Fam Med Fellows 2009 1 Oct09
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Fam Med Fellows 2009 1 Oct09

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  • Welcome Introductions Find out who is from where..and if they have faculty apptmts
  • Since we have only 45 minutes with you today, there is now way we can tell you everything we want you to know. So, our plan is to hit the high points, and focus on the topics on the following slide. Going to Google or even Google Scholar is like walking the stacks and hoping you find what you want, depending on luck!
  • Assuring access to biomedical information resources in all formats; Teaching the principles & techniques of information retrieval & management; Providing services and an environment that promote effective information use and study. The Arizona Health Sciences Library is a member of the National Network of Libraries
  • Systems that provide access to medical literature Expertise in locating quality healthcare information Loans of printed materials Electronic delivery of information Classes or learning modules relating to health information literacy, management of information and evidence-based decision making
  • Just SOME of the resources… MEDLINE/PubMed and OVID Up-to-Date – on campus only Micromedex (via Arizona Med) MD Consult/First Consult Dynamed (via Arizona Med) Stat!Ref Web of Science EBM Search Engine MEDLINE/PubMed and OVID Up-to-Date – on campus only Micromedex (via Arizona Med) MD Consult/First Consult Dynamed (via Arizona Med) Stat!Ref Web of Science EBM Search Engine
  • Mostly we want you to know that your library faculty are in the community as well as her on campus!
  • UA Barbara Eckstein [email_address] UA Luis Cruz [email_address] ?? Cecilia Urquides [email_address] ?? Daniel O'Brien [email_address] Mayo David Patchett [email_address] Abrazo Kathleen Shore [email_address] Banner Kerilyn Gwisdalla [email_address] ?? Kristin Yannetti [email_address]
  • Google works by focusing on relevancy . You will hear a variety of comments about how Google ranks sites, but in the end it all comes down to this term of art. Relevancy can simply be defined as a web page that is most relevant to the terms search for by a user. The trick, of course, is for Google to figure out how to determine relevancy. Google works by focusing on the content of web pages. It tends to mostly ignore meta tags as too many search engine optimization people learned how to tweak their sites to get results. Since these tweaks were often shortcuts, the search results were less than great. To circumvent this, Google now focuses on the overall text of the page as well as the site as a whole . The exact Google formula, known as the algorithm, is not public information, but issues such as keyword density, flow of the text, amount of code, registration length of domain and how long visitors stay on a site all seem to be used. In truth, there are probably a couple hundred factors involved in the evaluation. Google also determines relevancy and rankings by looking outside of a site. Specifically, it looks to see what other sites are linking to the site in question. In theory, the more sites linking to you must be an indication that you are offering highly relevant content on your site. For instance, the website for the IRS is consistently ranked highly for tax terms because thousands of sites link to it. Logically and practically, this must mean the IRS offers highly relevant information on taxes and of course it does. As you might imagine, this linking factor led to the growth of an entire industry dedicated to trading links. This process is known as reciprocal linking. In the last year, Google has devalued such links because it no longer represents a measurement of relevancy. Instead, it just represents a measure of how many links a site can trade. Google now looks more at the type of links being traded and gives high value to links which are inbound only. This means someone is linking to your site without you linking back to them. Asking how does Google work is a complex question. Part of the answer is unknown, but the parts we do know allow for the manipulation of search rankings. This, of course, leads to lots of traffic on a site.
  • Google Scholar is not the same as Google and is an altogether different database.
