” Smalls chipped in seven points and Funk added six points to help pace the Berkeley offense. The win improves the Lady Stags to 4-10 overall and 1-2 in Region 8AAA. Berkeley was to host Orangeburg- Wilkinson on Friday but due to early deadlines because of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday game results were not available at press time. “We’re going to win some games,” Peace said. “We’re learning and it may take us a little while but we’re going to win some ball games.” The Lady Stags travel to Stall on Tuesday and host Hilton Head in Region 8AAA games on Friday. Dan Brown/Independent Jill Funk drives the baseline to hit the go-ahead bucket with 1:35 left in the game as Berkeley downed James Island 31-26. Funk finished with six points on the night. Dan Brown/Independent Eric Orton does his best Pete Rose headfirst slide into second base during the Stags 5-3 win over James Island. The young and the hitless BY DAN BROWN The Independent The Stags are firing on all cylinders. In a game featuring a good baseball team, if not the best in Region 7AAA in Berkeley, against a Stall program still trying to find its game legs, the result was ugly: a 20-1 win for BHS at home on Friday night. Three Stags pitchers com- bined to no-hit the Warriors propelling Berkeley to a per- fect 9-0 record and a com- manding 3-0 record in the region. Joe Glauser, Bryce Kunkle and Josh Clarke teamed up to hurl the Stags second no-hit- ter of the 2013 season, fol- lowing Zach Gonzales’ gem against Fort Dorchester. The no-hitter put an exclamation point on what was supposed to be the Stags’ first real test in Region 7AAA, with big games early on against James Island and Hanahan. Berkeley passed with flying colors downing the Trojans 5- 4 and the Hawks 4-2, relying on big game innings with vin- tage small ball style. Against James Island on March 18, Berkeley plated four runs in the bottom of the sixth inning to come from behind and win. Down 3-1 the Stags loaded the bases on a pair of infield singles by Kyle Garrick and Zach Gonzales and a sacri- fice/fielder’s choice by Andrew Lockliear when Garrick beat the throw to third. Dylan Baker followed with a line-drive single up the middle, which plated Garrick and Gonzales to tie the score. Lockliear attempted to take third on the throw but the throw from the plate sailed high and wide down the left Stags don’t hesitate vs. Stall See STAGS Page 3B
  • 57. PHOTO PAGE DESIGN AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The Lancaster News Laura Caskey >> INSIDE: Church News, 2B, 5B I Classifieds, 5B I Coming Events, 4B, 5B I Education, 6B I Entertainment, 3B 1BFaces & Places The Lancaster News Driver puts phone out of reach after a frightening close call, Dear Abby/3B Sunday September 22, 2013 >>Features I (803) 283-1158 Extended Weather Forecast High 78 Low 62 High 78 Low 60 High 80 Low 58 High 83 Low 60 Today First day of fall looks rainy Monday Partly cloudy with a 10 percent chance of scattered showers Tuesday Partly cloudy and seasonal Wednesday Looks to stay cooler Thursday Mix of sun and clouds High 86 Low 62 The Bands Come Marching in Area HS bands show their colors in annual band expo Sept. 14 Eric Roberts leads the Andrew Jackson High School marching band during the band expo at AJHS Volunteer Stadium on Sept. 14. DRUM MAJOR Members of the Indian Land High School band color guard fly the flags during their routine. The exhibition provides friendly competition for seven local bands before the real competition season starts Oct. 26. INDIAN LAND COLOR GUARD Photographs by David Kellin/For The Lancaster News Each year, Andrew Jackson High School plays host to the annual exhibition. This year, in addition to the AJ band, above, the event featured bands from Lancaster, Buford, Indian Land, Cheraw, Central and Chester high schools. ANDREW JACKSON HIGH SCHOOL BAND Lancaster High School drum major Austin Wilson, above, leads the Bruin band, above right, in an evening performance. Below right, the Buford High School Yellow Jackets Band march on to the field. STANDING TALL
  • 58. PHOTO PAGE DESIGN AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Carolina Forest Chronicle Michael Smith A13 CAROLINA FOREST CHRONICLE | CAROLINA FOREST, S.C. | PHOTO PAGE | OCTOBER 31, 2013 www.myhorrynews.com HALLOWEENCOSTUME EXTRAVAGANZA Photo story by Michael Smith | michael.smith@myhorrynews.com Every year the annual Halloween costume contest at Broadway at the Beach fails to disappoint, and this year was no exception. Amid the plethora of 10-foot tall monster costumes and elaborate props, Michonne and her two zombies from “The Walking Dead” took home the $2,500 top prize in Saturday's contest. Second place and $1,000 went to “Despi- cable Me,” which consisted of Gru and two of his minions. Third place and $500 went to Corona Six-Pack. Nightmare Before Christmas characters, Zoltar from “Big” and several renditions of “The Anchorman” were among the other costumes garnering looks Friday night. Time tested favorites such as super- heroes, monsters and Star Wars were also circulating among the crowd at Celebrity Square. Another costume contest at Broad- way is scheduled for this Saturday evening. It’s being hosted by Celebrity Square clubs. I Online photo gallery For a photo gallery from Saturday’s Hal- loween costume contest at Broadway at the Beach, visit us online at www.myhorrynews.com. Above, a character from “Duck Dynasty” throws his arms into the air at Celebrity Square at Broadway at the Beach. Right, one of the more unique costumes at Saturday’s contest was the “Corona Six-Pack.” The costume won third place. The Incredible Hulk flexes his muscles for the crowd during the finals of Saturday’s Hal- loween costume contest. Michonne and her two zombies from “The Walking Dead” took home the $2,500 top prize in Saturday's Halloween costume contest at Broadway at the Beach. Frankenstein and his bride take the stage during the finals of Saturday night’s Halloween costume contest at Broadway at the Beach. Right, Gru and two of his min- ions made an ap- pearance at the Broadway at the Beach costume contest Saturday. The “Despicable Me” characters won second place in the contest. Hundreds of patrons fill Celebrity Square at Broadway at the Beach for the annual Hal- loween costume contest. Another costume contest is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 31.
  • 59. PHOTO PAGE DESIGN AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The Fort Jackson Leader Wallace McBride CMYK SOLDIERS COMPETE IN POST’S FIRST FULLY SANCTIONED BOXING EVENT ACTION@ JACKSON ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ IN FOCUS Photos by SGT. 1ST CLASS JOEL QUEBEC, 81st Regional Support Command Spc. Cody Pressley of the 81st Regional Support Command jogs to the ring during the Fort Jackson Boxing Smoker Satur- day at the Solomon Center. Fans hold up signs to support their boxers. The event was open to active-duty fighters of all service branches. Chants of,“Go Army, beat Navy” accompanied this match between Sgt. Curtis Adams of the 187th Ordnance Battalion, right, and Petty Officer 1 James Zeigler of the Navy Operational Support Center. Spc. Vicente De La Roca of the 17th Military Po- lice Detachment, gets coaching between rounds. Staff Sgt. Wesley Moore of MEDDAC takes a standing eight- count during the Fort Jackson Boxing Smoker Saturday at the Solomon Center. Moore went on to win his match
  • 60. EDITORIAL/OP-ED COLUMN Associate/Individual Division THIRD PLACE: Columbia Regional Business Report Bill Settlemyer P icking up where I left off in my last column on the Medicaid expan- sion, let’s look a little closer at the people in South Carolina who, accord- ing to our political leaders, don’t need health insurance. Who are those people? First and fore- most, they are “tax- payers,” that beloved class of citizens whose interests are purportedly put ahead of all others residing in the state. If you buy anything, you pay sales taxes, and increasingly our political leaders are trying to pile the financial burdens of government onto the sales tax and away from property and income taxes. It’s a highly regressive, unbalanced and unsta- ble approach to raising revenue, but that’s another column. Second, for those inclined to see a racial component to this issue, it should be noted that 63% of the uninsured in our state are white (i.e., non-Hispanic whites). A statistic of greater interest, perhaps, is that 70% of the state’s uninsured live in working families. They’re working hard to get by on low wages and either can’t afford the cost of coverage or work for employers who offer little or no coverage to their employees. These are people ask- ing for a hand up, not a handout. But they don’t need health coverage It has been carefully explained to us by our political leaders that those peo- ple don’t need coverage because “health insurance doesn’t make people healthi- er.” If so, why aren’t our leaders strongly advocating that all of us drop our own insurance coverage? Why waste money on something that you don’t need? And why should the state waste money pro- viding health coverage for state employ- ees? The difference, I think, is that “those people” are, to put it bluntly, second class citizens in our state’s political environ- ment. Decisions on access to care are more similar to decisions that might be made with regard to livestock. Will feeding the cattle or chickens antibiotics increase profits or not? If not, save the money. That seems like a rather harsh way to view this, I’ll grant you, but let’s admit that we apply a very different stan- dard to “those people” than we would to our more prosperous peers. Throw out the kitchen sink But suppose our political leaders acknowledged that “those people” really do need health insurance. The fallback argument is that the state just can’t afford to expand Medicaid, even with the fed- eral government reimbursing 100% of the cost of care for the first three years and then scaling down to 90% starting in 2020. To prove we can’t afford the Medicaid expansion, Health and Human Services Director Tony Keck uses a “kitchen sink” approach, throwing dollars into the pot that aren’t directly related to the expan- sion. In fact, the data from the state’s own outside actuarial consultants found that the direct costs of the expansion would rise to about $200 million per year by 2020. An analysis of the state’s actuarial projections by the Moore School of Busi- ness estimates that about half of that $200 million annual cost would be offset by additional state tax revenues generated by increased health care spending under the expanded program. To put all this in perspective, let’s take a look at the FY 2014 budget presented to the Legislature by Mr. Keck. He proj- ects state spending on Medicaid of just under $2 billion for FY 2014. Another $4.5 billion will be paid for by the federal government under the 75% match in the current Medicaid program. So based on the numbers, the added annual cost of $200 million would be 10% more than the state’s current spend- ing on Medicaid coverage. If the addi- tional 10% is “unaffordable,” then maybe the state should drop out of the Medicaid program altogether so we can corner the national market on poor people without health coverage. Sounds like a plan! A mind is a terrible thing to waste In my previous column, I said that Mr. Keck is highly intelligent and that he has impressive credentials as an expert on health care policy. Which makes it such a waste that he’s spending so much energy trying to pre- vent more than 300,000 South Carolin- ians from having access to health cover- age. Mr. Keck knows a great deal about what’s wrong with health care in this country. Most of what’s wrong has noth- ing to do with government programs like Medicaid and Medicare, which are actually more cost-effective than private health insurance plans due to low reim- bursement rates and lower administra- tive costs. With Gov. Nikki Haley’s support, Mr. Keck is pursuing some very good ideas about how to improve people’s health and reduce wasteful spending. One example is the decision announced in January that DHHS will stop paying for elective early deliveries. Research has shown that this can be detrimental to the health of newborns, and the decision has been widely supported by the state’s medical com- munity. Last month, Mr. Keck announced a proposed $40 million plan to do a variety of things to improve health outcomes in the state. One proposal would expand MUSC’s telemedicine net- work, connecting patients in rural areas with health care experts via high defini- tion video. Another would fund an effort to encourage more physicians to practice in underserved rural areas of the state. Tellingly, a number of the proposals also rely on an infusion of federal money. In South Carolina, we like getting money from the federal government, except when we don’t. Now all of these ideas are good ones, and Mr. Keck has many more. But with- out the Medicaid expansion, they are just Band-Aids applied to an open wound. This is the tragedy of Red State politics, where we’d rather shoot ourselves in the foot than make a common sense decision that would benefit the state in multiple ways. And frankly, it all comes back to my people vs. livestock analogy. Aside from the 20-somethings who think they’re invincible, you’ll find very few people of any socioeconomic group, rich, poor or middle class, who don’t think it’s vitally important to have adequate health cover- age. The argument of the state’s political leaders that we’ve got to fix everything that’s wrong with health care before we can consider giving “those people” access to coverage is both counterintuitive and illogical. The right answer, and the logical one, is to do both. At the same time that we cover more South Carolinians through the Medicaid expansion, we can be pur- suing all the other good ideas Mr. Keck has to improve health outcomes and make health care more efficient and cost- effective. Now that would be a win-win deal. I challenge every state legislator who opposes the Medicaid expansion to can- cel his or her health coverage and any coverage on his or her family. Prove to me that you really don’t think health cover- age is a necessity for everyone. Walk the talk, and then we’ll talk. Bill Settlemyer is the founder of the Charles- ton Regional Business Journal. E-mail him at bsettlemyer@scbiznews.com. Bill Settlemyer Viewpoint:Views, perspectives and readers’ letters Unlike us, ‘those people’ don’t need health insurance We want to hear from you Write: Bob Bouyea, Publisher Columbia Regional Business Report 1612 Marion St., Suite 301, Columbia, SC 29201 E-mail: editorial@scbiznews.com Comment on the Web: www.columbiabusinessreport.com WHO ARE THE UNINSURED PEOPLE IN SOUTH CAROLINA? Source: S.C. Hospital Association 63% 70% 11.8% are non- Hispanic whites are childrenlive in working families
  • 61. EDITORIAL/OP-ED COLUMN Associate/Individual Division SECOND PLACE: S.C. United Methodist Advocate Jessica Connor
  • 62. EDITORIAL/OP-ED COLUMN Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE: Columbia Regional Business Report James T. Hammond Viewpoint:Views, perspectives and readers’ letters I magine this scenario: A section of Interstate 26 that spans the Saluda River northwest of Columbia col- lapses, sending vehicles crashing into the water. After the carnage, the region faces months or years of gridlock as this artery of commerce from the industrial Upstate to the Port of Charleston is shut down. Trucks and cars are thrown onto I-126 and Huger Street, seeking a path around the col- lapsed bridge. Some trucks turn east on I-20 to I-77, a major artery from Char- lotte, worsening gridlock. AAA Carolinas ranks this I-26 bridge as the state’s worst bridge. It’s a choke point for exports to the Port of Charles- ton. S.C. business leaders say fixing I-26 is a top economic development priority, the “lifeblood of commerce.” The I-26 span three miles northwest of downtown is 55 years old and handles 547,000 vehicles weekly. It’s just one of the top six worst bridges in the state, all six of which are on I-26. Now the General Assembly has let another year go by without seriously addressing the state’s looming transpor- tation crisis. And if one respected Low- country business leader is to be believed, Gov. Nikki Haley encouraged a handful of senators to block passage of adequate highway improvements. The governor’s office denies the asser- tion by Mary Graham, senior vice presi- dent at the Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce, that the governor urged senators to stop a bill that would have provided money for roads and bridges. “She called a group of senators into her office a couple of weeks ago and said, ‘You need to kill this bill. I want ethics reform passed this year. I don’t want this one passed until next year so I can use it in my re-election campaign,’” Graham said. “So that’s what we’re up against in Columbia.” A Department of Transportation study shows the state needs $29 billion to fix substandard roads and bridges over the next 20 years. The agency also esti- mates the loss to businesses from choked roadways at $2.6 billion over seven years. The legislature approved $50 million a year to leverage $500 million in bonds for road improvements. That will only scratch the surface of the state’s needs. Another proposal to borrow $1.3 billion for roads by raising fees and the gasoline tax didn’t make it out of the Senate. Ignoring the pleas from business to bring South Carolina roads up to mod- ern standards, Gov. Haley seems content to put her own political ambitions ahead of the welfare of the traveling public. And her allies in the General Assembly acquiesced to putting the public’s welfare behind her political priorities. South Carolina is just one disaster away from transportation chaos that could freeze interest among manufac- turers in locating new plants in the state. Allowing South Carolina roads to crum- ble is a signal that our leaders are not willing to maintain a road system equal to those in North Carolina and Georgia. South Carolina citizens, business owners and local political leaders need to raise a ruckus. Let’s ensure that our law- makers do their duty in the coming year and fix our crumbling road system. James T. Hammond is editor of the Columbia Regional Business Report. Reach him at 803-726-7545. Statehouse dithers while S.C. roads crumble James T. Hammond
  • 63. HARRIS AWARD FOR EDITORIAL WRITING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Fort Mill Times Michael Harrison W ith all due respect to the great William Shake- speare, sometimes the answer to his rhetorical question “What’s in a name” is “quite a bit, real- ly.” Which is why the Fort Mill School District deserves much credit for its recent decision to change of the name of a planned new school off Doby’s Bridge Road, itself named for one of the town’s founding families, from “Dobys Bridge Ele- mentary”toDoby’sBridgeElementary.”Somereadersmight have to re-read the previous sentence to see the difference – which isn’t as subtle as it may seem. Theapostrophehascomeunderattackinrecentyears(see theMay16WallStreetJournalstory,“TheresaQuestionMark HangingOvertheApostrophesFuture”[sic])andsomemem- bers of the textinati (perhaps texterati, or even textocracy, is more accurate?) have the ways and means of doing harm to this humble, but important, punctuation mark. Standing guard like a hardy colon armed with an exclamation point cockedandreadytofirelikeaspear,wearequickdefendersof the besieged apostrophe. Apparently we’re not alone. Many readers expressed support for our July 3 editorial asking the school board to reconsider its choice, and in less than24hoursweweretoldthatdistrictofficialswillnamethe newschoolDoby’sBridgeElementary.Supt.ChuckEppssays his recommendation for the name sans apostrophe was err- ing on the side of safety, that he was worried first responders andvisitorslookingfor“Doby’s”withaGPSwouldnoteasily findtheschool.AftergettingreassurancefromYorkCounty’s chief of safety that using the proper name would not impede policeandfirefightersfromfindingtheschoolinanemergen- cy, he passed on a new recommendation to the school board and members agreed. Epps and School Board Chairman Patrick White maintain that they don’t agree with some of the arguments we made in ourJuly3editorialandthatistheirright.What’simportantis thatwedidourjobbyfocusingattentiononanissuewefeelis important and they did their job by listening – and ultimately making the correct choice. School district deserves credit for decision W hat is the public’s right to know what government is up to, and when should the public know it? Asdeepasourheelsareduginwhenitcomesto First Amendment rights and the obligation of government to operatewithtransparency,evenwehavetoadmitthereareno easy answers to those questions. The revelation last month that the U.S. Department of Jus- tice obtained secret subpoenas to seize phone records of re- porters while investigating an apparent CIA leak caused a knee-jerk reaction so profound that it had media pundits typ- ically critical of mainstream journalists crying foul. The ap- parentleakofinformationaboutacovertanti-terrorismoper- ation could put at the risk the lives of agents working for the U.S. or one of our allies and while we shudder at the ham- handed approach by DOJ to trace the source, we can fully understand the effort. Transparency issues are all around us lately. Right here in South Carolina, the state Senate, at the last minute, breathed life into an ethics reform bill that seemed destined to die of inaction before the current legislative ses- sion ends. Among other things, the bill, if it becomes law withoutextensiverevision,wouldrequirelawmakerstomore fully disclose their sources of income and shed light on other possible conflicts of interest. Unfortunately,thedealthatbroughtthebillbacktoviabili- ty this session included an agreement to prioritize an- other bill that proposes blocking any implementa- tion of the federal Afford- able Care Act in S.C. Since that law mandates the cre- ation of state-run insuranc- es “exchanges” it seems unlikely S.C. can enact any blocking legislation without inviting a protracted and costly court fight. However, since the state seemed destined to fight to keepanybenefitsoftheAffordableCareActfromreachingits citizens,perhapsit’snotanunreasonablepricetopayfortrue ethics reform being enacted this year. Even closer to home, there are open government issues to consider. From the county council to town and city councils and the school boards, so-called executive sessions allow elected officials to discuss the public’s business behind closed doors. While there may sometimes be sufficient rea- sons – although no good recent examples come to mind – for elected officials to meet in secret, that practice should be the exception, not the rule. Instead, almost every public meeting agenda includes an executive session period. Sometimes, councilsandboardswillgoinandoutofthesesessionssever- al times during the course of a meeting. If they feel going behind closed doors is absolutely neces- sary, perhaps officials can at least give the public a better explanation of why. Another practice we’d like to see changed involves the TownofFortMill’squarterlyworkshop.Althoughopentothe public, these sessions at which various town businesses is discussed are often held far from town. The last one, held in May,tookplaceinChester.We’renotaccusingthetowncoun- cil of holding a public meeting in Chester to evade scrutiny, butdoingsocertainlyrunscountertowhatshouldbethegoal – encouraging public participation. And that’s what all of our elected officials and bodies should be doing. Even in the most heated election cycles or when voters have an opportunity to decide important issues suchastherecentFortMillschoolbondortheproposedcoun- ty infrastructure bond that went down in flames a few years ago,fartoofewresidentsgotothepolls.Itallstartsatthelocal level and an earnest effort by elected officials to encourage public participation through meetings and practices that are more open. We agree there are instances, like the CIA leak, where full disclosure is not in the public’s best interest, but those in- stances should be even more rare than digging up a dinosaur egg. When they do occur, officials owe the public a full and satisfactory explanation why. Encourage local participation in government What’s your opinion? Comment on our website .com T here was a lot of fretting and fussing Friday morning when many of us wrenched ourselves from our warm beds to confront this winter’s coldest morning. Par- ents and students were anxious to find out if the school day would be called off or end early and those with a morning drive ahead wondered if the roads had become a skating rink overnight. Now imagine if you woke up that morning in a tent in the woods. Not because you enjoy roughing it, but because it’s the only refuge available. That’stherealityforanestimated20orsopeoplewhohave been living in the shadows of a makeshift encampment on vacant land off Carowinds Boulevard. And those are the des- perate souls we know about. There’s no telling how many more homeless people in the township have lives that have been reduced to basic survival. Apparently, the encampment hasn’t been a closely guard- ed secret. Officials, including sheriff’s office deputies, have humanely looked the other way rather than shoo the squat- tersofforhavethemarrestedfortrespassing.Othersawareof this loose confederation of homeless people have helped them out by bringing food and supplies. It’s only recently, after the Fort Mill Times started running a series of stories about the encampment and other media picked up the story, that more township residents have learned about it. The result has been pre- dictable if you know any- thing about Fort Mill resi- dents and their generous hearts: An army of angels has joined the few who have been helping this group of homeless people survive, and now a stream of food and supplies has been fun- neled to the neediest of the needy living quietly in our midst. One circle of friends made quilts they delivered last week. The recent outpouring of care and compassion is not un- expected, and those who are giving should be an example for us all. Unfortunately, their efforts are not enough. Now that Fort Mill Township’s not-so-well-kept secret is out in the open,it’stimetotakeacollective,holisticapproachtoending homelessness in our area. Before we go any further, however, it’s important to point out that we recognize that not all of the homeless people we encounteredendedupthiswaythroughnofaultoftheirown. Yes,somearetheclassicexampleofbeingonepaycheckaway from living in the woods, but others admit being active alco- holics, for example, and it’s hard not to imagine that most are paying the price for making poor choices in life. Shouldthatmeantheyarenotworthyofourhelp?Certain- lynot.Andnotjustthesortofhelpthatenablesthemtoavoid dying of starvation. Indeed, there are programs across the country, many created through public-private partnerships, that address immediate needs while shepherding homeless people through an array of services designed to return those who are capable to self sufficiency. The needs can be as sim- ple as access to showers, clean clothes and help navigating bureaucracies and as great as providing medical attention, mental health treatment, education and job training. But first we need to find a way to provide those without a home a warm place to spend a frigid night. A place to recoup somedignityandselfesteem.That’sthelogicalplacetostart. Some of the building blocks are already in place. There are citizens committed to helping their much less fortunate fel- low humans. Now we need to get them together with elected officials from the state, county and town levels, clergy and businessleaders.Tosucceed,thisprojectneedsproperty,per- mits, social services, energy and, most important, money. Fewpeoplecanreallyunderstandwhatit’sliketobehome- less without actually experiencing it, and it’s a sure bet that it’s even worse than you can imagine. For all of us fortunate enough to have homes and basic needs fulfilled, let’s spend more time thinking about what life would be like if we didn’t have these things and what we can do to help lift our afflicted brothers and sisters out their daily nightmare. Giving food to homeless is not enough What’s your opinion? Comment on our website .com
  • 64. HARRIS AWARD FOR EDITORIAL WRITING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Greenville Journal Susan Clary Simmons FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK Making room for food trucks Food trucks are the latest evolution in Greenville’s growth as a foodie town – a complement to the city’s emerging national reputation as a gastro hub extraordinaire. With growth, come growing pains. So it is no surprise the Greenville com- munity is engaged in testy debate over how the rolling eateries might co-exist with their sister brick-and-mortar restaurants in the battle for clientele. First, it’s important to note that food truck vendors will have their say. The rules proposed at this point are an early draft, subject to change, and city staffers will be meeting with both food truck and restaurant owners in the coming weeks. That said, the city uncharacteristically flubbed the public relations by giv- ing first-draft duties to an eight-member task force that included restaurants but no food truck vendors. City public information director Angie Prosser further telegraphed the us-versus-them mentality when she reportedly told the City Council at a recent work session, “We haven’t talked to them yet because we wanted to talk to you first.” Casting food truck vendors as “them” implies an adversarial relationship the vendors do not deserve and the city emphatically does not need. Food trucks are a niche market that enhances Greenville’s ethnic diversity in small, tasty bites. Handled wisely, they should complement rather than compete with sit-down restaurants and bring – in planning-geek terms – a “social fabric on the street” that attracts the young urban workers city leaders covet. However, the rolling eateries must also respect the legitimate concerns of their stationary sisters whose significant financial outlay helped Greenville earn its foodie status. Most restaurants don’t turn a good profit for months and sometimes years after opening, and the competition for repeat clientele is fierce. They can hardly be blamed for resisting rivals who can roll up and park right outside their door. The draft rules make a decent attempt at balance, lifting the current ban on food trucks downtown, but limiting their operations to private property 250 feet from an open restaurant. Vendors would be allowed on public property or rights-of-way only for permitted special events. Truck vendors complain that this restricts them to the fringes of the central business district, and it does. But the limits are comparable to those imposed in cities like Asheville and Raleigh, where food trucks are established and plentiful. Asheville allows food carts vending prepackaged foods in its cen- tral business district, but limits food trucks (four at a time) to one parking lot adjacent to the downtown bus terminal. In Raleigh, food trucks may conduct sales on public streets only for special city festivals, and operate on private property downtown up to 20 days a year at a 150-foot distance from private dwellings and 100 feet from the front door of a restaurant. Charleston has no laws specific to food trucks, but its strict regulations con- cerning peddlers, transient businesses and cart vending downtown pretty much restrict food trucks to private property edging the central business district. Mayor Pro Tem David Sudduth has raised the idea of allowing food trucks to park a block or two off Main Street during lunch hours, or use a side alley certain days a week. Both are ideas worth exploring, and there are sure to be others. This is a debate Greenville is lucky to be having. The challenge to all con- cerned is to strike a balance worthy of Greenville’s reputation as the food lover’s place to be. FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK Creating chaos Gov. Nikki Haley’s irresponsible veto of Certificate of Need funding has done harm to the health care industry that legislators need to undo. South Carolina’s five Supreme Court justices must sometimes feel like the only grownups in the room, considering how often they are called on to save state government from itself. So it goes with the lawsuit filed following Gov. Nikki Haley’s reckless decision to veto $1.7 million required to run the state Certificate of Need program – and the S.C. House’s irresponsible decision to let her do it, triggering an avalanche of consequences that are still rolling on. In South Carolina, health care providers cannot open new facilities, expand services or make big equipment purchases without first winning a Certificate of Need permit from the state Department of Health and Environmental Control. As the name implies, the intent is to hold down costs by prevent- ing unwarranted duplication. CON has done that. However, the pro- cess can also be buffeted by politics as much as the practicalities of genuine need. That is the reality behind Haley’s animus, dating back to those polit- ically charged days when Haley the legislator worked as a foundation fundraiser for Lexington Medical Center while the hospital fought for a heart surgery unit. Lexington eventually overcame DHEC’s denials and got its surgery unit. But Haley’s dislike of CON runs deep. Unable to kill the program legislatively, she has vetoed its funding every year she’s been governor. Legislators overrode her in 2011 and 2012. This year, the House vote fell short – creating government-imposed chaos yet again. Haley’s veto did not eliminate CON. She killed funding for a program that issues certifi- cates state law still requires. Yes, DHEC suspended that process for a year, but it’s questionable whether the agency has the authority to do so. DHEC Director Catherine Templeton obviously has her doubts: She sued two trade associations as a way to put the tangle before the state Su- preme Court. Equally worrisome is her second promise that the agency won’t penalize non-permitted ex- pansions “unless instructed otherwise by the General Assembly.” That “unless” has thrown 32 CON applications worth $86.4 million into limbo with good reason. What rational health care provider will invest millions in a multi-year project on those terms? The Legislature could re-impose CON in January, the state Hospital Association point- ed out. “This is like driving down the highway and all the speed limit signs are down,” Dr. Bruce Snyder, president of the S.C. Medical Association, told The State newspaper. “We don’t know what we’re supposed to do.” Which is exactly what legislators should return to Columbia and tell them. House leaders issued a press release within days saying they didn’t mean to kill the law, only fund it differ- ently. Well, that takes legislative action, folks. DHEC cannot move money around absent your instructions. Gov. Haley has recklessly thrown one of the biggest economic engines in our state into chaos with the Legislature’s consent. Leaving it to the Supreme Court to sort out is a dereliction of duty. It’s time for House and Senate leaders to call their colleagues back into session to give DHEC some plain direction. And if Haley wants to dismantle CON, she should propose the legislation next year and make her case in a debate everyone affected can join. That is how grownups behave. FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK Simpsonville’s balancing act The public’s right to be heard does not include a right to disrupt. Open government is one of those American principles that’s roundly applauded in theory and fitfully understood in practice – by those in government and those outside it. That tension is playing out now in Simpsonville, where the mayor and City Coun- cil are struggling to balance the public’s right to be heard against how to contain a bombastic former police chief who refuses to go away. For months since the council’s Dec. 28 vote to fire Po- lice Chief Keith Grounsell, crowds of his supporters have packed council meetings to wave signs and shout abuse at the council, with Grounsell usually on hand to join in and spur them on. The council has repeatedly allowed extended time for public comment, with much of it coming from speakers who were not Simpsonville residents or property or business owners, according to May- or Perry Eichor, their primary target. The council won a brief reprieve after enforcing time limits and other established rules of decorum in February, but the crowds were back last week when word leaked out that the council was considering further changes to its public comment rules. Groun- sell was at the head of the pack, resurrecting his familiar demands for an apology from Eichor and reinstatement as chief. There’s one certainty in all this hullabaloo: Eichor owes Grounsell no apologies and reinstating the former chief would be a miserable mistake. The council had every legal right to terminate him, and was wise to do so if the reasons that have been documented since are proven to be true: helping expunge a criminal record, firing a qualified police officer to make an opening for an unqualified relative of a council member, and failing to work responsibly with the council and city staff. Grounsell counters that his ouster was tied to his attempts to discipline an employee who threatened the city with a federal discrimination suit and he was never allowed full authority as chief. A SLED investigation is underway. But whatever SLED concludes, Grounsell’s defiant public attacks on his former employers validate his unfitness for a post that requires the capacity to respect authority as well as exercise it. Grounsell promised last week that he “will not back down.” The mayor and council are justifiably weary of the repetition – hence the proposed rule changes that include a di- rective that anyone speaking during the council’s public comment period cannot revisit a topic the speaker addressed at a prior meeting. The problem, however, is this change won’t just shut down recycled rants on Keith Grounsell – it will stonewall any return to a topic an individual has raised before, however briefly or incompletely. As former council member Pat Thomas noted last week, “Some- times people do not hear things the first time around.” Some things need repeating. Other provisions, such as a 30-minute time limit for the comment period, are reason- able and even generous, considering that state law requires only that council meetings be open to the public – not that the public be allowed to speak there. That said, most local elected bodies allow public comment, and Simpsonville City Council should do the same. However, revising the rules in light of experience gained is entirely in order. How about: two minutes for previous topics, four for new. And Eichor should keep his gavel handy.
