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New Media Consumption: What You Need To Know
 

New Media Consumption: What You Need To Know

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    New Media Consumption: What You Need To Know New Media Consumption: What You Need To Know Presentation Transcript

    • New Media Consumption: What You Need to Know By:  Jay Davis Adam Feldman Robin Nelson Alexander Platonov 1 1) http://cache.gawker.com/assets/images/valleywag/2008/06/teen_internet_connectivity_electronics.jpg
    • “ The entire media universe is expanding so consumers are choosing to add elements to their media experience, rather than to replace them.” - Jim O’Hara, President, Media Product Leadership, The Nielsen Company 1 1) http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/3ScreenQ209_US_rpt_090209.pdf 2)- pic http://www.thesmartbean.com/magazine/health-magazine/media-alert-dangers-and-guidelines-for-safe-media-consumption-by-kids/ 3) Anderson,  Daniel R., Ph.D.,  Children, Media, Methodology Encompasses: Cell phone use Internet Texting Social Networking (Facebook, Youtube, Twitter) Video Games ...Constantly evolving Effects 3 :  Social/Emotional Behavior  Health  Education Cognition/Attention 2
    • Psychological Effects Aggression 1 Short-term - increases the probability of physically and verbally aggressive behavior, aggressive thoughts, and aggressive emotions. Long-term - frequent exposure to violent media in childhood may lead to aggression later in life, including physical assaults and spousal abuse. Sexuality 3      Studies link the amount of time youths spend with media with sexual content or media that presents sexual engagement nonchalantly increases the likelihood of sexual activity 1) Anderson, Craig, The Influence of Media Violence on Youth , Psychological Effects in the Public Interest  2) Reviewed by Mathis, Charlotte, MD.  Media Violence May Effect Children's Minds, WebMD Health News, June, 2005 3) Rapporteur, Alexandra Beatty,  Studying Media Effects on Children and Youth: Improving Methods and Measures 4) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jeVQjJtwjr0&feature "Researchers found nonaggressive children who had been exposed to high levels of media violence had similar patterns of activity in an area of the brain linked to self-control and attention as aggressive children who had been diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorder." 2 4
    • Psycho/Emotional Effects Internet addiction common symptoms: 1   psychological dependence on being online,  interference with other responsibilities,  disruption of offline social relationships,  and withdrawal when internet use is limited. 1) Whitaker, Jodi, Bushman, Brad, Online Dangers: Keeping Children and Adolescents Safe 2) Turkle, Sherry, Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Interne 3) Anderson, Craig and Bushman, Brad, Effects of Violent Video Games on Aggressive Behavior, Aggressive Cognition, Aggressive Affect, Physiological Arousal, and Prosocial Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Review of the Scientific Literature Changes to perspective of:  (a) nature and society, (b) personal identity  through these random and complex  interactions in new media 2 Violent video game study - negatively correlated with helping others and empathy 3
    • Physical Effects Carpal Tunnel Syndrome    –  pain and numbness in hands and wrists, Migraines    –  excessive Internet users are prone to migraines because of the intense concentration required and the strain put on the eyes , Sleep Disturbances:   - insomnia (sleeping difficulties),  - narcolepsy (excessive daytime sleepiness),  - sleep apnea (abnormal pauses in breathing),  - nocturnal myoclonus (periodic leg or arms jerks during sleep),  - parasomnia (i.e., night terrors, sleepwalking or talking, and nightmares).         Sleep disturbances are caused, in part, by overstimulation of the brain. http://www.video-game-addiction.org/physical-consequences.html
    • Physical Effects Backaches – most users stay seated in the same position for hours on end. The lack of movement causes stiffness and soreness, but could deteriorate into chronic back problems. Pronounced Weight Gain or Weight Loss. Eating Irregularities – addicted users don't want to take the time to eat properly. They eat food that is quick and usually unhealthy. In extreme cases, they may choose not to eat at all. Poor Personal Hygiene – an addicted user is not going to take the time to properly care for himself. It simply becomes less of a priority, if it's a priority at all. http://www.video-game-addiction.org/physical-consequences.html
