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Model VAPA language SPSA revised

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  • 1. Model Research-based Visual and Performing Arts Language for inclusion in the Single Plan for Student Achievement SPSA GOALS STRATEGIES TO IMPLEMENT Goal 1: 100% Graduation: Achievement of California State Content Standards, and the Common Core State Standards. We believe that the Visual and Performing Arts (VAPA) are an essential part of the Core Academic Curriculum for every child1, and will provide the keys to unlock the doors to profound human understanding and accomplishment for all children. Therefore… ⇒ A high-quality, discrete, comprehensive, sequential Course of Study2, utilizing the California State Content Standards3 in all of the Visual and Performing Arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts), will be integrated with the Common Core State Standards, and fully implemented and sustained PreK-12. “… the arts have been an inseparable part of the human journey; indeed, we depend on the arts to carry us toward the fullness of our humanity. We value them for themselves, and because we do, we believe knowing and practicing them is fundamental to the healthy development of our children’s minds and spirits. That is why, in any civilization - ours included – the arts are inseparable from the very meaning of the term 'education.' We know from long experience that no one can claim to be truly educated who lacks basic knowledge and skills in the arts.” - National Standards for Arts Education “(11) Core Academic Subjects: The term ‘core academic subjects’ means English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography.” The Federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Title IX, Part A, “The adopted Course of Study, for grades 1 to 6, inclusive, shall include instruction beginning in Grade 1 and continuing through Grade 6… [and] for grades 7 to 12, inclusive, shall offer courses, in the following areas of study… Visual and Performing Arts, including dance, music, theatre, and visual arts, aimed at the development of aesthetic appreciation and the skills of creative expression.” - California Education Code 51210(e) and 51220(g) VAPA courses, instruction, methods, projects, and a variety of instructional materials, will be utilized with all students to: • Spark their creativity and imagination; • Engage them fully in learning and understanding relevant and complex concepts across the curriculum; • Develop their capacity: to seek and attain graduation; and for the challenging expectations of the 21st Century4 workforce; Daily opportunities to learn in, through, and about the arts will embolden all students during their journey, from preschool to high school graduation, and onward to college and careers, to be: • Curious experimenters and investigators; • Conceptual, critical, and creative thinkers; • Tenacious, inventive, and resourceful problem solvers; • Focused, confident, coherent, and creative communicators; • Cooperative collaborators; • Ingenious innovators; • Passionate, environmentally responsible, productive members and leaders in our democratic society. A fully implemented, robust Course of Study in VAPA, from PreK-12, delivered by Highly Qualified Dance, Music, Theatre, and Visual Arts Teachers, in suitable learning environments, will ensure that the specific needs of the whole child will be met… All students will have: • Equal access to receive, participate in, and explore a high-quality comprehensive curriculum, and achieve in all core content areas, at each/every grade level; • Multi-dimensional, imaginative, creative, and original ways of expressing what they know and are able to do; • Opportunities to construct knowledge; practice and build upon foundational skills; and attain mastery in the craft and techniques of the Visual and Performing Arts; All students will be: • Able to follow a Pathway to Artistry5 and eligible for the Seal of Artistry Award upon graduation; • Fully prepared to successfully complete the A-G college entrance requirements on time to graduate6. Developed by UTLA Arts Education Committee, 2011-12; Revised 2012-13. 1
  • 2. Model Research-based Visual and Performing Arts Language for inclusion in the Single Plan for Student Achievement SPSA GOALS Goal 2: Proficiency for All “The arts significantly boost student achievement, reduce discipline problems, and increase the odds students will go on to graduate from college. As First Lady Michelle Obama sums up, both she and the President ‘believe strongly that arts education is essential for building innovative thinkers who will be our nation’s leaders for tomorrow.’” Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education (in Reinvesting in Arts Education: Winning America’s Future Through Creative Schools) “ARTS are at the HeART of SmART” - Mimi Ortiz, National Board Certified Visual Arts Teacher “It would be nice if all of the data which sociologists require could be enumerated because then we could run them through IBM machines and draw charts as the economists do. Counting sounds easy until we actually attempt it, and then we quickly discover that often we cannot recognize what we ought to count. Numbers are no substitute for clear definition. Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.” - William Bruce Cameron, Sociologist, 1963 “The ARTS Counts!” - Arts Education Committee STRATEGIES TO IMPLEMENT Scientifically-based research7 has shown that high-quality, standardsbased, Visual and Performing Arts pedagogy, curriculum, and instruction in dance, music, theatre, visual arts and media arts, delivered by Highly Qualified Arts Teachers, sustained PreK-12, and integrated across the curriculum for all student groups, will: • Effectively engage EO’s, EL’s, SEL’s, SWD’s, GATE, and Socio-Economically Disadvantaged students in learning; • Increase proficiency -- and provide challenging opportunities to excel to advanced levels -- in literacy and numeracy; • Accelerate English Language Development and support foreign/world language acquisition; • Inspire scientific, technological, and multi-media assimilation; • Augment historical and cultural context of content; • Improve motor skills, physical fitness, health, and wellness. To meet the various needs of diverse student groups8; to improve focus, concentration, listening and attention; to maximize Access to the Core curriculum; to enhance Culturally Relevant and Responsive Education; and to ensure all students achieve high expectations and competencies in all content areas: standards-aligned VAPA instructional materials, tools, media, methods, and strategies will be utilized, such as: • Scaffolding; differentiated and personalized instruction; SDAIE; • Innovative and effective interventions; • Safe and healthy habits of body, mind, and heart; • Multiple intelligences and pathways to understanding; • Reading, listening to, watching, inquiring about, reflecting on, and producing oral and written responses to: various forms of • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • fiction, nonfiction, abstract, representational, and informational texts; Articulating thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly and creatively (using academic and descriptive vocabulary) in expository, poetic, visual, musical, physical, and dramatic compositions; Various modes of communication, universal languages, and artistic expression: auditory, written, verbal, kinesthetic, body movement, visual, musical, and multi-media formats; Visualizing, spatial organization, and graphic representations; Thematic, hands-on, interdisciplinary, creative projects; Communal and cooperative learning pairs and groups; Individual and collaborative processing and decision-making; Building ensembles to deepen relationships with others; Ascending upwards to higher-levels of thinking and complexity: Recognizing, describing, and remembering patterns; Perceiving, responding, classifying, interpreting, and inferring; Planning, structuring, sequencing, combining, and organizing; Imagining, inquiring, exploring, experimenting, and discovering. Applying, implementing, improvising, performing, and sharing; Analyzing, comparing, contrasting, connecting, and valuing; Critiquing, clarifying, revising, modifying, elaborating, and extending. Creating, designing, forming, constructing, inventing, producing, originating, adapting, illustrating, playwriting, composing, choreographing, directing, problem solving, and inspiring. Developed by UTLA Arts Education Committee, 2011-12; Revised 2012-13. 2
  • 3. Model Research-based Visual and Performing Arts Language for inclusion in the Single Plan for Student Achievement SPSA GOALS Goal 3: 100% Attendance “A school that treats the arts as the province of a few gifted children, or views them only as recreation and entertainment, is a school that needs an infusion of soul. The arts – music, dance, painting, and theatre – are an essential element of education, just like reading, writing, and arithmetic.” - William Bennett, Former U.S. Secretary of Education Goal 4: Parent & Community Engagement “The creative arts are the measure and reflection of our civilization. They offer many children an opportunity to see life with a larger perspective… The moral values we treasure are reflected in the beauty and truth that is emotionally transmitted through the arts. The arts say something about us to future generations.” - Ann P. Kahn, Former President of The National PTA STRATEGIES TO IMPLEMENT Equitable access to Visual and Performing Arts Education is critical to a high quality of life for all student groups: • Scientifically-based research9 has shown that arts education not only has intrinsic value, but when implemented with a structured, innovative, and long-term approach, it can also provide many extrinsic benefits, such as improved school attendance, academic achievement across the curriculum, as well as social and emotional well-being. • Anecdotal evidence has shown that school attendance increases when students and staff know they will have opportunities to engage in invigorating, sensory stimulating, experiential arts learning; and meaningful, hands-on, creative activities and projects during the instructional day. • Recent groundbreaking research10 has demonstrated that school attendance is significantly higher for students involved in engaging and long-term arts education programs, in