Jennifer D. Klein
Professional Development Director, World Leadership School
@jdeborahklein – blog at www.principledlearni...
World Leadership School strives to empower young
leaders to find new and innovative solutions to the
world’s pressing prob...
Time comes into it
Say it Say it.
The universe is made of
stories,
not of atoms.
--Muriel Rukeyser
The Danger of a Single
Story
Chimamanda Ngozi
Adichie“Stories matter. Many stories matter.
Stories have been used to dispo...
What Does This Mean for the
English Classroom?
In the classroom where “anything goes,” how
can English teachers help to hu...
“The illiterate of the 21st
Century will not be
those who cannot read
and write, but those
who cannot learn,
unlearn, and ...
Offer Opportunities for Students to
Create Knowledge, Not Just Consume
Information
Help Students to Navigate
Authentic Complexity
Foster Open-Mindedness,
Promote Awareness and Acceptance
Bring Diverse Voices and Stories
into the Classroom
What is James Joyce trying to reveal
about Ireland through Dubliners?
What can we learn about the
world by exploring which
elements of James Joyce’s
Dublin still exist in modern day,
and which...
How is William Golding’s Lord of the
Flies an allegory on the human
experience?
As sociologists, what can we
learn about human nature from
William Golding’s Lord of the
Flies which might help us solve
a...
Why is William Shakespeare’s Romeo
and Juliet an important piece of
literature?
Cover by Christopher
Porter, winner of the...
Why is William Shakespeare’s Romeo
and Juliet an important piece of
literature?
As young writers, how might we
reimagine W...
“Educational exchange can turn nations into people,
contributing as no other form of communication can to
the humanizing o...
Explore Untold Stories and Voices:
Aaron Huey on the Lakota Nation
http://youtu.be/8tEuaj4h8dw
Connect with the World:
Live Video Conferencing
Foster Optimism and Connectedness
through Photographic Prompts
Explore our Common Sense of Beauty
and Shared Humanity
Celebrate our Common Passions and
Planet
Connect with the World through
Technology http://tigweb.org
TakingITGlobal
TIGblogs and
Publications
http://tigweb.org
Vladimir Nabokov,
“The Art of Literature and Commonsense”
“Commonsense has trampled down many a
gentle genius whose eyes h...
from Creating
Innovators,
by Tony Wagner
“[Innovators] are imbued with a
purpose, style of behavior and
attitude that allo...
by Frankie Frank
by Frankie Frank
Educational Impact:
The Shift Away from Cultural Myopia
“Seeing two worlds come together because of
poetry and writing ope...
Erin Sanchez’ and Jennifer
Klein’s new writing workshop
for schools will launch in
June, 2013; more soon at
www.principled...
From “Wandering Around
an Albuquerque Airport
Terminal”
Naomi Shihab Nye
This is the world I want
to live in.
The shared w...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42E2fAWM6rA
Karin Tidbeck
All hand images come from
http://twentytwowords.com/2013/04/0
3/writing-advice-from-writers-
handwritten-on-...
Jody Lynn Nye
Patrick Rothfuss
“In times of change, learners
inherit the Earth, while the
learned find themselves
beautifully equipped to deal with
a wor...
jennifer@worldleadershipschool.com
Blog at www.principledlearning.org
Twitter @jdeborahklein
Find ALL RESOURCES at
http://...
Fostering Global Citizenship in the English Class
Fostering Global Citizenship in the English Class
Fostering Global Citizenship in the English Class
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Fostering Global Citizenship in the English Class

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Keynote address delivered for the Canadian Independent Teachers of English Conference. April, 2013. Oakville, Ontario.

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  • 45minsCreativity and Conflict: Humanizing the World through the Poetic ArtsWe are seeing the rapid disappearance of the poetic arts in education across North America, and it comes with a serious global price.  Rather than turning to poetry for consolation after global tragedies, educators need to start using the creative arts to avoid global tragedies and humanize the world for young people.  Our students need avenues for the expression of their ethnicity, perspectives and strong opinions, and global education which embraces the creative and digital arts allows students to connect across cultural and political boundaries in increasingly powerful ways.  As technology makes it easier for students to share their creative work and collaborate on artistic projects, educators have the opportunity, in the words of Palestinian poet FalastineDwikat, to build bridges “from heart to heart, from word to word, and from line to line.” This session will explore poetic work and writing prompts, as well as student projects from a variety of countries, organizations and programs.  Attendees will leave the session with ideas for classroom activities, significant projects, and avenues for finding global partners, programs, technological platforms and resources.