    • Computer Addiction Computer Addiction – obsessive playing of off-line computer games, such as Solitaire or Minesweeper, or obsessive computer programming. Components of Computer Addiction: 1)   excessive use, often associated with a loss of sense of time   or a neglect of basic drives ,  2) withdrawal, including feelings   of anger, tension, and/or depression when the computer is inaccessible ,   3) tolerance, including the need for better computer equipment,   more software, or more hours of use, and  4) negative repercussions,   including arguments, lying, poor achievement, social isolation,   and fatigue . Block, J.J. (2009) Issues for DSM-V: Internet Addiction
    • Interpersonal Effects International literature has identified a stable correlation between problems in the sphere of adolescents' personal relationships and potential Internet dependence:  Adolescents with problematic Internet use compared to adolescents without PIU were found to use the Web mostly for social reasons (respectively, 97.2% vs. 77.4%) and less for learning or informative purposes (respectively, 25.0% vs. 50.9%). 1 Internet-dependents gradually spent less time with friends and family in exchange for solitary time in front of a computer. 2  Some respondents experienced increasing social isolation except for Internet friends.   3 1. Milani L, Osualdella D, Di Blasio P. (2009) Quality of interpersonal relationships and problematic Internet use in adolescence. 2. Young K.S. (1998)  Internet addiction: the emergence of a new clinical disorder. 3. Brenner V. (1997)  Psychology of computer use
    • Diversity in Access and Use Diverse populations are producing differing usage patterns of the Internet and associated technologies 1. http://pewinternet.org/Trend-Data/Whos-Online.aspx
    • Diversity in Access and Use Diverse populations are producing differing usage patterns of the Internet and associated technologies 1. http://www.marisatapia.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Bridging-the-Digital-Divide-for-Latina-Girls-Analysis-doc.pdf The digital divide is a concept used to describe the gap between those who have effective access to information and communication technologies (ICT) and their related online skill sets and those who do not. 1
    • Diversity in Access and Use Examples 1. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Better-off-households/Report/Health-information.aspx 2. http://broadbandbreakfast.com/2010/11/commerce-report-shows-diminishing-digital-divide/ 3. http://pewhispanic.org/reports/report.php?ReportID=123 4. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Home-Broadband-2010/Part-1/Broadband-adoption-among-African-Americans-grew-significantly-between-2009-and-2010.aspx Higher-income internet users are more likely to seek health information and conduct other health-related activities online. 1 Income and education are some of the most significant factors in determining if broadband Internet access exists for a household. 2 Technology use among foreign-born Latinos continues to lag significantly behind that of their U.S.-born counterparts. 3 Despite gains in broadband adoption, African-Americans continue to trail whites in their use of broadband technologies. 4
    • Interpersonal Effects When used responsibly, the Internet can be a great place to interact socially, meet new people, and even start romantic relationships. However, online relationships can often be more intense than those in real life. Our fantasies are given free reign and the idea of being with our online love can exceed all realistic expectations. Since few real-life relationships can compete with these wild, fantasy relationships, the Internet addict will prefer to spend more and more time with their online friends. Another problem is that about 50% of people online lie about their age, weight, job, marital status, or gender. When online friends meet and the real-life person fails to match the online persona, it can create profound emotional disappointment. http://helpguide.org/mental/internet_cybersex_addiction.htm
    • Growing Up in an Age of New Media 2400 mothers surveyed: 73% said TV was their children's favorite pastime  1 Kaiser Foundation Study: media consumption can lead to poor grades and lower levels of contentment  2 Between 2004 and 2009, young people increased their average daily media consumption by an hour and 17 minutes, going from 6:21 to 7:38. That's almost as much time as adults spend at a full time job, except that kids are doing it seven days a week. 3 1) Singer, Dorothy, Children’s Pastimes and Play in Sixteen Nations:  Is Free Play Declining? 2) Rideout, Victoria et. al. Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-year-olds 3) Id.
