Sac lesson plan industrial revolution

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Sac lesson plan industrial revolution

  1. 1. Lesson Plan Template based on Understanding by Design by Jay McTighe and Grant WigginsTitle of Lesson: The Industrial Revolution in AmericaAuthor: Eric A. Marszalek Grade Level: 10School: Middletown High School Time Estimated: 1 HourBrief Overview Students will describe/examine/evaluate the impact of the 19th century Industrial Revolution in the United States on Americans.Historical Inquiry Was the Industrial Revolution of the mid-to-late 19th beneficial or harmful toQuestion Americans?Content Knowledge As a result of this lesson, students will know: • The definition of the Industrial Revolution in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. • How the industrialization of the United States affected Americans during the time period.Skills As a result of this lesson, students will be able to: • Ask relevant questions related to social studies/history to initiate, extend or debate a point of view. • Use evidence to develop an interpretation of a historical event. • Evaluate primary and secondary interpretations of a historical event.CT Standards S.S. 1.1.4 – Explain the changing nature of the U.S. economy.Addressed S.S. 1.1.10 – Analyze the impact of technology and scientific discovery on American society. S.S. 2.4.11 – Ask relevant questions related to social studies/history to initiate, extend or debate a point of view. S.S. 3.1.1 – Use evidence to develop an interpretation of a historical event. S.S. 3.1.2 – Evaluate primary and secondary interpretations of a historical event.Prior Knowledge • “The Industrial Revolution in the United States” – handoutResources needed Library of Congress Resources • “Child Labor in the Canning Industry of Maryland” Hine, Lewis. Library of Congress collection. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/static/data/nclc/resources/images/canneries3.pdf • “Growth of Cities in the United States” Harper’s New Monthy Magazine Volume 7 Issue 38 July 1853 pp. 171-175 http://digital.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx? c=harp&cc=harp&idno=harp0007-2&node=harp0007-2%3A1&view=image&s eq=181&size=175 • [Anti-trust cartoons]: Nursery Rhymes for Infant Industries, No. 15: O is the Oil Trust, a modern Bill Sikes; he defies the police, and does just as he likes Frederick Opper; Copyright W.R. Hearst 1901; Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2005685052/ • The Ideal Home Town The Westinghouse World: The Companies, the People, and the Places. 1
  2. 2. Library of Congress collection. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/papr/west/westpres.html • Breaker boys, Woodward Coal Mines, Kingston, Pa. Detroit Publishing Company c1900. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/det1994007312/PP/ • Ford factory, first assembly line, Highland Avenue, Detroit, MI American Landscape and Architectural Design, 1850-1920. Library of Congress collection http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/h? ammem/alad:@field(NUMBER+@band(mhsalad+220102)) • “With drops of blood. The history of the Industrial workers of the world has been written” An American Time Capsule: Three Centuries of Broadsides and Other Printed Ephemera http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/h? ammem/rbpebib:@field(NUMBER+@band(rbpe+01805500)) • Western Union Telegram, Orville Wright to Bishop Milton Wright announcing the first successful powered flight, December 17, 1903. Words and Deeds in American History. Wright Brothers Papers. Library of Congress collection. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r? ammem/mcc:@field(DOCID+@lit(mcc/061)) Other Resources • “The Industrial Revolution in the United States” – handout • “Industrial Revolution” Brainstorming Graphic Organizer - handout • SAC Document Handout – Industrial Revolution • SAC Capture Sheet – Industrial Revolution • SAC Procedures – handoutProcess of Lesson • Please see “Lesson Procedures” beginning on Page 3Evaluation • Students will write a persuasive letter to an elected official advocating one side of the argument and describing a plan of action to either further the affects of the Industrial Revolution in America or reform it. • Please see “Industrial Revolution Persuasive Letter” Task Sheet.Possibilities for • The primary sources may be edited further.Differentiation • The primary sources may include a word bank of various vocabulary words. • The teacher may model the analysis of a primary source similar to those presented in the Document Handout. • The teacher may include a narrative analysis of each of the primary sources presented in the Document Handout. • The teacher may assign groups that pair a struggling learner with a stronger learner. 2
  3. 3. Lesson Procedures – Structured Academic Controversy – The Industrial Revolution in AmericaCentral Question: Was the Industrial Revolution of the mid-to-late 19th beneficial or harmful to Americans? Actions of Teacher Intended Actions of Students Introducing the DO NOW – Using your prior Lesson knowledge from last night’s handout, What were the best parts of the (5 minutes) Students will respond to the warm up. Industrial Revolution in America? The worst parts? Students will raise their hands to list (5 minutes) the best and worst parts of the Elicit responses to the warm up from Industrial Revolution in the U.S. students. Create two Hub graphic organizers on the whiteboard. Lesson Activities 1. Introduce question to be examined: 1. Was the Industrial Revolution of the mid-to-late 19th beneficial or harmful to Americans? (5 minutes) 2. Review handouts to introduce 2. Students will get into assigned structured academic controversy and groups organize groups. 3. Circulate through room to view (20 minutes) 3. Students will analyze the Capture Sheet progress to check for documents in pairs and find understanding of the documents. documents to support their assigned point of view. 4. Instruct students to present their (15 minutes) 4. Students will present their positions position to their counterparts and vice to the other group citing evidence versa from the document packet. The pair not presenting will take notes on the other group’s arguments. 5. Build consensus. As a group of (20 minutes) 5. Students should be debating with four, instruct students to discuss their one another and citing the documents findings and debate. (Check for as support for their positions. understanding: are students debating Students are integrating multiple and citing documents?) perspectives to deepen their understanding of the topic question. Concluding the 1. Class discussion: Sample the Lesson 1. Students will share their group’s groups’ responses to the question. (5 minutes) conclusions. What did they conclude? 3
  4. 4. 2. Connection Discussion – If we 2. Students will relate what they havechanged the controversy question to (10 minutes) discussed today to current day. Is thethe Technological Revolution of the Technological Revolution beneficiallate 20th-early 21st century what would or harmful to Americans? Studentsyour answer be? Why? Compare or will draw comparisons to history.contrast today’s “revolution” with the18th/19th century.1. Explain homework assignment Assessment Students will evaluate the impact of • I.R. Persuasive Letter the Industrial Revolution on (5 minutes) Americans by trying to persuade an2. Alternate homework assignment elected official to their position and • T.R. SAC Primary Source plan of action. Students will provide Research evidence from sources to support their position. 4

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