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  • 1. Rhetoric, Argument and Persuasion
  • 2. Recall an Argument
    Recall an argument that you’ve had lately. Describe the circumstances leading to it. Now draw two columns; on one side, list your points, and on the other side, list the other side’s points. Evaluate the strengths and weakness of the argument.
  • 3. Staking your claim
    Stake your claim in the form of a thesis statement at the end of your introduction.
  • 4. Make sure that your claim is arguable
    Must have a competing viewpoint
    Must have an ethical component
    Can’t be based on purely subjective standards
  • 5. Specific, Interesting and Manageable Claims
  • 6. Specific Claim
    States clearly and precisely what you will be arguing.
    Vague:
    Parents of children who play hockey would like to have violence eliminated at all levels of the game.
    Specific:
    Fighting should be prohibited in hockey, since violence gives young hockey players a negative model and reinforces a win at all costs mentality.
  • 7. Interesting
    Must have a specific audience in mind.
  • 8. Manageable
    Determined by specificity and interest; availability of sources and complexity of argument---nature of assignment.
  • 9. Define hard evidence and provide examples
    Facts
    Statistics
    Authorities
    Experts
  • 10. Define soft evidence and provide examples
    Anecdotes
    Examples
    Illustrations
    Case studies
    Precedent
    Personal experience
    Analogies
    Description
  • 11. Hypothesis
    Unproved assumption and is not the same as fact
    Analogy
    A comparison to help your reader relate to or understand the point you are making.
  • 12. Refuting the opposing view
    Acknowledgment
    Point-by-point refutation