comparison to those students who have infrequent or no access to arts education. • Research11 has also found that young people who participate in the arts are 3 times more likely to win an award for excellent attendance. Opportunities will be provided for parents and families (including Limited English Proficient and those with disabilities) to collaborate with school faculty and staff, students, feeder schools, Community Arts Partners12, and local colleges and universities to: • Collectively design and implement family literacy, health and wellness, and Visual and Performing Arts events – festivals, faires, summits – which will include engagement in creative arts making/doing with their children. • Institute instructional/curricular trips, field experiences, internships, work-based and service learning opportunities. To assist parents and families in understanding13 the California State Content Standards, and to monitor and recognize their child’s progress, accomplishments, academic achievement, distinction, and literacy in the Interdisciplinary Themes of the 21st Century; families and the community will be invited to observe and participate in demonstrations of the successful outcomes of students’ character, courage, commitment, cooperation, collaboration, communication, creativity, artistry, ingenuity, inspiration, and innovation by means of: • Presentations of authentic, interdisciplinary, project-based and problem-based, performance assessments14 that integrate the Visual and Performing Arts across all content areas; • Exhibitions of visual arts and media arts; • Performances of dance, music, and theatre. Developed by UTLA Arts Education Committee, 2011-12; Revised 2012-13. 3
  • 4. Model Research-based Visual and Performing Arts Language for inclusion in the Single Plan for Student Achievement GOALS Goal 5: School Safety, Climate, and Culture "The arts are not a frill. The arts are a response to our individuality and our nature, and help to shape our identity. What is there that can transcend deep difference and stubborn divisions? The arts. They have a wonderful universality. Art has the potential to unify. It can speak in many languages without a translator. The arts do not discriminate. The arts can lift us up." – Barbara Jordan, Former Texas Congresswoman “Aeschylus and Plato are remembered today long after the triumphs of Imperial Athens are gone. Dante outlived the ambitions of thirteenth century Florence. Goethe stands serenely above the politics of Germany, and I am certain that after the dust of centuries has passed over cities, we too will be remembered not for victories or defeats in battle or in politics, but for our contribution to the human spirit.” - John F. Kennedy, Former President of the United States STRATEGIES TO IMPLEMENT Daily utilization and integration of various resources, pedagogy, curriculum, and instruction in the Visual and Performing Arts (dance, music, theatre, visual and media arts) by Highly Qualified Arts Teachers, Community Arts Partners, and by and throughout the entire school community, before, during, and after school will15: • Create: an inviting, dynamic, balanced, harmonious, aesthetic atmosphere; and a safe, supportive, sustainable, environment, inside and outside of the classroom; • Captivate and cultivate student’s interest, enthusiasm, confidence, and initiative in all aspects of school and life; • Nurture and provide the conditions and support for the whole child: their cognitive, social, emotional, and physical well-being and wellness needs; • Improve every child’s awareness, attitude, and morale of their individual and cultural identity, abilities, goals, potential, and multiple possibilities for their future; • Encourage discovery of the natural talents, true passions, and the fundamental elements of each child; • Form meaningful and long-lasting “contributions to the human spirit” and intellect; • Structure and promote safe, positive, supportive, caring, trusting, empathetic, diplomatic, democratic, respectful, ethical, and peaceful relationships with peers and adults; • Build capacity for greater responsibility and leadership; • Equip students with brain-based skills, strategies and practice to confidently implement: emotional and physical stress-management; reading social cues; appropriate responses; coping mechanisms; ethical decision-making; and creative problem solving; • Develop certainty, resiliency, reliability, dependability, accountability, flexibility, adaptability, and affinity; • Establish16 and reinforce safe and civilized learning environments by reducing bullying, and impulsive, defiant, violent, and delinquent behavior; • Deter truancy problems, lower the drop-out rate, and keep at-risk youth engaged in school; • Foster active, responsible civic participation, and productive, socially-just service, within/for the local, state, national, and global communities; • Create and expand opportunities to: explore, share, appreciate, understand, express, value, and celebrate everyone’s ethnic, cultural, physical, linguistic, ability/disability, socio-economic, gender, age, and lifestyle perspectives, similarities, and differences; • Motivate17 students to soar towards: high academic and artistic achievement; personal excellence and accomplishment; and life-long learning. Developed by UTLA Arts Education Committee, 2011-12; Revised 2012-13. 4
