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GBF2007, Okotoks, Alberta, nancy weigel

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Nancy Weigel presents the community scale sustainable development features of Okotoks Alberta at GBF 2007

Nancy Weigel presents the community scale sustainable development features of Okotoks Alberta at GBF 2007

Published in: Design, Technology, Real Estate

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  • 1. Sustainable Okotoks “Leave a Legacy” Green Building Festival Toronto October 25, 2007 Presented by: Nancy Weigel, MA, CHRP Communications Manager Town of Okotoks
  • 2. SHEEP RIVER “Heart of Okotoks”
  • 3. A VIEW FROM ABOVE
  • 4. A COMMUNITY FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS Planned Growth Without Limits Traditional By Intent - Regional Utilities Continuous Boundary Adjustments Planning Continuous Annexation as Required OR Planned Destiny Live Within the Carrying Capacity of the Choosing for Sheep River Minor Boundary Adjustments Ourselves Self Reliance Long Term Watershed Management
  • 5. WHY BE A SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY? Necessity Desire Willingness Commitment
  • 6. NECESSITY Municipal Development Plan Inter-municipal Development Plan Land Use Bylaw
  • 7. DESIRE “In the year 2030, Okotoks is a leader in sustainability, driven by an involved, connected and creative community. Through visionary leadership, citizens are engaged in maintaining a safe, caring and vital community that honours our culture, heritage and environment.” Town of Okotoks Vision - 2006
  • 8. WILLINGNESS Take the challenge of creating a sustainable future. Listen to and analyze ideas “outside the box”. Consult with residents, as to their wants and needs.
  • 9. COMMITMENT 89% of residents are somewhat or very supportive of the Town’s move towards sustainability. 90% of residents are somewhat or very aware of the Town’s sustainable community activities. The areas most important to residents are: 82% Water Conservation 82% Recycling 78% Population limit (25,000 – 30,000) 74% Community development 73% Living within the natural carrying capacity of the Sheep River 2006 Community Survey Results
  • 10. FOUR FOUNDATIONS Environmental Stewardship Economic Opportunity Social Conscience Fiscal Responsibility
  • 11. SELECTED TARGETS Build Out Population of 25,000 – 30,000. Downtown as geographic centre, with 50% of the population north & 50% south of the river. 22% non residential assessment base. 20% of total land area as open space. 100% river valley lands owned by the Town. 11.5 residential units per gross hectare. 318 liters (70 gallons) per capita water use per day. 20% reduction in Greenhouse Gas emissions.
  • 12. THE REACTION Can It Be Done?
  • 13. STRATEGIC GROWTH Clear targets negotiated well in advance Gradual, managed evolution of land use 15-20 year build out No significant annexation Density targets for new development Sustainable neighborhood design Comprehensive community plans
  • 14. SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBOURHOOD DESIGN “A Community Within a Community”
  • 15. GOOD GOVERNANCE Engagement in residents’ hearts and minds Participative Grass roots support Nurturing a safe and caring social fabric Okotoks Town Council October 2006
  • 16. CORPORATE COMMITMENT Sustainable Okotoks is not a “project” or “department of”, it’s a way of doing business. Twenty two Business Centres Big Bike Challenge have well defined tactical plans Calgary Corporate Challenge 2006 & benchmarks, evaluated annually and aligned with Council objectives. Staff awareness and commitment with recognition of innovation & risk-taking. Silver Medal Winning Tug of War Team Calgary Corporate Challenge 2006