  • 65. HARRIS AWARD FOR EDITORIAL WRITING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The News & Reporter Travis Jenkins Drug-testing T he Chester County School District is mak- ingamodificationtoitsdrug-testingpolicy where athletes are concerned, making it a more district-wide initiative instead of a school- by-school program. We aren’t questioning the change or even the policy so much, but rather its scope. Athletes in all sports are subject to random drug tests, which screen for illegal drugs, pre- scription drugs and alcohol. Testing is not con- ducted for performance enhancing drugs at this point. The program was started with the best of intentions, that being to identify school children who may have a potentially life-threatening drug habit. Like any still-developing policy, the district’s drug-testing program is not perfect. The language of the rule clearly states the pur- pose is not to punish students, but rather to alert parents that their children may have a problem. It seems to be a tad contradictory then that a punishment for a failed test is clearly laid out (a 10-day suspension, with three failed tests bring- ing a one-year athletic ban.) Our initial, somewhat knee-jerk, reaction when this was started as a pilot program at Lewisville High School five years ago was that drug-testing represented a bit of an over-reach and started brushing up against an invasion of privacy. We wondered if students should even be subject to punishment at school for something they do off of school grounds. Time brings some clarity, though. Going to public school is optional as is participating in athletics, so anyone who doesn’t want to subject themselves to drug tests does not have to. It is within the purview of the district to set its own standards for participation in athletics, including having athletes subject themselves to random drug tests. If there is to be a drug-testing policy, though, why should it begin and end with athletics? We think no extracurricular activity should be treated any differently than another. What’s the difference, really, between being a member of the football team, the marching band or the Spanish Club? All are a privilege, all require a high level of effort and dedication, all come with certain perks and all are school-sponsored activ- ities. The bar for participating in any of the three should be the same. No sport is an exercise in pure brute force. Try looking at the playbook a high school quarterback has to memorize some- time and you’ll realize football, or any sport, is as much about mental acuity as it is strength or Free information A recent issue in Hilton Head got us to thinking about the cost to obtain public documents. A businessman in Hilton named Skip Hoagland is suing the Hilton Head Island- Bluffton Chamber of Commerce. He requested numerous document from the Hilton Head gov- ernment to use as part of his lawsuit. The docu- ments sought are related to the accommodations tax money the town gives the chamber. He was told the cost for the requested information would be $13,000. We know most things cost more in Hilton Head, but that hefty total is outlandish by any measure, even if producing the documents will require employees to spend time combing through various data bases as Hilton Head offi- cials insist. The standard cost for obtaining documents from most places not named Hilton Head is between 10 and 25 cents per page. The South Carolina Press Association considers that cost “reasonable” as laid out by the state’s Freedom of Information Act. Compared to what information will apparently run you on the South Carolina coast, somewhere between a dime and a quarter does seem reasonable. However, the more we think about it, the more we feel that small, per- page charge is too much. The government, at any level, is nothing but a group of citizens who are tasked with handling the collective business of other citizens. With very few exceptions, the government should not have any business that is not your business. They operate on tax dollars you pay. If they build a new park or building, you have to be allowed access to it because the government itself can’t actually own anything. Those places belong to you and your fellow citizens, because really, you are the government, even if you don’t hold elect- ed office. As such, the public information and docu- ments contained in the filing cabinets and com- puters of government employees and elected officials are your’s. A budget is an accounting of how your tax dollars are being spent. Paperwork about property purchases, expenditures on pub- lic buildings, government contracts for services... those all your’s. We are finding it harder and harder to justify anything but the most minimal of charges for people to view those. They are our’s so h should ou ha e to pa to see W Wm e o n b C h f a e u I w k i P f M t b C t b Recreation T he City of Chester is currently without a full-time recreation director. We think this a good time to question whether or not the city needs to be in the recreation busi- ness. Jack Sink was relieved of his duties last week after six years heading the parks and recreation department. We aren’t privy to his personnel file, of course, but we think Sink did a lot of things well. Recreation opportunities were aimed at children, adults and seniors. Events seemed to be well-planned and attend- ed and we can say from personal experience that Sink did a good job of promoting every- thing his department did. We aren’t here to question the relative merits of his ouster, how- ever, we want to talk about his replacement, if there needs to be one. The recreation department hasn’t been a part of the city forever, only being founded 10 years ago with Sink having been the third director. We think recreation is a worthwhile endeavor for the city to pursue, with sports and activities providing entertainment options and adding to the general quality of life. However,pernumbersfromthe2010Census, the population of Chester County and the City of Chester has contracted over the past decade. Fewer people means fewer taxpayers. If that eventually means a drastically pared down budget, we think recreation is the most likely department to face cutbacks. That isn’t pleas- ant and it isn’t desired, it’s just a reality that has to be faced if there is less money to go around and essential services like police and garbage pick-up that have to be fully funded. The other thing about recreation is that it is a competitive marketplace. Chester County has a terrific YMCA, youth football, baseball, softball and soccer leagues along with travel teams and AAU among many other offerings. The city hasn’t traditionally delved much into sports leagues, but we know some leaders have wanted to go in that direction. Some of the ideas we’ve heard about some adult leagues could make sense, but any thoughts of creating new youth leagues to compete with existing ones don’t make sense to us given that there are only so many kids to go around, many of whom are already committed to the leagues that are already here. We are not suggesting the elimination of the
  • 66. PUBLIC SERVICE FOR WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Free Times Eva Moore columbia’s free weekly Aug. 28-Sept. 3, 2013 free-times.com Columbia at Breaking Point Over Homelessness No Direction Home
  • 67. PUBLIC SERVICE FOR WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Daniel Island News Elizabeth Bush Annexation
  • 68. PUBLIC SERVICE FOR WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The Gaffney Ledger Cody Sossamon and Scott Powell Some Know2 knowledge could net students iPad By SCOTT POWELL Ledger Staff Writer spowell@gaffneyledger.com Cherokee County students can get a free T-shirt and earn a chance to win an iPad just by learning a lit- tle bit about the county’s Know2 education initiative. Cherokee, Charleston and Marl- boro counties were chosen last year to become pilot sites for a Know2 education initiative developed by the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. Know2 is focused on the impor- tance of all community residents re- ceiving at least two years of higher education beyond high school so they are better prepared for jobs available in the workforce. Now county students will have a chance to show how well they un- derstand the goals of the Know2 ed- ucation initiative. Starting March 7, Cherokee County students will have an oppor- tunity to win a T-shirt if they can re- cite from memory what Know2 means. Students will also be placed in a March 28 drawing for an iPad given away in each public school in Cherokee County. “We want to change the attitude about education, that it’s an unat- tainable goal,” said Know 2 task force member Dee Kirby, who is coordinating the contest. “There are many scholarships available to make college affordable for anyone to attend, regardless of their eco- nomic status.” Statistics show someone needs to say and hear a message at least seven times in order to memorize it. “If a student can recite the mean- ing of Know2 seven times, we be- lieve this will build their confidence and belief that they can do any- thing,” Kirby said. “Then we can start to change the attitude toward education in our community.” Cherokee County schools will re- ceive 2,300 T-shirts to distribute among students who successfully memorize the Know2 education slogan. Kirby said students who can recite the meaning of Know2 from memory will be entered in a draw- ing for a free T-shirt or iPad given away by each county school. So what does Know2 mean? 1.) Know that I must be highly educated for economic success and G See KNOW2, Page 5 By SCOTT POWELL Ledger Staff Writer spowell@gaffneyledger.com U.S. Senator Tim Scott will be the keynote speaker today when 1,000 residents attend an invita- tion-only kickoff event for KNOW(2) at the Broad River Electric CooperativeAuditorium. Scott was appointed to the U.S. Senate in January by Gov. Nikki Haley to fill the unexpired term of Jim DeMint, who resigned to be- come president of The Heritage Foundation. Raised in a single parent home, Scott will share his personal story about how education helped him overcome poverty. He is among many participants at a Cherokee Education Liftoff (CELO) event organized by KNOW(2) volun- teers. Cherokee County leaders will announce a vision and goals for changing the local education cul- ture. KNOW(2) is an initiative sponsored by the Cherokee County Community Foundation, South Carolina Higher Education Foundation and other partners. In a show of support for the ini- tiative, successful alumni from Blacksburg and Gaffney high schools are attending as “Home- town Heroes.” Superintendent Dr. Quincie Moore will issue a charge to the community on the impor- tance of education. “This event is going to be like no other ever held in Cherokee County,” said CELO chairman Cody Sossamon. “Those attend- ing are going to be impressed with what they hear and see. In the future, Friday,April 12, 2013, will be looked at as the beginning of a remarkable change in the cul- ture of education in Cherokee County.” The event will be streamed live beginning at 6:40 p.m. at www.gaffneyledger.com. To view the event on the Inter- net, click the “News” link in the “LEDGER LIVE” box in the upper left corner of our home page at gaffneyledger.com. Web- casts are available via the same steps onApple mobile devices, such as iPhones, iPads and smart- phones. Granard principal Dr. Mark Bunch will serve as the master of ceremonies. The metrics and ob- jectives of KNOW(2) will be pre- sented by Dr. Terry Duvall, pastor of Macedonia Baptist Church. Cherokee County Community Foundation chairperson Brad Wilkins will present a special recognition and closing remarks. Videos byAbe Duenas will highlight the history of KNOW(2). LIFTOFF! Event tonight shifts education urgency into higher gear “This event is going to be like no other ever held in Cherokee County. Those att- ending are going to be impressed with what they hear and see. In the future, Friday, April 12, 2013, will be looked at as the beginning of a remarkable change in the culture of education in Cherokee County.” — Cody Sossamon CELO Chairman
  • 69. SPORTS ENTERPRISE REPORTING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Fort Mill Times Mac Banks By Mac Banks mbanks@comporium.net FORT MILL — In 2002, Fort Mill High senior Tyler Kluttz was like any other 18-year-old wondering what lifewasgoingtoholdwhenitcameto finding a profession. A decade later, his chosen career involves a whole lot of holds – in the pro wrestling ring. Kluttz, who goes by the ring name BradMaddox,recentlyburstontothe main stage of the WWE, the Major League of professional wrestling, as the referee who hit the hulking behe- moth Ryback with a low blow during his Hell in a Cell main event match against WWE champion CM Punk in late October. M a d d o x t h e n went on to wrestle Ryback earlier this month for a po- tential $1 million contract and was tossedintothebackofanambulance exiting the WWE almost as quickly as he came in – or at least that is how things appeared on TV. However, the story of Brad Mad- dox doesn’t end there. Maddox, who according to WWE corporate official Kevin Hennessy was off-limits for an interview be- cause his character is in limbo, could return in the future. Before Brad Maddox burst onto the scene in professional wrestling, thepeopleoftheCityofTegaCayand in the halls of Fort Mill High, knew him as Tyler Kluttz. TheKluttzfamilyhaslivedinTega Cay for more than 20 years. Kluttz graduated from the College of Charleston in 2006 and married Fort Mill High grad Ryan diPretoro in 2007. Even though he became a profes- sional wrestler, Kluttz didn’t wrestle in high school. He played basketball for Fort Mill under current Nation Ford Athletic Director and head bas- ketball coach Brian Turner. COURTESY OF OVW Tyler Kluttz, aka Brad Maddox, has embarked on a pro wrestling career that recently included a high-profile match on national TV. What’s his next move? GETTING A HOLD ON LIFE: Tyler Kluttz Please see WRESTLER 2B Fort Mill grad works his way up pro wrestling ladder Tyler Kluttz
  • 70. SPORTS ENTERPRISE REPORTING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Daniel Island News Elizabeth Bush DI runners recount“surreal” Boston Marathon experience
  • 71. SPORTS ENTERPRISE REPORTING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Free Times Patrick Wall 14 July 31-August 6, 2013free-times.com twitter.com/freetimessc facebook.com/freetimescoverstory its roster in 1959, according to numbers compiled by USA Today. Several teams had no black players: The San Francisco Giants, winners of last year’s World Series, had none. In the college game, too, the black base- ball player is disappearing. In the 2009-2010 season, black athletes, according to an NCAA study, made up only 5.6 percent of Division I baseball rosters, compared to 60.9 percent of basketball ros- ters and 45.8 percent of football rosters. The University of South Carolina, for example, had three black players on this year’s roster: Outfielders Shon Carson and Ahmad Christian, and pitcher Kwinton Smith. Carson played in 18 games, starting nine; Christian had one start in six appear- ances. Kwinton Smith did not play. None are expected to make the team next year. Some historically black colleges and universities have baseball teams — Bene- dict yes, South Carolina State University no — but they’re often racially mixed. White baseball players outnumbered blacks at five of the nine historically black schools that play baseball in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, a 2012 article in the Raleigh News and Observer notes. What’s clear is that black athletes, and kids especially, are moving away from base- ball. What isn’t clear is why. C olumbia Blowfish owner Bill Shanah- an’s been in minor league baseball since 1984; he currently runs three minor league franchises in three states in addition to the summer-league Blowfish. He’s seen, first-hand, the precipitous decline in black baseball players. It’s a sign of a flawed youth system, he says. “There’s a whole generation [of kids] that’s been missed,” Shanahan says. “In the last generation, [baseball] has just kind of faded away. And it’s not the kids’ fault. It’s our society.” Also, many prominent black Major League Baseball superstars contend that they aren’t marketed properly, aren’t promoted as ambassadors of the game, especially to inner-city kids. “I won MVP in 2007,” Philadelphia Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins told the New York Daily News last year, “and I wasn’t on anybody’s cover.” “We don’t have a LeBron of baseball,” says Lerone Johnson, who runs the Major League Baseball-affiliated Reviving Base- ball in Inner Cities program in Charleston. “So baseball isn’t being marketed in the inner cities like it should be.” Rollins, too, cites the prevalence of single-parent households in black commu- nities. Baseball is largely an inherited game, passed down from fathers to sons. “Without dads around,” says Shanahan, “it’s hard to have the guidance and mentor- ship to learn baseball.” Gentrification is also a problem. “Many of these African-American communities are now in these spaces that TakenOutof theBallGame On the Decline of the Black Baseball Player ByPatrickWall O n a triple-digit hot day in early June, Hank Aaron, the black baseball great who broke Babe Ruth’s home run record, walked into Capital City Stadium. He was flanked on his right by Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott. He shook the hands of the Columbia Blowfish players, then their opponents, the Martinsville Mustangs, all while receiving showers of applause from the hundreds-strong crowd. It was the first time Aaron had set foot in Capital City Stadium since 1953, when he was a skinny, 19-year-old second base- man playing for the Milwaukee Braves’ sin- gle-A affiliate in Jacksonville, Fla. Aaron, now 79 and physically feebler, is still razor sharp, mentally — Capital City Stadium, he said, still seemed familiar to him, and he still remembered his last minor-league game there. “I had a four-for-four night,” Aaron, speaking with WIS-TV’s Rick Henry, recalled of that final game. “I got two base hits, one triple and one home run. And I can remember on the single that I hit, I stole second base. And the second base- man — I was a young kid at the time — told me, ‘Take your foot off the base for a little while.’ And I lifted my foot off, and he tagged me out.’” The crowd roared with laughter. “I can recall Ben Garrity,” Aaron con- tinued, “who was the manager at the time, kept me out here ‘til 12 or 1 in the morning, practicing slide and stay on the bag.” He didn’t bring it up, but he was one of the only black players on the field that day in 1953. Aaron wouldn’t stay much longer — long enough to receive a key to the City of Columbia from Mayor Steve Benjamin. Long enough to throw out the ceremonial first pitch — a ball in the dirt, bouncing 12 inches in front of Blowfish coach Jonathan Johnson. Long enough to meet with mem- bers of the local Boys and Girls Club, an organization Aaron ardently supports. Aaron didn’t stay long enough, though, to watch the Blowfish lose 7-1 to the Mustangs; he was quickly ushered into a silver-gray Nissan sedan idling behind the outfield walls. He didn’t even stay long enough to watch the Blowfish take the field, to see Erik Barber trot into left field for the Blowfish, or for Devan Ahart to step into the batter’s box to lead off for the visiting Mustangs. Had Aaron stayed around, even for the first pitch, he might have noticed some- thing else familiar: Barber and Ahart were the only black players on the field. Bases Empty T here was a time in American history, writes Kyle McNary in Black Baseball: A History of African-Americans and the National Game, when any young, black athlete who wanted to make a career in sports had only one choice: baseball. But by 1980 young athletes could forge financially rewarding careers in football and basket- ball. As a result, most young blacks focused on football and basketball. Despite its tortured racial history — Ma- jor League Baseball wouldn’t fully inte- grate until 1959, a full 12 years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier — baseball was once the top choice for black sports fans in America. But by the 1980s, baseball was a distant third, maybe lower, and it seemed the Major Leagues weren’t too concerned. There were no significant advertising cam- paigns in the 1980s to draw black fans back to the game, and though at least half of the “stars” in the majors were black, less than 20 percent of the fans at the ballpark were. “I think Jackie certainly would be disappointed in the way things are today, especially for African-Americans,” Aaron told USA Today in April. “Let’s face it, base- ball was down, and when he came along, he put a big spike into baseball with the way he played, and along came other great black ballplayers. And to see where it is today, he certainly would be disappointed. You look at baseball. The African-American [seg- ment] is not one they’re concerned with.” Black players accounted for just 7.7 percent of players on MLB rosters on open- ing day, the lowest mark since the Boston Red Sox became the final team to integrate
  • 72. BUSINESS REPORTING Associate/Individual Division THIRD PLACE: SCBIZ Chuck Crumbo 27 By Chuck Crumbo, Staff Writer S outh Carolina needs to improve its transportation infrastructure if it hopes to attract new businesses and encourage expansion. That’s the opinion of key business leaders as they press the South Carolina Legislature to find the money to widen inter- states, fix bridges, and revamp interchanges to improve the flow of commerce. “If we don’t get the infrastructure piece, none of this other stuff is going to happen,” said Otis Rawl, president and CEO of the S.C. Cham- ber of Commerce. “Businesses will start looking in other places.” The price tag to fix the infrastructure is hefty. S.C. leaders tackle transportation infrastructure, funding NARLED FUNDING fa l l short
  • 73. BUSINESS REPORTING Associate/Individual Division SECOND PLACE: Ron Aiken
  • 74. BUSINESS REPORTING Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE: GSA Business Bill Poovey May 6 - 19, 2013 www.gsabusiness.com Volume 16, No. 14 • $2.00 Crowdfunding JOBS Act could create new capital-raising opportunities, if SEC would set the rules. PAGE 18 Hockey town Road Warriors report increased home attendance in first year under new ownership. PAGE 4 INSIDE Leading off ...................... 2 Around the state.............. 5 In Focus: Banking & Finance ......... 13 People in the news ........ 26 News briefs ................... 29 Viewpoint....................... 31 SBA Lenders PAGE 16 Office Suppliers PAGE 22 THELIST SC Deals A listing of South Carolina mergers and acquisitions during the first quarter. PAGE 13 The inland port comes ashore by Bill Poovey bpoovey@scbiznews.com D uke Energy’s request to raise rates for a third time since 2010 — this time by an average 15.1% — has businesses charged up. “The public needs to rise up, residential and business owners,” said Frank Knapp, president and CEO of the S.C. Small Business Chamber of Commerce, a Columbia-based group with more than 5,000 members. He called Duke’s proposed increase “unjustified.” Duke Energy’s filing for a $220 million annual increase is set for a July 31 hearing before the S.C. Public Service Commission in Columbia. The request would increase rates by an average 16.3% for residential customers, 14% for com- mercial customers and 14.4% for industrial users. Duke’s South Carolina rates are among the lowest in the Southeast, but rates are determined in part by utilities’ profit margins, or return on equities. At the proposed rates, Duke is requesting a return on equity of 11.25%, up from 10.5%. The PSC, the state’s utility regulator, must determine whether to allow that increased profit margin and decide what Duke’s customers can afford. Public hearings are set for June 20 at Spartan- burg Community College, June 24 at the Green- ville County Council Chambers and June 27 at the Homes on Moore Street will be razed to add room near the rail. Acquiring the properties raised the price tag for the project, as did a plan to double the facility’s freight capacity. Full story. Page 10 Is Duke’s rate hike justified? State regulators will attempt to answer that as some question whether the utility should be allowed an 11.25% profit margin, up from 10.5% see DUKE ENERGY, page 8 “I WAS ON THE BRINK OF FAILURE OR SUCCESS MANY TIMES AND IT IS A SCARY, THIN LINE.” Jason Fletcher, Greenville restaurateur At Work. PAGE 25 Photo/Liz Segrist
  • 75. BUSINESS REPORTING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Greenville Journal Jennifer Oladipo 16 • June 14, 2013 COVER STORY Business owners on Main Street have seen a dip in business during construction, but hope for a boost after ONE is done By JENNIFER OLADIPO senior business writer DOWNTOWN GROWTH PAINS SOME 14 UPSTATE BUSINESS JOURNAL June 28, 2013 Photosprovided There’s no reliable data on how many women- owned businesses are not taking advantage of programs designed specifically for them. But Janet Christy, business counselor at the South Carolina Women’s Business Center, said more than two decades of conducting workshops for women business owners has shown that they are consistently out of the loop. Women tend to be either unaware of the opportunities, or un- convinced that they are capable. “The reason I know that people don’t take opportunities is because when I’m doing a work- shop or talking with people, it’s new information to them,” said Christy. “Even after they hear the information it can still take a lot of convincing.” Many women simply think construction pros- pects are not for them. “It’s not always an informed opinion,” Christy said. “Sometimes they just assume it’s difficult [to work with government] or they wouldn’t be able to do it. It’s not easy but neither is doing business with large corporations. You just have to understand their processes, only their process is dictated by the law.” SEEKING WOMEN CONTRACTORS atthesametime,thosewhoowntheprojects are looking for more women. Government re- quirements and low numbers of women par- ticipating mean abundant opportunities for women-owned businesses. The U.S. Government has a goal of spending five percent with Women-Owned Small Busi- nesses (WOSBs). The deal is even sweeter at the WOMENCONTRACTORS HAVE BIGOPPORTUNITIES Government construction projects are a largely untapped revenue pool for women-owned businesses By JENNIFER OLADIPO senior business writer Many women are missing out on big-dollar construction opportunities, and a lack of information is one of the main problems. ABOVE: Susan Lindsey, owner of electrical contracting firm AMEC; FAR LEFT, TOP & BOTTOM: Employees of electrical contracting firm AMEC, a woman-owned business, work on a job site. 18 UPSTATE BUSINESS JOURNAL October 11, 2013 T The first week of the government shutdown didn’t inflict much pain on the Upstate, but it was enough to have the business community rethink- ing its ties to the feds. There are many such ties, but they vary in how obvious they are and how long it will take before we notice the severance. The Congressional Research Office (CRO) issued a report on the causes, processes and effects of government shutdowns two weeks ago after shut- down threats became a negotiating tactic for those in Congress who want to defund the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The report highlighted areas of concern based on an assessment of past shutdowns. A shutdown is essentially a funding gap that occurs when Congress fails to approve a budget. According to the CRO report, “six fairly lengthy funding gaps” occurred between fiscal year 1977 and fiscal year 1980, lasting from eight to 17 days. In the following decade and a half up to fiscal year 1995, nine funding gaps occurred, lasting three days or fewer. Most recently, a comparative whopper of a shutdown lasted for 21 days from December 1995 to January 1996. Among the impacts of that event were the loss of revenues from seven million na- tional park visitors and $18 billion in contracts in the Washington, D.C., area. The View From Here In the first week of October 2013, alarm bells weren’t exactly ringing in the Upstate. “There’s that feeling out there from some that ‘this doesn’t impact me,’” said Mark Cothran, vice president of public policy for the Upstate Chamber Coalition. Small businesses that don’t have gov- ernment contracts or rely on Small Business Association (SBA) loans saw little reason to worry. Cothran said he had heard of business trips to Washington, D.C., that had been cancelled, but many people felt like they would be unscathed for the most part. “Short term, it doesn’t affect them at all, but the longer it goes on, it’s going to impact them,” Cothran said. What did bother people was a feeling that COVER STORY Effects of the federal government shutdown may be slow in rippling to the Upstate – but wait and see, experts warn By JENNIFER OLADIPO | senior business writer | joladipo@communityjournals.com YEAH, THAT SHUTDOWN “I think what it does from a business community side is create more uncertainty.” Mark Cothran, vice president of public policy for the Upstate Chamber Coalition PHOTO BY GREG BECKNER/STAFF >>
  • 76. BUSINESS REPORTING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Daniel Island News Jennifer Johnston
  • 77. BUSINESS REPORTING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. Perry Citycouncilmanfacing nearly$7Kinethicsfines BYTOMO’DARE THEHERALD Myrtle Beach City Council- man Michael Chestnut is fac- ing nearly $7,000 in fines from the State Ethics Commission, according to public records. Cathy Hazelwood, the com- mission’s lawyer, said Chest- nut owes the commission $6,900 for failing to file three campaign disclosure reports on time. The commission notifies tardy filers by certified mail when forms are late. After that, thefine increases by $10 per day for 10 days, then it jumps to $100 for every addi- tional day the form isn’t filed. “While they’re ticking away at $300 a day, it wouldn’t take long to get to $6,900,” Hazelwood said. See FINES, Page 3A Despitelawsuit, newordinances, Horrystripclub plansprogress CountyissuespermitforGoldClub After being turned down for a business license a year ago, the owner of this club has now received zoning approval from Horry County to open a nightclub at this location. This will be called the Gold Club North. FILEPHOTO A case for Canada Pains of theWestJet deal • Through August, Horry County owed the airline more than $370,000 • The county will likely pay the airline nearly $570,000 in public funds • Although recent flight num- bers showed improvement, results for May and June were dismal Gains of theWestJet deal • The chamber estimates the flights generated a $6.64 million economic impact • In August, flights were 85 percent full • 59 percent of travelers were first-time visitors —Source: Horry County records Problemsaside,WestJetpartoflargermarketingstrategy Despite a less-than- stellar first season in Myrtle Beach, local officials are hoping WestJet will continue to serve the Grand Strand. The flights are part of a larger marketing effort to reach Canadian tourists. FILEPHOTO BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD Mike Rose thinks he’s found a way around Horry County’s new laws for adult entertain- ment. His dancers will reveal less of, well, themselves. Rose contends the strip club he’s opening on Restaurant Row shouldn’t be considered an adult business as defined in the ordinances Horry County officials approved last month. The reason? He said strip- pers at the Gold Club North, which is scheduled to open in February, will wear more clothing. Not much more, he insists, but enough to meet county standards about nudi- ty in businesses. “Even if I have to go to a skimpy top, to me it’s not See STRIPCLUB, Page 2A Chestnut BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD Tourism leaders covet visitors like Howard and Roberta Playfair. The Playfairs live just west of Toronto, and if they’re going to travel to Myrtle Beach, they’re not just staying for the weekend. This month, they’ll be here for three weeks. “My wife absolutely loves our timeshare on the beachfront,” Howard Playfair said. “Listen- ing to the surf and looking at the moods of the ocean every day is a treat.” The Playfairs are the kind of visitors Grand Strand tourism officials had in mind when they ramped up efforts to reach Canadian travelers several years ago. SeeCANADA,Page2A EDCfocusingontransparency,accountability BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD Economic development of- ficials are making their activ- ities more transparent and they’re taking extra steps to ensure the companies that want taxpayer-funded deals are capable of delivering on their job creation promises. In recent months, the Myr- tle Beach Re- gional Eco- nomic De- velopment Corporation (EDC) has been criti- cized for its handling of a call center deal known as Project Blue. EDC officials had touted the project as a coveted prize, a Georgia company that would create more than 1,000 jobs in the Carolina Forest area. Horry County Council members were preparing to finalize a multi- million dollar incentives package for the company three months ago. But council members were stunned when the Herald re- ported that the company’s chief operating officer had spent a year in federal prison after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to com- mit income tax invasion. Council members immedi- ately questioned the thor- oughness of the EDC’s vet- ting process. Some also wondered about the need for so many closed- door meetings for discus- sions involving public dol- lars. Project Blue was later put on hold and it’s unclear when the council will vote on the package, if at all. The EDC is the economic development arm of local governments, and, although it SeeEDC,Page3A Agencypayingoutsidefirmfor backgroundchecksonprospects FILEPHOTO The EDC is the economic development arm of local governments. Lofton Countyunsureof callcenter’sstatus ProjectBluehaduntilNov.20 tomeetstate,localdeadlines BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD Project Blue’s future re- mains hazy. Horry County leaders don’t know if the county is still competing for the 1,020-job call center, and local eco- nomic development officials aren’t saying anything about the status of the project. However, records obtained by the Herald indicate that some key pieces of the deal have not come together and economic development offi- cials are already making a backup plan in case this proj- ect fails. Three months ago, Horry County Council members were ready to finalize a multi- million dollar incentives package for Covation, the call center company officials had dubbed Project Blue. Covation and the Myrtle Beach Regional Economic Development Corporation (EDC), the county’s industry recruitment arm, had negoti- ated plans for a call center in Carolina Forest. EDC officials had said the average wage of the center’s 1,020 jobs would be $14.36 per hour. Covation’s proposed in- centives package had an esti- mated value of $24 million and included a $750,000 state grant and $1.25 million in county cash. But county council mem- bers decided to postpone their final vote on the project after the Herald reported that Covation’s chief operating See BLUE, Page 3A
  • 78. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Carolina Forest Chronicle Michael Smith Area road projects puzzle
  • 79. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: Charleston City Paper Scott Suchy Album Cover
  • 80. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Charleston City Paper Scott Suchy Squirrel Mugshot
  • 81. WEBSITE Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE: Municipal Association of South Carolina masc.sc
  • 82. WEBSITE AllWeekly Division HONORABLE MENTION: Charleston City Paper Sam Spence, Stephanie Barna and Chris Haire charlestoncitypaper.com
  • 83. WEBSITE AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Fort Mill Times Michael Harrison fortmilltimes.com
  • 84. WEBSITE AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Moultrie News Sully Witte, Vickey Boyd and David Whitley moultrienews.com
  • 85. WEBSITE AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Carolina Forest Chronicle Michael Smith, Heather Gale, Charles D. Perry and Annette Norris myhorrynews.com
  • 86. USE OF TWITTER AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The Weekly Observer Christopher McKagen @WeeklyObserver
  • 87. USE OF TWITTER AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Moultrie News Sully Witte @MoultrieNews
  • 88. USE OF TWITTER AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Free Times Eva Moore @YesEvaMoore
  • 89. FACEBOOK PAGE AllWeekly Division HONORABLE MENTION: The Moultrie News Sully Witte, Vickey Boyd and David Whitley
  • 90. FACEBOOK PAGE AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The People-Sentinel Susan Delk, Jonathan Vickery and David Purtell
  • 91. FACEBOOK PAGE AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE - TIE: Fort Mill Times Michael Harrison and Jenny Overman
  • 92. FACEBOOK PAGE AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE - TIE: The Press & Standard Brantley Strickland, Drew Tripp and Ashley Rohde
  • 93. FACEBOOK PAGE AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Carolina Forest Chronicle Michael Smith, Heather Gale and Charles D. Perry
  • 94. PHOTO GALLERY AllWeekly & Daily Under 18,000 Divisions Combined SECOND PLACE: Free Times Sean Rayford
  • 95. GENERAL NEWS/ FEATURE VIDEO AllWeekly & Daily Under 18,000 Divisions Combined THIRD PLACE: The Weekly Observer Christopher McKagen
  • 96. LIFESTYLE/FEATURE SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The Moultrie News Staff
  • 97. LIFESTYLE/FEATURE SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Press & Standard Staff
  • 98. LIFESTYLE/FEATURE SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The Press & Standard Staff COLLETTE FOODS THAT seduce THE LOVE ISSUE DATE NIGHT ...Collette's Menu for Wining, Dining & More! Men Food Fashion & tips to make your skin LOOK YOUNGER winter 2012 Powerin pumps
  • 99. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The Moultrie News Sully Witte BY SULLY WITTE editor@moultrienews.com Thesiteandsmellofdecom- residents and recreation en- thusiastspinchingtheirnoses this summer. be seen on the docks that line and throwing the carcasses into the water. Depending on the tide, the carcasses either sink to the - ward residential docks or out to Charleston Harbor. In one afternoon, several carcasses at a time can be creekhasbeendoneforyears. South Carolina released a Clean Marina Guidebook, produced by the S.C. De- partment of Health and En- Ocean and Coastal Resource Management in cooperation with the South Carolina Ma- rine Association (Revised 2010). The guidebook is just that and suggests that marinas require no fish scraps be dumped in marina basins. But Shem Creek is not a ma- rina. Marinas that follow this guidebook provide fish cleaning stations, encourage anglers to bag the scraps and disposeofthewastein dump- sters or at home; freeze and reuse scraps as chum or bait; orsaveanddisposeoverdeep water. The guidebook states that too much fish waste in a poorly circulated marina ba- sin can lower oxygen levels in the water. As the waste de- composes, it can lead to foul - ly addition to marina waters. There are no legal require- ments banning fish scrap dumping, but there are sug- gested management prac- tices. The simplest policy for Sh- em Creek, according to DH- Fishing for an answer Discarded fish carcasses causing stink on Shem Creek See DISCARDED,page A8 BY SULLY WITTE editor@moultrienews.com A proposed Sunoco gas sta- tionthattheBoardOfZoning AppealsreviewedonMonday was met with dissension. Residentsdirectlyaffectedby the proposal were on hand to voice their opinion against it. The property is owned by Lupert Adler and Preserva- tion Row. This company is affiliated with Front Door Communities, the company that is building The Tribu- tary residential development on Rivertowne Parkway. The gas station is slated to be constructed at the south- west corner of Highway 41 and Rivertowne Parkway. The case is under the cat- egory of “exemption” due to the fact that the original Rivertowne Planned Devel- opment, approved in 1994, would not allow it unless an exemption was made. The Board of Zoning Ap- peals’ decisions are final and warrant no approval of the Planning Commission or the Mount Pleasant Town Coun- cil. The board voted to defer the proposal for 30 days. Residentsofthecommunity touted safety and quality of life concerns about the store. More than 1,000 residents useRivertowneParkwaydai- ly, as it is the only way in and out of the community. Com- munitieswithintheneighbor- hood include Planter’s Pointe at Rivertowne, Rivertowne on the Wando, Rivertowne Country Club and the new Tributarydevelopmentalong Rivertowne Parkway among others. A future develop- ment along the parkway will be comprised of $380K-plus homes that will be directly next to the proposed station. The station would be com- pleted around June or over the summer of 2014. A right turnlaneisslatedforcomple- tion when the gas station is supposed to be completed. There are currently two gas stations along Highway 41 and one at the corner of Highway 41 and Highway. 17. Thedevelopersplanonhav- inganentranceandexitfrom Rivertowne Parkway so cus- tomers can use the safety of a traffic light. Residents gassed up over proposed store See STORE, page A8 BY SULLY WITTE editor@moultrienews.com In June 2013, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) issued the 2013 Specific Rate Guide- lines to participating Write Your Own (WYO) insurance companies and other insur- ance partners to explain the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) premium rate changes that took effect Oct.1.Aspartoftheseannual ratechanges,thisyearFEMA will be implementing provi- sions of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 (BW-12). This is going to affect any- one with property that does not meet the minimum flood elevation. That is about 30 percent of Isle Of Palms right now, and if they change the elevations, it will be more property affected. Down- townCharlestonhasthesame problems. Steve Peper, a Lowcountry Allstate agent said that the situation is a simple concept. “The National Flood Insur- ance Program is in debt to the tune of some $18 billion. For over 40 years the federal government has been subsi- dizingfloodinsurancepremi- ums for low-lying or coastal areas,” he said. “Last year, the government stoppedkickingthecandown the street and actually decid- ed to address the problem. Biggert-Waters Flood Insur- ance Reform Act was passed last year and calls on FEMA to make several changes in the NFIP (National Flood Insurance Program).” Those changes are: to program - surance Rate Maps updates Flood of regulations Homeowners face new guidelines for storm insurance See FLOOD, page B9