  • Google Scholar Google Scholar is a better approach than just Google. For these reasons But at the same time, it does not give you all the answers you will need. We think that we can give you some better information resources. Examples: BRCA2= 40K cites HER2=20K Breast cancer screening = 359K Ovarian Cancer Screening= 51K+
  • Google search basics: Basic search help Print Search is simple: just type whatever comes to mind in the search box, hit Enter or click on the Google Search button, and Google will search the web for pages that are relevant to your query. Most of the time you'll find exactly what you were looking for with just a basic query. However the following tips can help you refine your technique to make the most of your searches. Throughout the article, we'll use square brackets [ ] to signal queries, so [ black and white ] is one query, while [ black ] and [ white ] are two. Some basic facts Every word matters. Generally, all the words you put in the query will be used. There are some exceptions . Search is always case insensitive. Searching for [ new york times ] is the same as searching for [ New York Times ]. With some exceptions , punctuation is ignored (that is, you can't search for @#$%^&*()=+[] and other special characters). Guidelines for better search Keep it simple. If you're looking for a particular company, just enter its name, or as much of its name as you can recall. If you're looking for a particular concept, place, or product, start with its name. If you're looking for a pizza restaurant, just enter pizza and the name of your town or your zip code. Most queries do not require advanced operators or unusual syntax. Simple is good. Think how the page you are looking for will be written. A search engine is not a human, it is a program that matches the words you give to pages on the web. Use the words that are most likely to appear on the page. For example, instead of saying [ my head hurts ], say [ headache ], because that's the term a medical page will use. The query [ in what country are bats considered an omen of good luck? ] is very clear to a person, but the document that gives the answer may not have those words. Instead, use the query [ bats are considered good luck in ] or even just [ bats good luck ], because that is probably what the right page will say. Describe what you need with as few terms as possible. The goal of each word in a query is to focus it further. Since all words are used, each additional word limits the results. If you limit too much, you will miss a lot of useful information. The main advantage to starting with fewer keywords is that, if you don't get what you need, the results will likely give you a good indication of what additional words are needed to refine your results on the next search. For example, [ weather cancun ] is a simple way to find the weather and it is likely to give better results than the longer [ weather report for cancun mexico ]. Choose descriptive words. The more unique the word is the more likely you are to get relevant results. Words that are not very descriptive, like 'document,' 'website,' 'company,' or 'info,' are usually not needed. Keep in mind, however, that even if the word has the correct meaning but it is not the one most people use, it may not match the pages you need. For example, [ celebrity ringtones ] is more descriptive and specific than [ celebrity sounds ]. How to read search results Google's goal is to provide you with results that are clear and easy to read. The diagram below points out four features that are important to understanding the search results page: The title: The first line of any search result is the title of the webpage. The snippet: A description of or an excerpt from the webpage. The URL: The webpage's address. Cached link: A link to an earlier version of this page. Click here if the page you wanted isn't available. All these features are important in determining whether the page is what you need. The title is what the author of the page designated as the best short description of the page. The snippet is Google's algorithmic attempt to extract just the part of the page most relevant to your query. The URL tells you about the site in general. For more information see the More search help page.
  • Now we are going to talk about alternative approaches to answering you learning issues. We suggest you bookmark the library home page at www.ahsl.arizona.edu, and begin your searches from here. This is the only gateway through which you can access all of the licensed, full-text content that the library offers. Access to ll three of your libraries will be possible on the Library PCs…
  • This is a Godiva view of the levels of evidence…
  • Now we are going to talk about alternative approaches to answering you learning issues. We suggest you bookmark the library home page at www.ahsl.arizona.edu, and begin your searches from here. This is the only gateway through which you can access all of the licensed, full-text content that the library offers. Access to ll three of your libraries will be possible on the Library PCs…
  • Be live from here on…
  • If your questions are not answered by the end of the program, or if you have any kind of feedback, please contact us. Here is our contact information. You can e-mail us by using the contact link “Ask a Health Librarian” on the Library’s Home Page.
  • LG--Give them the paper handouts…Walk them through it…
  • We know this has been a very quick and very small taste of what we want you to know about. This session is the first of many sessions we hope to have with you in order to ensure that you don’t waste your time finding the information you need. Please do keep us informed as you identify information and service needs.

Fam Med Fellows 2009 1 Oct09 Fam Med Fellows 2009 1 Oct09 Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome to the Arizona Health Sciences Library-Phoenix!
  • These are NOT the Phx stacks
  • Our Learning Objectives
    • Your librarians’ names
    • Benefits of library databases vs. Google
    • Key resources of the UA libraries, including Medline: OVID and PubMed
    • MS Word tips, Social Bookmarking
    View slide
  • Your COM-Phoenix Librarians
    • Jacque Doyle
      • 602-827-2031
      • [email_address]
    • Lindsey Greene
      • 602-827-2062
      • [email_address]
    View slide
  • AHSL Mission
    • To advance the education, research, clinical practice and community service goals of the Arizona Health Sciences Center and to foster informed health care practice in Arizona through:
    • Access
    • Teaching
    • Services
  • Library Services
  • Library Resources Tucson and Phoenix
    • 30+ Information professionals (aka librarians) (2.5 in Phoenix)
    • Access to over 5,500 online journals
    • Print subscriptions to over 600 journals
    • Over 90,000 printed books and several thousand e-books
    • Computer-equipped classrooms
  • www.ahsl.arizona.edu
    • ALSO:
    • AHSL EBM Search
    • OVID Medline and more…
  • More Librarians
    • At Teaching Hospitals
      • * Lora and * S ally, Banner Good Sam
      • * Kathy at PCH
      • * Rebecca and * April, Maricopa
      • Molly and Billie, St. Joseph’s
      • Mary Lou and Evonda, Scottsdale
      • Mark, VAMC
      • Kay and Carol Ann, Mayo
    • At ASU’s Downtown Phoenix Campus:
      • * Kathleen Carlson
    * University of Arizona College of Medicine Clinical Education Librarians
  • Your UA Tucson Librarians
    • David Howse
    • Carol Howe
    • Sandy Kramer
    • Jennifer Swift-Martin
    • Annabelle Nunez
    • and many more…Including several hospital-based Clinical Education Librarians in the Tucson area
    http://ahsl.arizona.edu/about/staff.cfm
  • We’ll begin with SEARCHING…
    • And then move on to managing and using what you retrieve in your searches.
