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Landscape urbanism 02
 

Landscape urbanism 02

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  • What if we substituted the word graphic design?\n
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  • representation\n
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  • What does this mean?\n
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  • Santa Monica California\n
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  • Walter Christaller's diagrams of population distribution \n
  • Walter Christaller's diagrams of population distribution \n
  • Walter Christaller's diagrams of population distribution \n
  • Walter Christaller's diagrams of population distribution \n
  • The flow field around an airplane is a vector field in R3, here visualized by bubbles that follow the streamlines showing a wingtip vortex.\n
  • Magnetic field lines of an iron bar (magnetic dipole)\n
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  • view the entire metropolis as a living arena of processes and exchanges over time\n\n
  • What we see here is the dominance of the infrastructure that supports commerce, a logical outcome of the Industrial Revolution. Is this what we all need to know? \n
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Landscape urbanism 02 Landscape urbanism 02 Presentation Transcript

  • Islais
Creek
Atlas
Projectby
way
of
introduc/on
through
the
lenses
of
Terra
Fluxus
&
The
Beholding
Eye.
  • Landscape
Urbanism"Nature"&Systems
  • The
promise
of
landscape
urbanism
is
the
development
of
a
spaceBme
ecology
that
treats
all
forces
and
agents
working
in
the
urban
field
and
considers
them
a
conBnuous
networks
of
inter‐relaBonshipsCorner
  • Big
ideasrelaBve
to
the
pracBce
and
forms
of
visual
communicaBon
design.
  • Moreover,
it
is
increasingly
the
case
that
vast
developer‐engineering
corporaBons
are
construcBng
visualizing
todays
world
with
such
pace,
efficiency,
and
profit
that
all
of
the
tradiBonal
convenBonal
design
disciplines
(and
not
only
landscape)
are
marginalized
as
mere
decoraBve
pracBces,
literally
disenfranchised
from
the
work
of
spaBal
cultural
formaBon.Corner
  • Perhaps
the
very
complexity
of
the
metabolism
that
drives
the
contemporary
metropolis
demands
a
conflaBon
of
professional
and
insBtuBonalized
disBncBons
into
a
new
syntheBc
art,
a
spaBo‐material
pracBce
able
to
bridge
scale
and
scope
with
criBcal
insight
and
imaginaBve
depthCorner
  • landscape(signifier
or
sign?)
  • urbanism(signifier
&
sign)
  • nature not
nature
  • nature?
  • Nature,
is
mostly
represented
by
a
soSly
undulaBng
pastoral
scene,
generally
considered
virtuous,
benevolent,
and
soothing,
a
moral
as
well
as
pracBcal
anBdote
to
the
corrosive
environmental
and
social
qualiBes
of
the
modern
city…Corner
  • nature not
nature
  • (cultural)
image
of
Nature
(sign)
  • technological
blitzkrieg
  • technological
blitzkrieg
  • In
this
view,
ciBes
are
seen
to
be
busy
with
the
technology
of
high‐density
building,
transportaBon
infrastructure,
and
revenue‐producing
development,
the
undesirable
effects
of
which
include
congesBon,
polluBon,
and
various
forms
of
social
stress;Corner
  • landscape,
in
the
form
of
parks,
greenways,
street
trees,
esplanades,
and
gardens,
is
generally
seen
to
provide
both
salve
and
respite
from
the
deleterious
effects
of
urbanizaBon.
Corner
  • landscape,
in
the
form
of
parks,
greenways,
street
trees,
esplanades,
and
gardens,
is
generally
seen
to
provide
both
salve
and
respite
from
the
deleterious
effects
of
urbanizaBon.
Corner
  • to
situate
landscape
in
the
city
  • themes
  • By
way
of
providing
a
schemaBc
outline
for
such
a
pracBce,
I
can
sketch
four
provisional
themes:
‐
processes
over
Bme‐
the
staging
of
surfaces‐
the
operaBonal
or
working
method‐
the
imaginaryCorner
  • Processes
over
Bme:
urbaniza)on
is
a
dynamic
process
characterized
more
by
terms
like
fluidity,
spontaneous
feedback,
and
non‐linearity,
than
stability,
predictability,
or
ra)onality.
Ecology
and
systems
theory
are
concepts
inherent
to
the
city.Corner
  • Systems
Theory
is
a
transdisciplinary
approach
that
abstracts
and
considers
a
system
as
a
set
of
independent
and
interacBng
parts.
The
main
goal
is
to
study
general
principles
of
system
funcBoning
to
be
applied
to
all
types
of
systems
in
all
fields
of
research
  • The
term
cyberneBcs
derives
from
a
Greek
word
which
meant
steersman,
and
which
is
the
origin
of
English
words
such
as
"govern".
CyberneBcs
is
the
study
of
feedback
and
derived
concepts
such
as
communicaBon
and
control
in
living
organisms,
machines
and
organizaBons.

