Open Educational Resources Jessica Eisner National University
Purposes: <ul><li>To define Open Educational Resources (OER) </li></ul><ul><li>To examine the efficacy of some current OER...
Open Educational Resources Defined   <ul><li>As defined by Atkins, Seely-Brown, & Hammond (2007) </li></ul><ul><li>OER are...
Goals of Open Educational Resources <ul><li>“ To use information technology to help equalize the distribution of high qual...
OER in Action MIT OpenCourseWare Project <ul><li>The OpenCourseWare Project at MIT was one of the flagship OER investments...
OER In Action Rice University Connexions <ul><li>Rice University has developed Connexions Content Commons ( http:// cnx.or...
OER In Action Curriki <ul><li>“ Curriki is an online environment created to support the development and free distribution ...
The Future of OER <ul><li>Atkins, Seely-Brown, & Hammond (2007) proposed “that the OER be leveraged within a broader initi...
The Future of OER <ul><li>“ At the heart of the open-educational resource movement is the simple and powerful idea that th...
References: <ul><li>Atkins, D. E., Seely-Brown, J., and Hammond, A. L. (2007). A Review of the Open  Educational Resources...
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Open Educational Resources: Contributions to the Efficacy of the Internet

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Open Educational Resources

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  • Definition from: Atkins, D. E., Seely-Brown, J., and Hammond, A. L. (2007). A Review of the Open Educational Resources (OER) Movement: Achievements, Challenges, and New Opportunities. William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Report.
  • Open Educational Resources: Contributions to the Efficacy of the Internet

    1. 1. Open Educational Resources Jessica Eisner National University
    2. 2. Purposes: <ul><li>To define Open Educational Resources (OER) </li></ul><ul><li>To examine the efficacy of some current OER Projects </li></ul><ul><li>To present future visions of OER </li></ul>
    3. 3. Open Educational Resources Defined <ul><li>As defined by Atkins, Seely-Brown, & Hammond (2007) </li></ul><ul><li>OER are teaching, learning, and research resources. </li></ul><ul><li>They are within the public domain or have been released under licenses that permit free use or re-purposing. </li></ul><ul><li>Can include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, tests, software, and other tools, materials, or techniques used to support access to knowledge. </li></ul>Source: handmadebook_create_OT.jpg. Retrieved March 18, 2010 from http://www.canyons.edu/offices/library/handmadebook_create_OT.jpg
    4. 4. Goals of Open Educational Resources <ul><li>“ To use information technology to help equalize the distribution of high quality knowledge and educational opportunities for individuals, faculty, and institutions within the United States and throughout the world” (Atkins, Seely-Brown, Hammond, 2007, p. 2). </li></ul><ul><li>“ To provide an opportunity for everyone to share, use, and reuse knowledge” (Atkins, Seely-Brown, Hammond, 2007, p. 5). </li></ul>Source: NETWORKED TEACHER.jpg. Retrieved March 18,2010 from http://blogs.uct.ac.za/gallery/1169/previews-med/6.%20NETWORKED%20TEACHER.jpg
    5. 5. OER in Action MIT OpenCourseWare Project <ul><li>The OpenCourseWare Project at MIT was one of the flagship OER investments </li></ul><ul><li>“ MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) is a web-based publication of virtually all MIT course content. OCW is open and available to the world” ( http:// ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/web/about/about/index.htm ). </li></ul>
    6. 6. OER In Action Rice University Connexions <ul><li>Rice University has developed Connexions Content Commons ( http:// cnx.org / ). a collection of free Open Educational materials and software that allow: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Authors to publish & collaborate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instructors to rapidly build and share courses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learners to explore links between concepts, courses, & disciplines. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ These materials are covered under a Creative Commons’ open license, so anyone can take them, adapt them to meet their needs, and contribute them back to the Connexions’ Commons” (Johnstone, 2005, p. 16). </li></ul>Connexions as a dynamic “knowledge factory.” Source: Rice University (2006, February). Connexions: Sharing Knowledge and Building Communities.
    7. 7. OER In Action Curriki <ul><li>“ Curriki is an online environment created to support the development and free distribution of world-class educational materials to anyone who needs them” ( http://www.curriki.org ). </li></ul><ul><li>Curriki focuses on creating a community of Open Educational Resources for K-12 curricula. </li></ul><ul><li>Curriki is partnered with Academic Benchmarks to empower Curriki users to align content with appropriate standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual Tour </li></ul><ul><li>What can you do in Curriki ? </li></ul>Source: http://www.academicbenchmarks.com/home/ Source: http://www.curriki.org
    8. 8. The Future of OER <ul><li>Atkins, Seely-Brown, & Hammond (2007) proposed “that the OER be leveraged within a broader initiative – an international Open Participatory Learning Infrastructure (OPLI) initiative for building a culture of learning” p. 35. </li></ul><ul><li>Some Future Implications for Education (Atkins, Seely-Brown, & Hammond, 2007, p. 77): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The rapid improvement of automated translation could help make content available in local languages at less cost. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of images and voice on mobile phones is highly available and easy to use. These media should be considered for delivery of educational experiences. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Online gaming, rapidly evolving and appealing to youth in developing countries, could become a platform for educational modules based on gaming technology. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Of highest priority should be the consideration of mobile phones or hybrid handheld devices as a platform for delivering educational materials and services. </li></ul></ul>Source: iphone_parallels.jpg. Retrieved March 20, 2010 from http://kottkegae.appspot.com/images/iphone-parallels.jpg
    9. 9. The Future of OER <ul><li>“ At the heart of the open-educational resource movement is the simple and powerful idea that the world’s knowledge is a public good and that technology in general and the World Wide Web in particular provide an extraordinary opportunity for everyone to share, use, and reuse that knowledge” (Smith & Casserly, 2006, p.10). </li></ul>
    10. 10. References: <ul><li>Atkins, D. E., Seely-Brown, J., and Hammond, A. L. (2007). A Review of the Open Educational Resources (OER) Movement: Achievements, Challenges, and New Opportunities. William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Report. </li></ul><ul><li>Connexions Website. Rice University. http://cnx.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>Curriki Website. http://www.curriki.org/xwiki/bin/view/Main/ </li></ul><ul><li>MIT OpenCourseWare Website. (2002-2010). MIT. http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/web/home/home/index.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Rice University. (2006, February). Connexions: Sharing Knowledge and Building Communities. Retrieved March 20, 2010 from http://cnx.org/aboutus/publications/ConnexionsWhitePaper.pdf/ </li></ul><ul><li>Smith, M.S., Casserly, C.M. (2006). The Promise of Open Educational Resources. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 38 (5), p. 8-17. Retrieved March 20, 2010 from EBSCOhost. </li></ul>

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