Power point project 551

  • 279 views
Uploaded on

eduu 551 project

eduu 551 project

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
279
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n

Transcript

  • 1. CHINESE EXCLUSION ACT
  • 2. Visuals Words (not all cartoons include words)1. List the objects of people you see in the cartoon. 1. Identify the cartoon caption and/or title. 2. Locate three words or phrases used by the cartoonist to identify objects or people within the cartoon. 3. Record any important dates or numbers that appear in the cartoon.Level 2Visuals Words 2. Which of the objects on your list are symbols? 4. Which words or phrases in the cartoon appear to be the most significant? Why do you think so? 3. What do you think each symbol means? 5. List adjectives that describe the emotions portrayed in the cartoon.Level 3 A. Describe the action taking place in the cartoon. B. Explain how the words in the cartoon clarify the symbols. C. Explain the message of the cartoon. D. What special interest groups would agree/disagree with the cartoons message? Why? Designed and developed by the Education Staff, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC 20408
  • 3. OVERVIEWStarting with the Gold Rush, Chinese migrated to California and otherregions of the United States in search of work. As several photographsshow, many Chinese found work in the gold mines and on the railroads.They accepted $32.50 a month to work on the Union Pacific inWyoming in 1870 for the same job that paid white workers $52 amonth. This led to deep resentment by the whites, who felt the Chinesewere competing unfairly for jobs.
  • 4. POLITICAL CORRUPTIONWhite labor unions blamed the Chinese for lower wagesand lack of jobs, and anti-Chinese feelings grew. Thecartoon "You Know How It Is Yourself" expresses thissentiment. Several political cartoons in this topic aregraphic representations of racism and conflicts betweenwhites and Chinese. "Wont They Remain Here in Spite ofthe New Constitution?" shows a demonized figure ofpolitical corruption protecting Chinese cheap labor, dirtypoliticians, capital, and financiers. "The Tables Turned"shows Denis Kearney (head of the Workingmans Party ofCalifornia, a union that had criticized Chinese laborers) injail, being taunted by Chinese men.
  • 5. EXCLUSION ACT 1882In 1880, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed theChinese Exclusion Treaty, which placed strictlimitations on the number of Chinese allowed to enterthe United States and the number allowed to becomenaturalized citizens. In 1882, Congress passed theChinese Exclusion Act, which prohibited immigrationfrom China (The Act was not repealed until 1943). Thetwo-part cartoon from the July-December 1882 issue ofThe Wasp reflects how some citizens saw the situation.After the Act was passed, anti-Chinese violenceincreased. One illustration depicts the Rock SpringsMassacre of 1885, a Wyoming race riot in which 28Chinese were killed by British and Swedish miners.
  • 6. The "Certificate of Residence" document illustratesthat Chinese individuals were required to prove theirresidence in the United States prior to the passage ofthe Exclusion Act. The poster offering a reward forWong Yuk, a Chinese man, makes it clear that theUnited States was actively deporting Chinese.
  • 7. California Content Standards English language arts Grade 8: 1.0 Writing Strategies: Research and Technology 2.0 Writing Applications 2.3 Write research reports. 2.0 Speaking Applications 2.3 Deliver research presentations. Social Science Grade 8: 8.12 Students analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in the United States in response to the Industrial Revolution.
  • 8. SOURCES• http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=pw3i1X8_qUY&feature=related• http:// www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu/ themed_collections/subtopic2a.html