  • Its
focus
is
how
anything
(digital,
mechanical
or
biological)
processes
informaBon,
reacts
to
informaBon,
and
changes
or
can
be
changed
(adapt)
to
be[er
accomplish
the
first
two
tasks.
  • PosiBve
feedbackAdding
to
system
increases
change
but
makes
things
unstable.++++
  • NegaBve
feedbackBrings
the
system
back
to
stasis.
“Homing
in”‐
‐
‐
‐

  • ciBes
and
infrastructures
are
just
as
"ecological"
as
forests
and
rivers
  • Processes
over
Bme:
urbaniza)on
is
a
dynamic
process
characterized
more
by
terms
like
fluidity,
spontaneous
feedback,
and
non‐linearity,
than
stability,
predictability,
or
ra)onality.
Ecology
and
systems
theory
are
concepts
inherent
to
the
city.Corner
  • Much
of
the
world
looked
different
not
all
that
long
agoSanta
Monica
California
  • An
Epistemological
Problem:
How
did
we
get
here? Santa
Monica
California
  • An
Epistemological
Problem:
How
did
we
get
here?Historical
Amnesia? Santa
Monica
California
  • City
as
Palimpsest
(Sequence
Occupancy)
  • City
as
Palimpsest
(Sequence
Occupancy)
  • City
as
Palimpsest
(Sequence
Occupancy)
  • City
as
Palimpsest
(Sequence
Occupancy)
  • City
as
Palimpsest
(Sequence
Occupancy)
  • Russian
River,
California
  • Los
Angeles
River,
California
  • Los
Angeles
River,
California
  • Los
Angeles
River,
California
  • Los
Angeles
River,
California
  • Processes
over
Bme:
 urbaniza)on
is
a
dynamic
process
 characterized
more
by
terms
like
fluidity,
spontaneous
feedback,
and
non‐linearity,
than
stability,
predictability,
or
ra)onality.
Ecology
and
systems
theory
are
concepts
 inherent
to
the
city. Corner
  • Visualizing
systems
  • This
suggests
shiSing
a[enBon
away
from
the
object
qualiBes
of
space
(whether
formal
or
scenic)
to
the
systems
that
condiBon
the
distribuBon
and
density
of
urban
form.
Field
diagrams
or
maps
describing
the
play
of
those
forces
are
parBcularly
useful
instruments
in
furthering
an
understanding
of
urban
events
and
processes