  • 17. NETWORKING FOR SUCCESS Calgary Regional Partnership Regional Servicing & Planning Framework University of Calgary Sustainable Neighborhood Design Alberta Urban Municipality Association Building Eco-Efficiency Federation of Canadian Municipalities Sustainable Community Initiatives PFRA, Natural Resources Canada, Alberta Environment, Private Sector Watershed initiatives Natural Resources Canada Climate Change Central Seasonal solar storage neighborhood Rick Quail & Ed Sands LivCom Awards Alberta Water Council LaCoruna, Spain Water for Life Alberta’s Sustainability Strategy November 2005 Pembina Institute Greenhouse Gas emissions reduction targets
  • 18. ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP Annual River Clean Up Three Bag Garbage Limit Water Conservation Initiatives Community Composting Award Winning Recycling Program Integrated Pest Management Program
  • 19. WATER MANAGEMENT TOWN OF OKOTOKS PER CAPITA WATER CONSUMPTION 560 538 502 519 508 510 Liters per person per 460 478 467 456 465 418 419 437 401 374 360 368 Day 326 260 160 60 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
  • 20. WATER CONSERVATION IN RESIDENTIAL AREAS Density bonus above MDP unit allocation Where a minimum 20% reduction in per capita water consumption Six communities with over 3000 households are involved.
  • 21. WASTE WATER MANAGEMENT TOWN OF OKOTOKS PER CAPITA SEWER PRODUCTION 450 400 403 393 385 Liters per person 350 382 357 365 372 367 348 347 per Day 300 320 322 326 303 309 250 278 200 150 100 50 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
  • 22. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT TOWN OF OKOTOKS LOCAL PER CAPITA GARBAGE PRODUCTION 1 0.9 Kilograms per 0.8 0.90 0.91 0.7 0.82 0.80 0.6 0.70 0.64 Day 0.62 0.5 0.57 0.52 0.53 0.51 0.53 0.54 0.55 0.55 0.55 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
  • 23. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT TOWN OF OKOTOKS vs. TOWN OF HIGH RIVER RECYCLING TONNAGE PROCESSED 2,060 1,860 370 1,660 267 1,460 290 TONNES 233 1,260 253 247 1,060 193 244 1,542 860 156 1,305 660 129 1,176 54 918 1,020 1,073 782 460 571 686 511 260 271 337 316 357 140 60 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Okotoks Tonnage High River Tonnage
  • 24. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT TOWN OF OKOTOKS LANDFILL TONNAGE COMPARISON Actual Tonnage with recycling & 9,000 Composting 8,000 7,000 6,000 TONNES 5,000 4,000 3,000 Tonnage without 2,000 Recycling & 1,000 Composting 0 2003 2005 1999 2001 1997 1993 1995 1991 (Calculated)
  • 25. ENERGY EFFICIENCY Aquatic Centre Solar Water Heating System Arenas Solar Ice Resurfacing System Recycling Depot Cardboard Bailing Building Solar Heating System Operations Centre Solar Wall Heating System
  • 26. ENERGY EFFICIENCY ENERGY USE COMPARISON 1998 - 2006 Town of Okotoks 34,000 Gigajoules - Natural Gas 10,000,000 33,000 KWHrs - Power 8,000,000 32,000 6,000,000 31,000 30,000 4,000,000 29,000 2,000,000 28,000 0 27,000 1998 2006 Power Natural Gas
  • 27. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION REDUCTION GREENHOUSE GAS COMPARISON 1998 - 2006 Town of Okotoks Kg of Greenhouse gas generated 7,000,000 6,000,000 5,000,000 4,000,000 3,000,000 2,000,000 1,000,000 0 1998 Total GHG Power GHG N Gas - GHG 2006
  • 28. DRAKE LANDING - A NORTH AMERICAN FIRST Natural Resources Canada R-2000 Certified “Built Green” Alberta Gold Standard
  • 29. SOLAR PANELS ON REAR GARAGES
  • 30. THERMAL STORAGE FACILITY
  • 31. CREATING GROWTH MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES THAT MAKE SENSE! All municipal services Planning a system of intentionally connected parts Utilities Ecological Infrastructure
  • 32. WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED? Leap “Outside the Box” Create a clear vision Make your goals tangible and deliverable Find & Form Partnerships Ask “Who Needs to be at the Table”? (administration, public, council, developers, provincial departments, etc.) Make sustainability the “business that you’re in” – not a “program” Adapt and Adopt from others
  • 33. “We didn’t inherit the Earth from our parents. We’re borrowing it from our children.” Chief Seattle (1788-1866)