Writing a proposal requires seven steps: <ul><ul><li>Analyze your audience. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze your purpos...
Understand the logistics of proposals Chapter 16. Writing Proposals  © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
Solicited and unsolicited proposals respond to different needs: <ul><li>Solicited proposals are sent in response to an IFB...
Proposals lead to two kinds of deliverables: <ul><ul><li>research </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>goods and services </li></ul>...
A successful proposal is  a persuasive argument <ul><ul><li>Show that you understand the readers’ needs. </li></ul></ul><u...
When writing international proposals, follow these six suggestions: <ul><li>Understand that what makes an argument persuas...
Follow these four guidelines in demonstrating your professionalism: <ul><ul><li>Provide your credentials and work history....
Avoid these four common dishonest practices: <ul><li>saying that certain qualified people will participate in the project,...
There are three reasons to write honest proposals: <ul><ul><li>to avoid serious legal trouble stemming from breach-of-cont...
To follow through on a proposal, you need three categories of resources: <ul><li>personnel </li></ul><ul><li>facilities </...
A typical proposal includes six sections: <ul><ul><li>summary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>introduction </li></ul></ul><ul><...
An introduction answers seven questions: <ul><ul><li>What is the problem or opportunity? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What i...
Task schedules are presented in one of three formats: <ul><li>table </li></ul><ul><li>bar chart or Gantt chart </li></ul><...
This is a task schedule as a bar chart: Chapter 16. Writing Proposals  © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
Make a Gantt Chart for the PA Center for the Book <ul><li>Incorporate the entire assignment—cover the proposal and writing...
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Proposal Chapter Notes

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Proposal Chapter Notes

  1. 1. Writing a proposal requires seven steps: <ul><ul><li>Analyze your audience. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze your purpose. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gather information about your subject. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Choose the appropriate type of proposal. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Draft the proposal. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Format the proposal. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Revise, edit, proofread, and submit the proposal. </li></ul></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  2. 2. Understand the logistics of proposals Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  3. 3. Solicited and unsolicited proposals respond to different needs: <ul><li>Solicited proposals are sent in response to an IFB (information for bid) or an RFP (request for proposals). </li></ul><ul><li>Unsolicited proposals are submitted by a prospective supplier who believes that the customer has a need for goods or services. </li></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  4. 4. Proposals lead to two kinds of deliverables: <ul><ul><li>research </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>goods and services </li></ul></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  5. 5. A successful proposal is a persuasive argument <ul><ul><li>Show that you understand the readers’ needs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show that you have decided what you plan to do, and that you are able to do it. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show that you are a professional, and that you are committed to fulfilling your promises. </li></ul></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  6. 6. When writing international proposals, follow these six suggestions: <ul><li>Understand that what makes an argument persuasive can differ from one culture to another. </li></ul><ul><li>Budget enough time for translating. </li></ul><ul><li>Use simple graphics, with captions. </li></ul><ul><li>Write short sentences, using common vocabulary. </li></ul><ul><li>Use local conventions regarding punctuation, spelling, and mechanics. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask if the prospective customer will do a read-through. </li></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  7. 7. Follow these four guidelines in demonstrating your professionalism: <ul><ul><li>Provide your credentials and work history. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide your work schedule. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe your quality-control measures. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Include your budget. </li></ul></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  8. 8. Avoid these four common dishonest practices: <ul><li>saying that certain qualified people will participate in the project, even though they will not </li></ul><ul><li>saying that the project will be finished by a certain date, even though it will not </li></ul><ul><li>saying that the deliverable will have certain characteristics, even though it will not </li></ul><ul><li>saying that the project will be completed under budget, even though it will not </li></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  9. 9. There are three reasons to write honest proposals: <ul><ul><li>to avoid serious legal trouble stemming from breach-of-contract suits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to avoid acquiring a bad reputation, thus ruining your business </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to do the right thing </li></ul></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  10. 10. To follow through on a proposal, you need three categories of resources: <ul><li>personnel </li></ul><ul><li>facilities </li></ul><ul><li>equipment </li></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  11. 11. A typical proposal includes six sections: <ul><ul><li>summary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>introduction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>proposed program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>qualifications and experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>budget </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>appendices </li></ul></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  12. 12. An introduction answers seven questions: <ul><ul><li>What is the problem or opportunity? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the purpose of the proposal? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the background of the problem or opportunity? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are your sources of information? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the scope of the proposal? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the organization of the proposal? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are the key terms that you will use in the proposal? </li></ul></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  13. 13. Task schedules are presented in one of three formats: <ul><li>table </li></ul><ul><li>bar chart or Gantt chart </li></ul><ul><li>network diagram </li></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  14. 14. This is a task schedule as a bar chart: Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's
  15. 15. Make a Gantt Chart for the PA Center for the Book <ul><li>Incorporate the entire assignment—cover the proposal and writing of the article— </li></ul><ul><li>How will you divide the work into stages? </li></ul><ul><li>How much time will you allocate for each particular stage? </li></ul><ul><li>Turn in your Gantt Chart with your proposal for extra credit. </li></ul>Chapter 16. Writing Proposals © 2010 by Bedford/St. Martin's

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