What Is Readers Theatre

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This is a presentation created for my Grade 7 English class wiki to assist them with the creation of reader's theatre scripts.

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What Is Readers Theatre

  1. 1. Reader’s Theatre What is it? & How do we prepare for a reader’s theatre?
  2. 2. What is reader’s theatre?
  3. 3. What is reader’s theatre? <ul><li>It is a performance, usually an adaptation of an existing literary work </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is reader’s theatre? <ul><li>It is a performance, usually an adaptation of an existing literary work </li></ul><ul><li>Actors use their voices, facial expressions and gestures to convey the image of the scene ~ it is not ‘acted’ with physical movement </li></ul>
  5. 5. What is reader’s theatre? <ul><li>It is a performance, usually an adaptation of an existing literary work </li></ul><ul><li>Actors use their voices, facial expressions and gestures to convey the image of the scene ~ it is not ‘acted’ with physical movement </li></ul><ul><li>Performers use their scripts as a guide </li></ul>
  6. 6. How is it staged? <ul><li>There are many styles of reader’s theater. In the most traditional style: </li></ul><ul><li>Taken from Aaron Shepard’s Reader’s Theatre website at www.aaronshep.com/rt </li></ul>
  7. 7. How is it staged? <ul><li>There are many styles of reader’s theater. In the most traditional style: </li></ul><ul><li>Readers are arranged in a row or a semicircle, standing up or sitting on high stools. Typically, narrators are placed at one or both ends, and major characters in the center. </li></ul><ul><li>Taken from Aaron Shepard’s Reader’s Theatre website at www.aaronshep.com/rt </li></ul>
  8. 8. How is it staged? <ul><li>There are many styles of reader’s theater. In the most traditional style: </li></ul><ul><li>Readers are arranged in a row or a semicircle, standing up or sitting on high stools. Typically, narrators are placed at one or both ends, and major characters in the center. </li></ul><ul><li>Scripts can be held in hand or set on music stands. </li></ul><ul><li>Taken from Aaron Shepard’s Reader’s Theatre website at www.aaronshep.com/rt </li></ul>
  9. 9. How is it staged? <ul><li>There are many styles of reader’s theater. In the most traditional style: </li></ul><ul><li>Readers are arranged in a row or a semicircle, standing up or sitting on high stools. Typically, narrators are placed at one or both ends, and major characters in the center. </li></ul><ul><li>Scripts can be held in hand or set on music stands. </li></ul><ul><li>Readers look straight out toward the audience or at an angle, rather than at each other. </li></ul><ul><li>Taken from Aaron Shepard’s Reader’s Theatre website at www.aaronshep.com/rt </li></ul>
  10. 10. How is it staged? <ul><li>There are many styles of reader’s theater. In the most traditional style: </li></ul><ul><li>Readers are arranged in a row or a semicircle, standing up or sitting on high stools. Typically, narrators are placed at one or both ends, and major characters in the center. </li></ul><ul><li>Scripts can be held in hand or set on music stands. </li></ul><ul><li>Readers look straight out toward the audience or at an angle, rather than at each other. </li></ul><ul><li>Characters “exit” by turning their backs to the audience. (Narrators don’t normally exit.) </li></ul><ul><li>Taken from Aaron Shepard’s Reader’s Theatre website at www.aaronshep.com/rt </li></ul>
  11. 11. How is it staged? <ul><li>There are many styles of reader’s theater. In the most traditional style: </li></ul><ul><li>Readers are arranged in a row or a semicircle, standing up or sitting on high stools. Typically, narrators are placed at one or both ends, and major characters in the center. </li></ul><ul><li>Scripts can be held in hand or set on music stands. </li></ul><ul><li>Readers look straight out toward the audience or at an angle, rather than at each other. </li></ul><ul><li>Characters “exit” by turning their backs to the audience. (Narrators don’t normally exit.) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Scene changes”—jumps in time or place—can be shown by a group “freeze,” followed by some kind of collective shift. </li></ul><ul><li>Taken from Aaron Shepard’s Reader’s Theatre website at www.aaronshep.com/rt </li></ul>
