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Social Media Academic Spaces
 

Social Media Academic Spaces

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Presentation for the Digital Literacy Centre in the Faculty of Education. University of British Columbia.

Presentation for the Digital Literacy Centre in the Faculty of Education. University of British Columbia.

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    Social Media Academic Spaces Social Media Academic Spaces Presentation Transcript

    • Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Topics Digital learning landscape: UBC’s virtual campus Learning spaces: Assumptions about teaching and learning Social Media, Literacy practice, knowledge production Mixing it up in hybrid spaces Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • UBC Digital Landscape Dual Mode Institution (Campus and Distance Education) History of Innovation: BCNet, UPortal, WebCT, Kuali, Medical expansion program, Ike Barber Learning Centre One of first campus-wide wireless networks in North America Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • UBC: Applications/Servers/Learning Platforms Others Nascent Enterprise (Not comprehensive) myUBC Institutional Repositories Recognized Enterprise Systems CoursEval TeachEval (Campus-wide) MediaWiki CTConnect Interchange Human Clickers CWL Resources LMS Personal Publishing Student Course eLIP (course tools data app) WordPress Multiuser Exchange Service e- Centre Portfolio Course Admin WebWork (math homework) (SIS) Course Course Website Library Finance Video conferencing RISE Faculty Service Dept (local and central) Centre Course Website Locally supported Community lecture capture & podcasting Websites Externally Hosted Services Locally hosted Course Websites iTunes Grant agencies iTunesU Locally hosted Media Management & Streaming Google (YouTube, Blogger) Facebook Publisher Tools Scholarly Databases Turnitin Locally hosted discipline-based Teaching Web Apps 2nd Life Flickr Homework systems RefWorks Wimba Personal “Vendor-Faculty” University Department Websites Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Learning Spaces - Affordances/Constraints Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Learning Spaces - Affordances/Constraints Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Interaction and Interface Who is “in charge”? Who has the ability to write/speak? Who has the tools to design? Who decides on the structure/content of materials and activities? Who decides what is private and what is public? Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Social Media - wikipedia Information content created by people using highly accessible and scalable publishing technologies. It is intended to facilitate communications, influence interaction between peers and with public audiences. This is typically done via the Internet and mobile communications networks. The term most often refers to activities that integrate technology, telecommunications and social interaction, and the construction of words, pictures, videos and audio. This interaction, and the manner in which information is presented, depends on the varied perspectives and "building" of shared meaning among communities, as people share their stories and experiences. Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Classrooms without Walls Despite appearances, our classrooms have been fundamentally changed. There is literally something in the air, and it is nothing less than the digital artifacts of over one billion people and computers networked together collectively producing over 2,000 gigabytes of new information per second. While most of our classrooms were built under the assumption that information is scarce and hard to find, nearly the entire body of human knowledge now flows through and around these rooms in one form or another, ready to be accessed by laptops, cell phones, and iPods. Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Classrooms built to re-enforce the top- down authoritative knowledge of the teacher are now enveloped by a cloud of ubiquitous digital information where knowledge is made, not found, and authority is continuously negotiated through discussion and participation. In short, they tell us that our walls no longer mark the boundaries of our classrooms. Michael Wesch (2007) Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • The Social Turn Social Media Read/Write Web Affinity Groups Multimodal Environments Participatory Culture Knowledge & Authority: Continuously Negotiated Collective Intelligence Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Students Photo credit: UBC Library Graphics Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Student Use of Technology 0 25 50 75 100 Own Computer University Websites Campus CMS Texting VoIP Music/Videos 2009 ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology (30,616 students from 115 US and Canadian institutions) Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Student Use of Technology 0 22.5 45 67.5 90 Social Media Upload Videos Wikis Weblogs Podcasts Social Academic 2009 ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology (30,616 students from 115 US and Canadian institutions) Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Digital Divide(s) While many faculty members are technologically literate, routinely using computer resources in research and teaching, most did not grow up in the digital culture common to many of their N-Gen students. As a result, while N-Gens interact with the world through multimedia, online social networking, and routine multitasking, their professors tend to approach learning linearly, one task at a time, and as an individual activity that is centred largely around printed text. Mabrito and Medley (2008) “Why Professor Johnny Can’t Read: Understanding the Net Generation’s Texts” Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Digital Divide(s) Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Moral Panic! MySpace and Facebook are creating a youth culture of digital narcissism, open-source knowledge sharing sites like Wikipedia are undermining the authority of teachers in the classroom; the YouTube generation are more interested in self-expression than in learning about the insider world; the cacophony of anonymous blogs and user-generated content is deafening today’s youth to the voices of informed experts and professional journalists; kids are so busy self- broadcasting themselves on social networks that they no longer consume the creative work of professional musicians, novelists, or filmmakers. Keen (2007). The Cult of the Amateur Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Pedagogization of digital literacy practices Sequential activity is dominant, and everyone follows the same sequential path. Asynchronous communication is primary to synchronous communication (e.g., e-mail or web searching is more “schooled” than instant messaging). Public social spaces, including the Internet, must be bracketed for student use; school needs to produce kindergartens of public spaces for students to understand them, learn within them, and be safe within them. Material print texts and print spaces (the built environment) are primary and are authorized, while virtual texts are unauthorized and supplemental. Photo Credit: kodamakitty The Internet is primarily tool for information rather than a tool for communication. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT’s) are primarily “IT’s” in school. Leander (2006) “You won’t be needing your laptops today”: Wired bodies in the wireless classroom.” Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Photo credit: vaXzine “A whole range of cultural resources fail to be translated into cultural capital in the school system” Merchant (2007) Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • TV Generation Net Generation “...only a tiny trickle of the information flow into the student mind can be accounted for in the classroom.” McLuhan, 1969 Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Social Media - wikipedia identity formation Information content created by people using highly accessible and scalable publishing technologies. It is • intended to facilitate communications, influence interaction between peers and with public audiences. This is typically done via the Internet and mobile communications networks. status negotiation The term most often refers to activities that integrate technology, telecommunications and social interaction, and • the construction of words, pictures, videos and audio. peer-to-peer This interaction, and the manner in which information is presented, depends on the varied perspectives and "building" of shared meaning among communities, as people sociality share their stories and experiences. Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Networked Publics Rather than conceptualize everyday media engagement as “consumption” by “audiences,” the term “networked publics” places the active participation of a distributed social network in producing and circulating culture and knowledge in the foreground. The growing salience of networked publics in young people’s everyday lives is an important change in what constitutes the social groups and publics that structure young people’s learning and identity. Digital Youth Project (2008) Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • New Literacy Practice: participatory, collaborative and distributed The more a literacy practice privileges participation over publishing, distributed expertise over centralized expertise, collective intelligence over individual possessive intelligence, collaboration over individuated authorship, dispersion over scarcity, sharing over ownership, experimentation over “normalization,” innovation and evolution over stability and fixity, creative-innovative rule breaking over generic purity and policing, relationship over information broadcast, and so on, the more we should regard it as a “new” literacy. New technologies enable and enhance these practices, often in ways that are stunning in their sophistication and breathtaking in their scale.” Lankshear and Knobel (2006) Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • New Literacy Practice: participatory, collaborative and distributed “Book- and print-based literacies, and the industrial model of schooling built around book culture, are no longer wholly adequate in a changing information, social, and cultural environment. In light of the accelerated shift toward electronically mediated communication and social exchange in almost all facets of everyday life, there is a need for an expanded form of literacy.” Carmen Luke (2000) Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Dominant educational institutions – from Socratic dialogical circles, to medieval monasteries and universities, to the industrial-era school – do not have outstanding track records engaging with new communications technologies. This is in part because curriculum and teaching tend to be defined in terms of mastery of and engagement with dominant modes of information, whether of spoken language and gesture, inscription and print, or visual image. Simply, the domination of pedagogy by mode of information may prove harder to displace than any particular political or sociocultural ideology. Carmen Luke (2003) Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • intertextual participatory collaborative multimodal distributed mobile Informal Learning 2.0 .1.0? social hybrid networked peer to peer convergent recombinative pervasive Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Learning Spaces Increasingly Multimodal: text, graphics, audio, video Asynchronous and Synchronous From broadcast to dialogue/interaction across all modes (not just text) Hybrid: Formal and informal sites for learning Students as producers of knowledge, not just consumers of content: students and teachers have equal access to meaning making tools Knowledge building across multiple years and beyond programs Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Learning Spaces Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Learning Spaces Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • Student directed seminar/site Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • ETEC 510 Student Responses... I found the creation of the wiki far more creative than a traditional essay. Because of that aspect, I was willing to put more work into the wiki as I was enjoying what I did and really liked seeing it on the computer. The other observation I have, as a student, is that for the first time I can think of, I had a desire to add to other people’s work. I never got around to it due to time constraints, but I often came across something and would think to myself “oh, this would fit well with so-and-so’s topic”. I also found being able to watch other pages being built spurred me on to do more on my space. Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • ETEC 510 Student Responses... As a teacher, I have been amazed at what my 12 year-olds were able to do with their wiki project. Each student had a partner from the other class, so at no time were they able to work side-by-side on the wiki – yet the cooperation and problem solving they showed went far beyond what I expected. Many students worked far harder than they would have done on a regular class project and they all felt proud of what they had accomplished. Like me, they all liked the ability to see what their peers were doing and many contributed to more than just their own wiki. Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • intertextual participatory collaborative multimodal distributed mobile Informal Learning 2.0.1.0? social hybrid networked peer to peer convergent recombinative pervasive Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • [S]udden extensions of communications are reflected in cultural disturbances. Innis (1947) Thursday, March 25, 2010
    • jeff.miller@ubc.ca Thursday, March 25, 2010