  • 5. Model Research-based Visual and Performing Arts Language for inclusion in the Single Plan for Student Achievement REFERENCES 1 The Federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Title IX, Part A, Section 9101(1)(D)(11) “(11) Core Academic Subjects: The term ‘core academic subjects’ means English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography.” http://www.ed.gov/ LAUSD Board of Education Resolution (adopted March 23, 1998). Restoration of Arts Education: "The arts belong as a part of the core curriculum for all students"  LAUSD Board of Education Policy (adopted March 15, 2011): Arts Education Master Plan 2011-2014, Access, Equity, Quality: Arts and Creativity in Learning and Achievement, p.15: "Arts at the Core: The Board of Education and the Superintendent affirm the position that dance, music, theatre, and visual arts are core academic curriculum." LAUSD Resolution (adopted October 9, 2012). Supporting Educational Equity, Student Achievement and Mastery of 21st Century Skills through Arts at the Core: "To assure equitable access to quality arts instruction across LAUSD… the Governing Board of the Los Angeles Unified School District will establish Arts Education as a Core Subject".  2 California Education Code 51210(e) and 51220(g) “The adopted Course of Study, for grades 1 to 6, inclusive, shall include instruction beginning in Grade 1 and continuing through Grade 6… [and] for grades 7 to 12, inclusive, shall offer courses, in the following areas of study… Visual and Performing Arts, including dance, music, theatre, and visual arts, aimed at the development of aesthetic appreciation and the skills of creative expression.” LAUSD Office of Curriculum, Instruction and School Support (May 2, 2012) BUL-5429.2: Revised and New Middle and Senior High Visual and Performing Arts Courses: “Guidelines: With the move to school-wide implementation of smaller learning communities… and personalized learning environments… new course sequences and career pathways are necessary in the arts. Secondary schools are required to provide rigorous, sequential, standards-based learning opportunities in the arts for all students." 3 LAUSD Board of Education Resolution (adopted June 13, 2000). Support of Senate Bill 1390 (Visual and Performing Arts Standards): "The Los Angeles Unified School District recognizes that arts education, including dance, theatre, music, and visual arts is an integral part of basic education for all students" and "The Los Angeles Unified School District supports a comprehensive curriculum that includes performing and visual arts education as part of the program for all students as stated in the California Department of Education Visual and Performing Arts Framework for California Public Schools, Kindergarten through Grade Twelve (1996)" LAUSD BUL-4670.0: Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards for California Public Schools; Pre-Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve. January, 2001. LAUSD BUL-4670.1: Visual and Performing Arts Framework for California Public Schools; Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve. January, 2004.  4 Partnership for 21st Century Skills: http://www.p21.org/ 21st Century Skills Map in The Arts: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_arts_map_final.pdf 5 LAUSD Board of Education Policy (adopted March 15, 2011): Arts Education Master Plan 2011-2014, Access, Equity, Quality: Arts and Creativity in Learning and Achievement, p. 20, Pathway to Artistry and Seal of Artistry Awards: “Approval provides a framework for direction to school leadership in building upon the achievements of the first 10-Year Arts Education Plan and laying the groundwork for Pre-K thru 12 arts education pathways in all arts disciplines.” http://tinyurl.com/LAUSD-2011-14ArtsPlan 6 National Endowment for the Arts (2012). The Arts and Achievement in At-Risk Youth. Reports that low-income students who have access to arts education achieve higher GPA and test scores and are more likely to graduate from high school and attend college than their peers without access to the arts. http://www.nea.gov/research/Arts-At-Risk-Youth.pdf 7 Arts Education Partnership (2012). ArtsEdSearch. http://www.artsedsearch.org/ A research and policy clearinghouse focused entirely on student and educator outcomes associated with arts learning. Featuring user-friendly summaries of high-quality research, and overviews of current research, ArtsEdSearch provides reliable and objective information about the academic, cognitive, personal, social and professional outcomes of an arts education. http://aep-arts.org/ President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities (May, 2011). Reinvesting in Arts Education: Winning America’s Future Through Creative Schools, Washington, DC. “All of our research points to the success of schools that are “arts-rich,” in which students who may have fallen by the wayside find themselves re-engaged in learning.” http://pcah.gov/ Barry, N. H. (2010). Oklahoma A+ Schools: What the research tells us 2002-2007. Volume