Research on learning problems associated with math

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Research on learning problems associated with math

  1. 1. RESEARCH ON LEARNING PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH MAT H
  2. 2. RESEARCH ON LEARNING PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH MATH Learned Helplessness Passive Learners Memory Problems Attention Problems Cognitive/Meta Cognitive Thinking Deficits Low Level of Academic Achievement Math Anxiety
  3. 3. LEARNED HELPLESSNESS
  4. 4. What is learned helplessness in math? Learned helplessness in math is when students who experience continuous failure in math expect to fail. They lack confidence and that compels them to rely on assistance from others. It is assistance that only helps the student “get through” the current assignment and does not re-teach the concept or skill to the student.
  5. 5. HOW TO HELP STUDENTS WITH LEARNED HELPLESSNESS This is a problem I have seen in the regular classroom. Student’s convince themselves that they can not be good at math and that the assignment is just too hard for them. Here are a few ideas to help students with learned helplessness: Get to know the student’s strengths Accentuate the positive Use advance organizers or guided discovery Students relate better to lessons that are linked to their own experiences. For example: Have students calculate the sales tax when buying a new cd.
  6. 6. PASSIVE LEARNERS
  7. 7. What is a passive learner? Passive learners do not actively make connections between what they already know and what they are presently learning. Students who have learning problems often are not “active” learners. For example a passive learner may learn 8*4=32, but when presented with 8*5=__ they do not actively connect the process of multiplication to that of repeated addition.
  8. 8. HOW TO HELP STUDENTS BECOME ACTIVE LEARNERS I have observed this type of learning problem. The student struggled with applying what he already knew to what he was now learning. Encourage students to use manipulatives and participate in hands on experience Use cooperative activities Encourage a “can do” attitude Introduce lessons with an overview. Some students learn better from getting the “big picture.”
  9. 9. MEMORY PROBLEMS
  10. 10. MEMORY PROBLEMS Memory problems are most evident when students demonstrate difficulty remembering basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts. Memory deficits are often a result of an information retrieval problem.
  11. 11. HOW TO HELP STUDENTS WITH MEMORY PROBLEMS I have worked with a student who had memorization problems. We reviewed basic multiplication facts three to four times a week. It seemed like each day the student was learning most of these facts for the first time. Here are a few strategies: Instruction should include teaching the student strategies for accessing and retrieving the information they have stored. Provide students with formulas or definitions for testing Right brain memory tricks. Use songs to help students remember things Allow calculators as needed
  12. 12. ATTENTION PROBLEMS
  13. 13. ATTENTION PROBLEMS AND MATH Math requires a lot of attention, especially where multiple steps are involved. Students often miss important pieces of information during lectures. It is not possible to implement the problem solving process they just learned. They also may not be able to focus on important features that make a concept distinct. For example: Instead of counting the number of sides to tell triangles from rectangles the student may focus on size and color.
  14. 14. HOW TO HELP A STUDENT WITH ATTENTION PROBLEMS I have seen several students who have trouble paying attention and even staying in their seats. It is important to keep them engaged in learning. It is helpful to use visual, tactile, auditory, and movement cues to highlight relevant features of a concept.
  15. 15. COGNITIVE/METACOGNITIVE THINKING DEFICITS
  16. 16. WHAT IS COGNITIVE/METACOGNITIVE THINKING DEFICITS? Metacognition has to do with students’ ability to monitor their learning. 1. To evaluate whether they are learning 2. Employing strategies when needed 3. Knowing whether a strategy is successful 4. Making changes when they are needed Math is problem solving and students who have trouble with metacognitive abilities will have a hard time being successful with mathematics.
  17. 17. HOW TO HELP STUDENTS WITH COGNITIVE/METACOGNITIVE DIFFICULTIES Teach a problem solving procedure. Have students in your classroom answer these questions: 1. What is the problem? 2. What do I already know about this topic? The use concept maps and/or flow charts can help students with metacognitive difficulties.
  18. 18. LOW LEVEL OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
  19. 19. LOW LEVEL OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT These students often lack basic math skills. It takes students with disabilities longer to process visual and auditory data. The result is that they often never have enough time or the opportunity to master the basic concepts/skills that they need.
  20. 20. LOW LEVEL OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT STRATEGIES These students need more opportunities and more time to respond to math tasks. Students should also have a periodic review and practice of skills that the student has previously mastered.
  21. 21. MATH ANXIETY
  22. 22. MATH ANXIETY Math is approached with fear because it is difficult for the student. I have seen students break out into a sweat and get so upset they could not take the test.
  23. 23. HOW TO HELP STUDENTS WITH MATH ANXIETY Provide students with a non-threatening risk free opportunities to learn and practice math skills. Celebrate small and big advances.

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