  • http://youtu.be/D9Ihs241zeg
  • Clarify—standards and traditional benchmarks are met TENFOLD when we make the conversations and assignments more meaningful, global and student driven.
  • In general, the students recognized the importance of fostering open minds, and promoting awareness and acceptance of different cultures, including those within our own communities.One group noted: “Intolerance and ignorance of other cultures must be minimized. Get rid of patriotic egotism.”The students acknowledged that they have role in spreading the enthusiasm about studying languages and becoming more internationally engaged.Their ideas include sharing this message with their peers, especially younger ones; devoting at least some of their service work to supporting international causes, such as UNICEF or Rotary projects; and generating interest in other languages and cultures by volunteering to read stories in other languages at the local public library.This engaged group of students made it clear that ideas for internationalizing schools and communities are plentiful. In fact, many schools and communities across Wisconsin have been putting at least some of these into practice. Still, the summiteers indicated that they want more.The summit participants – students, teachers and others – were encouraged to carry their enthusiasm and the discussions of the day back into their schools and communities, perhaps even holding their own mini-summits. As these conversations move forward, ultimate success will depend on translating talk into organized and innovative efforts that will guide more students on the path to becoming global citizens.– by Kerry G. Hill(Kerry G. Hill, Director of Public Affairs for UW–Madison’s Division of International Studies, was one of the lead organizers of the Wisconsin Global Youth Summit. He also serves on the board of Global Wisconsin, Inc.)
  • Point out—”globalizing” also means pluralizing in every sense—diversifying the perspectives explored. Subtle choices make a particular difference for kids from different cultures—make the connection between global ed and improving diversity/dialogue in schools.
  • DO AS AN EXERCISE—decide on thesis of image, and then discuss how thesis would change w/cultural perspective.
  • This one offers the opportunity to ask questions of Irish students and explore Dublin and the Dubliners collaboratively.
  • Share briefly how I shifted my focus with LofFs to create room for student voice
  • Cover by Christopher Porter, winner of the “Recovered Books” project.
  • 2:30 mins. SHOW…. Mention “glocal” learning here, and the importance of understanding and valuing our own aboriginal cultures in any country.
  • Talk about RJI and AGENCY in particular, both for our students and the “voiceless.”
  • They also recommended using more non-travel means to connect, taking advantage of such online tools as Skype and e-Pals.“It’s so expensive to travel; technology is more convenient and efficient,” one group noted.In addition, they see the potential for developing more international relationships through sister cities and partner schools. Closer to home, they says that more community residents and others who come from or have experiences in other countries should be invited into their schools to speak and engage with students.International awareness and cultural diversity, both within their schools and in their communities, could be promoted by hosting a variety of special events. In addition to speakers, their ideas include holiday celebrations, dances, dinners, foreign films and international festivals that range from one-day event to a week-long festival.
  • importance of SHARING our work with the world—use theInCITE and TIG example
  • http://www.scribd.com/doc/24008084/The-Art-of-Literature-and-Commonsense
  • Talk about the English classroom as a place where students like this can thrive—and where less creative students are encouraged to trust their weirdest instincts and where being disruptive should theoretically be seen as a good thing!
