Monday, October 24

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Monday, October 24

  1. 1. Agenda for Monday, October 24 <ul><li>Research Paper (20 min.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Questions Addressed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Movements Assigned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Targets Explained </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expectations Reviewed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Independent Library Work (60 min.) </li></ul>
  2. 2. What is a Literary Movement? <ul><li>Generally, the term is not defined, and instead it is simply assumed that everyone is talking about the same thing when the term is used. That being “said”… </li></ul><ul><li>Broadly defined, literary movements are trends within historical periods in which literature (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, etc.) is unified by shared intellectual, linguistic, religious, and artistic influences . </li></ul><ul><li>Critics refer often to literary movements, citing different movements that have developed in literature and then been replaced by some other movement. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Our American Literary Movements <ul><li>Puritan/Colonial (1600-1750) </li></ul><ul><li>Revolutionary/The Age of Reason/Enlightenment (1750-1800) </li></ul><ul><li>Romanticism (1800-1860) </li></ul><ul><li>Transcendentalism/American Renaissance (1830-1860) </li></ul><ul><li>Dark Romantics/Gothic Romance </li></ul><ul><li>Realism (1850-1890) </li></ul><ul><li>South Western Humor (1830-1860) </li></ul><ul><li>Naturalism (1890-1950) </li></ul><ul><li>Modernism (1900-1950) </li></ul><ul><li>The Lost Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Harlem Renaissance </li></ul><ul><li>Post-Modernism (1950-1970) </li></ul><ul><li>Black Mountain Poets/Projective Verse (1930-1960) </li></ul><ul><li>The Beat Generation (1955-1970) </li></ul><ul><li>Contemporary (1970-Present) </li></ul>Each of the movements is further divided into genres: fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. You will be supplied with a few primary authors to get you started.
  4. 5. Now, It’s Your Turn!
  5. 6. Getting Started
  6. 7. Media Center Research <ul><li>3 main locations for your research : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Search for works written by your author using our online catalog </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mr. Scott’s Athena Media Center Teacher Project Page – databases + online links!! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the reference books Mrs. Rounding has set aside for you. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Literature and It’s Times </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Novels for students </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Poetry for students </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 8. Targets/Benchmarks <ul><li>Conduct initial research. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a THESIS STATEMENT. </li></ul><ul><li>Be well on your way to developing a preliminary introductory paragraph using the GENBIT strategy. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify 3—4 early sources. </li></ul>

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