Rhetoric, Argument and Persuasion<br />
Recall an Argument<br />Recall an argument that you’ve had lately. Describe the circumstances leading to it. Now draw two ...
Staking your claim<br />Stake your claim in the form of a thesis statement at the end of your introduction.<br />
Make sure that your claim is arguable<br />Must have a competing viewpoint<br />Must have an ethical component<br />Can’t ...
Specific, Interesting and Manageable Claims<br />
Specific Claim<br />States clearly and precisely what you will be arguing.<br />Vague:<br />Parents of children who play h...
Interesting<br />Must have a specific audience in mind.<br />
Manageable<br />Determined by specificity and interest; availability of sources and complexity of argument---nature of ass...
Define hard evidence and provide examples<br />Facts<br />Statistics<br />Authorities<br />Experts<br />
Define soft evidence and provide examples<br />Anecdotes<br />Examples<br />Illustrations<br />Case studies<br />Precedent...
Hypothesis<br />Unproved assumption and is not the same as fact<br />Analogy<br />A comparison to help your reader relate ...
Refuting the opposing view<br />Acknowledgment<br />Point-by-point refutation<br />
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Presentation4

1,007

Published on

Published in: Sports, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,007
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Presentation4

  1. 1. Rhetoric, Argument and Persuasion<br />
  2. 2. Recall an Argument<br />Recall an argument that you’ve had lately. Describe the circumstances leading to it. Now draw two columns; on one side, list your points, and on the other side, list the other side’s points. Evaluate the strengths and weakness of the argument.<br />
  3. 3. Staking your claim<br />Stake your claim in the form of a thesis statement at the end of your introduction.<br />
  4. 4. Make sure that your claim is arguable<br />Must have a competing viewpoint<br />Must have an ethical component<br />Can’t be based on purely subjective standards<br />
  5. 5. Specific, Interesting and Manageable Claims<br />
  6. 6. Specific Claim<br />States clearly and precisely what you will be arguing.<br />Vague:<br />Parents of children who play hockey would like to have violence eliminated at all levels of the game.<br />Specific:<br />Fighting should be prohibited in hockey, since violence gives young hockey players a negative model and reinforces a win at all costs mentality.<br />
  7. 7. Interesting<br />Must have a specific audience in mind.<br />
  8. 8. Manageable<br />Determined by specificity and interest; availability of sources and complexity of argument---nature of assignment.<br />
  9. 9. Define hard evidence and provide examples<br />Facts<br />Statistics<br />Authorities<br />Experts<br />
  10. 10. Define soft evidence and provide examples<br />Anecdotes<br />Examples<br />Illustrations<br />Case studies<br />Precedent<br />Personal experience<br />Analogies<br />Description<br />
  11. 11. Hypothesis<br />Unproved assumption and is not the same as fact<br />Analogy<br />A comparison to help your reader relate to or understand the point you are making.<br />
  12. 12. Refuting the opposing view<br />Acknowledgment<br />Point-by-point refutation<br />
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×