  • 100. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Gazette Frank Johnson
  • 101. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: The Berkeley Independent Frank Johnson Hair ye, hair yeCouncilmen sworn in at barbershop; county officials unaware of ceremony BY DAN BROWN The Independent Three Berkeley County Council members were sworn in during an unusual Jan. 3 ceremony that left much of the county’s administrative personnel in the dark. Council members Phil Farley, Tim Callanan and newcomer Ken Gunn took their oaths of office at Farley’s Hanahan barbershop. Usually the swearing in of the new council members occurs in council chambers on the first Tuesday of the New Year, but with New Year’s Day falling on a Tuesday this year, and the previous council terms expir- ing at midnight on Jan. 1, three council seats would Rob Gantt/Independent Berkeley County Council members Tim Callanan, Phil Farley and Ken Gunn are sworn in by Berkeley County Probate Judge Keith Kornahrens at Farley’s Hanahan barbershop. Also present were Ann Farley and Jason Gunn. See BARBERSHOP Page 7A BY DAN BROWN The Independent It has been a little more than a year since the 2012 Republican primary, eight m o n t h s since the e l e c t i o n , and six m o n t h s since the new edition of Berkeley C o u n t y Council began. And, finally, the election of the District 3 county council seat is official- ly over. Ken Gunn still won. Last week, the South Carolina Supreme Court dis- missed former councilman Bob Call’s final appeal in the lawsuit over the June 2012 election Call lost to Gunn, thus officially closing the cur- tain on the primary election that is now more than a year old. In the year since his victory over Call, Gunn has remained tightlipped over the outcome, the lawsuit and his political opponent. None of that has See CALL Page 10A Court hangs up on Call Bob Call Now what?What does governor’s veto mean for hospital debate? BY DAN BROWN The Independent Now what? That’s the question being posed by area hospitals fol- lowing South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley’s veto of funding for the state’s Certificate of Need program. As of July 1 and the new FY2013-2014 state budget, there is no funding provided for the CON program. Hospitals with expansion plans such as Roper St. Francis Healthcare and Trident Health System are left wondering what to do. The CON program was part of a years-long standoff between Roper and Trident, and affected potential con- struction of two new hospi- tals in Berkeley County, Roper’s proposed 50-bed hospital in the Carnes Crossroads neighborhood of Goose Creek, and Trident’s planned 50-bed facility in Moncks Corner. “It really is unclear what this change means,” said Trident CEO Todd Gallati. “There is a longstanding law still clearly in place that says hospitals are decided by Certificates of Need. Everything grounds to a halt. See HOSPITALS Page 8A
  • 102. PICTORIAL AllWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: Greenville Journal Greg Beckner
  • 103. PICTORIAL AllWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Hartsville Messenger Bob Sloan
  • 104. PICTORIAL AllWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Coastal Observer Tanya Ackerman
  • 105. NEWS REPORTING Associate/Individual Division THIRD PLACE: Charleston Regional Business Journal Matt Tomsic By Matt Tomsic mtomsic@scbiznews.com A cross the Lowcountry, public col- leges and universities are scrambling to make up for state funding cuts, which have impacted their ability to educate students and support existing industry and economic development. School leaders think the funding cuts have leveled off, but they’ve still been left with about half as much money as they received since fiscal year 2009. To mitigate the cuts, schools have decided to defer maintenance costs, hire fewer teachers and raise tuition. The state funding shortfalls have also pulled the universities’ attention and dollars to day- to-day operations, leaving less time to plan and budget for the future. “South Carolina really is at a point now where in my opinion we need to think about not just how we support higher education, but how we are going to position the state to be competitive with other states among the nation,” said Thomas Elzey, executive vice Higher-ed funding cut in half since ’09 See FUNDING, Page 8 July 15 - 28, 2013 • www.charlestonbusiness.com Volume 19, No. 15 • $2.00 Spy for a day Cybercamp educates students about STEM. Page 9
  • 106. NEWS REPORTING Associate/Individual Division SECOND PLACE: Charleston Regional Business Journal Liz Segrist p k s Wages in the Charleston region aren’t keeping pace with the cost of housing. Many residents are opting to live far from work to find affordable housing, causing congestion and frustration on the region’s roads. Full Story, Page 12 PAYING THE PRICETHE TOUGH EQUATION FOR HOUSING AFFORDABILITY IN THE CHARLESTON REGION Housing Affordability $45.11 per hour is the wage that would be required to afford the average home in the Charleston region. Charleston’s average wage is $19.80 per hour. Wages Pay increased almost 20% from 2005-2011, but the region still sits 15% below the U.S. average. W Population Growth The region’s population is growing at three times the U.S. average and is expected to hit 1 million people by 2027. + + Photo/Liz Segrist
  • 107. NEWS REPORTING Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE: S.C. Policy Council - The Nerve Rick Brundrett
  • 108. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Lexington County Chronicle & The Dispatch News Terry Ward BY TERRY WARD Lexchront@yahoo.com “I cried ‘til I was cried out,” said Sue Allen. Allen was distraught as raging flood waters threat- ened to swallow her home on Natchez Trail in the Sa- luda Terrace section of West Columbia. But Allen is happy now. A bed of concrete has been placed in the creek be- side her home to eliminate the eroding of her yard. With the help of several elected officials, including Sen. Nikki Setzler, Rep. Ken- ny Bingham and West Co- lumbia Mayor Joe Owens, disaster was averted. “This is the happiest event I’ve been to as mayor,” Ow- ens said. Setzler emphasized team- work. “This is what you can do when you work together,” he said, and elected officials may be wise to take heed. “Kenny Bingham has my vote forever,” Allen said. Her despair turned to joy came after abundant rains, and storm water run-off over the summer had erod- ed away a large portion of her yard. By July 18, Allen and her husband could all but feel the spray from the torrent of water rushing through their yard. “It’s gratifying that some- one heard out pleas,” Bob Allen said. He said the vio- lent flow was a close as three-feet from the house. Seeing the danger, Owens said immediate action was needed. Using the federal Emer- gency Watershed Protec- tion Program (EWP) to help those “threatened by sudden watershed impair- ments, the Natchez Trail Slope Stabilization Project was implemented, the City of West Columbia’s Mardi Valentino wrote in a re- lease. “ The EWP’s work must be sponsored by a public agency and the city of West Columbia stepped forward to support the project. The NCRS provided the con- struction cost share in the amount of 75 percent, while West Columbia contributed the remainder. The estimat- ed project cost is $222,000.” Steve Henry, assistant state conservation engi- neer with the Natural Re- sources Conservation Ser- vice (NRCS) and Sid Varn, West Columbia’s director of planning and engineering worked together to design a concrete and rock bed to correct the problem. Owens also lauded the C.R. Jackson company for an extraordinary effort to help fix the problem. Flood disaster averted in West Columbia Raging flood waters were dangerously close to the home of Sue and Bob Allen. Sue Allen was distraught as raging flood waters threatened to swallow her home on Natchez Trail. She is all smiles now.
  • 109. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Berkeley Independent Dan Brown BY DAN BROWN The Independent Students, coaches, parents and the entire Cross commu- nity tried to comprehend the news Sunday of the loss of one of Cross High School’s most promising young coaches. Antonio Simmons, 34, assistant football coach and head track coach for the Trojans since 2009, died of an apparent heart attack on Sunday morning. Cross Athletic Director Shaun Wright confirmed the news Sunday afternoon. “This is a very sad day for Cross High School and the community of Cross,” Wright said. “This was very sudden, a very tragic thing. “Antonio was one of the good guys.” A graduate of Berkeley High School and member of the Stags 1994 and 1996 state championship teams, Simmons played collegiately at Charleston Southern University, enjoying a break- out season in 1998 when he led the Buccaneers in tackles. ‘A very sad day’Cross High School, community reeling after death of coach See SIMMONS Page 5A Dominic McKelvey/Special to The Independent Antonio Simmons works the CHS football sidelines in 2012.
  • 110. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Independent Voice of Blythewood and Fairfield County James Denton James Denton Editor Employees, family members held captive - - - - - - Gunmen raid business
  • 111. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Greenville Journal Cindy Landrum GREENVILLEJOURNALGREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, July 12, 2013 • Vol.15, No.28 SEE STORY ON PAGE 8 PHOTOS PROVIDED ‘THERE ARE NO WORDS, NO ANSWERS’A mourning community remembers two families killed in Alaska plane crash Antonakos family McManus family From left, Connor McManus, Mills Antonakos, Meghan McManus, Olivia Antonakos and Ana Antonakos. Taken in Alaska, presumably on July 4, only three days before the plane crash that claimed all of their lives. Ana and Olivia Antonakos Chris, Connor, Meghan and Stacey McManusMills Antonakos Last photo posted by Olivia Connor McManus Meghan McManus
  • 112. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Horry Independent Robert Anderson Conwayite with big heart loses life in Monday morning blaze
  • 113. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 Division Charred lumber and ash are all that remain of one of the 26 buildings destroyed by fire Saturday in Windsor Green. BY MICHAEL SMITH AND HEATHER GALE INFO@MYHORRYNEWS.COM Long before the flames were extinguished, Car- olina Forest area busi- nesses were already scrambling to help dis- placed fire victims. Chet Crockett, owner of Carolina Forest Rental Properties, said he received an “overwhelming re- sponse” Sunday, saying res- idents turned out in droves to donate what they could, from food and dishes to bedding and furniture. “This right here shows the strength of Carolina Forest,” Crockett said. “When something like this happens, we all come to- gether as families and resi- dents. The whole Carolina Forest community is com- ing together.” Carolina Forest Rental Properties, located at 4006 Postal Way, will continue to accept donations through- out the week, Crockett said. “We managed two prop- erties in Windsor Green and will be assisting our tenants any way possible,” he said. Dennis DiSabato is also opening the doors of his business, DiSabato Law Firm in Carolina Forest, to those who wish to drop off donations. He’s also accepting non- perishables, clothing, toys, blankets and other items residents will need. “If people want to pro- vide assistance or need, we’ll be glad to be a con- duit to get that assistance to people,” DiSabato said. “Carolina Forest is a very tight-knit community. It’s great that people want to step up and help.” The X Gym Sports and PHOTOS BY MICHAEL SMITH | MIICHAEL.SMITH@MYHORRYNEWS.COM Flames consume one of the 26 buildings in Windsor Green that were destroyed Saturday when a woods fire spread to the Carolina Forest condominium complex. CHRONICLE CAROLINAFOREST CHRONICLE CAROLINAFOREST March 21, 2013 | Vol. VI, No. 20(843)236-4810 www.myhorrynews.com | Waccamaw Publishers, Inc., 2510 Main St., Conway, SC29526 Attention: Delivery INFERNOINTHEFOREST Fireinvestigatorsidentifyorigin, butcausestillremainsunknown 75 Cents POSTAL PATRON PRESORTED STANDARD U.S.POSTAGE PAID CONWAY, S.C. PERMIT NO. 44 CarolinaForestrushingtoassistfirevictims FIRE VICTIMS, A3 A Carolina Forest resident (left) shares his concerns about the Windsor Green fire with Gov. Nikki Haley (right) follow- ing a press conference near the fire site on Monday. Windsor Green fire destroys 26 condominiums BY MICHAEL SMITH AND HEATHER GALE INFO@MYHORRYNEWS.COM It looked like a scene from a major war film. Pockets of smoke fizzed from the smoldering ruins ofWindsor Green as the charred odor of melted vinyl blanketed the air. Palm trees stood listlessly, their blackened fronds drooping toward the ground. All that was left in some spots was a single wall, charred beyond recogni- tion. In other cases, whole buildings were flattened or reduced to a pile of ashes and rubble. Police and firefighters, wearing faces of exhaus- tion, trundled through the rubble where families once ate dinner or watched tele- vision. Outside the golf course community, displaced resi- dents huddled as sirens Residentswholost everythingrecount furyofcondofire BY HEATHER GALE HEATHER.GALE@ MYHORRYNEWS.COM W alking down the street to their now fire-de- stroyed home, Jerry and Gail DelPercio are at a loss for words. They look in the direction of where their three bed- room, two bath condo once stood on Britewater Court in theWindsor Green commu- nity and just shake their heads. “We were the third build- ing on the left,” Jerry DelPer- cio, an Horry County sheriff deputy and former police officer, said. “We had the top unit that was 1,300 square feet with a screened-in back porch.We lived there for 14 years.We loved it there and now it is gone.” The DelPercios, who have been married for almost 50 years, were just two of the 189 people who lost every- thing in a fire that ravaged a portion of theWindsor Green community in Car- olina Forest Saturday. No human lives were lost, but a large number of pets died in the fire that de- stroyed 26 buildings. The call came in to dis- patchers around 5 p.m. Sat- urday that a grass fire was quickly spreading and de- stroying homes in the com- munity. And thankfully, for Gail DelPercio, her husband was just getting home around that time. “It was just before 5 p.m. and I was in the house with the windows closed up and I was vacuuming,” she said. “I didn’t hear anything out- WINDSOR GREEN, A4 I Police rescue Horry County police officer rescues grandfather, pet from burning building. More on this amazing story inside on Page A5. I Extended coverage Column B | Ettie Newlands asks community to help fire victims, A4. Photo Story | Images from the front lines, A11. Online coverage | Photo galleries, video and more at www.myhorrynews.com. DELPERCIO, A2
  • 114. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly 2/3Times Division THIRD PLACE: The Lancaster News Gregory A. Summers Robbers hold up Antioch Grocery Clerk struck in head with pistol by masked gunman AARON MORRISON/amorrison@thelancasternews.com Authorities say two unknown black men robbed Antioch Grocery about 9:05 p.m. Wednesday, May 8. Gregory A. Summers gsummers@thelancasternews.com At least two men, possibly three people, are wanted in connection with an armed robbery at Antioch Grocery on Wednesday, May 8, in which a clerk was injured by a masked gunman. Then, a customer, who walked into the store while the crime was in progress, had a gun pointed at him, according to witnesses at the scene. Authorities say two un- known black men entered the store, at 2702 Flat Creek Road, about 9:05 p.m. Wednesday. One of them jumped across the counter and struck the clerk in the head with a pistol, demand- ing money and merchandise. A customer walking into the store after parking his car beside the gas pumps found himself looking down the barrel of a gun and was ordered outside by the rob- bers, said Rodger Payne. Payne is the owner of Rodger’s Automotive, which is next door to the store in the strip-mall-type shop- ping center just past the Whitehall subdivision on Flat Creek Road. Two other businesses – Antioch Roadside Grill and Rhonda’s Hair Fashions – are also adjacent to the store. Payne stood outside the crime tape that cordoned See ROBBERS | Page 2
  • 115. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly 2/3Times Division SECOND PLACE: The Hartsville Messenger Bob Sloan Hulsey found guilty
  • 116. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Weekly 2/3Times Division FIRST PLACE: The Lancaster News Christopher Sardelli Burglary in progress thwarted Grier, Tinsley ram police cars, run from deputies and are now in jail AARON MORRISON/amorrison@thelancasternews.com Deputies use a tracking dog to search a section of McIlwain Road on Thursday, May 30. Christopher Sardelli csardelli@thelancasternews.com A S.C. Law Enforcement Divi- sion helicopter whirred over- head Thursday morning, May 30,asdrovesofdeputiessearched a wooded area near the Sedge- field subdivision on the hunt for two men wanted for a home burglary. Within a few hours, both men were arrested after a tense chase that began in the 5000 block of Sedgefield Drive after a woman called 911 at 8:45 a.m. about a burglary in progress. The two men, Quindricus Mon- dra Tinsley, 22, and Terence Lam- ont Grier, 23, both of Lancaster, werearrestedseparately after flee- ing the scene of the burglary, ac- cording to a Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office news release.Their exact addresses were unknown as of press time Thursday. Tinsley was charged with sec- ond-degree burglary. Grier was charged with first- degree burglary, malicious in- jury to property and two counts of aggravated assault and bat- tery, the release said. See BURGLARY | Page 8A
  • 117. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Star Phyllis Britt BY PHYLLIS BRITT editor@northaugustastar.com City presents major riverfront project Proposal includes hotel, conference center, new GreenJackets stadium SUBMITTED PHOTOS PicturedisatentativeplanoftheproposeddevelopmentprojectrevealedbyCityAdministratorTodd Gloveratthisweek’sNorthAugustaChamberofCommercebusinessbreakfast,A.M.Connection. Pictured is an aerial view of the project. Please see PROPOSAL,
  • 118. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Weekly Observer Christopher McKagen
  • 119. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Under 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Coastal Observer Jason Lesley BY JASON LESLEY COASTAL OBSERVER It’s 6 a.m., well before the sun begins to streak the horizon east of Georgetown with light. Working people are stirring though. A garbage truck with its yellow light flashing pulls into the Piggly Wiggly on High- market Street, and the driver goes inside to get a hot breakfast from the deli. He comes out the door eating from a Styrofoam box. Steel mill workers, in their green uniform pants and shirts, follow suit. Must be a good breakfast. Or it’s cheap. Coast RTA bus No. 16 is scheduled to stop at Piggly Wiggly at 6:09 a.m. to pick up riders bound for Myrtle Beach and their jobs serving the tourist trade. Samuel Grant is waiting in the dark morning at Piggly Wig- gly. A longshoreman at 14, he’s retired from the steel mill. He qualified for a pension in 2003 and is waiting on another for the years he worked after a strike. Grant isn’t catching the bus today. He’s going to Charles- ton with a buddy to get auto parts from a junk yard. “Man’s gotta do something,” he says. He tells a first-time rider the bus stops SEE “BUS,” PAGE 3 BY JASON LESLEY COASTAL OBSERVER Advocacy groups for children, the sick and the unemployed say they all run into the same brick wall eventually: a lack of timely, reliable, affordable public transportation in George- town County. Suzanne Harris of Heritage Plantation addressed members of County Council last month asking for changes in the bus ser- vice provided by Coast RTA in Georgetown and Horry counties. SEE “TRANSPORT,” PAGE 2 Bus line, lifeline A rider gets off the Route 16 bus from Georgetown at Paw- leys Island. Photos by Tanya Ackerman/Coastal Observer Lack of transport hinders services
  • 120. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 & 2-3TimesWeekly Division THIRD PLACE: The Lancaster News Reece Murphy Misplaced History? County’s ‘Washington coin’ missing from Wofford Reece Murphy rmurphy@thelancasternews.com A storied piece of Lancaster County’s history is missing at the Wofford College archives. The George Washington half dollar is a silver Spanish piece of eight (Spanish real) said to have been used by the first president to pay for breakfast at the historic Nathan Barr’s Tavern on the morning of May 27, 1791. The coin has been in the care of the Wofford archives since the early 1900s. In a conversation Feb. 13, Wofford archivist Dr. Phillip Stone confirmed a tip received by The Lancaster News earlier this month saying the coin has not been accounted for since around November 2011.
  • 121. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 & 2-3TimesWeekly Division SECOND PLACE: The Lancaster News Reece Murphy Zais’ proposal worries educators State school chief wants to strike rules on class size, staffing levels Reece Murphy rmurphy@thelancasternews.com The S.C. Board of Education (SCBOE) is considering a proposal that would gut its regulation limiting class sizes and mandatory staffing levels at the state’s public schools. School board regulation 43-205, in effect since 2007, deals with adminis- trative and professional personnel qualifications, duties and workloads for the state’s public schools. The SCBOE held first reading of the proposed changes Sept. 11 and has scheduled public comments and sec- ond reading for Nov. 13. The Board of Education’s Policy and Legislative Committee heard testimony on the matter Wednesday, Oct. 9. The changes, proposed and support- ed by S.C. Department of Education Superintendent Dr. Mick Zais, are in- tended to provide flexibility for school districts. Educators believe the proposed changes are unrealistic and will cause students’ educations to suffer. “My fellow educators are nervous about this proposal,” said Erwin Ele- mentary School first-grade teacher Jen- ny Nowicki. “Many have wondered aloud why anyone would propose such detrimental changes.” “Many did not believe that these things were actually proposed until they read it, because the proposals are so unrealistic and detrimental to the students,” she said. The proposal does away with nearly every requirement in the regulations regardingmandatorystaffingatschools, educator duties and workloads. Right now, regulations call for an av- erage student to teacher ratio of 28 to 1 for schools. Maximum kindergarten class ratios are maxed out at 20 to 1; elementary See PROPOSAL I Page 5A
  • 122. ENTERPRISE REPORTING Weekly Over 6,000 & 2-3TimesWeekly Division FIRST PLACE: Free Times Corey Hutchins June 12-18, 2013 free-times.com columbia’s free weekly Nuclear IslandAs the World Abandons Nuclear Plans, South Carolina Digs In Politics Derails S.C. Ethics Reform, p. 8 1001 Arabian Nights in Earlewood Park, p. 22 It’s Time to Nominate Your 2013 Favorites, p. 63
  • 123. FEATURE WRITING Associate/Individual Division THIRD PLACE: The Catholic Miscellany Amy Wise Taylor and Christina Lee Knauss BY AMY WISE TAYLOR AND CHRISTINA LEE KNAUSS THE CATHOLIC MISCELLANY If late-night TV is any indicator, then one of the most popular segments is the man-on-the-street interviews — where people talk with great authority on topics they know nothing about. One program recently asked questions about a fictitious “new pope.” Folks discussed his ex-wife, who is apparently hilarious, and how great it was that the car- dinals chose someone from the Jewish faith. Oy vey. The Miscellany decided to take the discussion to the youngest of the faith- ful — kindergartners — who showed they are smarter than your average bear. OK, so maybe they don’t know some of the particu- lars, like the pope’s name, or how the order of authority works, but they get the gist of it just fine: God and Jesus are in charge and the pope is their helper. Here’s what students from four diocesan schools had to say about the pontiff. Nativity, James Island: The students in Katie Hatcher’s K-5 class seemed to have an intuitive knowledge about the bishop of Rome, declaring that he is “some- one in God’s house” and “an author.” Some of the things he does: Gives flowers to people who are sick, tells what the weather is going to be, helps people who fall down, helps someone who has done bad things, loves others, and “he should be your best friend.” As to what he looks like — well, duh, he wears a tall hat, carries a big stick with a cross on it, likes red, carries a basket filled with pine- cones, and has a lot of candy that he gives to the poor. They aren’t quite as sure about the pontiff’s family. All the students agree that he definitely has a family, but are vague on specifics. When asked, “Is he in your family?” they all nod em- phatically. The church fam- ily, of course. Three things they all know: the pope is a man, he’s Catholic, and he’s old, although old is a relative term with guesses ranging from 19 to 100. Also, all the kids want to be friends with him because he follows God’s rules. Blessed Sacrament, Charleston: If you ask these children about Jesus or Mary, they can write you a small book. But when it comes to the pontiff, things are a little fuzzier. His name could be St. Peter, or maybe it’s Paul, or Mary… hmmm, sounds like a singing group. Nobody knows for sure what he looks like, but they know he’s retiring, which means he’s old and needs rest — although a handful of the hardliners say he should find another job. When the discussion turned to the conclave and how a new pope is selected, things got serious —seri- ously silly, that is. Sarah Hemingway, the K-5H teacher, led a round- carpet brainstorming ses- sion so the children could figure out exactly how a pope is selected. They decided that the vote is held in a cave, all the cardinals sit on the floor in a circle and raise their hand to vote, and the person in charge is Jesus, who stands on a stage to count the votes. “OK, so this is what we have,” Hemingway said. When she reviewed it, the kids giggled like mad and decided that was too silly to be true. In the end, the 5- and 6-year-olds came away with a lot of information that even the grown-ups don’t know. St. Anne, Sumter Kids in the K-5 class at St. Anne took a break from lis- tening to a story about Irish folk heroes to talk about the pope, and had plenty to say. The students had some very absolute answers as to who the pope is and what he does all day: “He tells people what to do.” “He talks about stuff.” “He teaches kids about God and Jesus,” and, finally, the most basic of all: “He does a job.” Yes, yes he does. One of the biggest jobs in the world … think of him as supervisor of 1.2 billion very needy employees. Forget just answering questions, however. The K-5ers had some original questions of their own for the pope: What does he do all day? Does he have a bed? Does he have an office? Does he get to play and do fun things like go roller-skating? But mostly, these kids were concerned about the Holy Father’s dietary wellbeing. What do the Vatican cooks serve him? Does he like hot dogs? Pizza? Candy? One boy offered to share his favorite breakfast with the pope: Quaker oatmeal with dinosaur eggs. St. Joseph, Columbia If the new pope ever feels confused about how to conduct his role in life, he should ask the K-5 students at St. Joseph. They will set him on course as the true leader of the faithful because he “runs” and “takes care” of the Church, is “in charge of all the Catholics” and is “the priests’ and bishops’ boss.” One student even gave the pope accounting respon- sibilities: “he does all the paychecks.” They also realize the papacy isn’t all business, saying the pope prays a lot, helps take care of the poor, sick and “people who are feeling bad,” takes care of Rome, and, when needed, speaks directly to God. If the new pontiff visits their classroom, the students have two immediate ques- tions for him: why does he carry the funny crooked stick and what does it do, and what color are his eyes? (An original question, because, actually, when was the last time any news article anywhere mentioned the color of a pope’s eyes?) The kids also wanted some- one to show them the money: does the pope get paid and, if so, who signs the paycheck? And, when a long day is over, they worry about him being lonely and wonder if the Holy Father has dogs, cats or other pets to help keep him company? Kindergartners at Blessed Sacrament drew their vision of what the pope looks like and what their choice of a name would be. Names ranged from St. Jesus to St. Love and St. Great. The Miscellany posted all the artwork on its Facebook page and asked people to vote. St. Sparkles (above) by Lillian Austin won in a tight contest. (www.facebook.com/The.Catholic.Miscellany) PROVIDED
  • 124. FEATURE WRITING Associate/Individual Division SECOND PLACE: Charleston Regional Business Journal Liz Segrist Commercial beekeepers expect the cost of food to rise with the continuous decline of the honeybee across S.C. and the U.S. Full Story, Page 4 BUZZKILL Photo/Liz Segrist
  • 125. FEATURE WRITING Associate/Individual Division FIRST PLACE: Ron Aiken
  • 126. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Independent Voice of Blythewood and Fairfield County Ashley Ghere and Grace Tarrant See Nehemiah page 2 Grace Tarrant & Ashley Ghere Contributors Barbara Ball Nehemiah Jacoby Dandy (center) sits with his grandmother Betsy Shields (left), great-grandmother Mary Tindal and uncle David Tindal next to the family Christmas tree. Nehemiah needs a dog for Christmas; but not just any dog – a specially trained service dog. Special dog could change the life of Winnsboro boy battling rare disease - - - -
  • 127. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: News and Press Samantha Lyles
  • 128. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Coastal Observer Charles Swenson COASTAL OBSERVER 8 Thursday, April 18, 2013 BY CHARLES SWENSON COASTAL OBSERVER Bill Shehan started out look- ing for his sister. He found a family. A mourning dove calls as he tells the story, seated on a wick- er couch on a porch outside his home on Waverly Road. It isn’t an easy story. Shehan, now 73, was placed in an orphanage with his brother and sister af- ter their parents divorced when he was a year old. His broth- er, who was older, was adopt- ed. His little sister, Mary Jane, died in 1951 at age 10. Shehan remembered the open coffin, her pigtails and her blue dress. He remembered the cemetery was on a hill out- side the town where his father was from, Erwin, Tenn. Those were memories that didn’t lend themselves to casual conversa- tion. “Sad memories,” he said. “Every once in a while he would mention it,” said his wife, Lee Brockington. “You could tell he didn’t want to talk about it.” But she took note of what he said. Shehan picked up a few more details about his life even as he grew up in the Janie Hammit Home in Bristol, Va., about 60 miles from Erwin. His father, who was in the Army, picked him up one time when he was 4 or 5 and they went to stay with an aunt in Erwin. He also spent time with the family that ad- opted his brother. That’s where he learned his great-grandfa- ther was Cherokee. Shehan was adopted by his grandmother when he was about 13. She was his mother’s mother. He lived on her farm until he enlisted in the Army at 18. He put as much space as he could between himself and Bristol. “Those were hard times,” he said. Not just for him, but for everyone in that corner of the Appalachians where Tennes- see, Virginia and North Caro- lina meet. “I learned one thing in the orphanage,” Brockington re- called her husband telling her. “I learned how important fam- ily was.” But his family stories were something Shehan couldn’t share with his children, three from previous marriages and the son he and Brockington have. “When your parents don’t want you, what are you sup- posed to do?” he said. He wanted to return to the mountains and find his sister’s grave. “I planned on going one day. I was thinking about it; what do they call it, a bucket list?” he said. His wife is a senior inter- preter at Hobcaw Barony. On a trip with her son, Brock, to scout out colleges they decided to visit Bristol. A helpful librar- ian found a 1947 magazine ar- ticle about the Janie Hammit Home. At the top of the page is a photo of the director with three small children on Christ- mas Day. Mary Jane Shehan looks into the camera, a bow in her shoulder-length hair. They made copies and brought them home to Bill. He asked some questions, but didn’t have too much to say. Last summer, as the fam- ily drove home with a load- ed car after Brock’s freshman year at the University of Pitts- burgh, Bill said “Why don’t we go through Erwin and find my little sister’s grave.” They stopped on the way in Jonesborough, where She- han looked for his great-grand- mother’s house. Brock sug- gested they ask in the county courthouse. Staff were eager to help, and Shehan thinks they found it. Then they drove into the Cherokee National Forest to Erwin. ■ THE COMPUTER has been a boon to interest in genealogy. But Shehan said he gave up us- ing the computer after he re- tired from Santee Cooper in 1999. The morning after they arrived in Erwin he went down to the McDonald’s and found the table where locals gather for coffee. A retired mail carri- er said he thought he knew the place Shehan remembered, the Polly Erwin Cemetery. “Follow me,” the man said. The only marker they found was for Laddie Shehan. Some of the graves weren’t marked. They went to the courthouse, this time for Unicoi County. They found three or four ceme- teries around Erwin that might be a match. At one, a husband and wife were digging a grave for a burial. They had some leather-bound ledgers that they had saved from a funeral home that was being torn down. Those were in the loft of a shed of another cemetery. A year later, Shehan’s eyes still get misty at the thought of finding his sister’s name in those ledgers. She was buried in the Polly Erwin Cemetery. He and his wife and son went back, but they still couldn’t find the grave. It was getting dark. They planned to drive on, but stopped for something to eat. A wait- er heard them talking. “There are still some Shehans who live here,” he said. He pointed them down the road. The first house was owned by a Shehan, but rent- ed. The tenant pointed them to the next house. They found a woman on the porch and told her what they were looking for. She called her husband, Mel- vin. “Come up on the porch, let’s talk,” he told them. He listened to the story of three children left at the or- phanage in Bristol. “Bill, you have no idea how long we’ve been looking for you,” Melvin said. He spells his name Shee- han, which is the original Irish, Bill said. He is his father’s half-brother, one of 16 chil- dren in that generation. Mel- vin’s mother, Bill’s grandmoth- er, was Cherokee. Melvin had family records and photos. And he knew where Mary Jane was buried. The next day, they all went back to the Polly Erwin Cem- etery. Mary Jane was buried next to Laddie Shehan. Her grave was unmarked, but it didn’t stay that way. Bill is on the cemetery com- mittee at Pawleys Island Pres- byterian Church. He ordered a marker, listing his sister’s par- ents and grandparents so there will be a record for future gen- erations. They went back to Er- win on the Fourth of July for a family reunion and a service at the cemetery. The minister delivered a homily about be- ing led by God and about being complete. “I didn’t even know I had any relatives,” Bill said. And they weren’t all in the mountains. He learned he had a cousin. In South Carolina. Near Myrtle Beach. In fact she worked in Litch- field and one day told a cus- tomer at the salon where she worked that she just found out she had a cousin named Bill who lived in Pawleys Island. And the customer knew the sto- ry because she goes to church with Bill and Lee. When they finally met, she told Bill she often joked with her husband about taking the street sign Bill put up that said Shehan Lane. She saw it often because until recently she lived just down the street from Bill. “I went to Erwin for one thing: to find my sister,” Bill said. “I really wasn’t looking for the relatives.” GENEALOGY The hunt for family ties Third in a series Search for a grave, leads to a family he never knew Bill She- han grew up in an orphanage and didn’t talk much about the family that placed him there. Charles Swenson/ Coastal Observer
  • 129. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Link Kevin Smith Krystan Simpson Helms/Special to The Link Pictured above are a few of the 7,000 Santas Neil and Tim Griffin have on display at their home in Pageland. KEVIN SMITH Special to The Link Roy D. Griffin stands quietly in the dark at the door of the auditorium of Pageland High School. He listens to the actors on the other side, waiting for his cue. His hands hurt. His back aches. The diabetes has taken most of his vision. None of that mattered. Right now, the children wanted Santa Claus. Neil Griffin had just recently asked his dad if he could play Santa in his French students’ Christmas production at Pageland High School, but Roy de- clined because of his health. Roy strug- gled with chronic pain and physical damage after having been in an acci- dent years earlier while in the line of duty as a D.C. Metro police officer. Neil had cast a student in the part and continued the production and waited patiently for the kid to enter stage right. Only an hour before, Roy had put on the suit and asked one of his other sons to drive him to the school. Roy Griffin opens the door to the au- ditorium in December of 1975. It was the last time he would appear as the of- ficial Santa of Pageland. “The memory still brings tears to my eyes,” Neil said.“I believe the most poignant aspect of this memory is that no one knew just how ill he was and what a sacrifice it was for him to be there.” The Griffin Christmas Roy Griffin would lock himself in the recreation room of the Griffin home. The family would wait and listen as he decorated the room from top to bottom. From there, the decorations would spill out and cover the house on the hill that came to be known as “The Hot Dog Stand” at Christmas. The joy and excitement didn’t stop with lights and decorations. Roy’s own childhood Christmas memories were no doubt filled with the harsh realities his family faced during the Great Depres- sion, and regardless of the Griffin household’s bleak financial status (“dirt poor” as Neil puts it), Christmas would be as big and shiny as the decorations. “He was determined we would have a wonderful Christmas,” Neil recalls. “My mom admitted to me years later after his death that they would take out a new mortgage on the house each year to pay for gifts, and then pay it off in time for the next year’s celebration.” The Suit “Is that the suit?” I get up from my seat, surrounded by the mountain of Santas in Tim and Neil’s living room. Tim, Neil’s partner, pulls the suit down from where it hangs and holds it with reverence. The hanger bears an in- scription by Alexander Wood: “A father sees himself in his child’s eyes.” The suit was handmade in 1968 by Margi The story behind the Santa House See SANTAS, 10A Pictured above is the town of Pageland’s longtime Santa Claus, Roy Griffin. Pic- tured below, Roy’s son, Neil, holds his fa- ther’s Santa suit.
