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  • Good  morning.    Outreach  to  high  school  students.    By  Jeffery  Loo  and  Lisa  Ngo,  UC  Berkeley  Library     1  
  • Jeff:  It’s  been  16  years  since  I  was  in  high  school  at  Burnaby  North  Secondary  in  the  same  school  district  where  two  famous  Michaels  graduated  -­‐  J.  Fox  and  Buble.     2  
  • Lisa:  As  a  lady,  I’m  not  going  to  tell  you  how  long  it  has  been  since  I  was  in  high  school,  but  I  can  say  that  Danny  Glover  and  Maya  Angelou  are  fellow  Eagles  and  graduates  of  George  Washington  High.     3   View slide
  • Despite  our  distance  from  adolescence,  we  came  up  with  a  plan  to  teach  high  school  students  from  the  SHARP  program  how  to  use  the  libraries  at  Berkeley.  SHARP  is  a  high  school  summer  research  program  coordinated  by  the  Berkeley  Nanosciences  and  Nanoengineering  InsVtute.  Local  high  school  juniors  apply  for  the  program  and  spend  the  summer  working  in  labs  in  departments  in  ChemE,  LBNL,  and  MSE.     4   View slide
  • Our  goal  was  to  teach  young  students  completely  new  to  Berkeley  about  the  library  using  acVve  and  problem-­‐based  learning  -­‐  without  overwhelming  them.     5  
  • We  wanted  to  reap  these  potenVal  benefits  of  acVve  learning    1.    Students  learn  by  doing  …  so  they  can  gain  pracVce  and  get  coached  for  their  eventual  research  assignment.      2.  Students  solve  problems  and  make  discoveries  ..  because  it’s  fun  and  moVvaVng  when  you  figure  out  how  something  works.      3.  The  instructor  engages  students  closely  …  to  build  a  rapport  and  to  observe  students’  progress.    This  is  when  teaching  can  be  the  most  rewarding.     6  
  • With  50  minutes  for  the  average  informaVon  literacy  class,  the  Vme  constraint  can  kill  our  acVve  learning  goals.      1.    One  challenge  is  Chaos.  CompleVng  acVviVes  in  a  short  Vme  period  may  lead  to  students  moving  in  different    direcVons  and  speeds.      2.    Another  challenge  is  stress  and  performance  anxiety.  Solve  a  problem  in  ten  minutes  in  public.    This  pressure  may  discourage  students.      3.    Finally,  the  temptaVon  of  passive  instrucVon.  SomeVmes  we  want  to  efficiently  download  our  knowledge  to  our  students,  so  it  is  tempVng  to  just  give  lectures  and  demonstraVons       7  
  • We  tried  to  resolve  these  challenges  by  following  three  guidelines.      1.  Form  a  team  When  students  work  together  in  teams,  it  is  a  stabilizing  force  that  fights  the  chaos.    They  share  the  workload,  moVvate  one  another,  and  rely  on  peer  instrucVon.       8  
  • 2.  Carefully  guide  the  discovery  with  worksheets.  We  had  students  solve  informaVon  problems  by  following  worksheets  that  guided  them  step  by  step  through  the  problem-­‐solving  process  with  hints  and  suggesVons  that  led  them  to  a  discovery  or  conclusion.     9  
  • 3.  Help,  without  showing.  To  engage  with  students,  we  changed  our  posiVon  from  lecturer  to  facilitator.      We  eliminated  lectures  and  demonstraVons  to  free  Vme  for  students  to  complete  the  exercises  and  to  search  databases.      As  student  teams  worked,  we  helicoptered  the  room  to  check  in  with  students  and  to  answer  any  quesVons.      Ader  each  exercise,  we  had  group  discussions  to  check  that  class  learning  was  on  track.     10  
  • Exercises  that  the  students  completed:      Literature  rotaVon  staVons:  we  had  4  tables  set  up  where  each  table  had  a  different  type  of  scienVfic  literature.  students  in  groups  rotated  to  each  staVon,  examined  the  literature,  and  used  a  worksheet  to  rate  each  type  of  literature  on  how  useful  it  was  for  locaVng  a  specific  kind  of  informaVon.        Finding  materials:  Students  then  worked  in  groups  to  complete  3  exercises  that  asked  them  to  locate  books  in  OskiCat,  find  scholarly  journal  arVcles  on  their  research  topic,  and  find  a  piece  of  data  in  a  handbook.  Each  exercise  walked  them  through  a  search  process.  While  the  groups  were  working  together,  we  went  from  group  to  group  to  answer  quesVons  and  help  them  only  if  they  were  stuck.        Ader  each  exercise,  we  had  them  stop  and  wait  for  other  groups  to  finish,  and  then  discussed  as  a  class  what  they  found.       11  
  • If  you’re  interested  in  our  approach,  check  out:    1)  POGIL  -­‐  short  for  process  oriented  guided  inquiry  learning  -­‐  is  a  formal  technique  of  using  worksheets,  guided  discovery,  and  discussion  for  instrucVon      2)  AddiVonally,  check  out  hfp://goo.gl/UfNNy  for  sample  informaVon  literacy  worksheets  and  lesson  plans  we  used  here  at  Berkeley  and  at  other  libraries.       12  
  • Lisa:  What’s  your  top  Vp  for  teaching  with  our  approach?      Jeff:  Teach  less,  but  teach  it  well.      AcVve  learning  takes  Vme,  so  let  go  of  teaching  it  all.      Having  fun  working  on  a  few  exercises  in  class  may  be  less  overwhelming  and  may  moVvate  students  to  self-­‐instrucVon  and  to  seek  librarians  for  help  outside  of  class.       13  
  • Jeff:  What’s  your  Vp,  Lisa?      Lisa:  Planning  the  exercises  takes  a  lot  of  Vme,  but  it’s  worth  it  in  the  long  run  as  you  can  re-­‐use  them  in  future  classes.        If  you’re  worried  that  leing  go  of  the  lecture  means  that  the  students  will  miss  something  important,  incorporate  a  mini-­‐lecture  or  Vp  on  the  topic  (1-­‐2  min.)  during  an  exercise  where  it’s  relevant  -­‐  students  will  be  more  likely  to  remember  it  if  the  Vp  is  not  lost  in  an  hour-­‐long  lecture.       14  
  • To  summarize  our  approach,  a  haiku  poem.      MoVvate  through  teams  Discovery  through  small  tasks  No  demos/lectures     15