MODEL-DRIVEN ENGINEERING OF BEHAVIORS FOR USER INTERFACES IN MULTIPLE CONTEXTS OF USE
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

MODEL-DRIVEN ENGINEERING OF BEHAVIORS FOR USER INTERFACES IN MULTIPLE CONTEXTS OF USE

on

  • 1,098 views

This paper describes a model-driven engineering approach for specifying, designing, and generating consistent behaviors...

This paper describes a model-driven engineering approach for specifying, designing, and generating consistent behaviors
in graphical user interfaces in multiple contexts of use, i.e. different users using different computing platforms in different
physical environments. This methodological approach is structured according to the levels of abstraction of the Cameleon
Reference Framework: task and domain, abstract user interface, concrete user interface, and final user interface. A
behavior model captures the abstractions of the behavior in terms of abstract events and abstract behavior primitives in
the same way a traditional presentation model may capture the abstraction of the visual components of a user interface.
The behavior modeled at the abstract level is reified into a concrete user interface by model-to-model transformation. The
concrete user interface leads to the final user interface running thanks to code by model-to-code generation

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,098
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
1,098
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    MODEL-DRIVEN ENGINEERING OF BEHAVIORS FOR USER INTERFACES IN MULTIPLE CONTEXTS OF USE MODEL-DRIVEN ENGINEERING OF BEHAVIORS FOR USER INTERFACES IN MULTIPLE CONTEXTS OF USE Presentation Transcript

    • Model-Driven Engineering of Behaviors in User Interfaces Efrem Mbaki & Jean Vanderdonckt Université catholique de Louvain (UCL) Louvain School of Management (LSM) Pole of Research on Information and Services Management and Engineering (PRISME) http://www.lilab.beIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Objective • Our goal: build a methodology for model-based approach for behavior: Foundation MODELS METHOD SOFTWARE ExploitationIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Why behavior in user interfaces? • Two dimensions in UI development: presentation (look) vs behavior (feel) – Behavior is often left out for the profit of the presentation – Behavior is more complex – Behavior is often programmed, not frequently modeled nor represented – When behavior is represented, many different techniques exist – Behavior is hard to abstract from computing platform and from interaction modality – Behavior is hard to generate in a way that remains independent from any technologyIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • What is a behavior model? • A behavior model defines how users can interact with the presentation in order to carry out a given interactive task – Thus, behavior is intertwined with task and presentation • It represents – the actions that a user may initiate via CIO – the reactions that the UI communicates via CIOs • Same • Different – It tries to relate task to presentationIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Models: Conceptual ModelIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Main Classes : ToolKit (1/3) In the modern graphical environments of design or development, Toolkits are represented as an objects box in which the developer can drag and drop items. A toolkit is characterized by its name, its level (abstract, concrete and Final) and a series of templates, functions and events describing particular behaviors. With this view, we consider a toolkit as a ModelIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Main Classes : ToolKit (1/3)IHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Main Classes : Mapping (2/3) Mechanism which makes it possible to define rules of transformation from a Toolkit towards another, possibly the same one Applying mapping, a given object can change to another or several others. In this second case, rules of transformations are necessary. A mapping is based primarily on two toolkits; a source and a destination. Its application requires presence of a user interface relating to the source Toolkit to lead to an interface in the destination Toolkit. It’s possible to apply the same mapping into to several interfaces.IHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Main Classes : Mapping (2/3)IHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Main Classes : Behavior Script (3/3) A sequential text furnished with the logic and conditional elements. It describes the desired actions according to a given interaction scenario. An action can be the change of an attribute value; the call of a mathematical function, the opening or the closing of a user interface, etc.IHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Main Classes : Behavior Script (3/3)IHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Method: Global View Strategy : Level X Model X Project X MappingIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Method: Data Flow Strategy : Level X Model X Project X MappingIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Software: Global View To support our model and method, we exploit MDA to build a graphic Dialog EditorIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Software: Object Tree To support our model and method, we exploit MDA to build a graphic Dialog EditorIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Software: characteristics This Dialog Editor is Implemented with Visual Basic 6 (VB6) and VBA 1. It’s based primarily on the concept of objects Box. Developer has the choice between creating his own objects, using existing interactive objects or making both; 2. It Gives freedom concerning the level of specification. The user can choose to specify his project at the abstract, concrete or final level; 3. It generates the user interface at final level according to the platform toolkit. The resulting executable proposes architecture with three layers: The user interface, the functional machine and, the dialog controller; 4. It Provides reification and concretization functionalities by skews of the mappings.IHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Software: Architecture The Dialog Editor architecture is composed of four componentsIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Case Study: CTI Application With our dialog editor, we developed a software intended to cover the activities of a company which is specialized in the international transfer of money and import express worldwide servicesIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Case Study: CTI Application Percentage indicating the parts carried out manually and those generated automaticallyIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Conclusion • We introduce a particular method for supporting model-driven engineering of UI behaviors that are compliant with the Cameleon Reference Framework (CRF). • For this purpose, a UI Dialog Editor has been implemented; • Three target contexts of user are supported: HTML for Applications (HTA) in a mobile context, Microsoft Visual Basic 6 and Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) in a stationary context; • Two operating systems are equally addressed: Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X; • A Case Study, CTI Application, is implemented using Dialog EditorIHCI2011 - Rome, July 26, 2011
    • Thank you very much!FP7 Serenoa projecthttp://www.serenoa-fp7.euUser Interface eXtensible Markup Languagehttp://www.usixml.orgFor more information and downloading,http://www.lilab.be