  • 130. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Greenville Journal Leigh Savage JOURNAL COMMUNITY HEATHER’S RIDE continued on PAGE 14 GREGBECKNER/STAFF EVERYONE Biking for Heather’s Ride brings special-needs bikes to the Swamp Rabbit By LEIGH SAVAGE | contributor Ann Moore and her son, Archie, 9, take a ride along the Swamp Rabbit Trail. Six months ago, an idea came to Stephen Houston, fully formed, as he sat in church: Put bikes on the Swamp Rabbit Trail for kids with special needs. “It’s an activity we all take for granted,” said Houston, an avid mountain biker. “Kids that would never be able to ride a bike should get the chance to get the sensation we all get when zooming down the trail.” That day, the Heather’s Ride program was born. Now a special-needs bike, valued at $7,200, is housed at TTR Bikes next to the Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery, waiting for families who want to reserve it. Houston, an account manager in pharmaceutical sales, is “very close” to getting funding for two more children’s bikes and another for adults with special needs. “I want a whole army of these,” he said. “But I’m hoping to have four by May.” The project was a natural fit for Houston, whose sister Heather was diagnosed with Sturge-Weber, a severe form of epilepsy, at “Our focus is on ability, not disability, and this is a solution. It’s just the right thing to do.” Stan Healy, administrator at Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital
  • 131. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Charleston City Paper Stratton Lawrence Healthy Homework
  • 132. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division THIRD PLACE: The Gaffney Ledger Joe L. Hughes II By JOE L. HUGHES II Ledger Staff Writer joe@gaffneyledger.com Laughing as if nothing is wrong, Russell Jones struggles to reach from his seat to the floor where his cane is laying. In essence, it is as if an attempt to make strangers comfortable, loosening them up for what is likely the most serious bit of news they’ll hear that particular day.  “I have cerebral palsy, a condition which affects my motor skills, particu- larly in my legs,” he said. “And I don’t at all see my condition getting better, conversely I think it will get much worse.” As for his wife, Amanda, her situation could not bear becoming more grim. Termed morbidly obese and anorexic at dif- ferent times of her life, the local woman searched deep in her soul for an answer, one which would be best for herself, her hus- band, and their two young children. In the end, the answer was simple … the couple had to work out — and there was no choice in the matter. Believing the condition of their bodies serve as a ministry unto itself, the couple has faithfully made their way  — with their kids in tow — to the Cherokee County YMCA multiple times during the course of each week. As a result of their diligence, Russell and Amanda Jones have lost a total of 125 lbs. over the course of this year. “If we don’t maintain our temple — our bodies — we cannot say that we have been good stewards of what the Lord has given us; it’s a poor example of our faith,” Amanda Jones said. “None of our bodies are the same as that with which others have been blessed. But I must do well with what God has given me, and set a great example for our kids that health is of great impor- tance.”  Taking part in a daily regimen which in- cludes the services of a moving console treadmill machine, recumbent elliptical ma- chine, pull-ups and free weights, the two leave much better than they came, profusely sweating out the calories so easily obtained through unhealthy habits through the years. G See JONESES, PAGE 5 Keep up with these Joneses You had better start getting in shape if you want to Russell Jones and his wife Amanda, have lost more than 100 pounds less than eight months after they welcomed the arrival of their second child, Zoe. Russell Jones works out at the YMCA several times a week. (Photos by Joe L. Hughes, II)
  • 133. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division SECOND PLACE: The Lancaster News Laura Caskey See HISTORY | Page 2A “Valentine’s Day is a sham created by card companies to reinforce and exploit gender stereotypes,” Liz Lemon, Tina Fey’s cynical character on NBC’s sitcom “30 Rock,” tells her co-worker, Pete. Lemon’s view on the commercialization of Valentine’s Day has become one com- monly shared by those who feel the holiday is just another way greeting card companies and retailers get customers to spend money and put a monetary value on love. But it wasn’t always like this. The roots of Valentine’s Day are steeped in both history and mystification. A sordid past Before the foundation of the Christian Church, the Ancient Romans celebrated a festival of love known as Lupercalia, a time to honor Lupercus, the god of fertility. Roman men would participate in traditional purification rituals to the gods and slaughter goats as sacrifice. After consuming wine, the men would run through the streets of Rome, carrying the skins of the slaughtered goats. Women flooded the streets, believing by being touched by the goat skins, their chances at fertility and easy childbirth would be improved. So, it was very similar to how we celebrate today. While there is no substantial evidence linking Lupercalia and the later celebration of Valentine’s, the celebration, tra- ditionally commenced at the end of Feburary, helps connect this time of year to love. The Catholic celebration of St. Valentine’s Day on Feb. 14 wasnotofficiallyestablisheduntil496A.D.byPopeGalasius. St. Valentine’s Day was created in memory of the martyred St.Valentine. Historically, it is disputed who the actual St. Valentine was. Two saints are credited with being St.Valentine – St.Valen- tius of Terni and a 3rd Century Roman priest, known as Bishop Valentine. The latter is most widely-held to be the celebration’s namesake. One of the most commonly accepted versions of the tale states Bishop Valentine was a priest in the time of Caesar Claudius and was jailed and beheaded for betraying the emperor some time between 269 and 273 A.D. During his rule, Claudius had banned the marriage of younger citizens, believing married men made poor sol- diers. As a devout Catholic,Valentine believed marriage was a part of God’s plan and purpose, and continued conducting marriages for couples as young as 12 years old. The story goes that Valentine was put in jail, and fell in love with the jailer’s daughter. On the day of his death he sent her a note signed “From yourValentine.” It’s hard to tell how much of this story has been trans- formed and embellished to fit the more modern views on the holiday, but it is still an interesting one. It wasn’t until much later that the holiday took on the tra- ditional symbol as one of love and gift-giving. Traditions “For this was Saint Valentine’s day, when every bird of every kind that men can imagine comes to this place to choose his mate.” – “The Parliament of Fowls,” Geoffrey Chaucer Some literary historians credit Chaucer, of Canterbury Tales fame, as the first poet to equate the celebration ofVal- WIKIMEDIA COMMONS Staff Column Laura Caskey
  • 134. LIFESTYLE FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division FIRST PLACE: The Gaffney Ledger Joe L. Hughes II By JOE L. HUGHES II Ledger Staff Writer joe@gaffneyledger.com The pristine blue waters of Cal- ibogue Sound in clear view, local filmmakerAdam Gordon con- fesses he pinched himself a few times in awe of the beauty found in his home state. Standing on the shores of Dau- fuskie Island, a sea island nestled between Hilton Head Island and Savannah, Ga., the worries of the world meant nothing, for there it was simply him and God’s cre- ation — a brave new world of sorts. “Literally you are in your own world down there,” Gordon said. “There are no speed limits, and most people travel by golf cart or horse. Seeing the island and meeting the native people, the Gullahs, was a thrill, though get- ting there was no easy task.” Although taking in the sights and sounds of the South Carolina coast was a perk of the trip, Gor- don was there on business. Work- ing with film director Max Watson, producer Eric Williams and the Carolina Marsh TackyAs- sociation, the Gaffney filmmaker inApril was tasked with helping produce a documentary about a species of horses instrumental in Patriot forces’efforts during the American Revolution, and illus- trating the plight which currently endangers their existence. Titled “Marsh Tacky: The Line In The Sand,” the film was pro- duced by Creative Motion Media Design, LLC. Chronicling a species once as abundant as a family dog but now on the brink of extinction, the production is currently in the editing stages. No timetable for its release has been set. “This by no means was for the money; it was just something I was interested in,” Gordon said. “I had done an internship with the guy shooting it and felt it was a great opportunity to do something I love.” Developed from horses brought to the South Carolina coast by Spanish explorers during the 16th century, the Carolina Marsh Tacky was designated as the S.C. State Heritage Horse in 2010. Adapted for use in lowland swamps, the horses were used by colonists for farm work, herding cattle and hunting. In particular, the horse helped build the legend of the likes of Francis Marion — nicknamed the “Swamp Fox” — who along with his troops used the breed to evade and frustrate British forces during theAmerican Revolution. “Francis Marion used the horses because they could easily navigate through the marshy areas, something most breeds of horse have trouble with; particu- larly at that time, the European breeds being used by the British,” Gordon said. “Because their hooves were so much bigger, they could go on top of the marsh in- stead of sinking, and the horses are rather intelligent as well.” But by 1950, the Carolina Marsh Tacky was believed to be extinct, Spanish stock either cross- bred with or replaced by horses of larger size. However, in 2005 the American Livestock Breeds Con- servancy was able to locate ap- proximately 100 horses on the South Carolina coast, their her- itage confirmed by DNAsamples. Currently, there are approxi- mately 300 Carolina Marsh Tack- ies believed to be in existence. “In essence, that is what the documentary is about; the fact that we have a historic species in this state that is endangered,” Gordon said. “Carolina Marsh Tackies are more expensive, and people would prefer a quarter horse or some other breed. But the goal of this film is to bring light to the issue and help bring it back in the population area of about 1,500 horses, so then it may be somewhat out of the danger zone.” CAROLINA MARSH TACKY “This by no means was for the money,” said local filmmaker Adam Gordon, pictured at right. “It was just some- thing I was interested in.” The documentary is about a species of horses instrumental in Patriot forces’ efforts during the American Revolution. It illustrates the plight which cur- rently endangers the breed’s existence. Local man lending his talents to documentary about unique and endangered horse breed
  • 135. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Enquirer-Herald Jennifer Becknell By Jennifer Becknell news@enquirerherald.com YORK — Arthur Black and his two brothers grew up working on the fami- ly’s 500-acre farm, hauling loads of peaches that were picked in its or- chards to its packing house on S.C. 5. The Black boys — Eddie, Arthur and John — also pulled loads of 300-pound ice blocks from plants in York and else- where to the packing house, where peaches were sorted and cooled to 34 degrees for shipping. Peach farming was big business in the1950sand‘60s,whentheboysgrew up. Refrigerated trucks, cooled by ice, carried loads of peaches to Philadel- phia, New York, Chicago and other northern cities. “I remember as a kid, you could go all the way west of York and up to Fil- bert, and you’d see peaches after peaches after peaches,” said Arthur Black,62.“Youtalkaboutaprettysight in the springtime.” Peach growing in Western York County has changed during the years, yet it still attracts thousands of peach fanseachsummer,whochoosebaskets of the sweet, juicy fruits or set out into local orchards to pick their own. The Black family, which has been PHOTOS BY JENNIFER BECKNELL - NEWS@ENQUIRERHERALD.COM Arthur Black checks out ripe peaches on his peach farm west of York. The Black family has been growing peaches in York County for 90 years. 90 YEARS OF PEACHES Black’s to mark its long history in the peach, farming business Beth White, the daughter of Arthur Black, who manages the produce market at Black’s Peaches, puts out sweet corn for customers. Want to go? Black’s Peaches, 1800 Black Highway, York, will host a birthday celebration to mark its 90th year of peaches from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, with throwback prices, children’s activities and food.Please see PEACHES / 5
  • 136. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Jasper County Sun Anthony Garzilli Chris Jones, right, pets his dog Jackson as he chats with Nick Mendes on the porch at Palm Key in Ridgeland last week. Jones, from upstate New York, and Mendes, from California, are wounded veterans who were invited to Lt. Dan Week. Jones called the week s experience astounding. Anthony Garzilli / Jasper County Sun Anthony Garzilli Jasper County Sun A few months ago one of the most outgoing vet- erans at Lt. Dan Week would go days without speaking to his family. He’d sit in a chair and stare at a television. He’d sleep two hours a night before being jolted awake from a nightmare. He wouldn’t remember what he’d eaten for din- ner. He’d find comfort in staying indoors. “It was better to stay at home where it’s safe,” retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Paul Cornett said. But there he was last Thursday evening, walk- ing the grounds of Palm Key in Ridgeland, talking into a microphone, look- ing into a camera and going out of his way to find a waiting reporter. “I’m out here talking to people,” Cornett said. Cornett,44,served18½ years in the army, with tours in Operations Des- ert Shield, Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom. He’s suffered concus- sions, suffers from post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), has a degenera- tive disc in his back and in 2007 was diagnosed with diabetes. He has peripheral neuropathy and it’s difficult for him to walk for long periods of time. The Ohio resident was all smiles last week, how- ever, as he recounted the days at Palm Key talk- ing with veterans, riding horses and making brace- lets for his two daughters and granddaughter. A combined 60 vet- erans and their caregiv- ers were invited for the week, sponsored by the non-profit Independence Fund. They were set to go to Charleston last Satur- day to watch the Lt. Dan Band perform. Volunteers helped make the veterans com- fortable as they cooked meals — oysters were on the menu last Thursday — and took them fishing and allowed for a quiet environment. According to volunteer Don Gabbard, there are about 10 active county residents who volunteer. Cornett said the Palm Key experience was like a revelation. “I will come back any year they will have me,” he said. “This is a little heaven on earth.” For Chris Jones, 27, of upstate New York and Nick Mendes, 23, of California, the week was an opportunity to talk to veterans their age and SEE LT.DAN ONPAGE6 Veterans enjoy heaven on earth at Lt. Dan Week Retired Staff Sgt. Paul Cornett served for more than 18 years. Anthony Garzilli / Jasper County Sun
  • 137. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Clinton Chronicle Vic MacDonald What she loved doing best. Emily Anna Asbill plays her guitar while “mentoring” her friend Lucas, playing with her. Asbill’s “Wagon Wheel” lives on - in fond memories of friends and on Facebook. - Photos provided She just looked approachable. That is a remembrance of Emily Anna Asbill from a high school friend - a young woman who shared an important part of a life cut short. Asbill, 19 of Clinton, is re- membered on social media as a young woman of a giving nature, a singer - she would break out “Wagon Wheel” at the least provocation - and a love of “the underdog”. Literally. Asbill volunteered her time and affections for Carolina Lov- ing Hound Rescue in Greenville. A remembrance on the group’s website says of Emily Anna, “... when I asked her what it was about the Bluetick (hound) and rescue in general that she loved so much, her answer will more than likely haunt me for the remainder of the my life. ‘I love helping nurse the abused back to health, give them a chance at a good life!’” Remembering her friend, Emily Anna, fellow Bob Jones Academy student Irina Rice said Monday, “As a friend, she was once in a lifetime. “She was a person you would come across and you would never again (have a friend like that) in your lifetime. She was that special to me.” Rice said their friendship started one day in the BJAcafete- ria. Emily Anna looked so “ap- proachable” that Rice felt compelled to sit and talk to her. That led to attending sporting events and arts series programs, and in-the-dorms singing ses- sions. Rice is keeping Asbill’s mem- ory alive on two Facebook pages - her own and on Emily Anna’s, where hundreds of remembrances have been posted. Scores of pic- tures ofAsbill with friends - even one of her swimming with a dol- phin - and a video of her singing are on the Emily Anna Asbill Facebook page. Her sister Amanda is a fre- quent contributor. Her mom, Emily Joy, said she has had to take a break from Facebook be- cause the response to her daugh- ter’s death has been “so overwhelming”. “I just appreciate so much,” Joy said, “the EMS, first respon- ders, law enforcement, everyone who has assisted us, and our church family.” People from Emily Anna’s two workplaces in Greenville have provided support, she said. Emily Anna was attending Greenville Technical College, completing her first year there this past May, going for a degree in psychology. “She was a people person,” her mom said. “She wanted to help everybody - anybody who was troubled.” Joy said the family donated Asbill’s eyes for a possible trans- plant. “We will be able to meet that person,” Joy said if a needy eye- transplant recipient receives Emily Anna’s gift of sight. Asbill died June 30 at Laurens County Memorial Hospital, brought in by EMS from a Calvert Avenue, Clinton, house where she was found in cardiac arrest in a car. Her death has been ruled a homicide. Two men have been arrested and charged in connection with the homicide. The two suspects and four other people have been charged with contributing to the delinquency of a minor in the in- cident. Her mom would not speak about the arrests. “She was just a loving, caring child. She loved to go to nursing homes,” Joy said. “She will be missed by so many people.” Rice said meetingAsbill is her fondest memory of a valued friendship. “That’s where it all started,” she said. “One day I saw her with a group of people on the Quad at a table. I approached her and we talked. She couldn’t go off campus so we ate dinner together almost every evening.” Secular performance was not encouraged at BJA, Rice said, but “in the dorms, she would play, al- ways ‘Wagon Wheel’.” How was she? “She was great,” Rice said. Joy took her daughter once to The Flying Pie in Newberry, where a regular jam session is held. When EA broke out into “Rock me, mama” - “The whole place sang with her,” Joy said. “She thought it was great.” “Wagon Wheel” is a No. 1 sin- gle on the country chart for South Carolina native/singer Darius Rucker, who recently performed in Simpsonville (this month the single went double platinum, sig- nifying 2 million units sold). It’s just one “sign from the be- yond” related to the young woman being remembered so fondly by friends she cultivated at LaurensAcademy, Thornwell and Clinton High, where she played lacrosse with her sister Amanda. Emily Anna was a 2011 Pal- metto Girls State delegate, meet- ing at Presbyterian College. The day Emily Anna was laid to rest, July 2, her funeral caravan wound along Broad Street in a EA remembered: once in a lifetime friend By Vic MacDonald Staff Writer EA, 10A “Once in a lifetime.” EA, with friends at Bob Jones Academy, was a Palmetto Girls State del- egate in 2011 and somehow she got a Counselor shirt, but it’s for - look closely ...
  • 138. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division HONORABLE MENTION: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. Perry Nahom, age 3, and Robel, age 8, are biological brothers living in Ethiopia. Horry County residents Victor and Robin Crawford are preparing to travel overseas to adopt the boys in the coming weeks. Josiah Crawford, age 9, poses with his little brother Miles, age 2. The Crawford boys will soon be welcoming two more brothers. Yours. Mine. His. AmongU.S.families,internationaladoptionhasbeen decliningfor10years.TheCrawfordsmissedthememo BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD Robin Crawford didn’t recognize the number on her iPhone. She’d lost her contact list a few months earlier during an upgrade, so caller ID often presented a mystery. This was Tuesday, Aug. 20, and Robin was at peace. She and her husband Victor had recently been cleared to adopt two boys from Ethiopia. After a year of lawyers, fundraisers and paperwork, the 30-year-old was teeming with excitement, ready to bring two more children into her Conway home. The Crawford family already included Josiah, a 9- year-old from Guatemala, and Miles, the couple’s 2- year-old biological child. Then came the call. Robin knew the voice instantly. It belonged to a friend, the former foster mother of a 4-year-old girl Robin and Victor had tried to adopt. Just before that adoption was about to be finalized, the girl’s grandmother said she wanted to raise the child. See ADOPTION, Page 10A Astory offaith, familyand adoption
  • 139. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Charleston City Paper Elizabeth Pandolfi FEATURE|charlestoncitypaper.com 21 CHARLESTONCITYPAPER08.14.2013 20 and social character of a neighborhood, town, tribe, city, or region around arts and cultural activities.” The projects such initiatives fund are often things like parks and gather- ing spaces, which later host cultural events; housing developments for artists; public art events or installations; and public art, like murals or artist-designed bus shelters. Then there are specific placemaking events, like Enough Pie’s recent Awakening, which drew more than 1,000 people to 1600 Meeting for a massive one-day art installation featuring local artists like John Duckworth, Alizey Khan, and Patch Whisky. ArtPlace America, which is one of the biggest funders of creative placemaking projects in the country, has developed a list of creative placemaking principles, which include “creat[ing] opportunities for people at all income levels and backgrounds to thrive,” and “support[ing] economic diversity in the community.” These are meant to work in tandem with the field’s basic principle, as ArtFields articulates it, which is “place artists and art at the center of planning, execution, and activity.” So it’s a solid idea in many ways. From a quality of life standpoint, culturally rich communities are hands-down better places to live than those that aren’t, as anyone who lives in Charleston can attest. In addition, the These are a few of the comments attendees offered at a February community meeting hosted by Enough Pie, a new, arts-based community development organization work- ing in Charleston’s upper peninsula (other- wise known as the Neck). Called the Muster Plan, the meeting was designed to bring together business owners and residents in the area — which, for the purposes of Enough Pie, roughly encompasses the Meeting Street Road and King Street Extension corridor from around Pittsburgh Avenue at the northern end to Huger Street at the southern — to throw out ideas for what the community needs. If it sounds open-ended, that’s because it was. “We invited the community to come out and said what role do you want us to play, what do you think is important, what do you think is missing, what do you love about the upper peninsula, what should stay the same?” says Claire Johnson, the communications director for Enough Pie. The organization then com- piled attendees’ feedback, verbatim, into a report that’s available on the group’s website. While there was a healthy dose of concrete input — comments like “We need bike paths” or “better bus stops” — when it came to the question “What role should Enough Pie play in the upper peninsula community?” the ideas grew a little more abstract. That’s the question that prompted the “Be inclusive” and “Prevent gentrification” comments. Of course, both of those things are much easier said than done. The room itself was proof of that. In a crowd of more than 100, there was one, maybe two African Americans, even though the residents of the upper peninsula are still predominantly African-American. The rest, including the representatives from Enough Pie, were white. What’s in a Place? Enough Pie is in the business of creative placemaking, one of those hard-to-pin-down fields that entices a wide range of city plan- ners, architects, community development professionals, and others concerned with influencing the way cities look and feel. The National Endowment for the Arts, which funds creative placemaking initiatives around the country, defines it as when “public, pri- vate, not-for-profit, and community sectors partner to strategically shape the physical arts are a fairly uncontroversial topic, aside from the funding aspect — no politician is going to say he or she doesn’t support the arts, even if that same politician won’t sup- port publicly funding them. These simple facts have allowed many to ignore or push aside the problems with creative placemaking, namely its connection to gentrification and the effects it can have on low-income populations. The topic drew greater notice this January, when Richard Florida, author of the seminal The Rise of the Creative Class, acknowledged on The Atlantic Cities website that the benefits of a town with a strong creative economy don’t extend to lower-income workers. Rather, they’re largely concentrated in the creative class and among highly-skilled work- ers — college-educated professionals and the intellectual elite. Florida’s made a living off his thesis that attracting creative workers, which he says include everyone from artists and writers to tech pros, can help revitalize cities that are suffering from a “brain drain,” or the loss of college graduates and educated middle- class professionals. And how to attract those creative workers? Aside from offering them jobs, it helps to develop vibrant, beautiful, culturally significant places, which is part of what creative placemaking does. So far, so good. Most people, whether they make a little money or a lot, enjoy vibrant public spaces and a thriving creative atmosphere. But as Florida has recently found, these things can create problems for lower-income citizens. Although an influx of creatives into a city can raise wages across the board, he says, those higher wages are negated by the accompanying higher housing costs. As his research into the subject has continued, his findings haven’t changed. “It’s certainly true that the wages of all workers rise in knowledge and creative class regions,” Florida says in an email. “But research I undertook with my colleague Charlotta Mellander disclosed a troubling pattern. Once we take housing costs into account, creative class and knowledge workers do better in knowledge regions, but service workers and blue-collar working-class members do not.” This problem is exacerbated by the increase in economic segregation. “A 2012 study by the Pew Research Center found that segregation of upper- and lower-income households has increased in 27 of the 30 largest US metro areas over the past several decades. The full effects of this sorting are even more insidious than job and wage statistics can show ... Where our lower wage workers are concerned, we can’t put our faith in trickle-down theory,” Florida says. “If we want more economic diversity, we are going to have to create it. Diversity matters to thriving, vibrant communities.” Slice it Up Enough Pie was founded last year by Kate Nevin, the wife of developer and owner of 1600 Meeting Lindsay Nevin. Although Enough Pie will be relocating to 1600 Meeting once the building is ready for ten- ants, the organization is a separate entity. The group aims to support and further continued on page 22 DR. ADE OFUNNIYIN IS A COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON PROFESSOR AND AN OUTSPOKEN CRITIC OF HOW LOCAL BLACKS HAVE BEEN IGNORED KIM ODOM WORKS AT THE DART LIBRARY, THE DE FACTO COMMUNITY CENTER IN THE NORTH CENTRAL NEIGHBORHOOD CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT FURTHER UP THE KING STREET-MEETING STREET CORRIDOR WILL AFFECT NEIGHBORHOODS ON EITHER SIDE OF I-26 Whose Pie Is It Anyway? As the Neck develops and creative placemakers like Enough Pie set an agenda, will the black community be deliberately included or benignly neglected yet again? BY ELIZABETH PANDOLFI PhotosbyJonathanBoncek “Be inclusive with neighbors.” “Reach out to those with a history in the area.” “Reinvent and help prevent gentrification.”
