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Bradford tod ca gbc 20120324 v2
 

Bradford tod ca gbc 20120324 v2

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Brad Bradford of Dialog, presents an overview of Transit Oriented Developments (TODs) for the Toronto CSBA Program.

Brad Bradford of Dialog, presents an overview of Transit Oriented Developments (TODs) for the Toronto CSBA Program.

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    Bradford tod ca gbc 20120324 v2 Bradford tod ca gbc 20120324 v2 Presentation Transcript

    • Brad BRADFORDPLANNER | Planning + Urban Design bbradford@designdialog.ca @bradplans
    • process of shaping a physical setting toenhance quality of life ; and the visual and physical experience of everyday life
    • it is the art of creating meaningful and memorable places through the design and configuration of buildings, groups of buildings, spaces and landscapes.
    • building cities – differentiating one cityfrom another, enriches urban living,generates economic value, and attractspeople and business to these places.
    • the quality and character ofareas or structures that are in,design, patterns, arrangementsor that frame, public spaces.
    • 01 neighbourhoods02 streets03 open spaces04 built form
    • 01 neighbourhoods complete walkable connected identifiable
    • 02 streetsprimary open spacenetwork of the city
    • 02 streetsrelationship of streetsand buildings
    • 02 streetsvariety of users, modes oftransportation
    • 02 streetscomfort, safety, visual appeal
    • 03 open spacesopportunity for activity,range of scale
    • 03 open spacesadjacent uses,overall connectivity
    • 04 built formquality urban fabric,context+scale sensitive,contribution public realm
    • “Most of us will outlive our ability to drive. Ifwe want to be able to stay in ourneighborhoods, in our homes, beyond ourdriving years, we need streets that support usin walking and transit”.Smithtown, NY. Walkable and Liveable Cities Institute, 2012.
    • “This family in central Florida needs to cross astreet, but there isnt a crossing within aquarter-mile. So they take their chances withthe six lanes and cars passing at 45 to 55mph”. Walkable and Liveable Cities Institute, 2012.
    • Metrolinx planned investment: $11.5B provincial $6B federal
    • Transit-Oriented a mixed-use residential or Development: commercial area designed to maximize access to public transport, and encourage transit ridership
    • Transit-Oriented typically contains a centre Development: with train, subway, LRT, or bus station
    • Transit-Oriented surrounded by higher density Development: development, with progressively lower density outwards from centre
    • Transit-Oriented generally located with a Development: 500m radius from transit stop 500 m radius
    • stops set far apart 500 m radius 500 m radiusactivities are polarized + development sporadic + pedestrian environment inconsistentstops at regular intervals 500 m radius 500 m radius 500 m radius 500 m radius 500 m radiusactivities and development are well distributed + pedestrian environment continuous
    • Transit oriented development Extended tree canopydrive + transit Active uses at park grade level Active public realm walk Wider Sidewalks cycle Enhanced Crosswalks
    • Critical mass of peopleand activitiesConsistent buildingpodium (street-wall)Distinct streetscapingBuildings face thestreet with active usesat grade levelPedestrian crossings atregular intervalsIntegrated transitsystem
    • Neighbourhood
    • Common Characteristics• Predominantly single-family homes• Condition and value of homes vary widely• A mix of multi-family, employment and retail uses may occur, especially at stations close to downtown and along arterial roadways• Street grids are typically present within more urbanized areas; fewer are present within suburban areas and often include cul-de-sacs.Appropriate TOD CharacteristicsInfill – 2 storey townhomes and duplex housing, except on arterials, collectorroads and large sites where 4 storey apartment housing is appropriate.Neighbourhood serving retail uses, eating and drinking establishments andprofessional offices close to station. Improved pedestrian and bike access.
    • New Neighbourhood
