Metrolinx - Regional Planning - Leslie Woo

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Leslie Woo of Metrolinx present an introduction to Regional Planning with a focus on the Greater Golden Horseshoe Region of Ontario (Greater Toronto Area).
Presented to the Toronto Sustainable Buildings Advisor Program.

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Metrolinx - Regional Planning - Leslie Woo

  1. 1. Regional SustainabilityLeslie WooVice President, Policy, Planning and InnovationSustainable Building Advisor Certification March 24th 2012 1
  2. 2. GROWTHGTA1986 3,733,0852006 5,555,912 1,822,827 (+49%) in 20 yearsTORONTO1996 2,385,4212006 2,503,280 882,141 (+37%) in 10 years• 2 million more people in last 20 years ~ 100,000 per year 2
  3. 3. 3R. M. Wright (2000)
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. 7 7
  8. 8. GOVERNANCE: A REGIONAL ISSUE1988 Provincial Office of the Greater Toronto Area1997 Toronto/Metro Amalgamation1998 Greater Toronto Services Board (to 2001)1999 Ontario SuperBuild Growth Fund established2003 Creation of a provincial infrastructure ministry2005 Bill 53 – City of Toronto Act2006 Greater Toronto Transportation Authority (Metrolinx) 8
  9. 9. PLANNING FOR GROWTH 9
  10. 10. 10Waterfront Regeneration Trust (1992)
  11. 11. THE GGH GROWTH PLAN (2002-06) 11 11
  12. 12. THE GGH GROWTH PLAN (2002-06) 12 12
  13. 13. GREENBELT PLAN (2004 - 05) Legend Regional and Single Tier Boundaries Greenbelt Plan Area 13 13
  14. 14. THE BIG MOVE (2008) 14
  15. 15. The Planning Process
  16. 16. Existing Regional Rapid Transit Network
  17. 17. The Region in 25 Years
  18. 18. 2. High-order transit connectivity to Pearson Airport district from all directions 1.2 Establish high-order transit connectivity to the Pearson Airport district from all directions, including a multi-purpose, fast transit link to downtown Toronto.
  19. 19. 3. An expanded Union Station - the heart of the GTHA’s transportation system 1.3 Union Station will become a customer-focused facility that provides seamless connections between all modes of transportation and the surrounding downtown Toronto area. The following will be clearly addressed: • upgrading of facilities to accommodate services proposed in the RTP, • phasing to allow for the timely delivery of services; and • identification of necessary investment and potential revenue streams to meet the above objectives.
  20. 20. 4. A complete walking and cycling network 2.1 Plan and implement complete, integrated walking and cycling networks for the GTHA to bring every GTHA urban resident to within a maximum of one km of a dedicated bicycling facility. This will be supported by a provincial funding commitment increased over time to at least $20 million per year for municipalities to complete the walking and cycling networks. photo: Gary J. Wood
  21. 21. 5. An information system for travellers, where and when they need it 5.1 Create a regional transportation information portal that is accessible online and by telephone, e-mail or smart phone that provides all users of the transportation system with comprehensive, easily accessible and standardized information on the full-range of transportation alternatives and optimal routings available to them, as well as the status of all of the elements of the transportation network.
  22. 22. 6. A region-wide integrated transit fare system 6.1 Implement a region-wide integrated transit fare system by 2012 that allows users to pay a seamless, integrated fare for all transit systems across the region
  23. 23. 7. A System of Connected Mobility Hubs 7.1 Create a system of connected mobility hubs, including Anchor Hubs and Gateway Hubs, at key intersections in the regional rapid transit network that provide travellers with access to the system, support high density development, and demonstrate excellence in customer service
  24. 24. 8. A comprehensive strategy for goods movement9.1 Develop a comprehensive strategy for goods movement within theGTHA, and between the GTHA and other regions, that identifiesopportunities and actions to improve efficiency, increase capacity, enhancethe region’s competitiveness, and reduce emissions of GHGs and otherpollutants.
  25. 25. 9. An Investment Strategy to provide stable and predictable funding Metrolinx required by legislation to report back by June 2013 on recommended revenue and financial tools to implement the 25-year RTP.
  26. 26. 26
  27. 27. 27
  28. 28. 28