  • 140. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Free Times Eva Moore 16 October 2-8, 2013free-times.com twitter.com/freetimessc facebook.com/freetimes I t was three days before the Fourth of July, and Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin was chiding his colleagues again. At a July 1 special called meeting — they were supposed to be on vacation — Colum- bia City Council members were preparing to vote on a contract with Greenville developer Bob Hughes to develop the Bull Street prop- erty, a 181-acre tract near the center of the city. It was a deal Columbia leaders had been trying to finalize for many years. “I’m never sure why, when the tough issues hit us, we’re always so quick to throw up our hands and say, ‘There’s no time,’” Benjamin said. “If we sleep and we miss this opportunity as a community, we will regret it for years to come.” It wasn’t a matter of throwing up their hands, said Councilwoman Tameika Isaac Devine. There were real questions about some key things in the proposed contract with Hughes — how the city would pay for $50 million in infrastructure, what Hughes would be required to do with an archeologi- cal site on the property and more. If Council were to approve the contract that night, she said, “Does that send a message that we’re not serious about the amendments we’re go- ing to be proposing?” But Benjamin warned the deal would fall through if city leaders didn’t get it together and vote that night. (Hughes didn’t exactly say that, it turns out, but the developer was nearing the end of his patience.) “At some point we’ve got to decide we’re going to move forward, and I believe the time is now,” Benjamin insisted. Scenes like the Bull Street vote have played out countless times during Benja- min’s term: Council members want to cover all their bases, to hear from the public and hash things out and tie up loose ends — and Benjamin wants to vote and move on. Whether people love him or hate him, most agree that Benjamin — who faces re- election a month from now — has really big ideas for the city. As mayor, Benjamin has helped keep the city’s finances in the black, without any tax increases. Columbia is in much better financial shape than it was five or 10 years ago, according to the ratings agencies and an outside accountant. He’s helped bring energy and investment to Main Street. But the big projects and risks by which Benjamin’s time as mayor will be judged — those haven’t really come to fruition yet. His critics point to the Palmetto Com- press building, a massive historic cotton warehouse that the city bought earlier this year to save it from demolition — borrowing $7 million from a city retirement fund to do so. Will the building be a success of public- private partnership or a millstone around the city’s neck? Residents will head into the voting booth Nov. 5 without knowing. Critics point to the ice rink the city brought to Main Street last winter; it lost more than $70,000 but brought thousands of people downtown. And they point especially hard to the Bull Street deal, in which the city has ex- posed itself to serious liability and financial obligations — but with the chance that developer Bob Hughes will revitalize the city core, making downtown Columbia dense and vibrant. Benjamin wants to make sure the project includes a minor-league baseball stadium — a symbol of big thinking if there ever was one. Benjamin calls his approach “bold.” It’s a word he deploys several times per speech. But along with boldness and big vision come tensions and risk. The Benjamin Doctrine BY EVA MOORE Will Big Ideas Be the Mayor’s Triumph or Downfall? Photo by Sean Rayford coverstory
  • 141. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Charleston City Paper Paul Bowers
  • 142. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division HONORABLE MENTION: The Gaffney Ledger Joe L. Hughes II By JOE L. HUGHES II Ledger Staff Writer joe@gaffneyledger.com Closing the door and locking it tight, Gaffney High School senior Zachary Benton handed a key over to an instructor, never to grasp hold of it ever again. While the memories are plentiful, he knew it was time to give up the key, one for which he no longer has any use. “It was time to give them up,” Benton said. “This door opens doors to past accomplishments, but I’m ready to open new ones that will take me to new things and new possibilities.” Born blind, Benton will not be able to visually take in Thursday’s gradua- tion ceremonies during which he and more than 500 other Cherokee County seniors will participate Thursday. However, he will hone in on every hoot, holler and kind word. Benton, along with Blacksburg High’s Alyssa Johnston are two examples of Cherokee County students making the walk from high school to adulthood with help from the Transition Advisory Council, a program that operates in conjunction with the Cherokee County School District. Serving as a support team for the transi- tion of students who have disabilities, the program is meant to provide as seamless a transition as possible for them through the collaboration of the school district, various community agencies and post-secondary colleges in an effort to equip stu- dents with the necessary tools to be productive, successful citizens. “These students are a motivation, as their desire to succeed far exceeds any dis- ability they may have,” said Kathy Brannon of the Transition Advisory Council. “They are a great example of perseverance and an inspiration to all.” Among the avenues in which the program assists local students with disabilities include landscaping, food service and countless vocational jobs. After a stint at the S.C. School for the Deaf and the Blind (SCSDB) in which his grades slipped, Benton said the transition to Gaffney High School was smooth and memorable, placing him on the path on which he finds himself today. “It took a little pushing and pulling, but it is one of my most memorable parts of being (at Gaffney High),” he said. “The school provided memories I will never trade, especially the times where I was able to meet people and socialize with them.” During his time at the school, Benton honed his expertise in the area of computer technology, so much so that he will begin courses focusing on the subject this fall at Limestone College. “I’ve always loved computers and found them very enjoyable to play,” the senior Gaffney High student said. “But I’m just thankful to have people there to help me become more independent and self-reliant. Without their help, I don’t know where I would be.” The program has also worked wonders for Johnston, who overcame a learning disability to get a step closer to her goal of becoming a caretaker. Serving as an intern at Magnolia’s of Gaffney, which provides assisted liv- ing and memory care for those with Alzheimer’s and other forms of demen- tia, she learned the ropes of the job through a host of daily chores. “She never lost patience with the people she was working with, and they knew she loved and cared for them,” said a Transition Advisory Board member during a recent event honoring Benton and Johnston. “(Johnston) was always prepared and ready to work.” But the Transition Advisory Board is not the only means through which G See COURAGE, Page 5 Honored for their hard work despite difficult odds, local graduates Zachary Benton (top photo, center) and Alyssa Johnston (middle photo, center) pose with Cherokee County School Superintend- ent Dr. Quincie Moore and Kathy Brannon of the school district’s Transition Advisory Board following a recent event. Megan Up- church, who will graduate Thursday from the S.C. School for the Deaf and the Blind (SCDB), is pictured in bottom photo. 3 STORIES OF COURAGE Benton, Johnston, Upchurch ready for life’s next chapers
  • 143. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division THIRD PLACE: The Summerville Journal Scene Leslie Cantu
  • 144. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division SECOND PLACE: The Newberry Observer Elyssa Parnell Eddie Anderson pulls out his shoehorn to fit customer, Patsy Chappell for a pair of tennis shoes. NEWBERRY — After 103 years of faithful ser- vice to the Newberry community, Anderson’s Shoes will soon be clos- ing its doors for the last time. Owner Eddie Anderson, along with his wife Mary, will be retiring with plans to travel and spend more time with family. Opening Jan. 2, 1910, by R.H. Anderson, also known as “Hal,” Anderson’s Shoes was originally located fur- ther down Main Street, where Carolina Gifts and Collectibles now stands. The business expand- ed to its current loca- tion on Feb. 12, 1938, when R.H. Anderson’s son, LeRoy Anderson became a part of the family business. At the time, the store was half the size, and was unable to open the other half until the early 1980s. LeRoy Anderson’s son, Eddie Anderson and current owner of Anderson’s Shoes, began helping out with the business at an early age. “I started when I was 9 years old on Easter Saturday,” Anderson said. “Several people had called in sick and my dad figured I could at least pick stuff up off the floor.” From that point on, Eddie began helping in the store off and on until the age of 12. “My father paid me a quarter for helping each Saturday,” he said. After graduating col- lege from The Citadel, Eddie Anderson worked for Brown Shoe Company in St. Louis, which led him to travel to different places such as Tennesse and Virginia with the company for work. Now married to his wife, Mary, he began working at Thalheimer department store in hopes of spending more time at home, rather than traveling. Having worked for Thalheimer for nine years, Eddie Anderson’s family had now grown with his two daughters, Katharine and Meg, and as a family they decided to move back to Newberry in December 1975. “I always will believe that my daughters being in Newberry provided them with special oppor- tunities,” Mr. Anderson said. After moving back to Newberry, Eddie and his wife began continuing the family business at Anderson’s Shoes where they have been ever since. Anderson said what set Anderson’s Shoes apart from bigger, department stores is simply the person- al service they have Anderson’sShoesleavesalastinglegacy Elyssa Parnell Staff Writer See ANDERSON | 10
  • 145. NEWS FEATURE WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division FIRST PLACE: The Summerville Journal Scene A.M. Sheehan Corey Gardens issues escalate to hate crime status BY A.M. SHEEHAN The Journal Scene Turning into Corey Gardens feels like a time warp…a step backwards to Nazi Germany or the Deep South in the ‘50s. It is nauseating, deeply sad and inspires an anger most don’t realize they have in them. Swastikas, anti-Semitic racial slurs, and foul lan- guage have been spray paint- ed all over the exterior of two of the residences on Amberwood Drive. A non- sensical plywood sign has been screwed above the entrance to one that reads CGHOA – presumably Corey Gardens Home Owners Association. Corey Gardens is quiet on this bright sunny Labor Day Monday. Few are out and about. One gentleman, who has stepped outside his home for a smoke, declines to talk about the desecration a few doors down. “I am new here,” he says. “I don’t know anyone and I don’t want to get in the mid- dle of this.” But, he does offer, “This is terrible, just terrible…why can’t people live and let live.” See HATE PAGE 8A
  • 146. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Under 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: News and Press Jana E. Pye
  • 147. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Coastal Observer Charles Swenson BY CHARLES SWENSON COASTAL OBSERVER Charles Hadley speaks soft- ly, but has a sharp ear. You need both in his busi- ness. Hadley retired several years ago from his day job as a pro- fessor of comparative literature and linguistics at Queen’s Uni- versity in Charlotte. He isn’t quite ready to give up his other line of work: coaching actors to speak Southern. He took his name off the list of technicians that studios keep, but his wife has urged him to put it back. He used to be at the top for Southern di- alect coaches. “It was a very short list,” he said. But Hadley has a list of cre- dentials that’s hard to equal, starting with his first job when he coached Vivien Leigh for her role as Blanche DuBois in “A Streetcar Named Desire” on the London stage. He’s worked with Charlton Heston, Robert Duvall, Faye Dunaway, Rich- ard Widmark, Nick Nolte, Lau- ra Dern and, in his last screen credit, John Travolta and Scar- lett Johannson. He also gets calls. One was from Tom Hanks who was try- ing to pin down an accent for “Forrest Gump.” “It sounds so name-droppy, but this is my work,” Hadley said during a visit to Pawleys Island. He grew up in Statesville, N.C., and started coming to Pawleys Island with his fam- ily in the 1930s. Now 84, he missed a few years recently un- til Tom and Jo Claire Dulin, friends from Charlotte, invit- ed Hadley and his wife Jane to spend a week at their condo in Litchfield by the Sea. “You can imagine what it was like in the ’30s when we first came down,” Hadley said. “I’m like a homing pigeon. I just have to get back once a year, and I’ve missed several years.” One thing about Pawleys in the 1930s was that it was cheap. Hadley’s father was a hard- ware salesman who lost every- thing at the start of the Great Depression. He rebounded and started a hardware store in Statesville. Hadley was born the year af- ter movies began to talk with the premiere of “The Jazz Sing- er.” When he was 10, his par- ents let him see “Gone With the Wind,” but only after he prom- ised to cover his ears for Clark Gable’s final line. “Of course I never did,” he said. He graduated from Davidson College and won a Fulbright scholarship to study in France. It was 1949. “There were still unexploded bombs in the roads,” Hadley said. “I saw Eu- rope almost in a state of war.” His travels took him to Lon- don where he sat in on some classes at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. “The head of the school, the dean, came to me and said there’s a call for an American, in fact she read me the request. It said ‘Wanted, genuine Amer- ican, Southern, preferably cul- tured.’ Of course all the English students laughed at that,” Had- ley said. He said he wasn’t interested. “Well, for your information,” the dean said, “it was put in by Laurence Olivier.” “I thought, that sounds like a possibility,” Hadley said. The job Olivier had in mind was coaching his wife Vivien Leigh in “Streetcar,” which he directed. “It was so unbelievable be- cause I had fallen so in love with her as a child back in Statesville when ‘Gone With the Wind’ appeared,” Hadley said. “It was an extraordinary adventure. It was my first sail- ing into dialect coaching, which became kind of a second profes- sion for me.” It was a decade after Scar- lett O’Hara and Leigh wanted to brush up her Southern ac- cent. Hadley was with her ev- ery day. “I would read the Lon- don Times in my good old North Carolina accent. I didn’t know any more. I was 21. What does anyone know at 21. But that was sufficient,” he said. They would also read the script and Leigh shaped her speech for Blanche around his accent. “I would watch her every night from the wings and what is so miraculous, I didn’t know this of course, she was really having a nervous breakdown playing a person having a ner- vous breakdown,” Hadley said. “As far as I could tell in my lim- ited knowledge, she was all right. She was high strung, but she wanted to do it right and she worked and she worked to get what she thought was the speech.” He would drive with her from her home to the theater, but Olivier told him not to speak to Leigh on the ride. She was already in her role, and no one else was allowed to speak with her. One night while Hadley sat outside Leigh’s dressing room Winston Churchill arrived. “Here’s this country boy from Statesville saying to the man who won the war, who led us to victory, saying ‘I’m sorry, sir, you can’t come in until after the show.’ ” Hadley said. “When I think about it, the effrontery just boggles the mind.” Someone in the cast men- tioned his name in Hollywood as a dialect coach, but the in- formation stayed in the files. It wasn’t until the 1980’s that he got a phone call. “Would you be interested in doing the dialect coaching for ‘Chiefs’?” he was asked. “We have a record of you being a di- alect coach.” The mini-series based on a book by Stuart Woods was due to start filming in Chester. Hadley declined, but the pro- ducers asked him to give it a try. “Down I went to Chester and began the most extraordinary experience of my life,” Hadley said. The cast included Heston, Paul Sorvino and Keith Car- radine. “Many people, including Hol- lywood actors, think we all talk alike. And that would be Gomer Pyle. My biggest job is to tell these actors we’re so different,” Hadley said. The director of “Chiefs” asked him in front of the cast whether he could do a Southern accent. “And I said, ‘I reckon I can, I’ve lived here all my life,’ ” Hadley said. He tried to point out there is more than one. The direc- tor wanted “Chester.” So would that be black or white, urban or rural, rich or poor, Hadley wanted to know. “Most people think it’s all one accent, but it’s simply not,” he said. “It’s become my life’s work listening and learning about accents.” It’s a field that continues to evolve along with the lan- guage, but one that is full of un- knowns. Hadley coached Nick Nolte in “The Prince of Tides” and the actor called to get advice when he played the title role in “Jef- ferson in Paris.” It’s impossible to know how Jefferson sounded, or even when the American accent di- verged from its English roots. “The unknowns about language are so great. It’s one reason it keeps me so interested.” Coaching dialect is a skill best acquired through experi- ence, Hadley said. “As far as I know, there are no schools.” “One of the most important qualities is to get along well with the actors,” he added. “I think I’ve done that well.” And most actors are willing to work hard to get the accent right. Most have an ear for the sounds. But not all. Without naming names, Hadley recalled one actor who never grasped the quintessen- tial Southern word Bubba. It came out buh-BAH. “I said, no, the accent’s on the first sylla- ble, like brother. Can you say brother?” Hadley recalled. The actor said he could. The camera rolled. “In the first take he said, ‘Come in the door, Mr. buh-BAH.” Try bubble, Hadley suggest- ed. “He never got it and there was not a thing I could do,” Hadley said. He would occasionally get calls from people seeking help to lose their Southern accents. “I say why? Be proud of your Southern accent,” Hadley said. “There’s such a social stigma.” The television series “Home- land” is being filmed two blocks from his home and he paid a visit to the set recently. “I had a cameraman say to me, ‘Every time I hear a Southerner speak I subtract a hundred points from their IQ,’ ” he said. He used to be teased about his accent when he started working on films. “I go along with it. I’m good natured,” Had- ley said. “It doesn’t hurt any- more. It did in the beginning.” The Voice Professor’s second career as a dialect coach owes its start to the kindness of strangers Tanya Ackerman/Coastal Observer Charles Hadley made his first visit to Hobcaw on a trip to Pawleys Island last month. He met another Hobcaw visitor, Winston Churchill, during a stay in London in 1950.
  • 148. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Under 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Enquirer-Herald Jennifer Becknell CLOVER Joe Williams watched four historic World War II Ameri- can military landings, including Normandy and Iwo Jima, from the deck of the USS Bayfield. Normandy and Iwo Jima, and a smaller landing in southern France, are well-documented examples of American military bravery and sac- rifice. But the other landing be- came a terrible failure, a tragic se- cret the Clover-area man carried for many years. Operation Tiger, the first of four U.S. military landings Williams saw in World War II, was a lesser-known but similarly historic operation in 1944, six weeks before the D-Day invasion. Williams, who will speak about his World War II experience after the Nov. 9 Veterans Day parade in downtown York, said he wonders what happened to the bodies of 749 men who died in Operation Tiger. He remembers hearing their cries. “I heard them hollering,” said Williams, 88, who served in the U.S. Coast Guard as a carpenter’s mate aboard the Bayfield. “I heard people saying, ‘Save me, save me. Come get me, help me, help me.’ ” Operation Tiger, in late April 1944, was one of a series of Amer- ican practice runs for the D-Day Normandy landings that would take place on June 6. But the oper- ation, at the village of Slapton Sands in Devon, England, is fa- mous for the disaster that resulted in the deaths of 749 men. People who lived in the village were moved out of the area, Wil- liams said, so the exercise could be as realistic as possible, with thou- sands of troops landing under live fire. Eight American landing ship tanks carrying 30,000 soldiers set off from England toward Slapton Sands for the exercise, according to published reports, along with a con- voy of ships and British Royal Navy escorts. But due to an apparent error in radio frequencies, the Germans picked up American communica- tion about the operation, and nine E-boats fired on the convoy near Lyme Bay. Two landing ships were aban- doned or sunk, and one was crip- JENNIFER BECKNELL - news@enquirerherald.com World War II veteran Joe Williams and his wife of 60 years, Faye, enjoy a moment on the back porch of their Clover-area home. Clover WWII vet remembers historic landings, loss By Jennifer Becknell jbecknell@enquirerherald.com This photo of the USS Bayfield is reproduced on a plaque given to Joe Williams to thank him for his efforts in hosting several reunions of the ship’s crew. SEE VETERAN, PAGE 4A
  • 149. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Over 6,000 Division HONORABLE MENTION: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. Perry Mr. Clarence’s magic MeetthesagebehindMB’smostfamousshe-crabsoup PHOTOSBYCHARLESD.PERRY|THEHERALD Clarence Myers stirs his famous she-crab soup at the Sea Captain’s House restaurant on Monday. He’s made this beloved soup herefor decades. BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD Just about every day, an 80- year-old man bikes two miles to the Sea Captain’s House restaurant. He heads to the kitchen where he takes a large silver pot down from its hanger. He pulls a rolling cart to the pantry for his butter, milk and other ingredients and returns to his warming stove. It is there that he does what remains a mystery to his coworkers — he makes the restaurant’s legendary she- crab soup. For years, this has been the primary occupation of Clarence Myers, or “Mr. Clarence” as his coworkers call him. He’s the only one who knows the recipe for the creamy concoction that has won Taste of the Town awards and been a top seller for the popular eatery. And he’s not about to reveal his secret. “I ain’t telling exactly how I make it,” he said. Colleagues have unsuccess- fully tried to get the recipe out of Mr. Clarence. “I asked him last week,” said Ralphnette Page, a cook who grew up in Mr. Clarence’s Myr- tle Beach neighborhood. “He said, ‘I’ll think about it.’” That’s a more reassuring an- swer than sous chef Todd Busby got. “He said he’s taking it to the grave with him,” Busby said. Pastry chef Marshall Brown has tried to cajole the method from him several times. “He holds onto it,” he said. “But I don’t blame him.” For Mr. Clarence, that recipe has represented his livelihood for the last few decades. See MR.CLARENCE, Page 2AMyers picks out his soup-making utensils at the Sea Captain’s House.
  • 150. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Over 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Moultrie News Sully Witte BY SULLY WITTE editor@moultrienews.com Itwasembarrassingenough to weigh more than 300 pounds, but to be slapped in the face with a no seat-belt ticket by a state trooper be- cause of it was worse. On March 11, 2011, Janette Colantonio was pulled over by a state trooper and issued a citation for not wearing her seat belt. The officer could clearly see that it would not fit around her waist, and apologetically handed her the ticket, suggesting she get a doctor’s note and have the ticket excused when she ap- peared in court. Colantonio comically laughed it off by agreeing that, yes, she was too fat. But, later she realized it was not funny at all. “Here I am, 30 years old, and I am too fat to buckle my seat belt,” she said she thought to herself. That was the straw that broke the camel’s back, she said.Sherefusedtogetadoc- tor’s note because her weight Colantoniosaidhercontinu- ous weight gain came about while suffering minor spells ofdepression.Shelosthersib- lingandparentsinthespanof just a few years. She had her 16 years old. That child was diagnosed with autism. Refusing to fail Janette’s weight-loss journey PHOTO PROVIDED Janette Colantonio before and after her weight loss jounrey. Since 2011, she has lost more than 200 pounds. See Journey, PAGE9A
  • 151. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Tom O’Dare BYTOMO’DARE•THEHERALD n a small town in Communist-con- trolled Albania, a small boy would sit in his room each night quietly listening to a radio using a makeshift antenna he had carefully run to the top of his house. He knew the danger of staying up each night listening to broadcasts from through- out Europe and beyond. If he got caught, his father and maybe more of his family would be exiled to the mineral fields for 25 years. Lazer Lekani was 10 years old in 1977 and knew in his heart that there had to be a bet- ter place beyond the barbed wire border surrounding his country. He just couldn’t believe that the rest of the world had to deal with the oppression and atrocities that he lived through every day. Then over the homemade antenna, Lazer picked up “Voice of America,” which be- came his window of truth for years to come. At the young age of 14, he began to put to- gether an elaborate plan to escape the Communist bondage — a plan that would See LEKANI, Page 2A ‘A country to die for’ Twenty-fouryearsago,LazerLekanifakedhisown deathtoescapeCommunistAlbania.NowtheSurfside businessmanpraiseshisnewhomelandas… TOMO’DARE|THEHERALD Lazer Lekani enjoys his perch inside the Surfside Beach pizzeria his family owns. Having escaped Communist rule 24 years ago, Lekani has a unique appreciation for the freedoms of the United States. His tale of fleeing Albania sounds like a plot for a suspense movie or novel. I
  • 152. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly Over 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Charles D. Perry Ode to an organist Aftermorethan62years,atimelessmusicianretires BYCHARLESD.PERRY THEHERALD The crowd packed the front pews of Myrtle Beach’s First Baptist Church for the 8:30 a.m. service. They sat on the right rows, on the same side as the organ. It was Dec. 30, the final Sunday of 2012 and the last day a petite woman named Sarah Watts would grace the keys of the church’s organ as its primary caretaker. For more than 62 years, Mrs. Sarah had served as First Baptist’s organist, greeting worshippers every Sabbath Day with a prelude and sending them off to Sunday dinner after the closing prayer. But this, this was the beginning of her retirement. Mrs. Sarah doesn’t remember much about the service. She couldn’t tell you that the pastor read from the second chapter of Matthew or that the final hymn that day was No. 275, “I Surrender All.” She just recalls those people, dozens of her family and friends who came to see her play one last time. And she re- members crying, being overwhelmed by the love of her first and only church. A gift Sarah Watts grew up a few blocks from the church. Her home always had a piano in it, and by the age of 8 she was playing that instrument for the chil- dren’s Sunday school class. “I loved music so,” she said. “I was a quick learner.” As a teenager, she sometimes toyed with the church organ, just trying to un- derstand its sounds. She took a few organ lessons, but mostly she taught herself to play. She suspects she was about 18 years old when the church staff asked her to take over the organist’s duties. They wouldn’t regret it. Other than being a Christian, a wife to See MRS.SARAH, Page 2A CHARLESD.PERRY|THEHERALD Sarah Watts, 81, plays the organ at the First Baptist Church of Myrtle Beach. She served as the church’s main organist for morethan 62 years.
  • 153. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly 2/3Times Division THIRD PLACE: The Lancaster News Michele Roberts ‘I WANT TO TELL EVERYONE TO NEVER, EVER GIVE UP’Life goes on for Alyssa Garris after pediatric stroke in 2010 PHOTOS SUPPLIED Because of her fondness for animals, therapy dogs were brought in to help Alyssa Garris, above, get through the therapy at Children’s Hospital at Scottish Rite in Atlanta, Ga. Lancaster High School student bounces back from long journey The Garris family includes from left, Mika, Hannah, Alyssa and Mark. Michele Roberts For The Lancaster News P ediatric strokes are extremely rare. When Lancaster High School student Alyssa Garris suffered a stroke after cleft lip and palate surgery in June 2010, the doctors on her case had a hard time giving her parents a proper prognosis. They couldn’t even tell Mika and Mark Garris what the future held for their daughter. See ALYSSA | Page 2B
  • 154. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly 2/3Times Division SECOND PLACE: The News & Reporter Nancy Parsons BY NANCY PARSONS gfreporter@onlinechester.com William Thomas “Trey” Holmes III is excited to be graduating from high school. Holmes, 17, will join his class- mates as they walk across the stage, marking the end of their learning days at Great Falls High School. The day of celebration is one Holmes has planned for a long time. An honor graduate, Holmes has mixed emotions about the 10:30 a.m. Friday graduation ceremony. “It will be a bittersweet day,” Holmes said. Friday is also the birth date of Holmes’ father, William Thomas Holmes II. But Holmes won’t be in the stadi- um to see his son receive his high school diploma. He passed away on April 28, 2011 because of an enlarged heart and a heart arrhythmia. He was 46. A guidancecounseloratHartsville HighSchool,theseniorHolmesmade the trek to Hartsville every day until he became sick a few months before his death. Trey Holmes was 15-years-old when his father passed. “We were really close,” Holmes said. “We’d go everywhere together on weekends. If he had to work, we’d go after he got off work.” Holmes said he and his father spent a lot of time at the drag races in Pageland. They also enjoyed going to the movie, he said. One of Holmes’ favorite memories with his father was meeting actress Phylicia Rashad, remembered by many for her role in The Cosby Show. Holmes said he was around seven or eight-years-old when he met Rashad at Carmel Presbyterian Church in Chester. “It was a good experience,” he said. Holmes said his father always offered words of encouragement to him. “He wanted me to strive for my BY NANCY PARSONS/GREAT FALLS REPORTER Trey Holmes will graduate on Friday. Although the day marks a celebration in his life, it is also a bittersweet day for him. It is his deceased father’s birthday. Holmes knows his father, a former guidance counselor, would have been proud of him. Trey Holmes hopes for father’s smile at graduation See HOLMES, Page 3-B
  • 155. PROFILE FEATURE WRITING OR STORY Weekly 2/3Times Division FIRST PLACE: The Summerville Journal Scene A.M. Sheehan BY A.M. SHEEHAN The Journal Scene Anyone who patronizes the Dorchester County Library has seen the gentleman who sits on one of the benches, his leg encased in a rainbow cast. He smiles and nods as people pass by.Apair of metal crutch- es lean against the rail next to his bench and a scruffy black backpack sits on the ground at his feet. His leg has been in a cast since March 21 when the brakes went on his bike and he put his foot down to try and slow down. Broken in two places, it has been a long, slow heal, he says. Mark Mapes, almost 49, suf- fers from osteogenesis imper- fecta he says. This is an inher- ited disorder characterized by extreme fragility of the bones. Consequently, what might be a simple injury for most is months and months of healing for Mapes. “But!” he says, “In 12 days I get the cast off…I hope.” The removal of the cast will depend on how well his bones have healed from the surgery necessary to put them back together, he says. Born and raised in Virginia, Mapes was adopted and his dad was in the military so he moved a lot he says. Now, with his parents gone and his sister in a nursing home, Mapes finds the climate here much more conducive to his lifestyle. Until May of 2011, Mapes says he worked at Johnson’s Auto Parts. However, in May he broke his elbow and it took that two years to heal with his arm in a cast making it impos- sible for him to work. Consequently he was forced, he says, to move to his current home. A tent. In the woods. He has a GED and some col- lege, but, he says, he never fin- ished. “I’ve been a mechanic all my life…I was building race car motors when I was 14,” he says. Mapes says when he was in his 20s, his biological father found him. His father sends him money every so often to help him out. Right now, says Mapes, he is having a bit of trouble. “They just took away my food stamps,” he says shaking his head. “They took them away once before, because they wanted proof that my father was send- ing me money. So my father wrote a letter. I got them back. Now, they told me I have to prove I am a felon.” Mapes felonies date back to his time in Virginia, he says. One was when he was in his 20s and stole an outboard motor. Another was for drug possession and the third, was for absconding when he was on parole. “I went back to Virginia, turned myself in, did my time,” he says. He has not been in trouble with the police in South Carolina he says. “I got clean [from drugs],” he says. “I am seven years clean.” He does, however, drink, he says, but he is not an alcoholic. He is clear-eyed, with clear speech and a steady albeit one- legged gait. There is no smell of alcohol around him. “I get around okay,” he says, “on crutches…just takes longer.” Every day he walks a mile from his tent to the library. It takes him an hour. He has a library card and will often spend time on the com- puter. He is very excited about get- ting his cast off although, he says, it will take about a month on the crutches to get his leg back to normal. “I haven’t walked on it in six months.” He says he won’t do physical therapy but “don’t you worry, I’ll get it back…there’s a bike calling my name.” Mapes says he eats whatever and whenever he can. Sometimes he goes to the food pantry/kitchen but, he says, “there is only so much Ramen, Chef Boyardee and soup outa a can you can eat, you know….” “I eat with whatever money I can scrape together. My father just sent me money for my birthday but I lent $17 to a girl. She hasn’t paid me back and I can’t get ahold of her.” Mapes’ birthday is Monday when he turns 49. His tent, he says, is off by itself, hidden in the woods. He doesn’t want it printed where. “I like it by myself…when you stay alone it is better…a group always brings the cops.” He did say that Cpt. Pierce of Summerville Police came to see him the other day to ask when he was getting his cast off. Apparently his tent loca- tion is on Highway Department land and “they don’t want you there.” “You know,” he said, “I stayed at Crisis Ministries for a whole year in Charleston but unless you are a veteran they treat you like crap. The vets, they get to hang around all day, watch TV. The rest of us are thrown out at 7:30 a.m. and the door is locked until 7:30 p.m. “There are no shelters for men here. Some homeless folks sleep under the bridge, some in the woods…you just gotta find a spot and hope they don’t bother you.” The “they” includes police, or anyone intent on doing harm such as drug addicts. “I could apply for disability but I don’t want to get on it…I can still work!” Mapes is emphatic. He wants to work. He loves to work. He hopes to get a job at Don’s car crusher place, he says. “I specialize in junk yards.” His brightly colored cast is signed by “the girls in the library and people from my church – Seacoast Church.” When he is not at the library, Mapes is volunteering at the food pantry, helping others. “I have friends who let me shower and people who offer to do my laundry,” he says. But no one ever offers a place to sleep. “I have been in the woods since July 2011. Mapes says he shares his home with deer, raccoons, opossum, rabbits and squirrels. Once he is back on his feet – both physically and financially – he says he will rent a place and his door will be open to someone else in need of a place to stay or a helping hand. “Well,” he amends, “depend- ing on their character…I don’t want any drug addicts.” “Only 12 more days,” he says again. “I hope to get back to work and back to living.” Mapes doesn’t want to have his picture taken outside of the library. I don’t want any repercus- sions because of me being here, he says. They are really nice people and I was brought up to have respect for people and I respect them. The women in the library simply say the library is there for everyone, including Mapes. “I’m going to Burger King now and spend my last $3 to get something to eat,” he says. He slings his backpack over his thin shoulders, grabs his crutches, stabilizes everything and takes off at a pretty good clip toward Burger King. Only 12 more days…. The man with the brightly colored cast… Mark Mapes
  • 156. SHORT STORY Weekly Under 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Berkeley Independent Dan Brown
  • 157. SHORT STORY Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The People-Sentinel David Purtell How do you explain to someone how long 100 years is? You could say it’s 1,200 months or 5,217 weeks. Or you could say 100 years is 36,524 days. Butmaybe100yearsisn’t about the time, but instead the person who lives it 100 year old celebrated want to look as good as Cora if they reach 100. “I thank the Lord for my life,” Cora said when she ad- dressed the crowd. She told them, “Don’t forget to pray.” She said she was “sur- prised” by the program and was happy to see her family and friends, many of whom had come from out of state. Cora spent part of her life living in New York. She said she is in good Cora Lee Quattlebaum speaks during an Oct. 27 celebration honoring her 100th birthday. David Purtell/Staff Writer David purtell Staff Writer david.purtell@morris.com
  • 158. SHORT STORY Weekly Under 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Coastal Observer Charles Swenson COASTAL OBSERVER 24 Thursday, July 11, 2013 BY CHARLES SWENSON COASTAL OBSERVER There was nary a ripple on the water as Paul Sass- er launched the delicate white shrimp fly through the heavy morning air. It fell silently, as flies will do, and with it fell a world record. It all happened in less than a minute, so quick- ly that Sasser took giant steps backward and tried for another. Sasser, a doctor from Conway, was in Pawleys Island last week casting for what he hopes will be a new record in the Guin- ness Book of World Re- cords. Well, not a record, the record. “There’s only one record for fly-fishing,” he said. That record is currently 7 meters. It’s the distance from which an angler in the UK cast a fly into a fishbowl with an 8-1/2 inch opening. Sasser set up to beat that on a mea- sured course at the edge of the parking lot at Paw- leys Island Outdoors. He hired a surveyor to mark the distances: 8, 10 and 13 meters. His fish bowl, cen- tered over a piece of fluo- rescent pink surveyor’s tape, was only 8 inches wide. He used an 8-weight Sage rod, 9-feet long. The same rod he uses for red- fish. It was his 9-year-old son, Kai, who brought him to the challenge. “My son is good in math, but not so good in English,” Sasser said. So they read together. “We ran out of interesting things to read so we start- ed on the Guinness Book of World Records.” He’s been fly-fishing for 10 years and when he saw the record he thought that was something he could do, or rather something he does routinely, but with- out the accoutrements needed for the record book. “Doing it’s not the hard part, it’s getting ev- erything set up,” he said. Along with the authen- ticated distance, Sasser had to have a public of- ficial verify the feat. For that he recruited Pawleys Island Mayor Bill Otis. “I’m watching to make sure he doesn’t step over the line,” Otis said. Sasser hit the mark at 8 meters with just a few casts. It took longer to up- load the official video to the store’s computer, so rather than wait, he took a shot at the 10-meter re- cord. Another half-dozen casts and another record was in the creel. “We’ll take it,” Sasser said. He took a couple of doz- en casts at 13 meters. A couple were close enough to energize his tiring left arm, but not close enough for the record book. No fish needed as angler goes for world record Photos by Charles Swenson/Coastal Observer The angler, Paul Sasser, above. His target, below left. His inspiration, below right.