  • Why Not Just Google?
  • Google Scholar ≠ Google
  • Google Scholar ( www.scholar.google.com )
    • It is one of the largest databases on earth.
    • It does not include commercial content
    • It does how your library holdings.
    • It has a unique relevancy ranking
    • It may give you only a partial answer.
    • It is wise to use other sources as well
  • Advanced Google Searching
  • Tips from Google re Google Phrase search ("") By putting double quotes around a set of words, you are telling Google to consider the exact words in that exact order without any change. Google already uses the order and the fact that the words are together as a very strong signal and will stray from it only for a good reason, so quotes are usually unnecessary. By insisting on phrase search you might be missing good results accidentally. For example, a search for [ "Alexander Bell" ] (with quotes) will miss the pages that refer to Alexander G. Bell. Search within a specific website (site:) Google allows you to specify that your search results must come from a given website. For example, the query [ iraq site:nytimes.com ] will return pages about Iraq but only from nytimes.com. The simpler queries [ iraq nytimes.com ] or [ iraq New York Times ] will usually be just as good, though they might return results from other sites that mention the New York Times. You can also specify a whole class of sites, for example [ iraq site:.gov ] will return results only from a .gov domain and [ iraq site:.iq ] will return results only from Iraqi sites. Terms you want to exclude (-) Attaching a minus sign immediately before a word indicates that you do not want pages that contain this word to appear in your results. The minus sign should appear immediately before the word and should be preceded with a space. For example, in the query [ anti-virus software ], the minus sign is used as a hyphen and will not be interpreted as an exclusion symbol; whereas the query [ anti-virus -software ] will search for the words 'anti-virus' but exclude references to software. You can exclude as many words as you want by using the - sign in front of all of them, for example [ jaguar -cars -football -os ]. The - sign can be used to exclude more than just words. For example, place a hyphen before the 'site:' operator (without a space) to exclude a specific site from your search results. Fill in the blanks (*) The * , or wildcard, is a little-known feature that can be very powerful. If you include * within a query, it tells Google to try to treat the star as a placeholder for any unknown term(s) and then find the best matches. For example, the search [ Google * ] will give you results about many of Google's products (go to next page and next page -- we have many products). The query [ Obama voted * on the * bill ] will give you stories about different votes on different bills. Note that the * operator works only on whole words, not parts of words. The OR operator Google's default behavior is to consider all the words in a search. If you want to specifically allow either one of several words, you can use the OR operator (note that you have to type 'OR' in ALL CAPS). For example, [ San Francisco Giants 2004 OR 2005 ] will give you results about either one of these years, whereas [ San Francisco Giants 2004 2005 ] (without the OR) will show pages that include both years on the same page. The symbol | can be substituted for OR. (The AND operator, by the way, is the default, so it is not needed.) Exceptions to 'Every word matters' Words that are commonly used, like 'the,' 'a,' and 'for,' are usually ignored (these are called stop words). But there are even exceptions to this exception. The search [ the who ] likely refers to the band; the query [ who ] probably refers to the World Health Organization -- Google will not ignore the word 'the' in the first query. Synonyms might replace some words in your original query. (Adding + before a word disables synonyms.) A particular word might not appear on a page in your results if there is sufficient other evidence that the page is relevant. The evidence might come from language analysis that Google has done or many other sources. For example, the query [ overhead view of the bellagio pool ] will give you nice overhead pictures from pages that do not include the word 'overhead.' Punctuation that is not ignored Punctuation in popular terms that have particular meanings, like [ C++ ] or [ C# ] (both are names of programming languages), are not ignored. The dollar sign ($) is used to indicate prices. [ nikon 400 ] and [ nikon $400 ] will give different results. The hyphen - is sometimes used as a signal that the two words around it are very strongly connected. (Unless there is no space after the - and a space before it, in which case it is a negative sign.) The underscore symbol _ is not ignored when it connects two words, e.g. [ quick_sort ].
  • Google search basics: Basic search help
    • Search is simple: just type whatever comes to mind in the search box…Sometime you'll find exactly what you were looking for with just a basic query. However the following tips can help you refine your technique to make the most of your searches…
      • Some basic facts
      • Every word matters. Generally, all the words you put in the query will be used
      • Search is always case insensitive
      • With some exceptions , punctuation is ignored
      • Guidelines for better search
      • Keep it simple. Simple is good.