  29. 29. Rapid Transit Network Performance 200080% 1800 TODAY70% 160060% 1400 In 25 Years: 120050% CURRENT Auto TRENDS 100040% Transit Walk/Cycle 80030% 2015: TOP 15 600 Projects20% 40010% 200 In 25 Years: RTP0% MODELLING 0 FORECAST Today Mode Share 2031 Total length of rapid transit service (km) 3 TODAY 120 TODAY 2.5 100 In 25 Years: In 25 Years: 80 2 CURRENT CURRENT TRENDS TRENDS 60 1.5 2015: TOP 15 2015: TOP 40 Projects 15 Projects 1 20 In 25 Years: 0.5 In 25 Years: RTP 0 MODELLING RTP FORECAST 0 MODELLING Average time spent commuting each day per person (minutes) FORECAST Annual GHG emissions from passenger transportation per person (tonnes)
  30. 30. Top 15 Priority Projects
  31. 31. Mobility Hubs
  32. 32. The Big Move imagines a future in which keytransit stations become MOBILITY HUBS,where transportation modes, including rapidtransit, local transit, specialized transit,cycling and accessible pedestrian networkscome together SEAMLESSLY.
  33. 33. 51MobilityHubs
  34. 34. The Role of Metrolinx– Lead design and implementation for key hubs– Partnership with municipalities– Provide advice and guidance on hub concept– Mobility hub analysis and policy development– Expand the range of and ways of providing customer services– Innovation in operations– Other
  35. 35. Mobility Hub GuidelinesObjectives: Seamless Mobility Placemaking Successful Implementation Provide guidance for mobility hub andstation planning and development acrossGTHA. Guide Metrolinx in planning efforts,infrastructure design, and facilities inmobility hubs and stations
  36. 36.  Comfortable and efficient connections between walking, cycling, local transit, rapid transit, and personal vehicles Range of transportation alternatives to access the station
  37. 37.  Provide a high level of pedestrian priority, safety, and amenities Build or retrofit a network of complete streets to support movement by all modes of transportation
  38. 38.  Ensure an accessible, attractive, and comfortable customer experience Transit station will be a centre of activity in many mobility hubs and should contribute to sense of place through high-quality architecture and public realm improvements
  39. 39.  Right-sizing commuter parking Parking pricing as part of an overall approach to transportation demand management High quality design of parking facilities
  40. 40.  Mix of employment, retail, housing, and civic/cultural facilities key to role of hub as an origin and destination for trips throughout the day Clustering population and employment reduces the need for travel, and facilitates more travel options, making the transportation system more efficient
  41. 41.  Use context-sensitive architecture and landscaping to create an attractive pedestrian-scaled environment and encourage active street life
  42. 42.  Mobility hubs should be innovative, best practice examples of environmental sustainability Implement sustainable energy, water, landscape and waste management practices
  43. 43.  Attracting transit supportive development is a key challenge at many hubs Public investment and infrastructure design should enhance development potential Incentives are required for design excellence and innovation
  44. 44.  Detailed phasing is required to reach the vision in achievable steps Stations and other facilities should be “future proofed” to account for ridership growth and new investment
  45. 45. SAMPLE Mobility Hub Planning Area
  46. 46. BEFORE
  47. 47. AFTER
  48. 48. Cooksville GO
  49. 49. Cooksville GO DRAFT
  50. 50. Midtown Oakville
  51. 51. Midtown Oakville
  52. 52. Midtown Oakville
  53. 53. Port Credit
  54. 54. Port Credit GO
  55. 55. 56
  56. 56. CIVIC ENGAGEMENT: more complex than ever1990 Royal Commission on the Future of the Toronto Waterfront: Watershed interim report – Toronto Bioregion2002 Toronto City Summit: Enough Talk – An Action Plan for the Toronto Region2004 United Way of Greater Toronto: Poverty by Postal Code2010 David Hulchanski- Three Cities within Toronto 57
  57. 57. PUTTING PEOPLE FIRST 58 58
  58. 58. PARTICIPATORY PLANNING with meaningful consultation 59 59
  59. 59. DIVERSITY of views embraced 60 60
  60. 60. REFLECTIONS: The URBAN Triple Bottom Line + Prosperity + Sustainability + Civil Society 61
  61. 61. REFLECTIONS: the Rise of the URBAN metropolis 62
  62. 62. REFLECTIONS: navigating URBAN complexity 63
  63. 63. 64
  64. 64. Leslie.woo@metrolinx.com www.metrolinx.com Thank you 65

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