  • 159. SHORT STORY Weekly Over 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Gazette Frank Johnson
  • 160. SHORT STORY Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Tom O’Dare Searching for Speedie MBwoman offersreward forpettortoise PHOTOCOURTESYOFBECKYWILSON Speedie the tortoise disappeared from his Myrtle Beach home Aug. 8. BYTOMO’DARE THEHERALD A city-wide search is on for Speedie. Speedie is a 70-pound African Sulcata tortoise that disappeared from his home on 76th Avenue North sometime in the late afternoon of Aug. 8, according to his owner Becky Wilson. A $500 no-questions-asked reward is being offered for his safe return. Wilson said Speedie is a spe- cial turtle that is on a daily reg- imen of medicine and has a $10-a-day diet of collards and kale. Speedie has lived in a pen at Wilson’s home for about a year and a half. See SPEEDIE, Page 2A
  • 161. SHORT STORY Weekly Over 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Greenville Journal April A. Morris instead of sipping a self-served cup of drip coffee, customers at Lexus of Greenville can now order a cappuccino or latte prepared by a well-trained and friendly barista. Dubbed Café Blends, the java spot is even more unusual in that it employs staff who have been diag- nosed with an autism spectrum disorder. The café will hold its of- ficial grand opening on March 20, offering samples along with the chance to see their staff in action. The Café Blends concept, a partnershipwiththeAtlantanonprofit Nobis Works, became an Asbury Automotive Group initiative when one Mercedes dealership in Florida hosted a coffee shop, said Melissa Corey,thegroup’spublicrelationsand communications manager and Café Blends program manager. Whenthemanagerlaterpresented the café to the meeting of 77 dealerships, it became a group initiative, Corey said. Within a year of the Florida location opening, the first Café Blends opened in Atlanta. The name refers to “blending autism into the workplace,” she said. “Many people have a fear of the unknown and when it comes to autism, people don’t understand it. We’ve realized that we can educate people about autism and a different ability rather than disability … and teach people that these individuals can do just as good a job as anyone else,” she said. Nobis Works hires and trains the staff for the cafes. There are three in Atlanta and now one in the Upstate. Barista Deidra Hall had been working in the café for about a month. She stood behind a marble counter artfully arranged with snacks and baked goods and said her favorite part of her new job is set-up in the morning. “I think I like it here,” she said. “It makes me happy and it helps me learn experience. I have fun with the employers here.” Hall is one of four baristas who work with Travis Norton, the site supervisor. Norton helped to get the café up and running in a Café Blends Brings Warm Cuppa to Lexus Dealership Shop hires employees with autism By April A. Morris | staff “Many people have a fear of the unknown, and when it comes to autism, people don’t understand it. We’ve realized that we can teach people that these individuals can do just as good a job as anyone else.” Melissa Corey, Café Blends program manager CAFÉ BLENDS GRAND OPENING March 20, 5:30-8 p.m., special presentation at 6:30 p.m. Lexus of Greenville, 2660 Laurens Road, Greenville Enjoy samples and hors d’oeuvres, meet the baristas and hear their stories 864-281-1111 • cafeblends.com converted break room and quiet lounge in early February. “Almost everyone who has come here has commented on how nice it is” and the friendliness of the staff, he said. A Marine veteran, he said setting up the café has also offered him valuable business experience. OpeningCafé’Blendsisimportant to the company, Corey said, because of the number of children who are diagnosed with autism. “We want to make sure that we provide opportunitiesforthemtocontribute.” The work gives “them an opportunity, but it has also changed our lives in that it has given us new family members,” said Dan Clara, the dealership’s general manager. “I think it has strengthened the team.” He said customer feedback “has been very positive. Whenever we meet people, they know someone who is affected by autism. When they learn about the café, they say, ‘Wow, I can’t believe you did that, I wish more people would do that.’” Clara said he has witnessed the café employees gain independence, draw their own paychecks and make their own decisions. “It’s something they are very proud of.” As for expansion in Asbury Automotive Group, there is already a line forming. “We’ve got plenty of general managers who are raising their hands and who are interested in opening a café,” Corey said. Barista Deidra Hall in the Café Blends coffee shop located in the Lexus of Greenville dealership. ABOVE, RIGHT: Hall puts cookies in the oven Photos by Greg Beckner
  • 162. SHORT STORY Weekly 2/3Times Division THIRD PLACE: The News & Reporter Denyse Clark BY DENYSE CLARK dclark@onlinechester.com ChesterHighSchoolseniorLayne Clement was simply minding her business in Julia Rowsam’s Spanish class when all of a sudden, an idea struck. “I was sitting in class one day and I said, ‘Ms. Rowsam, I really think that we need a rock,’” Clement said. “Pretty much, every school has a rock so we’re lagging behind.” Clement explained what type rock she wanted and then put a plan into action to get one. “It’s a spirit rock!” she said. “It’s dedicated to our Class of 2013.” The large stone that now rests on the front lawn at CHS isn’t known by any fancy name. It’s simply called “The Rock” but is already deemed a special rock because it has it’s own Twitter account, Clement said. “People think it’s me on twitter but it’s not,” she said. “The rock’s twitter name is @CHS_Rock.” Clement’s principals, Jeff Gardner and Alfred Williams, were very supportive of her idea to get a “spirit rock” and even assisted in the search for the large boulder. “Mr. Williams actually told me where to look for the rock,” she CHS Rock communicates on Twitter, really! BY DENYSE CLARK/THE N&R Chester High School senior Layne Clement stands beside the spirit rock that now rests on the front lawn of the school. The rock has its own twitter account @CHS_Rock. See CHS, Page 2
  • 163. SHORT STORY Weekly 2/3Times Division SECOND PLACE: The News & Reporter Travis Jenkins BYTRAVIS JENKINS tjenkins@onlinechester.com The early bird not only gets the worm, as it turns out, they also get the eggs. The new Chester’s Farmer’s Market building, located in the old McKeown Building next to Chester City Hall, had its first day of operation on Saturday. By far the youngest “farmer” on hand hand selling their pro- duce was six-year-old Erin Brawley. Brawley took part in a 4-H program last year to raise some chickens. She has 10 in all and she’s now selling their eggs at the market. Erin said she likes caring for her chickens. “I like to feed them every- day,” she said. Anyone lucky enough to be perusing the market when it opened got themselves a deal. Erin sells her eggs for just a $1 a dozen. Her grandfather said a few customers willingly over- paidforthehomegrownChester County eggs, giving her two or three times the asking price. Since Erin only has 10 chickens right now, she doesn’t have an unlimited supply of eggs. She brought eight dozen with her on Saturday. As with any small business owner, Erin has to put some of her revenue back into her busi- ness. She buys feed for her chickens, meaning she ended up with about $3 in profit this weekend, all of which she said she planned to save. Making money isn’t really why she tends to the birds anyway. It’s fun for her and her chickens are like little feathered friends. ‘Small’ business Six-year-old selling eggs at new Farmer’s Market BY TRAVIS JENKINS/THE N&R Erin Brawley sold out of eggs at the Chester Farmer’s Market Saturday in 90 minutes. See MARKET, Page 2-A
  • 164. SHORT STORY Weekly 2/3Times Division FIRST PLACE: The Summerville Journal Scene Leslie Cantu
  • 165. COLUMN WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Clinton Chronicle Larry Franklin Respect means to feel or show admiration and deference toward somebody or some- thing. Deference means polite respect. The Republicans in the U.S. Senate and U.S. House who were on the two committees questioning Secretary of State Hillary Clinton were anything but respectful to her or to her office. For that, they should be ashamed and the people they represent should be embar- rassed. The ones who say they are trying to “get to the bot- tom” of what happened in Benghazi are not being honest. The bottom has been gotten to. An independent review shows that Clinton was not aware that Ambassador to Libya Chris Stevens, one of the four people killed, had asked for additional security. Those who say she should have known are being disingenuous. Clinton has accepted blame for the deaths and it’s sure to surface again in 2016, but if that’s the only horse the GOP has, they might as well stay in the barn. Here’s a fact – House Re- publicans voted to cut $300 million from the security budget for U.S. embassies. They cut the funding and now are blaming Clinton and the Obama administration for not having enough security person- nel at the embassy in Libya. How do these people shave or put on makeup in the morn- ing because there’s no way they can look themselves in the mir- ror. The Obama administration wanted $2.15 billion for the State Department’s security program worldwide. The House – controlled by the Republicans – approved $1.9 billion. The Republicans have cut the funding request for the past three years. Last year, Clinton warned the funding cuts could be “detrimental to America’s national security.” Paul Ryan – remember him?—wants to cut another $400 million from embassy se- curity next year. Our congressman led the charge. “Madame Secretary, you let the consulate become a death trap.” What absurdity. That’s not governing. That’s not leadership. It was on Face- book almost by the time he said the word “trap.” Haul out the crackers. It’s time for a Tea Party. This from the man who wrote a letter to the president of the Remington Arms Co., trying to get him to move man- ufacturing from New York to South Carolina. “The enemies of freedom are waging an all-out assault on the Second Amendment to the Constitution which we have sworn to protect and defend,” our congressman wrote. So if you don’t think that people have a constitutional right to walk into a school and murder 20 six-year-olds, you are an enemy of freedom. Where do I sign up? Over in the Senate, Rand Paul said if he had been presi- dent, he would have fired Clin- ton. If there is a God in heaven, we will never have to face de- cisions made by President Paul. When will the people elected to represent us learn to respect the opinion of those who disagree with them? My guess? Never. (Larry Franklin is publisher of The Chronicle. His email ad- dress is lfranklin@clin- tonchronicle.com. Franklin’s Corner can also be read online at www.clintonchronicle.com.) Not much respect shown in hearings By Larry Franklin Franklin’s Corner These folks have got to take a week off so I can get back to writing about my grandchil- dren. Rep. Jeff Duncan compared a national gun registry – which nobody, nobody, nobody, no- body, nobody is proposing – to the genocide in Rwanda in 1994, when up to 1 million people were murdered. “Let’s not kid ourselves,” Duncan said on Facebook, and then proceeded to do exactly that. “Unlike some other mem- bers of Congress, I understand what an ammo magazine looks like,” he wrote. I know what a news magazine looks like. Does that count me as qualified to be a member of Congress? “Let’s discuss mental health issues,” Duncan posted on Facebook. Trouble is, Republi- cans want to repeal Obamacare, so there would be even less money to diagnose and treat mental health. “Let’s also discuss liberty (he capitalized it on Facebook). There is a reason that some want to end private gun owner- ship.” I would like a list of those people at your earliest convenience, sir. Are their names on a national database somewhere? “The second amendment is under attack,” he said. I missed the memo. Must be under at- tack by the same people who want to establish a national gun registry. Nobody, nobody, no- body, nobody. “A national registry was used in Rwanda to locate and murder members of an ethnic group in 1994,” Duncan said. So, if we establish this national gun registry that no lawmaker is proposing, it will be used with “evil consequences.” One account I read (per the instructions of the congress- man) said the Rwandan geno- cide resulted from the conscious choice of the elite to promote hatred and fear to keep itself in power. Now that’s something I can relate to here in America. The BBC News account of the genocide does not mention a national registry. Neither did a Frontline report on PBS. Ditto the non-profit World Without Genocide in Min- nesota. Couldn’t find a mention on history.com. I googled “Rwanda + na- tional registry.” I got some hits – all referring to Rep. Duncan’s Facebook post. And remember, the national gun registry that nobody is pro- posing would be far from the first registration of citizens in America. There are voter regis- tration lists, drivers license lists, property ownership lists, IRS lists, Society Security lists, Medicare and Medicaid lists. If the big, bad government wants to find us, it already knows where we are. “Our Founders expected us to be responsible citizens, play- ing an active role in our own protection in a myriad of are- nas.” Myriad of arenas? What the heck does that mean? “Preying on the fears of the American citizenry is not good governance,” Duncan said. He knows plenty about one part of that and very little about the other. (Larry Franklin is publisher of The Chronicle. His email ad- dress is lfranklin@clin- tonchronicle.com. Franklin’s Corner can be read online at www.clintonchronicle.com.) Not in favor of a list nobody proposed By Larry Franklin Franklin’s Corner I heard Glenn Beck say the other day there has been loot- ing in New York City since the hurricane. It’s not being re- ported by the media, he said, because it would reflect badly on President Obama before yesterday’s election. If you can make the connec- tion how reporting on looting in NYC after Sandy blew through would reflect poorly on President Obama, send me an email and explain it to me. The address is below. Don’t call me. I’m afraid it would hurt your feelings when I laugh and hang up on you. GB then told me I need to buy some gold. I stopped lis- tening. I was drawn back to my favorite radio station, the 60s station on satellite radio. I suppose if I had continued to listen, Mr. Beck would have warned me to hide my guns in the unlikely event Obama won a second term yesterday. Everybody knows if Obama is the winner (keep in mind this was written five days before the election), he’s sending somebody after our guns. Forget the economy, foreign policy (and wars) and health care reform. All the smart kids know Obama is going to focus on getting our guns away from us so he can force us into so- cialism. A friend told me he’s stock- ing up on guns and ammuni- tion. He’s getting ready for the revolution. He was serious. I was frightened. If you don’t think there are some very angry people out there in the world, you don’t have the same Facebook friends I have. And they are fighting mad not because - in my opinion - bad things are happening. They’re mad be- cause they don’t agree with what’s happening. So, we had a chance yester- day to change things. If we did, so be it. We didn’t have to use a gun and - I hope - not a single shot was fired. If Mr. Romney won, the biggest change will be in who is saying what on Fox News and MSNBC. If President Romney takes office in Janu- ary, the two cable networks can pull out the tapes (or however they store programming) from Bush II and use them. If Obama is still in, Fox News and MSNBC will continue the way they are now for four more years. Faithful readers will know I voted for Obama in 2008 and I’ll not be revealing secrets to tell you I voted for him again yesterday. But I’m not going apoplectic if Romney won. I think he has the chance to be a pretty decent President if he forgets the whackos and will just ask himself, “What Would Larry Do?” Or he can call me and I’ll tell him myself. Another friend predicted a Romney-Obama tie in the Elec- toral College, which would mean the US House would elect the president (Romney) and the US Senate would elect the vice president (Biden). Now wouldn’t that be a hoot? Can’t you just picture the State of the Union speech with Biden sitting behind President Romney and making faces or leaning over to whisper ob- scenities to the Speaker of the House? Wonder if one of our House members would make us proud by jumping up to yell “you lie” to Romney? Lord knows he’d have plenty of opportunities. Again, I’m writing in ad- vance of Election Day, but I’m predicting I didn’t get much sleep last night, so don’t call me today to rub it in or to com- miserate. We’ll talk about it some more later after we’ve all calmed down. One final prediction - the sun did come up today. (Larry Franklin is publisher of The Chronicle. His email ad- dress is lfranklin@clin- tonchronicle.com. Franklin’s Corner can be read online at www.clintonchronicle.com.) The sun will come out tomorrow By Larry Franklin Franklin’s Corner
  • 166. COLUMN WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Union County News Graham Williams A mother’s hands; School districts spinning the news; School shootings raise questions: No easy answers
  • 167. COLUMN WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Manning Times Melissa McCoy | Summer 2013 | 6 TO SUCCEED By MELISSA McCOY MANNINGMAMA Melissa McCOY MANNINGMAMA Melissa McCOY
  • 168. COLUMN WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Greer Citizen Krista Gibson
  • 169. COLUMN WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Greer Citizen William Buchheit I went to Earshot Music a few weeks ago to find they’d closed their big store beside Half Moon Outfitters and moved into a suite across Laurens Road. The record store still exists, but has far less space and inventory than it had in the old building. As grateful as I felt towards the owners for keeping the business open in some form, I also felt sorry for them. … And myself. From 1994-2012, I spent thousands of dollars and hours inside that old building at 1418 Laurens Road, which opened in 1985 under the title Mani- fest Discs and Tapes. Es- pecially in the mid to late nineties, my best friend and I would come home from college and blow all our money on new CDs and double-disc imports that cost up to $50 a pop. We called the store “Manny” for short, and we drove there from Spartan- burg with so much excite- ment you’d have thought we were going to judge a wet t-shirt contest. Back then, the place was always packed and had tens of thousands of CDs to sift through. It also had a few listening stations where you could sample an album before you bought it. Meanwhile, dozens of t-shirts hung from the walls advertising movies like “Evil Dead” and “Pulp Fiction” or bands as diverse as Phish and Megadeath. In the bastion of conservatism that is the Upstate, Mani- fest didn’t shy away from the controversial movies, albums and artists. Their selection, atmosphere and cool factor put other area music stores to shame. Even after it changed its name and ownership seven years ago, the new owners worked valiantly to keep the store’s long- term identity intact. In fact, until recently, Earshot rivaled Mani- fest Discs and Tapes in Columbia for best record store in the state. But eventually, the digi- tal revolution took its toll, and these days the old store sits quiet and dark at the end of the shop- ping center on Laurens Road. Technology changes things, and not always for the better. Newspapers shrink, bookstores fold, texting replaces talking and jobs vanish with each passing year. Today, any song you’re looking for is just a few clicks and a credit card number away. Gratification is easy and instant, yet also hollow and less rewarding. It’s all about the destination. There is no search, no quest, no journey. Music has been cheap- ened. Records used to be works of art, collectibles that were cherished, memorized and bragged about. Now songs and albums exist mainly as invisible MP3 files that people enjoy for about as long as kids do cheap Christmas toys. It’s a shame, but it makes me all the more grateful for those after- noons I spent shuffling through thousands of CDs back in the ’90s. For over a decade, I went to Manifest looking for music, but what I got was an experience and an education. THE BUCK STOPS HERE WILLIAM BUCHHEIT Dirge to Manifest Destiny Eventually, the digital revolution took its toll, and these days the old store sits quiet and dark at the end of the shopping center on Laurens Road. I wonder occasion- ally what someone who grew up in the old days might think about America today. I think they’d be stunned with a lot of the advancements we’ve made, but I also think they’d be a little con- cerned with how femi- nized we’ve become. You can credit the feminist movement, blame the col- lapse of the nuclear fam- ily, blame the economy, credit progress or blame the government, but the fact is we live in an era where females seem to be doing better than males. There are more women than men enrolled in col- lege today, a trend that would have been unheard of a half-century ago. Women are also taking the work world by storm, capitalizing on the rise of technology and the influx of customer service jobs that have come with it. Men, on the other hand, have been hit especially hard by the Great Reces- sion, thanks to a marked downturn in the real estate, banking and manu- facturing markets. It used to be that a man with a high school diploma could make a middle-class living for his family, now it’s virtually impossible. Traditional male jobs are gone and they aren’t coming back. An economic shift has forced hordes of men off the assembly line and into the unemployment line. Another significant gender overhaul is taking place in public schools, where girls generally out- perform boys in the lower and middle grades. Many schools have shortened recess periods and even gone so far as to outright eliminate physical educa- tion from their curricu- lums. Perhaps this is the reason so many children today (and in particular, boys) are being diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). According to a 2011 CDC report, 15 percent of US boys 4-17 have been diagnosed with ADHD, double the rate of girls (7 percent). In another revealing (but more local) study, the CDC found that roughly 40 percent of South Carolina chil- dren taking medication for ADHD didn’t even meet the criteria for the disorder. Moreover, re- searchers concluded that it’s often family physi- cians instead of specially trained psychiatrists who diagnose children and prescribe these drugs. That boys are diagnosed with ADHD at more than twice the rate of girls suggests that we might be tailoring the structure and curriculum of our schools in such a way that is fun- damentally detrimental to boys. Sitting quietly all day goes against their mas- culine impulse to play and engage physically with their peers. In such a light, one can only won- der if schools, teachers and parents are endorsing the prescription of ADHD meds simply to make boys less restless and more manageable. Sociologically, it seems a gender revolution is also at work. Large portions of men have embraced tradi- tionally feminine activities like shaving their body hair, wearing tight jeans and scheduling pedicures and botox injections. The move from macho to metrosexual is a genu- ine phenomenon happen- ing before our very eyes. It’s as if a storm of social and economic forces is working its way through America, unraveling five million years of evolution. There is no doubt that the gender revolution has led to major advances for U.S. women, but it has also left many men roam- ing through the desert in search of the ragged fragments of their old identities. America in midst of gender revolution THE BUCK STOPS HERE WILLIAM BUCHHEIT I n the days following the Jovan Belcher murder- suicide in Kansas City, we’ve heard a lot of com- mentary and criticism. Some writers (and broadcasters) have called for stricter handgun laws. Others have blamed the NFL for its macho culture and brain-damag- ing collisions. Still other columnists have pointed their fingers at modern society’s declining morals and ambivalence towards marriage and commit- ment. Personally, I think that substance abuse may have played as big a part in the tragedy as anything. After Belcher’s anger problems and prior squabbles with the late Cassandra Perkins came to light late last week, so did another critical detail. He had been drink- ing heavily in the early morning hours before the murder occurred. In fact, witnesses reported seeing him at several bars in Kansas City’s Power and Light district appearing intoxicated. We also know that the cops were called when someone noticed the line- backer passed out in his car in another girlfriend’s driveway around 3 a.m. Another source told reporters: “Jovan drank a lot, on a nightly basis. This is not a mystery as he did so in public and private.” Others reported that he routinely took painkillers as well. In other words, it is al- most certain that Belcher was under the influence when he shot Perkins nine times in front of their infant daughter and then killed himself at Arrow- head Stadium an hour later. By itself domestic vio- lence is a horrific staple of American culture. But when alcohol and/or drugs are added, inci- dents of partner conflict and abuse often become deadly. In 2001, a Journal Watch study found that problem drinkers were eight times likelier to abuse their partners and twice as likely to kill them. A 2003 National Institute of Justice inves- tigation concluded that over 80 percent of men who killed or abused their female partner were prob- lem drinkers in the year before the incident. Also significant was a re- port released last year in Psychiatric Times assert- ing that substance abus- ers are six times more likely to commit suicide. Add it all up and you find that substance abuse is a common denominator in many murder--suicides. The following are just some of the highest-pro- file examples. In 1980, Paul Snider was in a cocaine-induced rage when he killed estranged girlfriend, 20-year-old Playboy Playmate of the Year Dorothy Stratten, and then himself with a shotgun. In 1998, Brynn Hart- man was drunk and high on cocaine when she murdered her sleeping husband, comedian Phil Hartman. As the police moved in on her a few hours later, she shot herself to death with a handgun. In 2007, star wrestler Chris Benoit killed his son, wife and himself while under the influence of Hydrocodone, Xanax and steroids. And in 2010, unde- feated 28-year-old boxer Edwin Valero stabbed his wife to death and then hanged himself in jail. In the year leading up to the murder/suicide, he’d been arrested for domes- tic violence and ordered to attend an alcoholism treatment facility in Cuba. His mother-in-law also reported that he’d been addicted to cocaine for years and had recently been growing progres- sively violent. Sadly, the NFL expe- rienced another alco- hol-related tragedy last weekend when Cowboys’ linebacker Jerry Brown was killed while riding in a car a drunken teammate was driving. Once again, we saw judgment become a fast casualty of alcohol abuse. Under the influence, Jovan Belcher succumbed to an equally fatal but far more violent moment of alcoholic impulse. After the final shot was fired, two promising young adults were dead and a three-month-old infant was parentless. Belcher’s substance abuse mostly overlooked THE BUCK STOPS HERE WILLIAM BUCHHEIT
  • 170. COLUMN WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Free Times Kevin Fisher Sept. 4-10, 2013free-times.com twitter.com/freetimessc facebook.com/freetimes Mayor Benjamin Should Move to Columbia Y es, I know Mayor Steve Benjamin lives in Columbia. Technically. Officially. Legally. But the mayor’s home in the affluent Woodcreek Farms community in the outer suburban reaches of northeast Richland County is as far as one can get from the day- to-day issues and problems of the city itself. As our top elected official and political lead- er, I’d like to see the mayor residing among us in the population center of Columbia. Whether it be strolling Shandon or en- joying Elmwood or joining with the neigh- bors in any other part of the urban core of the city, it would be nice to have Mayor Benjamin and his fine family enjoying the benefits and facing the challenges the rest of us do here in the heart of the Columbia. Again, for those who are a bit partisan or a bit slow, this has nothing to do with ques- tioning the mayor’s legal residence. He and all the other fine folks in Woodcreek Farms are in the city limits, pay city taxes and are city voters. But you might say they’re not really city residents in a practical, everyday sense. Do they experience crime in the neighborhood? Very little. Violence? Even less. Poverty? None at all. Homelessness? Hardly. Conversely, all of those things are very real problems across the urban core of Columbia. From violence outside bars on Two Notch Road to violence outside bars in Five Points, from break-ins in Eau Claire to break-ins in Heathwood, from the impact of the homeless on Main Street to the impact of the homeless on surrounding downtown neighborhoods, the challenges of living in the urban core of the city are significant. So too are the benefits. Living close to the city’s cultural, athletic, culinary and recreational opportunities is a very real plus. From top-notch college football and baseball to top-notch entertainment venues to top-notch museums to a top-notch arts community to a top-notch restaurant scene to a top-notch university environment to a top-notch zoo, etc., it is both exciting and convenient to live within minutes of all that and much more. Wouldn’t you think the mayor of a city with an urban core that faces those chal- lenges and offers those benefits would want to live amidst it all? That he would like to be closer to the city’s strengths and weaknesses? That he would want to know firsthand and understand more fully the reality of life in the heart of Columbia? It appears not. Or maybe it’s just me. You may think it’s fine for the mayor of the city to live in the ‘burbs. You may want to move to Woodcreek Farms yourself. Indeed, I understand and respect the choice of those who can afford it to do so, and this column is not meant to be critical of them in any way. I just think that community is too far removed from both the grit and glory of the city to be where the mayor goes home at night. As to the politics of all this, it has noth- ing to do with my point — which would be exactly the same for any mayor of Columbia. But I do think Mayor Benjamin would do himself a favor in terms of personal popular- ity and depth of feeling among Columbia voters if he did move into town (so to speak). While I disagreed frequently with Mayor Bob Coble on matters of policy and performance, I very much liked that he and his family were so much “of Columbia.” Throughout his 20-year tenure as mayor (and to this day), Bob and Beth Coble lived in that nice yellow house in Shandon where they raised six children and were very much a part of that in-town neighborhood and the urban core of the city. Indeed, I think that’s a big reason why the affectionate nickname “Mayor Bob” not only stuck but became universal, helping him maintain his popularity even when the city stumbled badly. Whether you agreed with Bob or not, you knew he was “all in” with Columbia, that he and his family were part and parcel of the city. Come join us in Columbia, Mayor Benja- min. You’ll like it here. Fisher is president of Fisher Communications, a Columbia advertising and public relations firm. He is active in local issues involving the arts, conservation, business and politics. Let us know what you think: Email editor@free-times.com. Opinion by Kevin Fisher Woodcreek Farms is too far removed from both the grit and glory of the city to be where the mayor goes home at night. September 11-17, 2013free-times.com twitter.com/freetimessc facebook.com/freetimes Opinion by Kevin Fisher Sheheen and Gay Marriage — No Guts, No Glory K atie Bradacs is someone I met and spent a day with earlier this summer in the course of my work. She was highly professional and very personable. Though I didn’t know it at the time, she is also gay. Bradacs is with the South Carolina Highway Patrol. No, not as an administrator or staff member — she is a state trooper. Like her fellow troopers, she is on patrol on our highways, providing assistance, enforcing the law and facing danger. Trooper Bradacs leaped back to my at- tention last week when she and her partner, Tracie Goodwin, filed a federal lawsuit chal- lenging South Carolina’s ban on gay mar- riage. While the two were legally married in Washington, D.C., their marriage is not recognized under South Carolina law. I thought back to June when Bradacs had an on-camera role in my firm’s production of new DUI television spots for the South Carolina Department of Public Safety. Those spots, which emulate the look and feel of the legendary TV show 24, ran recently during the August DUI enforcement blitz. While they are heavily targeted in their place- ment to 16-to-34-year-old males, there was enough broader presence of the spots that you might have seen Trooper Bradacs on your TV screen as well. If so, I bet she struck you as someone who makes us proud. Some- one who stands up. Someone with guts. And then there’s Vincent Sheheen. The state senator from Camden and pre- sumed 2014 Democratic nominee for gov- ernor showed none of those qualities when news of the lawsuit broke. Indeed, Sheheen’s courage was in such short supply that he was “unavailable for comment” himself, sending out a campaign aide to tell The State that he “continues to personally believe that mar- riage is between one man and one woman.” To me, the issue is not about what Sheheen, or anyone else, may “personally believe” about gay marriage. Legal rights and personal views are different things. If you don’t like gay marriage, fine. If you do, fine. But either way, I think everyone should support equal rights under the law. This is about government, not religion. Church and state should be separate, as the founders intended and prescribed. By the way, that separation runs in both directions, as faiths or churches that do not support gay marriage should never be forced to sanction or perform them. Freedom of gay marriage does not trump freedom of religion. But it does deserve legal standing and equal protection due to the practical realities and matters of fairness that are involved. That said, let’s talk politics. For Sheheen, what is the point of carrying the Democratic Party banner if you’re not going to stand up for its tradition of leading the fight for equal- ity? Moreover, it’s not just that I think he looks weak and scared on the issue, it’s that I think he’s making a political misjudgment. Sheheen was not an exciting candidate in 2010, nor is he lighting it up thus far as we move toward 2014. As local blogger and former State editorial page editor Brad Warthen put it after attending a recent event, “Sheheen makes entirely unobjectionable speech at Energy Summit.” Ouch. The point is Sheheen desperately needs to generate some excitement, starting with the Democratic base. The gay community has traditionally been a part of that base, as have progressives who believe strongly in equality, be it by race, gender or sexual orientation. By openly supporting gay mar- riage, Sheheen could have lit a fire under those folks, positioning himself as a warrior rather than a wimp. To make a run at an in- cumbent governor, he needs to develop that persona, both personally and politically. Finally, I don’t think supporting gay marriage is even that politically risky. While the state constitutional amendment that banned it in 2006 passed with 78 percent of the vote, a December 2012 poll by Public Policy Polling showed that number had dropped 16 points to 62 percent — and that was before the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June of this year that overturned the Defense of Marriage Act. I suspect that 62 percent opposition has dropped another five to 10 points in South Carolina this year, and will continue to fall. No guts, no glory, Vincent. Fisher is president of Fisher Communications, a Columbia advertising and public relations firm. He is active in local issues involving the arts, conservation, business and politics. Let us know what you think: Email editor@free-times.com. Trooper Katie Bradacs Courtesy photo April 17-23, 2013twitter.com/freetimessc facebook.com/freetimes W e have a new mayor. A new city council. A new city manager. All of that has happened since 2010. But lately, it sure feels a lot like we’re going back- ward from 2009. The players have changed, but the result is the same: Amateur hour rolls on at Columbia City Hall. We have Mayor Steve Benjamin running circles around himself in the save it/tear it down/save it/buy it/flip it/use this money/ borrow that money/please everyone/please no one/please like me approach to the Palmetto Compress issue. Before that, we had City Council embar- rass itself with the lower the qualifications/ raise the salary/under the radar/shut out the public/special-called meeting/two days after Christmas/no questions asked/no ques- tions allowed hiring of Teresa Wilson as city manager. And now we have Wilson, Benjamin and Council as a whole all participating in the sham/shame/rumors/secrets/no information for citizens/salary funded by taxpayers/no de- tails/no time frame leave of absence for Police Chief Randy Scott. While those issues have all left city of- ficials appearing in over their heads, it is the Chief Scott matter that screams the loudest for attention, accountability and action by them. Indeed, those things are already long overdue in this City Hall soap opera. The idea that the police chief can sud- denly take a leave of absence for no stated reason, go into hiding and continue to draw his full salary indefinitely — and without explanation — is one of those laughable-but- not-funny moments that Columbia munici- pal government was known for in years past but that we hoped would stay in the past. In- stead, it seems the past is prologue as the new mayor, new council and new city manager have taken us back to the future. The unprofessional and unaccountable way in which this matter has been handled to date has in turn stoked the rumor mill about Chief Scott. Everyone has heard the stories, but we have no way of knowing what is true or false, substantiated or fabricated, real or imagined. If such stories are sensational lies, the city is doing a terrible disservice to Scott not Opinion by Kevin Fisher Amateur Hour Rolls On at Columbia City Hall Botched Handling of Police Chief’s Absence Reflects Poorly on City Officials to refute them and blast those who would spread them. If such stories are sadly true, the city is doing a terrible disservice to the citizens of Columbia not to fire him and move on. But it is not just Chief Scott’s job perfor- mance that Wilson, Benjamin and Council should be concerned about — it is their own. City managers are hired and city politicians are elected to provide leadership and deal with problems. Clearly, that isn’t happening in this case. In fact, the opposite is occurring as our city officials continue to say nothing, do nothing and resolve nothing on the Scott situation, now at three weeks and counting. Mayor Benjamin has been absent from the issue, both literally at first when he was con- veniently on vacation and now figuratively as he conveniently avoids the issue by saying it is Wilson’s problem. Funny thing, though: When Scott was hired, Benjamin was all out in front, happy to answer questions and take credit for putting the new chief in place. While this may not be as much fun, the mayor needs to step up. The same is true for Wilson. While it is unfortunate for her that this matter popped up just weeks into her tenure, she has not handled it well. First, she acknowledged com- plaints against Scott and said she considered disciplining him. Then she refused to discuss the particulars of those complaints, hiding behind a “personnel matter” exemption that The State reported does not exist. Of course, council members or others may be exerting pressure on her, but Wilson needs to take this opportunity to assert herself as the city manager. She will be better off in her job, and we will be better off as Columbia citizens, if she does so. All of this brings to mind what manager Casey Stengel famously said of his woefully bad New York Mets team: “Does anybody here know how to play this game?” Columbia citizens can relate. Fisher is president of Fisher Communications, a Columbia advertising and public relations firm. He is active in local issues involving the arts, conservation, business and politics. Let us know what you think: Email editor@free-times.com. It is not just Chief Scott’s job performance that Wilson, Benjamin and Council should be concerned about — it is their own.
