Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Wordpress Premium Plugin : How it adds value to your list of plugins
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Wordpress Premium Plugin : How it adds value to your list of plugins

323
views

Published on

WordPress with its open source has made it possible for several coders to provide plugins that add to the value of your website. Plugins have made it possible for the site owner to add greater …

WordPress with its open source has made it possible for several coders to provide plugins that add to the value of your website. Plugins have made it possible for the site owner to add greater functionality and make the site more user-friendly.


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
323
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. ==== ====Discover how to rank high in the search engines, even for affiliate products, with FREE tools...Youcould be ranking right up there with the product owner and raking in those big affiliatecommissions.www.wordpressbestplugins.com==== ====Have you ever taken the time to read over the license.txt file that comes with your WordPressinstallation? No? Dont worry, you probably arent alone. You must be familiar with softwarelicenses correct? Ah, there we go, something you do know a little about. Most software you needto purchased in order to legally use or own. WordPress, however is slightly different. Its built onthe GNU General Public License which means you are able to give it to whomever you want...forfree! Really, its right there in the license:"You may copy and distribute verbatim copies of the Programs source code as you receive it, inany medium, provided that you conspicuously and appropriately publish on each copy anappropriate copyright notice and disclaimer of warranty; keep intact all the notices that refer to thisLicense and to the absence of any warranty; and give any other recipients of the Program a copyof this License along with the Program."The codebase for WordPress is maintained by a group of coders who are not just developers, butusers of WordPress. Even you could contribute to making WordPress better by identifying bugs inthe Trac (core.trac.wordpress.org & requires a WordPress.org login). The same people who helpidentify bugs and issues with WordPress also are some of the same people who develop theplugins and themes you are using, myself included. Most of these plugins are free of charge andavailable for use under the same license as WordPress itself. You may find, however, that everynow and then you will stumble upon a Premium Theme or Premium Plugin. These are not freeadditions to WordPress typically and come in a wide variety of costs and functionality.There are some open source fans that think paid content for a free platform is just not right, andthere are others who welcome the idea of a paid addition to free products. Ill give you some of thepros and cons of both of them.The Free PhilosophyFree is better right to most people right? In an open source community, most people just assumethat software will be licensed as free and open. Not to mention, who doesnt like that price point,FREE! As with any free product you have to expect that you may find some delay in theidentification of bugs and the release of the correction. For developers free is nice because itspawns, typically, a much larger user base, it encourages people to try their product since there isno cost to doing so. As a user, free is desired because, well, there is no cost! No cost allows theuser to experiment and expand their site with no commitment.You might ask then what the downfalls of free content are. As mentioned, a lag in the development
  • 2. life cycle is the main issue since most of these developers have full time jobs outside of thisventure. You may also get ads, or nags to donate. While those do offer an income incentive to thedeveloper, they arent guaranteed, so I still consider it free. People who develop the free content,are free to host their plugins and themes at WordPress.org in their Extend section.The Premium PhilosophyA question I hear often is, "Why would someone charge for an addition to a free product?" Theanswer is pretty clear, its profitable. If you develop a plugin or theme that meets the needs of alarge user-base and market share at a low enough cost, then you will most likely make lots ofmoney. Premium/Paid plugins and themes typically get a much larger support community builtaround them and the developers and designers of them put more time and effort into maintainingthem, because they are getting paid to. It is essentially their full time job. Thats not to say that thedevelopers who give away their content freely dont offer great support, but theres less of anincentive to when it comes down to the barebones of the fact that...developers need to makemoney as well. Premium plugins and themes will usually have a much larger array of options andsettings to expand your site as well.Typically the premium content cannot be found at WordPress.org in their Extend area becausehere, you can freely download the distributed plugins and themes. The developers and designersmust host it themselves, or with another resource that offers the ability to protect their assets.My ThoughtsDo I use Paid plugins or themes? That answer is no. I do not have a plugin or theme that I paid forin use. My thoughts are that people who arent familiar with the coding of a theme or how a pluginworks, but wants something to simply function may want to look into Premium themes or plugins. Ifyou dont mind getting your hands a little dirty, you can use free themes and plugins, and modifytheir code to meet your needs. This is not for the faint of heart however and can cause someadverse effects.Simply stated, I can typically modify a theme or plugin to meet my needs, but thats not to say if Ifind a must have premium theme or plugin, I wont pony up some cash for it. Its best to think ofyour WordPress site the same way as your Smartphone. If the product is something you will usedaily and "cant live without" then whats the problem with throwing a few bucks at the developer.Weather its by paying for the application/plugin or by donating, the developer will appreciate it (fulldisclose, I have a "Donate" button on my plugin page, but I dont expect it to be used).Whatever your needs be for your site, I think you can probably find a free plugin or theme that willmeet it, but if you want great support with a product that has the better chance to be updated morefrequently you may want to look into a paid solution. Again, this isnt to say that a developer of afree add-on will not support their product but if you think about it, the odds are just in your favor.Chris is a WordPress Plugin Developer and Open Source advocate who writes about WordPressTips, AdSense Tips, and how to boost your blogs potential at ChrisKDesigns.com
  • 3. Article Source:http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chris_Klosowski==== ====Discover how to rank high in the search engines, even for affiliate products, with FREE tools...Youcould be ranking right up there with the product owner and raking in those big affiliatecommissions.www.wordpressbestplugins.com==== ====