  • Significant Content -1-day, 8 hour workshop facilitated by ______(short bios)___________, teaching writing process.21st century competencies – Our workshop specifically teaches communication, revision, reflection, written expression, presentation/performance, global awareness and empathy.Voice and Choice – Customized to meet student and community need. Malleable foci – theatre writing, fiction, prose, poetry, blog writing, digital storytelling, writing for the stage (spoken word).In-depth Inquiry – Students are introduced to multiple pathways to creative expression through skilled coaching by facilitators who live their craft. Students are given a global, virtual workspace to continue to collaborate after the workshop.Driving Question – The school community, in coordination with us, will craft a Driving Question prior to the workshop. Sample Driving Questions:How do we use our creative voice to illuminate the human experience?How can writing heal a person, a community, a country? How can we contribute?How can my writing be a vehicle to global empowerment?How do stories become history, and how do I tell my own story?Need to Know The student drives their writing, gives it a reason to exist. The student will be guided to tap into their understanding of community, culture, lived experience, and aspirations as inspiration for creative expression.Revision & Reflection – Revision is a key component of the writing process. We emphasize writing as a living art that changes as it grows, so revision is seen as natural and necessary to growth. The very act of writing requires reflection, and is central to the protocols and processes structured into the workshop.Public Audience – Every workshop utilizes local and/or global writers as experts and public audience.
  • Wandering Around an Albuquerque Airport Terminalby Naomi Shihab Nye After learning my flight was detained 4 hours,I heard the announcement:If anyone in the vicinity of gate 4-A understands any Arabic,Please come to the gate immediately.Well — one pauses these days. Gate 4-A was my own gate. I went there.An older woman in full traditional Palestinian dress,Just like my grandma wore, was crumpled to the floor, wailing loudly.Help, said the flight service person. Talk to her. What is herProblem? we told her the flight was going to be four hours late and sheDid this.I put my arm around her and spoke to her haltingly.Shudow-a, shu- biduckhabibti, stanistanischway, min fadlick,Sho bit se-wee?The minute she heard any words she knew — however poorly used -She stopped crying.She thought our flight had been canceled entirely.She needed to be in El Paso for some major medical treatment theFollowing day. I said no, no, we’re fine, you’ll get there, just late,Who is picking you up? Let’s call him and tell him.We called her son and I spoke with him in English.I told him I would stay with his mother till we got on the plane andWould ride next to her — southwest.She talked to him. Then we called her other sons just for the fun of it.Then we called my dad and he and she spoke for a while in Arabic andFound out of course they had ten shared friends.Then I thought just for the heck of it why not call some PalestinianPoets I know and let them chat with her. This all took up about 2 hours.She was laughing a lot by then. Telling about her life. AnsweringQuestions.She had pulled a sack of homemade mamool cookies — little powderedSugar crumbly mounds stuffed with dates and nuts — out of her bag —And was offering them to all the women at the gate.To my amazement, not a single woman declined one. It was like aSacrament. The traveler from Argentina, the traveler from California,The lovely woman from Laredo — we were all covered with the samePowdered sugar. And smiling. There are no better cookies.And then the airline broke out the free beverages from huge coolers —Non-alcoholic — and the two little girls for our flight, one AfricanAmerican, one Mexican American — ran around serving us all apple juiceAnd lemonade and they were covered with powdered sugar too.And I noticed my new best friend — by now we were holding hands —Had a potted plant poking out of her bag, some medicinal thing,With green furry leaves. Such an old country traveling tradition. AlwaysCarry a plant. Always stay rooted to somewhere.And I looked around that gate of late and weary ones and thought,This is the world I want to live in. The shared world.Not a single person in this gate — once the crying of confusion stopped— has seemed apprehensive about any other person.They took the cookies. I wanted to hug all those other women too.This can still happen anywhere.Not everything is lost.
  • START from the film—and then the whole presentation is about making that turn with students?Lost Generation SHOW IT SHOW IT!!!http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42E2fAWM6rA
  • HAVE THEM WRITE ON THEIR HANDS… need to decide PROMPT but I should have them DO it to start the conference.
  • Lost Generation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42E2fAWM6rA
  • Fostering Global Citizenship in the English Class

    1. 1. Jennifer D. Klein Professional Development Director, World Leadership School @jdeborahklein – blog at www.principledlearning.org/blog Fostering Global Citizenship in the English Classroom
    2. 2. World Leadership School strives to empower young leaders to find new and innovative solutions to the world’s pressing problems.
    3. 3. Time comes into it Say it Say it. The universe is made of stories, not of atoms. --Muriel Rukeyser
    4. 4. The Danger of a Single Story Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie“Stories matter. Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign, but stories can also be used to empower and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people, but stories can also repair that broken dignity.” http://youtu.be/D9Ihs241zeg
    5. 5. What Does This Mean for the English Classroom? In the classroom where “anything goes,” how can English teachers help to humanize the world and increase students’ sense of connectedness with the human experience?