  • 171. COLUMN WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division HONORABLE MENTION: Chronicle-Independent Martin L. Cahn - - always - geographically - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - my - - - - - - - (Martin L. Cahn is the edi- tor of the Chronicle-Independent, Camden, S.C. E-mail responses to mcahn@chronicle-independent. com.) The civil right of marriage equality I spent an hour Thursday morning with Erica Peake’s writing class at North Central Middle School (NCMS). Peake’s class is made up of a mix of some very bright and inquisitive sixth, seventh and eighth graders. Thursday served as Reading Day -- a day to talk about a book they re- cently read: City of Orphans by Avi, with illustrations by Greg Ruth. (Avi is the pen name of children’s author Edward Ir- ving Wortis.) I’ve never read the book, but according to its blurb on Ama- zon, it’s set in 1893 New York City and is about 13-year-old newsboy Maks Geless; his sis- ter, Emma, who’s been arrest- ed for stealing a watch from the Waldorf Hotel; and the Plug Ugly Gang, led by Bruno, who -- for reasons I don’t know -- are after Maks. Peake thought that since Maks was a newsboy, hawk- ing newspapers on the streets of New York, it might be good for her students to learn about what the newspaper business is like today. I jumped at the chance -- I always enjoy con- necting with our county’s young people and, hopefully, getting them excited about print journalism. I started by introducing my- self, explaining what I do as both an editor and reporter. I talked about our staff and what they do. And I talked about all the other publica- tions we handle, from the West Wateree Chronicle to The Camden Horse. Since City of Orphans takes place so long ago, I also told them a little of the C-I’s his- tory. The paper, of course, has its roots with the original Camden Chronicle, founded in 1889. The kids appeared suitably impressed (at least I think they were) that the pa- per will celebrate its 125th anniversary in 2014. I took a number of papers with me, not only of all our different publi- cations, but of special editions we’ve had during the years. I showed them the C-I’s centen- nial edition for 1989 and the extra edition we printed on a Thursday in 1991 covering the fatal derailment of a train in Lugoff. The main reason I was there, of course, was because of Maks in the book. The students want- ed to know if we still had news- boys and girls. Well, we do, sort of. I spoke with Publisher Mike Mischner before heading up to the school and he said while he was sure this paper employed street vendors at some point, he didn’t know when it would have stopped doing so. He did say, however, that we had neighborhood delivery boys and girls up until 1989 when we began using the U.S. Postal Service to mail papers to sub- scribers. That led to my telling Peake’s students that we do not print the C-I or any of our papers here in Camden. The decision was made years ago to outsource our printing to the Florence Morning News. I explained that printing press- es are expensive to maintain and operate and that we ac- tually save money by having Florence print our papers. That fact, in turn, led to me explaining how we make the sausage around here -- the actual work that goes into putting out the paper. Using computers, soft- ware and a wide area network link to Florence, we are able to write stories, compose our pages and send them to Florence. Now I could talk about deliv- ery. We employ several gentle- men who drive to Florence, pick up the papers, return to Camden, take subscriber cop- ies to the post office for mail- ing and then go around the county placing copies in racks at convenience stores. Peake and her students mentioned that, in City of Or- phans, Maks made only about 8 cents a day selling newspa- pers. Today, we sell the pa- per for 75 cents a copy, more than nine times what Maks made for a whole day’s worth of work. I also explained that we have a circulation of about 6,500 copies each Monday, Wednesday and Friday, but that -- using an average mul- tiplier of 2.5 -- we figure there are about 13,000 people that read each edition of the paper. We talked about deadlines and why they’re important, es- pecially since Florence has its own paper to put out as well as those from other clients. As the hour began to wind down, I asked the students why they thought newspapers are im- portant. One of them mentioned crime;another talked about read- ers wanting to know what’s going on in the community. Both are good answers. I explained a little bit about our watchdog role in that we attend all council and school board meetings since not ev- erybody who lives in Kershaw County can do that. People have the right to know what their government is doing and, if they think something’s wrong, write a letter, call their councilman or show up at an- other meeting. Also, as a community news- paper, I explained that the C-I covers the news of Kershaw County and its communities. People like to read about their neighbors, so in addition to hard news stories, we write feature stories on everything from ladies who take their dogs to church to folks who take to the air in sailplanes. Finally, since I was in a school setting, I talked about the importance of education. I asked them why that would be important. They rattled off ev- erything from writing to edit- ing to graphic design to proof- ing and so on. Again, all great answers. I added one more:staying in school and going to college helps you to learn how to research, how to for- mulate the right questions to ask and how to write stories in a way that informs, educates and enter- tains your readers. I don’t know if any of these students at NCMS will en- ter the journalistic fray, but I have a pretty good feeling I’ve given a few of them something to think about. That, and their enthusiasm, made it an hour well spent. (Martin L. Cahn is the editor of the Chronicle-Independent, Camden,S.C.E-mail responses to mcahn@chronicle-independent. com.) An hour in the classroom I shivered slightly when I re- alized that this Friday night, Dec. 7, is the exact five year an- niversary of the night 17-year- old Camden High School stu- dent Michael Smith died of a single gunshot blast to the chest, the first and so far only Kershaw County victim of a gang-related shooting. Two Friday, Dec. 7ths, five years apart. They couldn’t be more different. Or could they? That is the question we are beginning to answer today in a week-long series of articles written by staff reporter Miciah Bennett. Today, she is looking back at that night five years ago and what led up to it.Wednesday, she covers the reaction to Michael’s death -- the meetings where people asked for something to be done, and then tried to figure out what that something would be. Wednesday will also serve as a look at where we are now. Friday, Miciah will ask the same question many of us did then: where do we go from here? Michael’s murder was a shock to the system. Some people in Camden, especially, and out in the county, too, had refused up to then to believe there was a gang problem here. At best, some wanted to believe that what little gang activity we had was perpetrated by “wanna-be” kids. They weren’t real gang members, right? Maybe, maybe not. Either way, though, too many people had stuck their heads in the sand for too many years. They ignored the signs: a fight here, an armed robbery there, graffiti on this wall, a kid caught with marijuana at that school. And Michael Smith paid the price. We all did. Our fantasy that living in a small city meant we were safe from this kind of thing shat- tered. We knew -- most of us, anyway -- that something had to be done before one more person died because of a gang. But what? Some people wanted to reach out to kids at an age before they might be enticed to join a gang. Programs were needed: mentor- ing, early childhood education, anti-drug initiatives and more. That would take money. And that led to a series of meetings at The ALPHA Center where, ultimately, the county and Kershaw County School District (KCSD) decided to go after a nearly $6 million grant from the federal Safe Schools/ Healthy Students (SS/HS) Ini- tiative. According to the KCSD’s website, the SS/HS grant funds Bridge, a program to reduce re- cidivism among former Depart- ment of Juvenile Justice stu- dents; truancy and transition specialists; parenting classes; youth court; a job readiness for teens program; summer activity programs; substance abuase in- tervention services; a mentoring program; counseling services; after school activities; and other services. These programs are having an impact. There is no ques- tion about that; the question is whether it is enough. I don’t mean that in any kind of dis- paraging way, but I have to ac- knowledge that others wanted a bricks-and-mortar solution. In a way, that was perhaps the earliest nibbles at the idea of building a sports complex or YMCA here in Camden. Voters here may have decided the city can’t afford that right now, but that doesn’t negate, in my mind, the need for a place for teens to go so that they aren’t out on the streets looking for trouble. For years, some people have offered alternatives, mostly fo- cused on aging Rhame Arena, in the form of basketball tour- naments and step shows. These are not minor things. Hundreds, if not thousands of people come out to watch and cheer. However, these are seasonal and bi-annu- al events. Where is the community cen- ter where a teenager can go any day of the year and know they are going to be safe to talk to a counselor or just hang out with friends? Contrary to what some parents would like to believe, the Kershaw County Library is not an after-school or daycare center. Perhaps I’m wrong, though. Perhaps this is not needed and what we have now is enough. All I’m doing is asking the question: have we done everything we can? I know we can’t absolutely guarantee that no child will be the victim to a violent death ever again. I also know that Camden Police Chief Joe Floyd did the right thing when he went after every single person involved in Michael’s death. While only the young man who actually pulled the trigger was sentenced to any real time -- the minimum 30 years for agreeing to testify against his co-defen- dants (although he never had to) -- Floyd’s success in arresting all the players struck the message home: Camden wasn’t going to put up with this. That doesn’t mean it won’t ever happen again. If we’re not vigilant, gangs -- or at least the gang mentality -- will creep back into our schools and community. Some of us in the community, including myself, said then and say now that everything we do for young people must follow this simple rule: we have to be a better gang than the gangs. Have we done that? Does ev- ery kid -- white, black, Hispanic, whatever -- in Camden and Ker- shaw County know they have an alternative to crime, drugs and other self-destructive behavior? Do they know where to go or what to do when someone entic- es them with a seductively easy way out? Do they know that a gun or a syringe or dressing in certain colors doesn’t make your life easier, much less “cool?” We may not reach every kid, especially teens; that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try. If we don’t try to do more -- or at least ask the question of whether we should do more -- then Michael Smith’s death will mean nothing. I don’t know about you, but I’m not willing to let that happen. That’s part of why we’re bringing you this series of stories: to let you see what happened, where we are and whether there’s more to do. Ultimately, it comes down to you and what you want for our chil- dren’s future. (Martin L. Cahn is the editor of the Chronicle-Independent, Camden, S.C. E-mail responses to mcahn@chronicle-independent. com.) Gang shooting was ‘shock to system’
  • 172. COLUMN WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division THIRD PLACE: Chronicle-Independent Tenell Felder I cannot pinpoint the exact moment when I first heard that Gabbiee Swainson had been abducted. What I can remember though, is the sick feeling that grew in my stomach as news media reported on how this 15-year-old girl was taken from her home and had not been found. Gabbiee’s abduction hit close to home for me. It is always heart wrenching to hear about a child being taken, but when it happens in your own com- munity, the pain is magnified. She was a student at the high school that is five min- utes from where I live. Before her abduction, she had been to a local shopping center with a friend of hers. In the days following the first reports of Gabbiee’s abduction, I noticed flyers around my neighborhood with a picture of Gabbiee asking if anyone had seen her. I had seen the flyers before, but at that time I didn’t know the story behind her dis- appearance. I could feel heaviness and a sense of urgency descend on the community as the horrible details about her kidnapping emerged. One particular morning, I sat in my living room writing in my journal, telling God how much I hated what happened and to please protect Gabbiee and that if she was gone to please comfort her mother. About two weeks ago, as I was about to fall asleep, my mom knocked on my door and told me that they had found Gabbiee’s body. It felt like someone had poured ice water over me, sleep didn’t come easily that night. Because of my faith I know that death and acts of evil do not win in the end. By all ap- pearances it looks like they have gained a victory but I know that that isn’t the truth. This world is broken and cursed and that fact is pain- fully realized whenever some- thing of this nature happens. I know that many tears were shed over this tragedy -- tears by people like me who never even knew Gabbiee. I have to keep reminding myself that what happened to her is over; she can’t be harmed anymore by anyone. From what I’ve heard, I under- stand that death was not the end for her. I guess that the hardest part for this communi- ty will be coming to grips with that. It was like we all had to relive it again when her body was recovered. Promises from God’s Word can be a lifeline in times like these -- as it is meant to be. The following verse reminds me that there is a time that will come when the old order of things will be banished, and finally every- thing will be made new. “God will wipe away every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things have passed away.” -- Revelation 21:4 (Tenell Felder is the editor of the West Wateree Chronicle. Email responses to tfelder@ chronicle-independent.com.) Free Kid’ L HIS TO RY 12 Faith in times of tragedy Merida from Disney’s Brave officially became Disney’s 11th princess on May 11 and someone felt that she needed a makeover for her coronation. The problem was that Prin- cess Merida’s makeover looked more like plastic surgery. The Merida depicted in Brave has a round face splat- tered with faint freckles and a mass of thick long unruly red hair. Her figure is that of your average young woman -- some- one who you might bump into walking down the street. I took Merida’s appearance for granted, didn’t think twice about it -- until I saw the new version. The coronation-ready Me- rida had a significantly slim- mer waist, slimmer hips, glossy curls, almond-shaped eyes with perfectly arched eye- brows and a sparkly dress just slightly off her shoulders. Also, her signature bow and arrow are missing. She looks absolutely nothing like herself. I’m not down on femininity. I really enjoying dressing up, getting my hair and nails done, etc. … so I don’t take much is- sue with her dress being more sparkly. However I don’t like that they changed her body type. I don’t like that they changed her face. I don’t like that in doing so they changed her by sexualizing her. I haven’t seen Brave, but af- ter watching just a few clips, it’s obvious that Princess Me- rida’s main ambition in life isn’t to look like a Victoria Secret model. She seems like a daddy’s girl who prefers ar- chery and adventure to prin- cess lessons. So I wonder how the person who gave Merida her new look missed that. In researching for this col- umn, I discovered that Merida is not the only Disney prin- cess who has had some nip and tuck. Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty and Belle all have had some alterations. And because little girls (and some big ones) are fascinated with princesses, how do you think we feel when someone sends the message that even they aren’t pretty enough. I’ll tell you, we feel like we will never measure up Blogger Peggy Orenstein commented on how the chang- es to one princess, Cinderella, can affect the rest of us: “This Cinderella’s appear- ance is at once more acces- sible than the last version and equally (maybe more) unat- tainable -- she’s much more like the images girls see as they get older. She’s the girl they’re supposed to want to look like: blonde, pretty, skin- ny, a little bit sexy … it’s still an impossible, unachievable, externally-driven ideal.” Why make these changes? Most Disney Princesses dis- play wonderful examples of inner beauty and bravery. We don’t need to try to add to their worth by giving them smaller waists and glossier hair. There is a unique and mys- terious element to woman- hood that God intended, and while beauty certainly plays a role in that it’s not to be the main point. As the Bible says, beauty is fleeting. I think nearly every woman has a desire to feel valued just for who she is -- apart from her beauty. So if you have a little girl (or a big one), please go give her a kiss and tell her she’s beau- tiful from the inside out. We need to hear it. (Tenell Felder is the editor of the West Wateree Chronicle, Camden, S.C. Email responses to tfelder@chronicle-indepen dent.com.) BETHESDA PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 502 DEKALB STREET CAMDEN, SC. SUMMER WORSHIP SCHEDULE JUNE 2 - AUGUST 4, 2013 SUNDAY SCHOOL - 9:00 A.M. WORSHIP - 10:00 A.M. Merida doesn’t need a makeover In “Getting it wrong about Plan B,” Ruth Marcus ends her column by stating that the debate over the proposed Plan B policy “isn’t about the government coming between parents and children or society condoning teen sex. It’s about preventing teen pregnancy.” Plan B might very well pre- vent teen pregnancies, but I don’t think that the other two concerns should be so easily swept under the rug -- espe- cially the concern that Plan B is sign of society condoning teen sex. The reasoning behind Plan B is that teen girls engag- ing in sexual activity should have easy access to this form of birth control should their primary birth control fail. The risk of pregnancy is cut allow- ing teens more freedom to en- gage in sexual activity. The issue that I have with this policy is that it is yet another promotion of what I perceive as being a faulty and risky view of safe sex -- the view that something as seri- ous as sex can have its risks cut down by a pill or condom. I argue that sex needs to be held to a higher and safer standard that goes beyond try- ing to find methods and back- up ways to cut risks. Despite what our society says, you will not be able to find a better option for emotional and physical “safe sex” outside of a marriage relationship -- this view is definitely not thor- oughly examined, promoted or even viewed as possible in our sex education classes. In fact, policies such as providing Plan B to teens without a parents’ consent furthers the safe sex agenda of this society. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that the best policy to prevent against sex- ually transmitted diseases (STDs) is having one monoga- mous, lifelong sexual partner, or abstinence until that part- ner is selected. Not surpris- ingly, policies such as Plan B do not promote that type of thinking in young minds. Just as a society can institute ideas of racial inferiority, it also has the power to shape sexual practices and ideas. Is it possible that girls who might have abstained from sex will consider engaging in it because they believe that Plan B cuts a risk factor? I am interested in prevent- ing brokenness, emotional wounding and the disease risks that are more likely to occur when sex is used outside of a marriage relationship, es- pecially for women. Sex is serious and the de- bate over this policy illustrates that society is at a crossroads for deciding how it is going to be approached and promoted in the future. During my third year at Furman University I wrote a policy paper examining how cases of STDs have increased during recent years, especially among minority women. The data was gathered from the CDC and it was my own obser- vation that this increase has occurred despite the onslaught of “safe sex” teachings and pol- icies like Plan B. My biggest concern is that safe sex education and the messages about sex that are sent to adults do more harm than good. Is there a way that sex can be truly safe? It’s a highly risky behavior after all. Plan B is yet another attempt to remove the risk from some- thing that requires the utmost care and caution. (Tenell Felder is the editor of the West Wateree Chronicle, Camden, S.C. Email responses to tfelder@chronicle-indepen- dent.com.) Another view of Plan B
  • 173. COLUMN WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division SECOND PLACE: The Gaffney Ledger Cody Sossamon Not such beautiful day; The city’s seal of approval; But that’s not Gaffney
  • 174. COLUMN WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division FIRST PLACE: The Hartsville Messenger Bob Sloan W hen I first spoke with Aaron Jackson some three years ago, you could hear the weariness in his voice coming through the phone line. A few minutes into our conversa- tion, however, the weariness was replaced by a sense of excitement and determination. Jackson, the founder of the non- profit organization Planting Peace (www.plantingpeace.org), was just returning from Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, where he, his co-workers and a large group of volunteers had helped rebuild an orphanage and handed out de-worm- ing medicine. I was a working as a freelance reporter for the Presbyterian Church USA News Service at the time wanted him to share a few minute or so his time to tell me about his organization and its projects. It may very well be my 50-some- thing year-old mind playing tricks on me, but I seem to recall him saying something about wanting to paint the world with love. At the time I thought it was a rather imaginative way of explaining his organization’s mission of “spreading peace in a hurting world.” Not long after I awoke onWednes- day morning did I discover that Aaron’s words were meant to be taken literally rather than figura- tively. I turned on the TV and there was Aaron on NBC’s The Today Show, explaining how he had found this house for sale nearWestboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kan., and decided to make a statement for all the world — but especially the neighboring congregation — to see. Jackson and his Planting Peace cohorts bought the house, painted its siding in multi-hued stripes and raised a Gay Pride Flag on a 30-foot pole. The colorful house, which will be called “The Equality House” and will serve as a resource center to sup- port LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) individuals and organizations, is a sight to behold and probably not very pleasing to the palate of the Pastor Fred Phelps and his followers. The church, founded in 1955 by Phelps, hates gays and thinks God hates anyone who would accept their lifestyle. In fact, they think God is punishing America for being too open-minded. According to its web- site, the church “engages in daily peaceful sidewalk demonstrations opposing the homosexual lifestyle of soul-damning, nation-destroying filth.” Anyone who has seen video footage of the church’s so-called “peaceful demonstrations” outside high-profile funerals knows what the church is really about. They scream, mock and deride anyone nearby. They carry signs that read “God Hates Gays” and “God Hates America.” They do not mince words or shy away from sharing their feelings. It’s their God-given right, I guess. As Aaron explains it, buying the house and painting it is peaceful, yet very powerful way of sending the message that love will conquer hate every single time. “The concept is to show that where there is hate, there is also love,” Aaron told his hometown newspaper in Destin, Fla. on Tuesday.” “There is no better place to counterbalance hate than at the Westboro Baptist Church.” I couldn’t agree more. But don’t expect the hate-mon- gers atWestboro Baptist to go away quietly. Steve Drain, a church member at Westboro, told a local newspaper that Planting Peace’s decision to paint the house the colors of the gay pride flag was only a story because of where it’s located. “It’s not really that bold of a move at all,” he said. “I love that house because it represents and sheds light on our message that God hates fags.” Undaunted, Aaron says Planting Peace has no intentions of starting war of any sorts with his new neigh- bors. Just asWestboro wants to make its statement, he and Planting Peace want to make their own. Maybe, just maybe, the folks at Westboro Baptist will be able to look out of their stained glass windows and get a glimpse of what the world needs more of — love and equality — and what our society could do without — hate and bigotry. Seeing the images of Plant- ing Peace’s colorful masterpeace — misspelling intended — on numerous television stations and on hundreds ofWeb sites, made me smile. This kind of publicity will go a long way to helping Aaron and his organization fulfill their mis- sion. From orphanages in Haiti to a residential neighborhood in Topeka and everywhere in between, there’s still a lot of planting and painting to be done.We could sure use a good coat of unconditional love, be it interior or exterior, satin or semi- gloss. Driving to work, I couldn’t help but pop in a CD and listen to a most fitting tune by Toby Mac called “Love is in the House.” It most certainly is. Contact Editor Bob Sloan at rsloan@hartsville messenger.com. Love really is in the house Bob Sloan J erry Steen loved his job. For 35 years, Jerry worked as a millwright at Sonoco. He took great pride in the work he did and often went above and beyond his appointed duties to ensure that a job was done properly. Like most anyone, he was filled with an immense sense of pride and fulfillment when someone recognized and appreciated his dedication and loyalty to his job. Some 13 years ago, a person took the time to let Jerry’s bosses know just how valuable an asset he was to their company. He wrote them a letter of recommendation. That person probably doesn’t have an inkling of just how impor- tant the letter was to Jerry. Jerry retired from Sonoco in 2001. He is 72 now and not in very good health. Two years after his retire- ment, Jerry suffered a debilitating cerebral hemorrhage. According to his sister, Patsy Steen McInnis, his health has slowly deteriorated. Jerry now spends his days confined to a bed. He doesn’t speak very clearly. Someone is with him every hour of every day. Shirley Howle, Jerry’s other sister, is his primary caregivers. Patsy and Shirley love their brother very much. It hurts them to see him in such poor health. They want him to be as happy and as comfortable as possible. Whenever Jerry seems down, Patsy says she knows how to take his mind off things. She reaches for a photocopy of the letter sent his bosses at Sonoco. The original is tucked away in a file for safekeep- ing. She reads it to him. His eyes start glisten. As many times as he has read it or has had it read to him, it still brings tears to his eyes. Jerry still loves his job. “As you know, I am an environ- mental consultant for the SONOCO Products Co, Hartsville Mill in South Carolina, working on three pertinent problems this year. My efforts have required some challeng- ing objectives, including reconnais- sance of the 001 effluent dissipating in Black Creek. This effort on three occasions has required maneuver- ing by boat over and under numer- ous fallen trees that barricaded the creek channel or mainstream from the Old Landfill to Highway 15 bypass bridge. In the process, my colleagues and I had to collect water measurements by boat, measure flow of 10 unnamed tributaries en- tering the mainstream, and map ef- fluent movement at horizontal and vertical gradients down the creek. “The efforts required extraordi- nary boatmanship skill by Mr. Jerry Steen, who piloted the motorized boat through insurmountable ob- stacles. Many times we were lodged on fallen trees located 10 feet below the water surface causing us to push and prod the boat through the obstacles.We could have been hope- lessly stranded within the confines of the swamp if not for the Hercule- an efforts of Mr. Steen.With his skill in providing direction to either push or pull the boat, as well as his physi- cal efforts to overcome bodily harm to free us from obstacles, we would not have been able to complete these tasks…. Each successive trip became substantially easier to carry out due to his skill. He was constantly alert to warn us of approaching obstacles overhead so that we would not be thrown from the boat into the chal- lenging creek current 10 feet deep. We felt safer under his watchful care in the opposing environment that was not people friendly. “There is another side to Mr. Steen that needs to be expressed regard- ing his congeniality and wholesome personality as a human being. I found him to be loyal and trust- worthy colleague while under his care as well as having a responsible disposition to SONOCO. The man takes his job seriously and gives the company a return above and beyond the call of duty. I would rec- ommend him without reservation for his boatmanship and all other responsibilities as a millwright. I admire and respect a person who takes his job seriously but does so with a genuinely honest disposi- tion. He is a joy to have in one’s company, especially when there is some trepidation for bodily harm on the job. He is a team player who works well in a group as attested by my colleagues and me. Officials at SONOCO should feel fortunate and blessed that there is a Jerry Steen working in their mill. A person with his skills is analogous to the mortar between the bricks, one who keeps the day-by-day activities in the mill running smoothly without receiving due credit ….” Dr.Donald S.Cherry Aquatic Ecotoxicologist,Virginia Tech The letter actually contains another two paragraphs of adu- lation at Jerry’s dedication and commitment to his job, but you get the point. As letters of recom- mendation go, it doesn’t get much better than that. It’s not hard to see why the letter means so much to the retired millworker. It not only characterizes him as an exceptional employee, but as an exceptional person as well. I would think that Jerry may have a hard time seeing himself as exceptional now. He can’t do much on his own and is dependent on others. If one of his sisters is reading this to him, and I’ll bet they are, Jerry, let me assure you that you are still exceptional.Your integrity, loyalty and dedication toward your job set an example that should be admired and one that we should all aspire to.We should all love our jobs as much as you loved yours. I would think that Dr. Cherry’s let- ter should also serve as a reminder to us that if we see someone doing exceptional work we should point it out and let them know how much we appreciate them. You never know just how much an impact a few words of gratitude can have on someone’s life. Bob Sloan is editor of The Hartsville Messenger. Contact him at rsloan@hartsvillemsssenger. com No ordinary letter of recommendation BobSloan From the Editor’s Desk
  • 175. HUMOR COLUMN WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: News-Chronicle Elaine Ellison-Rider
  • 176. HUMOR COLUMN WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Union County News Graham Williams Cartoon mice are cute. Real-life mice aren't so cute - especially dead ones, like the one I found on my dining room floor one morning as I was get- ting ready to go to work. The mouse was so small, I didn't notice it when I walked past it on my way to the kitchen. On my way back to the dining room I looked down and there it was, a tiny mouse, lying on its side with its eyes closed and its tail stretched out behind it. This wasn't Jerry, the loveable cartoon mouse who always gets the upper hand over Tom, his feline counterpart. This was a miniature rodent, the kind of creature that causes women to shriek in fear and climb on top of stools. I immediately scanned the room for my calico cat, Kitty, but she was nowhere to be found. "This must be her doing," I thought. "It's about time she earned her keep." Kitty fancies herself as a great hunter; she likes to go out in the yard and stalk squirrels and birds. As far as I know, she's never caught one. Her only prize was a baby rabbit, which I rescued from her clutches and set free. Using a dustpan, I scooped up the dead mouse and took it outside for a proper burial - I flung it into the woods behind my house. I thought that was the end my experience with mice until a few days later, when I saw another one scurrying to safety under the refrigerator, with Kitty in hot pursuit. The cat lay down and waited for the mouse to reappear, but after a while, she gave up and left. Minutes later, the mouse ran into the living room toward the chair where I was sit- ting. I leaped to my feet and the mouse detoured toward the wall. I reached into the kitchen, grabbed the dustpan and slid it beneath the mouse before it could get away. I then ran through the kitchen, flung open the back door and dropped the mouse on the back deck. I haven't seen it since. I did, however, find out where the mice had been living. Last week I was downstairs, looking through my roll-top desk for a document. I rarely use that desk; instead, most of my important papers are in my mother's desk, which is in my bedroom. When I opened one of the drawers I discovered a small nest in the corner, made of small pieces of paper. Two drawers down I found the source of the nest - my collection of Sports Illustrated magazines with UNC basketball teams on the cover, along with newspapers I’ve saved over the past 25 years. In the middle drawer were income tax documents dating back to 1992, which the mice used for their bathroom. The three drawers on the other side of the desk were in similar shape - one had a nest, another had paper with ragged edges and a third had mouse droppings. Apparently, my desk had been serving as a high-rise rodent motel. I spent the next evening cleaning out drawers and shredding old tax documents. The next time I watch "Tom and Jerry" you can bet I'll be rooting for Tom. Graham Williams There’s mouse in my house Whatever happened to snow tires? I asked myself this question last Friday afternoon while negotiating the icy roadway between work and home (with a stop at the grocery store along the way for milk, bread and coffee). When I was growing up, snow tires were a neces- sity, especially when Old Man Winter paid a visit. At the first hint of winter weather, my mother would drive to N.A. King's Esso station, where the rear tires on her Chevy Nova would be swapped out for ones that looked like they would be more at home on a pickup truck than a passenger car. Mama always took her car to Mr. King's to fill up with gas, get the oil changed or have other mechanical work done. They knew she was a widow with three small children and looked out for her. When she got home, Mama would park the car on the street in front of the house instead of backing into our driveway. The next day, if we awoke to snow on the ground, she could get in her car, drop the gearshift into "Low" and be on her way to work. For some reason, the snow tires were always a lit- tle taller than the regular passenger tires. This caused the rear end of the car to sit higher, making it look like it had been "jacked up" - something the local rednecks did with their cars, only the spring shackles hadn't been turned upside-down; Mama's car didn't have air shocks, either. Because of their zig-zag tread, snow tires were able to get better traction in the snow than regular tires. The unusual tread caused the tires to make a singing noise when the car was driven on dry pave- ment. Sometimes it got so loud we had to turn up the volume on the radio to hear the music. That was just fine with my sister and me, especially when we were listening to our favorite Top-40 station. Mama usually went through a set of snow tires every other winter, because once they were on the car they stayed there until spring. By the time she stopped at Mr. King's to have the passenger tires put back on, the tread on the snow tires was pretty worn. Some snow tires came with tiny metal studs that helped propel the car through ice as well as snow. I think Mama once had a set of those, too, but by springtime, the studs were flat. After that, she went back to the regular snow tires. Nowadays cars have all-weather tires, eliminating the need for snow tires - which, like neighborhood service stations, are a thing of the past. Graham Williams Mama’s singing tires 3,092.4 miles. That's how far I must drive before my car records 200,000 miles on its odometer. At the rate I'm going it could reach that milestone in May, if not sooner. As many of you know, I drive a 1994 Buick LeSabre. My children have nicknamed it the “ghetto glider” because it's a little worse for wear - half of the grille is missing because I hit a deer; there's a couple of rust spots on the roof from being exposed to the elements for 19 years; and the ceiling liner has dry rotted from both sides of the rear window from years of direct sunlight. Veteran readers will remember also that my car has no horn; I had it dis- connected when it began blowing by itself. On the plus side, I can drive the car to Pawleys Island without feeling like I've been through 12 rounds with Manny Pacquiao and it gets pretty good gas mileage - I can travel from Union to Cary, N.C. and back on one tank of fuel. The best part about owning a 19-year-old car is not making a monthly car payment - plus my annual prop- erty taxes are only $16. Margaret and I bought the car from her parents about 12 years ago when it had only 27,000 miles on it. She said she wanted it because she was a grand- mother and needed a “grandma car” to drive. Over the years I have kept up with routine mainte- nance on the car - oil changes, tires, tune-ups, etc. - and when it needs major repairs, a top-notch mechanic takes care of it. Sammy Smith knows how much I depend on my car and he does his best to get it back on the road as quickly as possible. Last year, when I mentioned that I hoped to get at least 200,000 miles out of the car, Sammy all but guaranteed it. Earlier this month, I wasn't sure if the car would last another day, much less 3,000-plus miles. During a two-week span I had to get a new radiator, a new bat- tery and a new water pump. The car is running fine now. My children have asked me several times if I thought it was time to get new car. “Not yet,” is my reply. Caroline's 2003 Nissan Altima has already exceeded 200,000 miles. She takes good care of her car and it shows. Nowadays people are keeping their cars longer, Sammy told me. They don't trade them in after driving them for three to five years, he said. One of his cus- tomers drives a Chevrolet Tahoe with more than 400,000 miles on it. The owner bought a new engine a couple of years ago, thinking he would need it to replace the one in the Tahoe. It's still sitting in Sammy's shop. Hmmm, 400,000 miles - I'm almost halfway there. Graham Williams It’s not the years, it’s the mileage