    • Common Characteristics• Predominantly undeveloped land and large redevelopable sites; in some cases, portions of the area may already be developed for predominately single-family housing• Large development or redevelopment sitesAppropriate TOD CharacteristicsInfill –2 storey townhomes and duplex housing, except on arterials, collectorroads and large sites where mid-rise apartment housing is appropriate.Neighbourhood serving retail uses, eating and drinking establishments andprofessional offices close to station. Improved pedestrian and bike access.Greenfield –2 to 3 storey townhomes and 4 storey apartments.Neighbourhood serving retail uses, eating and drinking establishments andprofessional offices close to station. Interconnected street grid interspersedwith neighbourhood parks.
    • Enhanced Neighbourhood
    • Common Characteristics• No predominant use; existing uses vary from large redevelopment sites to existing shopping centres• Typically in close proximity to regional employment, shopping or recreational uses• Large development or redevelopment sites• Street grids may be present; however, large redevelopment sites may lack auto, pedestrian and bicycle infrastructureAppropriate TOD Characteristics• Higher density residential• Neighbourhood-serving street-oriented retail shops—grocery and drug stores and other anchor retail• Neighbourhood employment—professional offices and services• Neighbourhood urban parks• Street grid throughout• Improved pedestrian and bicycle connectivity through existing and surrounding neighbourhoods
    • Centre
    • Common Characteristics• Predominantly retail; existing uses may include shopping destinations Potential development sites consist mostly of parking lots or other low- intensity uses• Street grids typically absent; lacking pedestrian and bicycle access to residential areas• Regional auto access; adjacent to major roadwaysAppropriate TOD Characteristics• Primary shopping destination• Higher density residential housing coupled with park amenities• Neighbourhood employment—professional offices and services• Street grid within development site• Significant street-oriented retail uses• Maintain and strengthen existing retail.• Improved pedestrian and bicycle connectivity• to surrounding neighbourhoods
    • Employment
    • Common Characteristics• Predominantly undeveloped land or low intensity employment• Regional auto access; adjacent to major roadways• Street grid absent within development sites• Poor bicycle and pedestrian connectivity to existing residential areasAppropriate TOD Characteristics• Low-rise professional offices and services, such as corporate headquarters or research and development uses• Medical campus/hospital use• Major transit park & ride facility at select stations adjacent to major roadways• Street-oriented employment and neighbourhood serving retail.• Higher density residential uses• Street grid throughout development sites• Improved pedestrian and bicycle connectivity to surrounding neighbourhoods
    • Institutional/Recreation
    • Common Characteristics• Predominantly educational or medical campuses or regional-serving recreation facilities• Land use and circulation frameworks are dictated by campus master plans• Medical and educational campuses have high transit ridership throughout the day• Recreational uses have high peak ridership during events• Street grid may be absent throughout campus sites• Pedestrian and bicycle access within campus boundariesAppropriate TOD Characteristics• Maintain/strengthen existing campus and/or• recreation functions• Neighbourhood serving retail at stations— eating and drinking establishments, convenience retail, small grocery and drug stores• Improved pedestrian and bicycle connectivity
    • Downtown
    • Common Characteristics• A mix of uses is typical throughout• Development sites vary in size and location• Interconnected street grid• Pedestrian and bicycle improvements varyAppropriate TOD Characteristics• Maintain/strengthen existing transit supportive uses• Increase density
    • 42 DU/HA RESIDENTIALROW HOUSE
    • 63 DU/HA RESIDENTIALSTACKED ROW HOUSE
    • 125 DU/HA RESIDENTIALLOW-RISE APARTMENT
    • 225 DU/HA RESIDENTIALMID-RISE APARTMENT
    • YONGE ST. and DAVIS DR. looking south &Co., 2009
    • YONGE ST. and DAVIS DR. looking south &Co., 2009
    • YONGE ST. and DAVIS DR. looking south &Co., 2009
    • YONGE ST. and DAVIS DR. looking south &Co., 2009
    • YONGE ST. and DAVIS DR. looking south &Co., 2009
    • YONGE ST. and DAVIS DR. looking south &Co., 2009
    • DAVIS DR. looking west towards YONGE ST. &Co., 2009
    • DAVIS DR. looking west towards YONGE ST. &Co., 2009
    • DAVIS DR. looking west towards YONGE ST. &Co., 2009
    • DAVIS DR. looking west towards YONGE ST. &Co., 2009
    • DAVIS DR. looking west towards YONGE ST. &Co., 2009
    • DAVIS DR. looking west towards YONGE ST. &Co., 2009
    • Intersection of WESTIN and LAWRENCE, 1907
    • Brad BRADFORDPLANNER | Planning + Urban Design bbradford@designdialog.ca @bradplans