  12. 12. How do we create a script? <ul><li>Select the story, text or scene you wish to perform ( If you do not have an existng text to work from, you may find it easier to write out the ‘story’ first ) </li></ul>
  13. 13. How do we create a script? <ul><li>Select the story, text or scene you wish to perform ( If you do not have an existng text to work from, you may find it easier to write out the ‘story’ first ) </li></ul><ul><li>Decide who will play which character ~ remember to include a narrator ( If your group is small you may assign more than one role to a person – be careful that these two characters don’t have to ‘talk’ to each other!) </li></ul>
  14. 14. How do we create a script? <ul><li>Select the story, text or scene you wish to perform ( If you do not have an existng text to work from, you may find it easier to write out the ‘story’ first ) </li></ul><ul><li>Decide who will play which character ~ remember to include a narrator ( If your group is small you may assign more than one role to a person – be careful that these two characters don’t have to ‘talk’ to each other!) </li></ul><ul><li>When rewriting the text, try to move the story along through dialogue </li></ul>
  15. 15. How do we create a script? <ul><li>All members of the group must speak ( Try to keep the parts evenly distributed ) </li></ul>
  16. 16. How do we create a script? <ul><li>All members of the group must speak ( Try to keep the parts evenly distributed ) </li></ul><ul><li>Write the script as you would a play script, with the characters names on the left hand side, a tabbed space and then their lines </li></ul>
  17. 17. How do we create a script? <ul><li>All members of the group must speak ( Try to keep the parts evenly distributed ) </li></ul><ul><li>Write the script as you would a play script, with the characters names on the left hand side, a tabbed space and then their lines </li></ul><ul><li>You may want to include direction on how a line should be read in parenthesis </li></ul>
  18. 18. What to avoid…
  19. 19. What to avoid… <ul><li>Long speeches </li></ul>
  20. 20. What to avoid… <ul><li>Long speeches </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult or obscure language </li></ul>
  21. 21. What to avoid… <ul><li>Long speeches </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult or obscure language </li></ul><ul><li>Rude or inappropriate language that may offend members of your audience </li></ul>
  22. 22. What to avoid… <ul><li>Long speeches </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult or obscure language </li></ul><ul><li>Rude or inappropriate language that may offend members of your audience </li></ul><ul><li>Over use of ‘he said’ or ‘she said’ by the narrator </li></ul>
  23. 23. How to prepare
  24. 24. How to prepare <ul><li>After writing your script, perform it once for a ‘critical’ friend. Ask them for feedback ~ Did it make sense? Were any parts confusing? Do they wish something had been added? Deleted? </li></ul>
  25. 25. How to prepare <ul><li>After writing your script, perform it once for a ‘critical’ friend. Ask them for feedback ~ Did it make sense? Were any parts confusing? Do they wish something had been added? Deleted? </li></ul><ul><li>Make any necessary revisions based on the feedback </li></ul>
  26. 26. How to prepare <ul><li>After writing your script, perform it once for a ‘critical’ friend. Ask them for feedback ~ Did it make sense? Were any parts confusing? Do they wish something had been added? Deleted? </li></ul><ul><li>Make any necessary revisions based on the feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Practice, practice, practice!!! </li></ul>
  27. 27. Present your reader’s theatre <ul><li>Remember… </li></ul>
  28. 28. Present your reader’s theatre <ul><li>Remember… </li></ul><ul><li>Be confident </li></ul>
  29. 29. Present your reader’s theatre <ul><li>Remember… </li></ul><ul><li>Be confident </li></ul><ul><li>Speak clearly </li></ul>
  30. 30. Present your reader’s theatre <ul><li>Remember… </li></ul><ul><li>Be confident </li></ul><ul><li>Speak clearly </li></ul><ul><li>Be animated (enthusiastic) </li></ul>
  31. 31. Present your reader’s theatre <ul><li>Remember… </li></ul><ul><li>Be confident </li></ul><ul><li>Speak clearly </li></ul><ul><li>Be animated (enthusiastic) </li></ul><ul><li>Have fun! </li></ul>
  32. 32. <ul><li>Good luck! </li></ul><ul><li>Or as they say in the theatre… </li></ul>
  33. 33. Break A Leg! <ul><li>Good luck! </li></ul><ul><li>Or as they say in the theatre… </li></ul>

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