The other side of photography
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The other side of photography

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The other side of photography The other side of photography Presentation Transcript

  • Photography 101 The Other Side of Photography
  • Featured Topics
    • Showing Motion
    • Freezing Action
    • Night Photography
    • Fireworks and Lightning
  • Showing Motion
    • One of the most effective means of suggesting movement in a photograph is to allow a moving subject to become blurred.
    • To record a moving subject as a blur, you must use a slow shutter speed, but the exact slowness depends on several factors.
      • Speed of the subject
      • Camera distance to subject
      • Direction of motion (across the sensor/towards or away from sensor
    • All of these factors must be gauged against the amount of blur you want to achieve. The slower the shutter speed you use, the more blurred your subject .
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  • Freezing Action
    • Just a slow shutter speed is the chief means of blurring motion, a fast shutter speed, at the other extreme, is the primary tool for stopping action and producing a sharply detailed image of a moving subject.
    • Extremely fast shutter speeds can also let you capture the essence of a fast-moving event or preserve an elusive moment of beauty.
    • You should determine your camera angle, lighting, background, focusing distance, and exposure in advance so that you can concentrate on your subject.
    • It is necessary to anticipate the moment of peak action you want to freeze. Make a conscious effort to press the shutter a split-second before that instant occurs to allow for the microseconds required for your finger to respond to your brain ’ s command.
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  • Night Photography
    • The best time to take night photographs is during the first 30 minutes after sunset.
    • Photographs of night lights (i.e. city or Christmas lights) often turn out to dark when taken on an Auto mode.
    • Start with a wide open aperture and a 1 ” shutter speed and adjust from there (bracketing).
    • Tripods are a must!
    • Moving lights such as car taillights and amusement park rides create some great effects when combined with slow shutter speeds.
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  • Fireworks and Lightning
    • Here ’s how to get spectacular fireworks pictures:
      • Use a tripod
      • Set your ISO to 100
      • Set your aperture to f8
      • Set your shutter speed anywhere between 10 ” and 30”
      • Take as many shots as you can especially when large bursts are about to fill the sky
      • Follow the same procedure for lightning
      • The above guidelines are for when there are no city lights in your field of view. If lights are presents, expose for them as outlined on previous slide, you just have to pick your moments more carefully
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  • With and without Polarizer. Can you tell which is which?