  • 177. HUMOR COLUMN WRITING Weekly Under 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Berkeley Independent Dan Brown BY DAN BROWN I feel sorry for Tall Man. Tall Man is the first nick- name you ever used for your middle finger … the vertically blessed digit that stands nail and knuckles above all others. When the song announces his arrival in the final verse with the query “Where is Tall Man? Where is Tall Man?” 32 five-year olds shout out “HERE I AM! HERE I AM!” and simultane- ously 64 middle fingers get flipped at the teacher show- ing her she’s still number one in their book. I bet whoever wrote that early education song had one heck of a laugh in the teacher’s lounge over a ciga- rette. Lately though, the shadow of some unsavory press has been laid at Tall Man’s feet. Some wayward birds were spotted during the July 24 special meeting of Berkeley County Council. Due to that, some new parliamentary pro- cedures have been imple- mented that seek to cage this free bird. Security will con- duct a digit check at the door to ensure all eight fingers and both thumbs are acting uni- formly and all pointing in the same direction, and that council meetings will not begin until all audience mem- bers’ hands are neatly folded in their laps and everyone is facing obediently forward. I felt like I’d taken a trip back to first grade when Supervisor Dan Davis recent- ly asked an audience member to sit for the remainder of the meeting with his hands fold- ed neatly in his lap. He was not allowed to scratch, itch or pick at any- thing for the next hour while county council tried to show Berkeley County department heads that 1 + 1 = 3 when it came to figuring out a budget for the coming year. You see, the Berkeley County Council meeting room has suddenly become a Tall Man No Fly Zone. You cannot scratch certain parts of your body with the hand’s most prominent finger as you may send the wrong message. While clearly you have an itchy nose or a stubborn fleck of garnish stuck to your front tooth, you could be i n a d v e r - t e n t l y t e l l i n g m e m b e r s of County C o u n c i l what you think of their job performance. A little history if you will in regard to Tall Man. According to truthorfic- tion.com, before the Battle of Agincourtin in 1415, the French, anticipating victory over the English, proposed to cut off the middle finger of all captured English soldiers. Without the middle finger it would be impossible to draw the renowned English long- bow and therefore they would be incapable of fighting in the future. This famous English longbow was made of the native English Yew tree, and the act of drawing the long- bow was known as "plucking the yew." I promise I’m not making this up. Sadly for France, they lost the battle, and the English began using the middle finger as a rallying cry to mock the French in future battles. It is also because of the pheasant feathers on the arrows used with the longbow that the symbolic gesture became known as “giving the bird.” Now, how the word “pluck” morphed into the more vulgar F-bomb, you figure coming from a nation and a time when brushing one’s teeth happened about twice a year, it was simply easier to form the F sound than the PL sound. So there you have it. You see? It’s never too late to learn something new. I guess we should thank Berkeley County Council for that one. Woe is Tall Man BY DAN BROWN I get into moods when it comes to my clothes. These moods last about a minute and a half because I don’t put a lot of thought into what I wear. As long as I’m zipped-up, not button crooked, and with no shirttails sticking out of odd places, I’m good. During the winter I often go for the black and gray lectur- ing professor look – whether I believe I can pass for a vis- iting lecturing professor or not. I have this “Man in Black” look. Black sport coat, black mock turtleneck, black trousers, black socks, right down to black boxers. I wear black because black is supposed to be slimming, and combined with my sil- very hair and closely trimmed beard, it makes for what I hope to be an alluring site for the ladies. I’m not trolling when I get all trussed up in black because in all seriousness I don’t see myself as the trolling type. Oh, I belong on a lake bottom somewhere but I digress. On Thursday I had the MIB look working nicely. I’m standing in a Barnes and Noble perusing the con- temporary fiction section looking for something to read when an attractive woman approaches. While she too is perusing the con- temporary fiction section of books, I can tell her attention is more on me than what may be on the bookshelves. I’m thinking “Yahtzee!” Somebody’s about to score. She stands there regarding the bookshelves, cutting the furtive side glance my way until finally she says to me, and listen closely: “Father, that was something else today in the Vatican, wasn’t it?” This was the day Pope Benedict XVI became the first pontiff in more than 600 years to retire his Vatican post as head of the Roman Catholic church. That’s when I regard my MIB Look reflection in the store window. I don’t look anything like Johnny Cash, but more like Spencer Tracy’s Father Flannigan in “Boys Town.” The only thing missing was the clerical col- lar. She thinks I’m a priest. I give it a One-and-a- h a l f Mississippi and note my all- b l a c k attire; and kudos to me for thinking quickly on my feet because quick thinking is not included in my skills sets. I reply in an introspective and spiritual tone, “These are transitional times, my child.” I figured – quickly thinking mind you – that it would be less embarrassing for her and less awkward for me to just play along than to say she was mistaken because of the way I was dressed. I thought about doing the sign of the Cross but since I’m left handed I would have done so as a Southpaw and I’m not real up to date on any potential dark side rami- fications for making ceremo- nial theological hand signals with the left hand. I surely didn’t want my inadvertent faux pas to open some mysterious portal into a dark dimension and rain fire and brimstone down upon the Earth. So, I buy my book and beat a trail for the parking lot wondering how much trouble a person can get into for impersonating a man of the cloth. Now, before dodging the lightning I did take into account that I am an ordained minister duly sworn. I con- sider my five-minute ordina- tion period as an introspec- tive time of my life. But Lord, have mercy. You can’t make this stuff up. Or maybe you can. There, that should hold up in court. A man of the cloth?
  • 178. HUMOR COLUMN WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Greer Citizen Amanda Irwin The killers among us A pparently I’m living with serial killers. According to a new study, outdoor house cats kill, on average, 2.1 animals each week they are outdoors. I know what you’re think- ing, how did they unveil this life altering information about our furry friends? Well if you haven’t seen it on the news already, scientists from the University of Georgia, who ap- parently had excess funds and too much time, strapped small cameras, kittycams if you will, to 60 unsuspecting cats to see what these felines were up to when they roamed around for 5-6 hours every day. I’m not sure for exactly how many days this excitement went on, but they ultimately concluded that these animals whom we’ve always known to be predators, are in fact predators — groundbreaking research, I know! It’s been 17 hours, do you know where your cat is? Ac- cording to the study’s findings, of the 60 cats involved in the study only about 30 percent were successful in catching prey. Of these 30 percent, they determined that on average they would take one victim every 17 hours. And let me d i i d CURIOUSLY AMANDA AMANDA BRADFORD Staffreporter CURIOUSLY AMANDA AMANDA BRADFORD Staffreporter Cold bravery I n high school, I went on a first date skiing for the first time, and in retrospect I wouldn’t recommend this to anyone. Southern raised, my exposure to snow, ice and skis had been limited, and probably for good reason. Without ever practicing or learning the basics of stop- ping, turning — any of those potentially life saving maneu- vers — I hopped onto a ski lift for the first time. When the time came for me to jump off, I promptly face planted into the snow with my… I’ll call them ski sticks, being of no use to me. My date quickly helped me up before the next ski lift rider trampled me, and he probably instantly realized how clumsy I am. Still fearless, I stood at the top of the face of the mountain noticing the black diamond symbol, clueless that it was warning me of my bad deci- sion. With the endless white terrain ahead of me, I hurdled myself downward with my ski sticks so skillfully held into the air high above my head, because I really had no idea the purpose they served. Somehow, even in skiing I chose to stand- out, rather than skiing in the typical zigzag pattern, I flew straight down the mountain gaining speed. After what felt like eternity 50 h I h d h b Embarrassment proceeds F or anyone who knows me, this story shouldn’t come as surprising, but nonethe- less I thought I’d share it. I can be socially anxiety rid- den and awkward, and social norms are sometimes lost on me. Luckily, most days it doesn’t seem to be much of an issue, however, some days I find myself immersed into very uncomfortable situations. When I was living in New York, I was driving home one day and I noticed traffic had slowed and a police officer was standing in the median direct- ing cars. I wasn’t sure why he was directing traffic, but none- theless I filed into the lines of cars and crept slowly forward without thinking anything of it. While listening to fairly loud music streaming from the radio and unimpressively singing along, I, patiently of course, waited my turn to inch toward my destination. When I was a few cars away from the police officer, I noticed that with a seemingly somber look on his face, he was leaning in and talking to drivers of each car as they stopped in front of him. In my rearview mirror, I noticed the people behind me had the same look and … were they crying? I h I li d I h d CURIOUSLY AMANDA AMANDA BRADFORD Staffreporter
  • 179. HUMOR COLUMN WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Myrtle Beach Herald Betty Moses Gettheebehindme,Kindle I ’m an avid reader who has loved books ever since my hands were big enough to hold one. I was even reading long before I entered first grade. I couldn’t wait that long to learn what story those marks on the page were telling. I still remember the ones that kept me entranced as I grew up, such as “Back of the North Wind,” “The Good Fa- ther,” Eight Cousins” and “Little Women.” I read them over and over until I could close my eyes and speak the words. From the time I was old enough to have a library card, I was in heaven when I was surrounded by stacks of books. Then there were maga- zines. Mama and I went to a lot of movies when Daddy was working the evening shift. I turned into a starstruck little girl. When I grew a little older, I couldn’t wait to get the latest issue of Motion Picture or Photoplay to see what the beautiful people were doing. Elizabeth Taylor (we didn’t call her Liz back then) and Natalie Wood were my idols and I read every word Hedda Hopper or Louella Parsons wrote about them. In the years since then, I have read everything from Harle- quin ro- mances to “War and Peace” and a lot of murder and mayhem in between. Then Barnes and Noble came to town. I could spend hours poring over beautiful coffee table books and art books. Cook- books were my weakness — believe it or not. I loved to rummage the sale shelves for those books I could afford. I still have a large storage box full of art books. Then came Kindle. A broken arm caused me to buy one when I couldn’t hold a book with both hands. It changed my life, but I’m not sure it was a good thing. I’ve only been in a book store once since I bought it. I haven’t browsed through en- chanting destinations like I once did, and it’s been a while since I sought inspira- tion from the pages of color- ful art books. My literary world is now black and white. And my culinary world is now presented to me from the screen of my laptop. What an amazing world it is now. I only have to type “shrimp and grits” into a search engine on my com- puter and instantly hundreds of recipes for shrimp and grits will pop up. That’s all well and good, but how am I going to pass that on to my kids? My daughter was thrilled when I gave her my mom’s well-worn cookbook, along with her hand-written notes preserved in plastic covers. As for magazines, I get my daily dose of celebrity gossip every time I go online, but it’s not the same as holding a copy of People in my hands and reading a complete story instead of just snippets of in- formation and short videos that contain more ads than content. Between the Kindle and my laptop, a lot of color has gone out of my life. I long to walk through bright colored stacks and smell the perfume of new books. I need a Barnes and Noble fix fast. YoucanreachBETTYMOSESat488-7257orat betty.moses@myhorrynews.com.Youcan readbackcolumnsatbettymoses.com. |MYSENIOR | MOMENT BETTY MOSES It’sallabouthair O n Monday morning I had a little temper tantrum, what those of us born and bred in the mountains of North Carolina call a “hissy fit.” It all began when I made an early morning stop at the local branch of a national produc- tion assembly line hair salon. You know the kind I’m talking about — no appointment nec- essary and they specialize in haircuts. And one never knows who will be doing the styling. The reason I was there was because when I mangled my arm and shoulder a couple of years ago, I lost the ability to wield a blow dryer and a curl- ing iron — which means I can’t style my own hair. I’m totally at the mercy of others to keep me looking gorgeous. This also means that at least once a week, I must put my- self in the hands of strangers and pray that I emerge from the experience feeling confi- dent that I’m looking my best. This does not always hap- pen. This definitely didn’t hap- pen Monday. Let me explain. I wear my hair short, cut out over the ears and, hopefully, fluffy and a little windblown on top — the typical hairdo for an older lady who wishes to show the world that inside she is young and spirited. Sounds easy to do. Right? Maybe on someone else’s hair, but my hair needs root booster, gel, mousse and any other hair product that might be sitting at the hairdresser’s station. Then a session with a hot curling iron (one with a small barrel) seals the do in place — plus a liberal spraying with a freeze-in-place hairspray. Maybe you can’t run your fingers through my hair when the job is finished, but I defi- nitely look perky. That didn’t happen Mon- day. I won’t go into detail, but suffice it to say that I was rant- ing and raving when I looked at myself in the mirror in my car. There was nothing perky about the image that looked back at me. I came through the door screaming when I went home to try and repair the damage. My sons who were there found things to do outside until I cooled down a bit. There was no repairing the damage. Flat is flat and there was nothing I could do except keep my glasses on top my head to give me a little lift. Being men, my sons thought it was funny. I quick- ly changed their minds. “It’s not too bad,” one of them said, intending to com- fort me, but failing miserably. I guess it’s silly to let one’s hairdo have such an effect, but I know I’m not the only one to feel that way. Hair is important and has been throughout history, even for men. Look at Samson. He had a really bad hair day when Delilah took the scissors to it. I can’t compare my bad hair day to that, but I feel dowdy and dull when I know my hair isn’t like I want it to be. Before anyone takes of- fense, I will be going back to the same hair salon next week because I have walked out of there numerous times with a big smile on my face. But I will certainly take a turn through the parking lot before I commit to relin- quishing my hair to the wrong hands again. You do know that I wrote down a tag number Monday before I left the parking lot, don’t you? YoucanreachBETTYMOSESat488-7257orat betty.moses@myhorrynews.com.Youcan readbackcolumnsatbettymoses.com. |MYSENIOR | MOMENT BETTY MOSES
  • 180. HUMOR COLUMN WRITING Weekly Over 6,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Gazette Dan Brown BY DAN BROWN T here is a Southern term of endearment people will express when they regard someone acting like he doesn’t have the sense God gave one of His lesser cre- ations. Like a goose. They will say, “Bless your heart,” and follow it with something like, “didn’t your momma love you enough as a child?” or, “were you dropped as a baby?” In my case they usually say, “Bless your heart, were you dropped as a baby?” No disrespect intended toward my mother, but I think someone dropped me as a baby. I covered an event here in town this week and have taken to locking my car since some- one stole my license tag. Locking one’s car after one’s license tag has been stolen is considered standard operating procedure, much like locking the barn AFTER the cow has been stolen. Bless your heart. After the event had completed I returned to my car and depressed the UNLOCK button on my remote control thingie. Let it be said off the bat, anyone who uses the word, “thingie” to describe an object or device, you know that person is doomed to tragic fail- ure. I’ve owned this formerly white Sebring ragtop for four years now and I’ve used my remote control thingie to both lock and unlock my car. Every time. So when I depressed the UNLOCK button and nothing happened, I was more than a lit- tle consternated. I stood there in the parking lot, in the middle of town, and regarded my car as if it had somehow been disobedi- ent or disrespectful. It did not unlock upon my request. So I pressed the unlock button again. Still nothing. I then stood there in the park- ing lot and regarded my remote control thingie as if to ask, “What’s up with that?” Of course my remote control thingie didn’t respond. I pressed the button again, and again. I even growled as I pressed the button and held it down indefinitely, believing like smacking the VCR with a hammer, that the pressure of my thumb will somehow mag- ically seep through my remote control thingie’s plastic cover and fix whatever was broken inside. No such luck. My car would not unlock. I was stuck. What did I do? I was downtown. I had to get home. I saw a police car pass and took a few steps to chase it down. I stopped, realizing such a venture would be foolish and foolish looking. I went back into the office and looked for a coat hanger so I could perhaps break into my car and get it started. No coat hang- ers were anywhere to be found. I had just one option – walk the mile and a half home and get my spare remote control thingie, and walk a mile and a half back and unlock my car. So I started down Main Street toward home, totally aggravat- ed. Again, let me say I’ve owned this car for four years and not once have I used anything other than my remote control thingie to unlock my car. Out of sight, out of mind I say. I was halfway down Main Street, almost to Piggly Wiggly when I pulled out my remote control thingie to curse it. “You failed me and I must walk home because of you.” That’s when I saw my car key. And in “five Mississippis” the little pinball of my brain con- nects and it occurs to me, use your car key. Bless my heart. Bless your heart BY DAN BROWN I t’s not a kept secret in regard to my feelings about clowns. I saw a sign this weekend saying the circus was in town. A chill of fear crept up my spine. I don’t like clowns.They scare me. I was the fearful child, riddled with neuroses and phobias, cursed with the wild imagination that rendered all impossible and improbable things a definite possibility and an absolute certainty. What is it about clowns, anyway? It’s their freakishly long, water-ski feet, the wild orange hair and the big red ball nose, the leering, white faced grin spreading from ear to ear as if deliciously pondering the notion of what it would feel like to devour your soul as you slept. It’s the tall clowns on stilts, rising to the Big Top rafters, and especial- ly the short clowns, running every- where, falling down and then bouncing right back to their feet as if they were made out of rubber. Clowns are not the repre- sentation of the hidden sad face, clowns are pure evil incognito. Clowns do not speak – another thing I don’t like. Mime clowns, the worst kind. A friend of mine asked me, how do you ever eat at McDonald’s? It wasn’t easy. I kept my eyes downcast, staring at the floor, repeating the same mantra over and over again, “Don’t make eye contact with the clown… don’t make eye contact with the clown.” And if the clown doesn’t get you, the talking Big Mac head will. Puppets get me almost as much as clowns do. Puppets are merely clowns on strings. And the whole frog and pig love thing going on with the Muppets. Creepy. I don’t like mimes, either. Mimes are evil cousins to the clown. Mimes are patient, deathly pale in pallor, regarding you with that silent open-eyed stare of curious mockery, silently waiting for you to make a mistake while seemingly trapped inside their invisible boxes. And when you do, they will pounce on you in droves to attack and pretend to beat the snot out of you. I was inWalmart the other day and saw a mother demonstrating the fun of a Jack-in-the-box to her two year old. Here, crank the little knob and a pretty little song plays. Then, just as you’re enjoying the song, perhaps even singing along, you get to the end and “POP!” goes the weasel and a dismembered clown head on a spring jumps out of the box at you. The only reason no one in Walmart could hear the kid crying was because I was screaming like I’d just lost my legs. My aunt had several Red Skelton clown paintings hanging in her liv- ing room, and one in particular, a painting called “Cloud Clowns” that showed the clouds forming into dozens of clown faces. Hideous it was. For years I had trouble even look- ing up at the sky for fear of what might be looking back at me. My clown dreams though rank right up there with tornadoes and giants as all-time favorite night- mares. Friends of mine know this, and Carma, a good friend of mine last night brought up an interesting scenario. “Think about it,” she said, “A tor- nado forms from a cloud ... from a clown in the clouds.” A tornado with a leering clown face coming at you, Carma said, and chuckled. An evil woman you are. Probably a clown spy in disguise too, I’ll bet. Oh yeah. I’m sleeping with the lights on tonight. Clowns BY DAN BROWN H ello batophobia. I t ’ s been awhile, has it not? A couple years since we last enjoyed the other’s acquaintance. I believe I was standing on a narrow, grated catwalk some 450 feet off the ground, the only thing separat- ing me from doing a Peter Pan off the Cross Generating Station tower was an iron bar painted yellow with a yellow sign dan- gling off it saying CAUTION. It was a good thing we were wearing earplugs, that way nobody could hear me scream. But that was then. This is now. It’s been two years since my feet have left terra firma. I don’t like heights. I suffer from batophobia, the fear of heights, or tall things. Anything height related both- ers me – tall things, deep things (just heights in reverse), tall things in the distance, giants (that’s called Fee-Fi-phobia). The list is endless. My fear of heights is well docu- mented. M e d i c a l journals call batophobia an intense, per- sistent, irrational and unwar- ranted fear of heights or being close to high buildings. I take great umbrage with this defini- tion. There is nothing intense, irrational or unwarranted about my fear of heights. Still, at my age I feel it’s time to confront my fear head on, to scoff at the tiny voice in the back of my mind screaming bloody murder whenever it sees a tall thing or I am up high in the sky. It’s time – while there is noth- ing wrong with being more than a little cautious about heights – to no longer be afraid. So I agreed to go up in a heli- copter. I will take a real, live helicop- ter ride from Moncks Corner to downtown Charleston. If I’m lucky I’ll get to go this week. Or maybe next week. Or next month. There’s no rush. Nothing is set in stone yet as apparently riding in a helicopter is a little more involved than strapping into the seat and don- ning the Top Gun shades, which reminds me I have to purchase a pair for my ride. There is some paperwork to complete first. And a waiver to sign. We’ll get to the waiver in a minute. The first question I was asked, “How much do you weigh?” Apparently there is a limit. I remember wanting to bungie jump once – not bungie jump as in jump off a bridge with noth- ing keeping me from smacking the ground than a pair of cheap luggage cables – but this bungie contraption they had hooked up to the cruise ship. They harnessed you in and then “SNAP!” they send you up into the sky. Once again, the only thing keeping me from going into low altitude earth orbit were cheap luggage cables. They also asked me how much I weighed, and apparently I weighed too much. This is one of those good things to know before I ride in a helicopter. I’m a big guy. I don’t want to be 500 feet off the ground and the red warning light comes on and the pilot looks at the co-pilot and says, “We’re too heavy, we’re going to crash!” And the co-pilot looks at me and says, “Throw the fat guy out!” I don’t want that. I do want one thing, though. I have something to ask of you before I go climb onboard a hel- icopter. Please. Talk me out of it. An old friend returns
  • 181. HUMOR COLUMN WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division THIRD PLACE: The Press & Standard Brantley Strickland Soaring and weaving high above sunny Florida Just try being the heaviest passenger on a com- mercial flight next time. It won’t get you the copilot’s chair, just a lousy seatbelt extender. Brantley STRICKLAND Finally caving in the great flip flop debate Brantley STRICKLAND Although my 7:58 mile indicates a “high level of fitness,” according to a recent report in the New York Times, it wasn’t enough to best some of the friendly competi- tion I en- countered last week. n n n n Brantley STRICKLAND Losses to dentist, deputy and minister acceptable
  • 182. HUMOR COLUMN WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division SECOND PLACE: The Gaffney Ledger Cody Sossamon I can see fire at night; Ruined a good garden hose; Click, click, click
  • 183. HUMOR COLUMN WRITING Weekly 2/3Times Division FIRST PLACE: The Press & Standard Drew Tripp Lo and be- hold, the biggest danged opossum I’ve ever seen in my life. … This thing was bigger than some beagle hounds and boar ‘coons I’ve seen. Drew TRIPP AnightofReese’s,heroismand‘possumwrangling TV Free: A 20-something’s tale of cable celibacy Drew TRIPP Good old Facebook: If you hear it, you’ll hear it there first, and if you don’t hear it there, then it must not be worth hearing, right? See TRIPP, page 6A Drew TRIPP Along with heavy breathing, sore legs, and sweat- soaked shirts, these late afternoon excursions have led to some pretty unique discover- ies about our little town. Seeing Walterboro differently by running See TRIPP, page 4B
  • 184. SERIES OF ARTICLES Weekly Under 6,000 Division THIRD PLACE: News and Press Samantha Lyles AUGUST 7, 2013 | PAGE 1B WWW.NEWSANDPRESSONLINE.COM THE NEWS AND PRESS, DARLINGTON, S.C. 2B SOCIETY 3B CALENDAR 4B LEGAL NOTICES 5B CLASSIFIEDS lifestyles By Samantha Lyles Staff Writer slyles@newsandpressonline.com In modern society, two indi- viduals in conflict have a vari- ety of lawful options available to settle their differences; they can go to court, seek redress from a mediator, or even take the fight public and let majority opinion offer a ruling. But from the middle ages up through the late 1800s, it was perfectly legal for two men to settle an argument by taking up arms and fighting until one of them lay dead. In 1880, Colonel Ellerbe B.C. Cash of Cheraw and Colonel William M. Shannon of Camden met midway between their homes – near the Darlington County line – and fought the last duel in South Carolina. The tragic and frus- trating tale of their conflict res- onated across the country, and sounded a death knell for the practice of dueling in America. The Cash-Shannon duel was not a clear-cut case of impugned honor and necessary vengeance, but a series of pri- vate insults and public escala- tions spawned a very real dis- cord between the two parties over several weeks prior to their final, violent meeting. In 1878, Cash’s intemperate brother in law Robert Ellerbe engaged in a fierce fight with a litigious Camden blacksmith named Conrad Weinges. One year later, a judge decreed that Ellerbe must pay Weinges $2,000 in damages for his injuries, but this debt went unpaid because the insolvent Ellerbe already owed $10,000 to his sister – Allen Cash, wife of E.B.C. Cash – over her unpaid share of their family’s estate. Weinges’ attorneys chal- lenged the veracity of this claimed debt. A random, pen- ciled margin note on a legal summons even theorized that Mrs. Cash and her brother col- luded to fabricate this debt in order to cheat Weinges of his settlement money. The attorneys of record for Mr. Weinges were Robert DePass and William M. Shannon. When Colonel Cash learned of this insult to his wife, he was incensed and penned a chal- lenge to both DePass and Shannon. Cash’s friends inter- cepted this fiery missive, and he later wrote a milder letter to Shannon inquiring about the insulting margin note. Shannon claimed to know nothing about the note, and explained that as assistant counsel he did not prepare any of the suit papers. The two men exchanged letters expressing relief that they could remain friendly, and tensions briefly eased. In February of 1880, a Camden judge ruled against Mrs. Cash’s estate claim, saying the $10,000 debt was in excess of the property claimed. The South Carolina State Supreme Court reversed this decision in favor of Mrs. Cash, but the trial process – couched in presump- tion of her dishonesty – took a hard toll. Allen Cash died a couple of months after the final verdict. Col. Cash and Robert Ellerbe remained bitter over her loss, and issued formal challenges to DePass and Shannon, respec- tively. Shannon refused to duel with Ellerbe, claiming (in a posthumously published letter) that Ellerbe’s claims against him were false, and that Ellerbe was “in no condition or relation of life my equal or entitled to recognition.” In late May, DePass accepted Cash’s challenge, and the men arranged to face off on two sep- arate occasions: once at Dubose’s Bridge in Bishopville, and again at Wright’s Folly in North Carolina. The Camden Anti-Dueling Society knew of their plans, and both times DePass was arrested before he could present himself. Frustrated to the point of fury, Cash denounced both attorneys and local anti-duel- ing advocates in newspapers. His son Boggan Cash added fuel to the fire by penning and circulating a poem about William Shannon – a poem with a pointedly insulting final verse: My daddy was a gin maker No fighting man was he As long as I have legs to run No man will shoot at me Boggan also made overtures to take up the fight on his father’s behalf and settle the matter with any willing young men of the Shannon family. Though Shannon felt offended by the poem, he wrote to Colonel Cash with a request to keep their disagree- ment between themselves. Cash responded with more vit- riol and insults, decrying Shannon as a “poltroon” and a “coward” for refusing to duel Ellerbe, and for misrepresent- ing his intentions to sue Allen Cash for fraud. At wit’s end, and apparently unable to negotiate a cure for hostilities that did not involve bloodshed, Shannon put pen to paper on June 27 and advised Cash to prepare for a “hostile meeting.” The reckoning the Cash family yearned for was finally happening. Accompanied by their sec- onds and perhaps a dozen friends, Cash and Shannon met around 2 p.m. on July 5 at the first highland north of Dubose’s Bridge in Darlington County. Curious farmers and field hands wandered in until nearly 100 people stood watch- ing. Shannon’s second, W.E. Johnson of Camden, won the right to serve as signalman. Owing to Col. Cash’s partial deafness, Johnson would fire a shot in the air giving the right to open fire, and woul