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Camera Shots
 

Camera Shots

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This presentation identifies commonly used shots in film making and their purpose.

This presentation identifies commonly used shots in film making and their purpose.

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Camera Shots Camera Shots Presentation Transcript

  • Setting the Scene:Camera Shots and their uses
  • Mis-en-Scene“Setting thescene”What to shoot?How to shoot it?Everything thatappears beforethe camera andits arrangement.
  • Scene Part of the action in a single location
  • Scene Part of the action in a single location
  • series of scenes which form aSequence distinct narrative unit, usually connected either by unity of location or unity of time.
  • Establishing Shot Sets up, or "establishes", a scenes setting and/or its participants For example, an exterior shot of a large building on a sunny day, followed by an interior shot of a group talking, implies that the conversation is taking place inside that building.
  • Point of View Shot Also known as P.O.V. shot or a subjective camera. Short film scene that shows what a character (the subject) is looking at (represented through the camera). It is usually established by being positioned between a shot of a character looking at something, and a shot showing the characters reaction.
  • First PersonOver theShoulder
  • Ariel ShotsUsually done with a crane or with a camera attached toa special helicopter to view large landscapes.This sort of shot would be restricted to exteriorlocations. A good area to do this shot would be a scenethat takes place on a building.If the aerial shot is of a character it can make themseem insignificant or vulnerable.
  • Refers to a shot lookingdirectly down on the Bird’s Eye Shotsubject.The perspective is veryforeshortened, making thesubject appear short andsquat.This shot can be used togive an overallestablishing shot of ascene, or to emphasizethe smallness orinsignificance of thesubjects.
  • Crane Shot Shot taken by a camera on a crane. The most obvious uses are to view the actors from above or to move up and away from them, a common way of ending a movie.
  • A filmic recording of an entire dramatized scene,from start to finish, from an angle that keeps allthe players in view.It is often a long shot and can sometimes performa double function as an establishing shot.It is the foundation of what is called cameracoverage, other shots that reveal different aspectsof the action, groupings of two or three of theactors at crucial moments, close-ups of individuals,insert shots of various props, and so on.
  • LongShot Sometimes referred to as a full shot or a wideshot. Typically shows the entire object or human figure and is usually intended to place it in some relation to its surroundings; however, it is not as far away as an
  • Medium ShotA camera shot from a medium distance.The dividing line between "long shot" and"medium shot" is fuzzy, as is the linebetween "medium shot" and "close-up".In some standard texts and professionalreferences, a full-length view of ahuman subject is called a medium shot.
  • Close Up Tightly frames a person or object. The most common close-ups are ones of actors faces. Usually used for reaction shots displaying emotion of subject.