    • Trends in Media Consumption Nielson - 2nd Quarter 2009 1 people watching mobile video increased 70% from 2008 people who watch video online increased their viewing by 46% compared to 2008 1) http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/three-screen-report-media-consumption-and-multi-tasking-continue-to-increase/ 2) Lewin, Tamar, If Your Children Are Awake, They're Probably Online 3) Wray, Robert, How We Watch Now: Tune In, Log On, Call Up (pic) 4) http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/market-data-research/market-data/communications-market-reports/cmr08/ New York Times correlation- 47% of heaviest media users (16+ hours per day) C’s or lower Compared to 23% of those who typically consumed media three hours a day or less. 2 3 4
    • Positive Developments 1. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2009/15--The-Internet-and-Civic-Engagement.aspx 2. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Mobile-Health-2010/Overview.aspx 3. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Cell-Phones-and-American-Adults/Part-4-A-comparison-of-cell-phone-attitudes--use-between-teens-and-adults/Teens-and-adults-agree-that-phones-keep-them-safe-and-occasionally-annoy.aspx 4. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults/Part-2/5-Wireless.aspx?r=1 Online politics leads to offline activism: Internet-rooted activism shows the potential to change traditional patterns of civic engagement - especially among the young. 1 Younger adults are increasingly likely to access health information via the Internet. 2 The proliferation of cell phone ownership has made the vast majority (93%) of teens with cell phones feel safer. 3   The young, African Americans and Latinos are more likely to access the Internet via portable wireless devices. 4
    • Positive Developments 5. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Government-Online/Summary-of-Findings.aspx 6. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/Writing-Technology-and-Teens/07-Writing-Communication-and-Technology-Ownership/02-Teens-appreciate-the-ability-to-edit-and-revise-on-a-computer.aspx 7. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/Teens-Video-Games-and-Civics/08-2-Video-Games-Relationship-to-Civic-and-Political-Engagement/08-Youth-who-take-part-in-social-interaction-related-to-the-game.aspx#footnote56 8. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2007/Teens-and-Social-Media/1-Summary-of-Findings.aspx The Internet is giving citizens more paths to access government services and information. 5 A majority of teens feel they edit their writing for quality more frequently if they produce it on a computer versus by hand . 6 Youth who play video games and participate in their online community extensions are more engaged civically and politically. 7 The Internet is facilitating new means for creativity as 64% of online teens are content creators . 8
    • LAUSD COMPUTER USAGE POLICY 01/08/2002 – Board Rule 1254 established as the Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) for the Internet as required by Children’s Internet Protection Act ALL LAUSD students & employees are subject to AUP! Students & parents must BOTH sign agreements acknowledging comprehension & acceptance of policy Internet account “used only for educational or professional purposes” HIGHLIGHTS OF AUP for full viewing see:  www.lausd.k12.ca.us/lausd/lausdnet/aup.pdf.120604 Unacceptable Uses: Violation of any state or federal law (including pornography) Accessing/transmitting/downloading inappropriate materials Obtaining/using anonymous email sites Uses that cause harm to others or damage to their property Uses that jeopardize access into accounts Commercial uses Some actions LAUSD does: Implements filtering and/or blocking software to restrict access to some sites Implements a mechanism to monitor all minors’ on-line activities which may lead to a discovery of a violation of policy If student <18 accesses LAUSD account outside of school, parent or legal guardian must supervise student’s use of account/internet at ALL times & is completely responsible for monitoring use
    • (1) setting parental controls & limits over media (e.g., filtering/monitoring), (2) safe use of social networking, (3) usage of privacy settings, (4) cyber-bullying, (5) phishing, (6) sexting, (7) identity theft; (8) any other media behaviors which compromise their or another person’s safety; and (9) development of other interests and activities beyond new media. (http://www.onguardonline.gov) TYPES OF TREATMENT & STRATEGIES Depending on the nature of a student’s adverse effects experienced from new media usage (physical, emotional, legal, etc.), or in anticipation of preventing problems, the following methods and/or strategies may be explored: Professional Involvement When a student’s safety and well-being are in jeopardy due to new media-related usage, referrals should be made to medical practitioners, therapists, legal/law enforcement and/or other professionals who are trained in the proper treatment of or resolution of the media-related problem. Parent Education School and/or district-sanctioned workshops, communications, and referrals to media-related curriculum Parental encouragement to have continuing open dialogue with children about:
    • 1.Teach responsible , respectful , and safe media habits to students: Enforce classroom/school/district rules regarding media usage Teach curriculum that empowers students “to think critically & make informed choices in their ever-evolving, 24/7 digital world” through online or school-sanctioned programs (http://www.commonsensemedia.org) Be aware of and refer students with media-related issues to proper professionals Teacher Responsibilities
    • 2. Assist in parent education : ( Help parents optimize their roles as ultimate guardians of their children’s media habits.) Offer ongoing school workshops & communications on parental “new media management” tips and trends Promote awareness of and refer parents to online curriculum that offers similar information 3. Keep abreast of ongoing research in field of “new media management” As a teacher is ever-vigilant in staying current on subject content, s/he should also actively engage in staying current on new media trends and resources through: School/district-offered workshops and/or curriculum Websites (e.g., http:// www.commonsensemedia.org ; htttp://www.thesmartbean.com , etc.) that address new media management
    • Information Resources Online references for trends, data and curriculum regarding new media use Common Sense Media "Common Sense Media is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology."   Center for Media Literacy "Dedicated to promoting and supporting media literacy education as a framework for accessing, analyzing, evaluating, creating and participating with media content, CML works to help citizens, especially the young, develop critical thinking and media production skills needed to live fully in the 21st century media culture."   The Pew Internet & American Life Project "The Project produces reports exploring the impact of the internet on families, communities, work and home, daily life, education, health care, and civic and political life."