    6. 6. “The illiterate of the 21st Century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” -- Alvin Toffler
    7. 7. Offer Opportunities for Students to Create Knowledge, Not Just Consume Information
    8. 8. Help Students to Navigate Authentic Complexity
    9. 9. Foster Open-Mindedness, Promote Awareness and Acceptance
    10. 10. Bring Diverse Voices and Stories into the Classroom
    11. 11. What is James Joyce trying to reveal about Ireland through Dubliners?
    12. 12. What can we learn about the world by exploring which elements of James Joyce’s Dublin still exist in modern day, and which do not? What is James Joyce trying to reveal about Ireland through Dubliners?
    13. 13. How is William Golding’s Lord of the Flies an allegory on the human experience?
    14. 14. As sociologists, what can we learn about human nature from William Golding’s Lord of the Flies which might help us solve a modern-day conflict in the world? How is William Golding’s Lord of the Flies an allegory on the human experience?
    15. 15. Why is William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet an important piece of literature? Cover by Christopher Porter, winner of the “Recovered Books” project
    16. 16. Why is William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet an important piece of literature? As young writers, how might we reimagine William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict or South African Apartheid?
    17. 17. “Educational exchange can turn nations into people, contributing as no other form of communication can to the humanizing of international relations.” --Senator J.
    18. 18. Explore Untold Stories and Voices: Aaron Huey on the Lakota Nation http://youtu.be/8tEuaj4h8dw
    19. 19. Connect with the World: Live Video Conferencing
    20. 20. Foster Optimism and Connectedness through Photographic Prompts
    21. 21. Explore our Common Sense of Beauty and Shared Humanity
    22. 22. Celebrate our Common Passions and Planet
    23. 23. Connect with the World through Technology http://tigweb.org
    24. 24. TakingITGlobal TIGblogs and Publications http://tigweb.org
    25. 25. Vladimir Nabokov, “The Art of Literature and Commonsense” “Commonsense has trampled down many a gentle genius whose eyes had delighted in a too early moonbeam of some too early truth… Commonsense at its worst is sense made common, and so everything is comfortably cheapened by its touch. Commonsense is square whereas all the most essential visions and values of life are beautifully round, as round as the universe or the eyes of a child at its first circus show.” http://www.scribd.com/doc/24008084/The-Art-of- Literature-and-Commonsense
    26. 26. from Creating Innovators, by Tony Wagner “[Innovators] are imbued with a purpose, style of behavior and attitude that allows them to create something original of value, make a difference, or change a process, service, system or way of thinking.”
    27. 27. by Frankie Frank
    28. 28. by Frankie Frank
    29. 29. Educational Impact: The Shift Away from Cultural Myopia “Seeing two worlds come together because of poetry and writing opened my eyes to the beauty of diversity and the importance of communication. My writing has become less about me and more about the world around me. I’ve learned that writing is a testament to the events and people we encounter.” --Frankie Frank, 11th grade, Denver
    30. 30. Erin Sanchez’ and Jennifer Klein’s new writing workshop for schools will launch in June, 2013; more soon at www.principledlearning.org
    31. 31. From “Wandering Around an Albuquerque Airport Terminal” Naomi Shihab Nye This is the world I want to live in. The shared world…. This can still happen anywhere. Not everything is lost. http://www.helpothers.org/story.php?sid=6
    32. 32. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42E2fAWM6rA
    33. 33. Karin Tidbeck All hand images come from http://twentytwowords.com/2013/04/0 3/writing-advice-from-writers- handwritten-on-writers-hands-14-
    34. 34. Jody Lynn Nye
    35. 35. Patrick Rothfuss
    36. 36. “In times of change, learners inherit the Earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists.” - -Eric Hoffer
    37. 37. jennifer@worldleadershipschool.com Blog at www.principledlearning.org Twitter @jdeborahklein Find ALL RESOURCES at http://worldleadership.tiged.or g/teacher

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