three, quantitative measures. Oklahoma A+ Schools/University of Central Oklahoma. Survey data analyses reveal: Higher achievement: OAS students’ performances on standardized tests generally meet or significantly exceed state and district averages, a striking finding considering that OAS schools serve a greater proportion of ethnic minorities and a greater proportion of economically disadvantaged students; better attendance for students and teachers; decreased disciplinary problems in schools; happier, more effective educators; joyful, engaged students; more parent and community involvement; creative, focused instruction; positive student attitudes about their classroom activities; positive teacher attitudes about arts in education, arts integration, and teacher collaboration. Developed by UTLA Arts Education Committee, 2011-12; Revised 2012-13. 5
  • 6. Model Research-based Visual and Performing Arts Language for inclusion in the Single Plan for Student Achievement REFERENCES 8 Khan, Yasmeen, In District 75, Using the Arts in Everyday Academics, New York Times, May 16, 2012. Professional development program focused on the Arts for New York City special education teachers: http://www.nytimes.com/schoolbook/2012/05/16/in-district-75-using-the-arts-in-everyday-academics/ 9 Catterall, J.S., Chapleau, R. & Iwanaga, J. (1999). In Fiske (Ed.). Champions of Change: The Impact of the Arts on Learning. Washington D.C.: President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities, Washington D.C.: Arts Education Partnership. http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/champions/pdfs/ChampsReport.pdf Horn, J. (1992). An exploration into the writing of original scripts by inner-city high school drama students (ED366957). National Arts Education Research Center. http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/an-exploration-into-the-writing-of-original-scripts-by-inner-city-high-school-drama-students 10 Caldwell B J., Harris, J., Vaughan, T., (2011) Bridging the gap in school achievement through the Arts (Summary report) The Song Room, Abbotsford, Victoria. http://creativeindustriesgc.com/categorie/arts-programs-can-have-a-significant-impact-on-improving-school-attendance/ 11 Stanford University and Carnegie Foundation For the Advancement of Teaching (1998) 12 “Equity, Access, and Impact for Arts Education”, A Statement by the Professional Community of Los Angeles Artists, Arts Organizations, and Cultural Institutions (October 5, 2009) http://notebook.lausd.net/portal/page?_pageid=33,1161943&_dad=ptl&_schema=PTL_EP http://lacountyartsforall.org/ 13 Saraniero, Patti (2012) Raising “Art Smart” Students in the 21st Century: An introduction to 21st century workplace skills and why they matter to "art smart" parents. The Kennedy Center Arts Edge http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/families/at-school/all-for-arts-education/raising-smart-art-students.aspx http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/ 14 Edutopia (3/16/2008). How Should We Measure Student Learning? The Many Forms of Assessment. http://www.edutopia.org/comprehensive-assessment-introduction Rubenstein, Grace (4/11/2011). Replicating Success; Project-Based Learning. Edutopia. http://www.edutopia.org/stw-replicating-pbl 15 Willis, Judy (3/14/12). Executive Function, Arts Integration and the Nueroscience of Joyful Learning: http://www.edutopia.org/blog/arts-inegration-joyful-learning-judy-willis-md Skorton, David J. (1/28/2009) The Arts Are Essential: Cornell University's president on why teaching creativity in schools is not a luxury. Adapted by the author from an address given at a 2007 forum, "Transforming Arts Teaching: The Role of Higher Education," sponsored by the Dana Foundation. http://www.edutopia.org/arts-education-humanitiescreativity 16 U.S. Department of Justice (1996). Youth ARTS Development Project 17 Catterall, James S. (2009) Doing Well and Doing Good by Doing Art: The Effects of Education in the Visual and Performing Arts on the Achievements and Values of Young Adults. Los Angeles/London: Imagination Group/ I-Group Books. Oklahoma ADDITIONAL RESOURCES National Center for Educational Statistics in the US Dept of Education (April, 2012). Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 1999-2000 and 2009-10: http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2012/2012014.pdf http://www.ed.gov/blog/2012/04/ed-releases-new-report-on-arts-education-in-u-s-public-schools/ Diane Ravitch on Arts Education: http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/multimedia/series/VideoStories/diane-ravitch.aspx Arts for LA: Benefits of Arts Education flyer (English) http://www.artsforla.org/sites/default/files/AFLA-ArtsEdbenefits-ENGL_1.pdf Arts for LA: Benefits of Arts Education flyer (Spanish) http://www.artsforla.org/sites/default/files/AFLA-ArtsEdbenefits-SPAN_1.pdf Arts for LA: Title I and Arts Education flyer (English) http://www.artsforla.org/sites/default/files/Title I Funds and Arts Education- English_0.pdf Arts for LA: Title I and Arts Education flyer (Spanish) http://www.artsforla.org/sites/default/files/Title I Funds and Arts Education- SPANISH.pdf Developed by UTLA Arts Education Committee, 2011-12; Revised 2012-13. 6