      • Think how the page you are looking for will be written
      • Use the words that are most likely to appear on the page
      • Describe what you need with as few terms as possible
      • Choose descriptive words
  • http://www.mssm.edu/library/tutorials/googlechart.html
  • AHSL Library Portal http://www.ahsl.arizona.edu/
    • Great Tool: AHSL Developed EBM Search Engine
    Evidence Based Medicine e.g. Cochran Systematic Reviews e.g. PubMed Clinical Studies e.g. Textbooks e.g. UpToDate
  • Levels of … Chocolate Hershey Kisses Godiva Truffles Stever’s chocolates ( Park Ave., Rochester ) Ghirardelli Chocolate Bars D ecadence Fannie Farmer Sampler Nestlé's Quik
  • AHSL Library Portal http://www.ahsl.arizona.edu/
  • On campus Off campus
  • The first time you select a resource you will have to log in with your NetID and Password: https://netid.arizona.edu/
  • Logging into AHSL Resources with your NetID
    • It is best to begin your search at the AHSL home page so you will be recognized as authenticated !
    • If you are off campus, as soon as you select a resource to use, the system will request your NetID and password.
  • How to find other medical databases: Go to http://www.ahsl.arizona.edu/
  • These are the medical databases: Scroll down for complete list
  • How to find online journals: Go to http://www.ahsl.arizona.edu/
  • Search for Journal Title or Textwords Can also choose “Title contains all words”
  • PubMed vs. OVID Medline
    • The National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE database is available from many sources. The two primary ways to access MEDLINE at UA are PubMed and Ovid . Both are available on the AHSL Web under Databases .
    • Use PubMed
    • if you want to learn a MEDLINE interface that will be always available to you, even if you leave UA.
    • when you want quick results with strategies automatically created for you.
    • when you are looking for extremely recent citations.
    • if you are off-campus and having connection issues.
    • when you also want to search for genetics and molecular biology information
    • Use Ovid MEDLINE
    • to be guided through selections for a precise search based on Medical Subject Headings, subheadings, and limits.
    • to build a search strategy in steps and by trying multiple combinations
    • For a more extensive comparison of Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed, click here , a site posted by our colleagues at Dartmouth!
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  • PubMed Tips
    • Create your My NCBI Account
      • Customize Display and Searching Limits
      • Make it easy to save and email
      • Set up Alerts
    • Notice and use the tabs across the top
    • Notice and use the menu on left
      • Clinical queries
      • Special queries
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  • Note: You can go to PubMed directly, but by starting from the AHSL home page, you will be linked from the database TO items in the Library’s collections.
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  • Many Other Resources & Services
    • DynaMed ( phoenix/dynamed )
    • MD Consult/First Consult
    • Up To Date (on campus only)
    • EBM Search Engine
    • RefWorks
    • E-Books and Journals
    • Obtaining materials from Tucson
    • And more…
    All found from: www.ahsl.arizona.edu
  • http://www.ahsl.arizona.edu/ebmsearch/CollegeofMedicine/
  • Ask your librarians..
    • One-to-one sessions on PubMed, DynaMed, or whatever interests you!
    • Consultation on special projects searches
    • Critical appraisal
  • Contact Us on via our email form:
    • “ Ask a Health Librarian”
    http://www.ahsl.arizona.edu/emailreference/ Or call 602-827-2062
  • Now moving from finding and saving… ...to managing, organizing and using what you find...
  •  
  • RefWorks
    • With your OVID or PubMed Search Window still open, log in to RefWorks via the AHSL Home Page, or directly here: http://www.ahsl.arizona.edu/information/databases/refworks.cfm?name=RefWorks&ID=22807
      • Handout at: http://www.ahsl.arizona.edu/services/classes/pdf/2009%20RefWorks%20for%20web.pdf
    • Create your account
    • Run your search and save to file
    • Import file into RefWorks
    • Create your bibliography and access it from anywhere and in any format (APA, etc.)
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  • http://delicious.com/jdondoyle/family_medicine_fellowship
    • Creating
    • Editing
    • Changing
    • Formatting for effect
    • Etc…. http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word/FX100649261033.aspx
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  • http://docs.google.com/present/edit?id=0ARkRyZ4DL46KZGhwOXY4NXRfMjlkd3NoeG5jaA&hl=en
  •  
  • Our Learning Objectives
    • Your librarians’ names
    • Benefits of library databases vs. Google
    • Key resources of the UA libraries, including Medline: OVID and PubMed
    • MS Word tips, Social Bookmarking
  • tHANK YOU! We look forward to working with you!