  • Field
DiagramsWalter
Christallers
diagrams
of
popula)on
distribu)on

  • Field
DiagramsWalter
Christallers
diagrams
of
popula)on
distribu)on

  • Vector
Fields(visualizing
dynamic
systems
&
processes)
  • Vector
Fields(visualizing
dynamic
systems
&
processes)
  • ciBes
and
infrastructures
are
just
as
"ecological"
as
forests
and
rivers
  • view
the
enBre
metropolis
as
a
living
arena
of
processes
and
exchanges
over
BmeCorner
  • The
Hidden
Landscape
  • The
designaBon
terra
firma
(firm,
not
changing;
fixed
and
definite)
gives
way
in
favor
of
the
shiIing
processes
coursing
through
and
across
the
urban
field:
terra
fluxus.Corner
  • Surface:
The
second
theme
of
the
landscape
urbanism
project
concerns
itself
with
the
phenomenon
of
the
horizontal
surface,
the
ground
plane,
the
"field"
of
acBon.
These
surfaces
cons)tute
the
urban
field
when
considered
across
a
wide
range
of
scales,
from
the
sidewalk
to
the
street
to
the
en)re
infrastructural
matrix
of
urban
surfaces.Corner
  • Surface:
For
example,
the
grid
has
historically
proven
to
be
a
parBcularly
effecBve
field
operaBon.
Extending
a
framework
across
a
vast
surface
for
flexible
and
changing
development
over
Bme,
such
as
the
real
estate
and
street
grid
of
Manha[an,
or
the
land
survey
grid
of
the
Midwestern
United
States.
In
these
instances,
an
abstract
formal
operaBon
characterizes
the
surface,
imbuing
it
with
specificity
and
operaBonal
potenBal.
This
organizaBon
lends
legibility
and
order
to
the
surface
while
allowing
for
the
autonomy
and
individuality
of
each
part,
and
remaining
open
to
alternaBve
permutaBons
over
Bme.Corner
  • Surface:
The
second
theme
of
the
landscape
urbanism
project
concerns
itself
with
the
phenomenon
of
the
horizontal
surface,
the
ground
plane,
the
"field"
of
acBon.
These
surfaces
cons)tute
the
urban
field
when
considered
across
a
wide
range
of
scales,
from
the
sidewalk
to
the
street
to
the
en)re
infrastructural
matrix
of
urban
surfaces.Corner
  • Surface:
The
second
theme
of
the
landscape
urbanism
project
concerns
itself
with
the
phenomenon
of
the
horizontal
surface,
the
ground
plane,
the
"field"
of
acBon.
These
surfaces
cons)tute
the
urban
field
when
considered
across
a
wide
range
of
scales,
from
the
sidewalk
to
the
street
to
the
en)re
infrastructural
matrix
of
urban
surfaces.Corner
  • operaBon/working
methods:landscape
urbanism
a
suggests
a
reconsidera)on
of
tradi)onal
conceptual,
representa)onal,
and
opera)ve
techniques.
The
possibili/es
of
vast
scale
shi>s
across
both
/me
and
space,
working
synopBc
maps
along
side
the
inBmate
recordings
of
local
circumstance,
comparing
cinemaBc
and
choreographic
techniques
to
spaBal
notaBon,
entering
the
algebraic,
digital
space
of
the
computer
while
messing
around
with
paint,
clay,
and
ink,
and
engaging
real
estate
developers
and
engineers
alongside
the
highly
specialized
imagineers
and
poets
of
contemporary
cultureCorner
  • the
imaginary:imaginaBon
and
speculaBonPublic
spaces
are
firstly
the
containers
of
collec/ve
memory
and
desire,
and
secondly
they
are
the
places
for
geographic
and
social
imagina/on
to
extend
new
rela)onships
and
sets
of
possibility.
Materiality,
representa)on,
and
imagina)on
are
not
separate
worlds;
poli)cal
change
through
prac)ces
of
place
construc)on
owes
as
much
to
the
representa/onal
and
symbolic
realms
as
to
material
ac)vi)es.
And
so
it
seems
landscape
urbanism
is
first
and
last
an
imagina)ve
project,
a
specula)ve
thickening
of
the
world
of
possibili)es.Corner
  • THE
END
  • The
Hidden
Landscape
  • Surface, not form:horizontality and sprawl in places like Los Angeles, Atlanta, Houston, San Jose,and the suburban fringes of most American cites is the new urban reality. Asmany theories of urbanism attempt to ignore this fact or retrofit it to newurbanism, landscape urbanism accepts it and tries to understand it. Traditionalnotions of program and structure are not useful in this diffuse urban condition–their scope is small and limiting. Landscape urbanism uses territories andpotential instead of program to define a places use; it finds thinking in terms ofadaptable systems instead of rigid structures as a better way to organizespace.Form:the traditional character of the city; formlessness characterizes nature, thatwhich has been untouched by human intent. This city/nature duality is critical tomost theories of the city and nature. Landscape urbanists argue that this isduality is naive and argue for a conflation of landscape and building.
  • The
modernist
noBon
that
new
physical
structures
would
yield
new
pa[erns
of
socializaBon
has
exhausted
its
run,
failing
by
virtue
of
trying
to
contain
the
dynamic
mulBplicity
of
urban
processes
within
a
fixed,
rigid,
spaBal
frame
that
neither
derived
from
nor
redirected
any
of
the
processes
moving
through
it.
  • MODERNISM
  • CorrecBve
Phase
  • new working methods:landscape urbanism a suggests a reconsideration oftraditional conceptual, representational, and operativetechniques. The possibilities of vast scale shifts across bothtime and space, working synoptic maps along side theintimate recordings of local circumstance, comparingcinematic and choreographic techniques to spatial notation,entering the algebraic, digital space of the computer whilemessing around with paint, clay, and ink, and engaging realestate developers and engineers alongside the highlyspecialized imagineers and poets of contemporary culture
  • Visualizing the Landscape
  • imagination and speculation:Public spaces are firstly the containers of collective memoryand desire, and secondly they are the places for geographicand social imagination to extend new relationships and setsof possibility. Materiality, representation, and imaginationare not separate worlds; political change through practicesof place construction owes as much to the representationaland symbolic realms as to material activities. And so itseems landscape urbanism is first and last an imaginativeproject, a speculative thickening of the world of possibilities.
  • The
Hidden
Landscape