    • Information Resources Online references for trends, data and curriculum regarding new media use   NetCetera - Onguard Online "OnGuardOnline.gov's Net Cetera campaign provides information and resources about helping kids make safe, responsible decisions when they're online."   NetCetera - Additional Resources Google Fast Flip   "Google Fast Flip  is a web application that lets users discover and share news articles. It combines qualities of print and the Web, with the ability to 'flip' through pages online as quickly as flipping through a magazine." Media Arts at LAUSD "This site is in development towards representing this dynamic arts content discipline, which we are seeking to formally establish in Los Angeles Unified School District in complement to the four 'traditional' arts disciplines. Stay tuned for major developments as we move forward towards recognition and connection."
    • Citations     http://cache.gawker.com/assets/images/valleywag/2008/06/teen_internet_connectivity_electronics.jpg   http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/3ScreenQ209_US_rpt_090209.pdf http://www.thesmartbean.com/magazine/health-magazine/media-alert-dangers-and-guidelines-for-safe-media-consumption-by-kids/ Anderson,  Daniel R., Ph.D., (2009) Children, Media, Methodology Anderson, Craig, (2003) The Influence of Media Violence on Youth, Psychological Effects in the Public Interest  Reviewed by Mathis, Charlotte, MD.   Media Violence May Effect Children's Minds,  WebMD Health News, June, 2005 Rapporteur, Alexandra Beatty, (2006) Studying Media Effects on Children and Youth: Improving Methods and Measures http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=jeVQjJtwjr0 &feature   Whitaker, Jodi, Bushman, Brad, (2009) Online Dangers: Keeping Children and Adolescents Safe Turkle, Sherry, Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet Anderson, Craig and Bushman, Brad, Effects of Violent Video Games on Aggressive Behavior, Aggressive Cognition, Aggressive Affect, Physiological Arousal, and Prosocial Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Review of the Scientific Literature   http://www.video-game-addiction.org/physical-consequences.html Block, J.J. (2009) Issues for DSM-V: Internet Addiction   Milani L, Osualdella D, Di Blasio P. (2009) Quality of interpersonal relationships and problematic Internet use in adolescence.   Young K.S. (1998)  Internet addiction: the emergence of a new clinical disorder.   Brenner V. (1997)  Psychology of computer use http://www.marisatapia.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Bridging-the-Digital-Divide-for-Latina-Girls-Analysis-doc.pdf http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2009/15--The-Internet-and-Civic-Engagement.aspx http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Mobile-Health-2010/Overview.aspx http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Cell-Phones-and-American-Adults/Part-4-A-comparison-of-cell-phone-attitudes--use-between-teens-and-adults/Teens-and-adults-agree-that-phones-keep-them-safe-and-occasionally-annoy.aspx http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults/Part-2/5-Wireless.aspx?r=1 http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Government-Online/Summary-of-Findings.aspx http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/Writing-Technology-and-Teens/07-Writing-Communication-and-Technology-Ownership/02-Teens-appreciate-the-ability-to-edit-and-revise-on-a-computer.aspx http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/Teens-Video-Games-and-Civics/08-2-Video-Games-Relationship-to-Civic-and-Political-Engagement/08-Youth-who-take-part-in-social-interaction-related-to-the-game.aspx#footnote56 http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2007/Teens-and-Social-Media/1-Summary-of-Findings.aspx Singer, Dorothy, (2009) Children’s Pastimes and Play in Sixteen Nations:  Is Free Play Declining?   Rideout, Victoria et. al. (2010) Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-year-olds http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/three-screen-report-media-consumption-and-multi-tasking-continue-to-increase/ http://pewinternet.org/Trend-Data/Whos-Online.aspx  http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Better-off-households/Report/Health-information.aspx http://broadbandbreakfast.com/2010/11/commerce-report-shows-diminishing-digital-divide/ http://pewhispanic.org/reports/report.php?ReportID=1234.  http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Home-Broadband-2010/Part-1/Broadband-adoption-among-African-Americans-grew-significantly-between-2009-and-2010.aspx http://helpguide.org/mental/internet_cybersex_addiction.htm http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Government-Online/Summary-of-Findings.aspx http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/Writing-Technology-and-Teens/07-Writing-Communication-and-Technology-Ownership/02-Teens-appreciate-the-ability-to-edit-and-revise-on-a-computer.aspx http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/Teens-Video-Games-and-Civics/08-2-Video-Games-Relationship-to-Civic-and-Political-Engagement/08-Youth-who-take-part-in-social-interaction-related-to-the-game.aspx#footnote56  http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2007/Teens-and-Social-Media/1-Summary-of-Findings.aspx  www.lausd.k12.ca.us/lausd/lausdnet/aup.pdf.120604 http://www.netaddiction.com/articles/symptoms.pdf  http://www.onguardonline.gov   http://www.commonsensemedia.org   http://www.medialit.org/  http://www.medialit.org/  http://fastflip.googlelabs.com/