Dictators' Economies in the Inter-war Years

  • 213 views
Uploaded on

A comparison of the economic platforms and programs of the Soviet, Fascist and Nazi regimes in the inter-war period (for use in History 12 in B.C., Canada(

A comparison of the economic platforms and programs of the Soviet, Fascist and Nazi regimes in the inter-war period (for use in History 12 in B.C., Canada(

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
213
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Mussolini at the wheel of an Alpha Romeo/ The Grand Fascist Council
  • Mussolini at the wheel of an Alpha Romeo/ The Grand Fascist Council
  • Mussolini at the wheel of an Alpha Romeo/ The Grand Fascist Council
  • Watermark = Beauty of Labour Office project of beautifying industry.
  • High unemployment was addressed so that by 1938 there was a labour shortage. The autobahn was first floated in 1921 as cars became more popular, but reparations and inflation made the project impossible. Hitler got it started in 1933.
  • High unemployment was addressed so that by 1938 there was a labour shortage. The autobahn was first floated in 1921 as cars became more popular, but reparations and inflation made the project impossible. Hitler got it started in 1933.
  • High unemployment was addressed so that by 1938 there was a labour shortage. The autobahn was first floated in 1921 as cars became more popular, but reparations and inflation made the project impossible. Hitler got it started in 1933.
  • Top Left: Workers of the National Labour Front in govt project (similar to WPA in USA); Top Centre: women prisoners at Auschwitz fill labour shortage in 1942; Top right: Polish farm workers in 1940 after occupation; Bottom left: Kdf wagon – “Strength Through Joy” program – keep the workers happy; Bottom right: synthetic rubber trade display – science helping meet the need for autarchy.
  • Guns or Butter: should the economy be used to improve the standard of living by producing consumer products, or should it be used for militarization?

Transcript

  • 1. The Rise of Dictators Comparing Economic Plans J. Marshall, 2009
  • 2. Russia in 1921 Under Lenin, Russia was suffering at the end of the Civil War: – Devastated land, farms ruined, food supplies exhausted – Drought and effects of war led to famine – 50-90% of people starving – Industrial production broke down completely – Bolsheviks destroyed the economy with their enemies – Riots / open rebellion
  • 3. Lenin’s NEP • Re-established limited economic freedom in an attempt to rebuild agriculture and small industry • Heavy industry remained nationalized • It proved shrewd and successful politically and economically • Compromised with peasants to speed recovery • Returned to pre-WWI levels • Compromise with capitalism, small private operations, profit, • Remember Kulaks • Created internal political conflict “From the NEP Russia will (be)come the Socialist Russia” 1921
  • 4. Stalin • Ends NEP • “Socialism in one country” - no world revolution, internal focus • Soviet industry 50-100 years behind • 5-Year Plans (revolution from above) – – – – Build strong base of heavy industry Self-sufficiency Modern infrastructure Generate new attitudes, loyalties, and new socialist identity – 250% increase in industrial output • GOSPLAN - oversaw implementation
  • 5. Stalin • Eliminate private enterprise and capitalism, private ownership (from NEP), and propertyowning peasants • Challenge by Kulaks – Wealthy peasant class • Collectivization – – – – Agricultural plan to eliminate private ownership of land Used agricultural funds to help industry Destroyed Kulaks By 1932, almost all peasants lived on collective farms, but at a high cost – Famine resulted as people destroyed crops and slaughtered animals/Stalin sells grain overseas
  • 6. Hoarding, 1929 Collective Farm State Farm, 1932 Famine, 1933
  • 7. Stalin • Results – Collectivization brought victory for communist ideologues – Agricuture supplemented industrial growth – Collectivization called “the second serfdom” minimized power in rural areas – Millions killed or died of famine – Industry produced 4 times as much in 1937 as 1928 – Urban migration of more than 25 million – Increased government control of labor and agricutural workers – Agricultural workers won private plots (22% on 4%) – Avoided economic contraction of the west
  • 8. • Started out as a revolutionary left-wing journalist • Verbal assaults on rival socialists win him favor with conservatives Mussolini
  • 9. Mussolini • He allowed followers to believe he was opposing the Reds • Savior of law and order and property
  • 10. Mussolini • He allowed followers to believe he was opposing the Reds • Savior of law and order and property Red Ru le Capture a product ll s. Murder those who en for the law ce . Blow up barrack s. Liberate prisone rs . Burn pu bli records c of indebte dness.
  • 11. Mussolini • He allowed followers to believe he was opposing the Reds • Savior of law and order and property Red Ru le Capture a product ll s. Murder those who en for the law ce . Blow up barrack s. Liberate prisone rs . Burn pu bli records c of indebte dness.
  • 12. Cult of Personality
  • 13. Mussolini Economics • Mussolini condemned laissez-faire capitalism but also Marxist appeals to class • Introduced the corporate state--economy run as 22 separate corporations with reps from business, fascist organized labor unions, and the state. • State interest dictated policy and production priorities • Allowed private property and profit
  • 14. Mussolini Economics • Mussolini condemned laissez-faire capitalism but also Marxist appeals to class • Introduced the corporate state--economy run as 22 separate corporations with reps from business, fascist organized labor unions, and the state. • State interest dictated policy and production priorities • Allowed private property and profit
  • 15. Mussolini Economics • Mussolini condemned laissez-faire capitalism but also Marxist appeals to class • Introduced the corporate state--economy run as 22 separate corporations with reps from business, fascist M organized labor unions, and the state. • State interest dictated policy and production priorities • Allowed private property and profit
  • 16. Let the workers feel they have a voice in this top-down administration of the economy.
  • 17. Hitler • De-emphasized anti-capitalist elements to win support of middle-class • Vowed to fight Bolshevism • Germany devastated from WWI, reparations, and Great Depression • Unemployment at 43% in 1932 • He promised Germans economic, political, and international salvation • Rejected free market capitalism and advocated govt. programs to bring recovery
  • 18. Hitler’s Economic Plan • Outlawed strikes • Professional organizations were swallowed, communications and universities taken over • He promised economic recovery--work and bread and he delivered • Public works program to build infrastructure, appointed Schacht as central banker, helped restore credit and business S
  • 19. Strength Through Joy
  • 20. Hitler’s Economic Plan • Rearmament • Unemployment dropped from 6 million in 1933 to 1 million in 1936 (shortage of workers by 1938) • Improved standard of living, business profits rose sharply and recovery was tangible • 1936: 4-Year Plan – Promote self-sufficiency (autarky) in strategic commodities – Independent labor unions replaced by National Labor Front, state-run union – Projects like the autobahn
  • 21. Leftist newspaper parody of remilitarization, 1935 or Butter ? Guns
  • 22. Assignment: In a mini-essay, compare and contrast the economic policies of Stalin, Mussolini, and Hitler. Be sure to include their philosophical approaches and the outcomes that were realized. think: Government / Industry / Workers / Population-at-large
  • 23. End