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  • High stakes testing is driving instruction.
  • Jeff
  • This type of environment creates students who take little or no responsibility for their own learning. It is a top-down model where teachers proscribe all learning, rather than students being actively involved in pursuing learning that is of interest to them.
  • [Notes not written. But, I think here we should go into what we mean….and indicate that the list is NOT inclusive]
  • BUT HOW TO SHARE….[Here’s the meat of the matter. Now we can talk more about Connecting for High Potential and the different topics already covered]
  • Of course there are a LOT of other issues. In fact, It turns out there are BIG PROBLEMS that are really different at home and at school. While the issues may not overlap (such as Mother’s going to die. Father’s going to Iraq. OR Both parents work and there’s no one at home OR the child is being bullied at school OR ? and there’s no one at home), the manifestations can effect learning….and effect home behavior. Communication is clearly a key. But how?
  • Of course there are a LOT of other issues. In fact, It turns out there are BIG PROBLEMS that are really different at home and at school. While the issues may not overlap (such as Mother’s going to die. Father’s going to Iraq. OR Both parents work and there’s no one at home OR the child is being bullied at school OR ? and there’s no one at home), the manifestations can effect learning….and effect home behavior. Communication is clearly a key. But how?

Minds in motion 2010 Minds in motion 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Navigating the Educational Journey : The Student at School is the Child at Home December 4, 2010
  • NAGC’s Teacher Resource Specialist Jeff Danielian [email_address]
  •  
  • “ A ship in port is safe, but that's not what ships are built for.” - Grace Hopper “ It is not the ship so much as the skillful sailing that assures the prosperous voyage.” -George William Curtis “ A community is like a ship; everyone ought to be prepared to take the helm.” - Henrik Ibsen “ I am not afraid of storms for I am learning how to sail my ship.” -Louisa May Alcott
  • … Wait until KINDERGARTEN … THIS WEEK WE TOOK A TEST TO SEE IF WE’RE READY FOR THE TEST THAT TESTS OUR TEST SKILLS… In which direction are we moving in American Education?
  • “ Who are we?”
    • We are Teachers
    • We are Parents
  • Gifted and Talented Education Something That Connects Us All
  • “ Our Nation’s schools continue to cut crucial programs, budgets, and staff. They are underfunded, neglected, and forced to “work with what they have.” While there are a few governmental programs supporting school improvement and innovation, the advocacy, support, and overall exposure and funding of these programs is overshadowed by the immediate need to improve the economy.” From the pages of:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • From The Report
    • Most teachers believe that academically advanced students are not a high priority at their schools . They think that these students are bored, underserved, and unlikely to get the curriculum enrichment and resources that high achievers need.
    • Teachers want these advanced (some say “gifted” or “gifted and talented”) students to move up the list of education priorities because they see in their own classrooms youngsters whose considerable talents are not adequately challenged or fully utilized.
    • The narrowing of the gap during the NCLB era is largely due to a significant improvement in the performance of low achievers and smaller gains by high achievers.
  • From the Teacher Survey
    • Fewer than one in four teachers (23%) say that the needs of advanced students are a top priority at their schools.
    • More than seven in ten teachers (73%) agree that “too often, the brightest students are bored and under-challenged in school.
    • Teachers feel bad when they see talent going to waste. 
    • “ There is no real gifted curriculum,” said one teacher. “It’s up to the teacher to come up with it.”
    • The vast majority of teachers (90%) favors “having more professional development for teachers to develop skills for teaching advanced kids.”
    • Differentiated instruction—the strategy whereby teachers adjust their material and presentation to the diverse array of academic abilities within a given classroom—is tricky to implement, according to teachers.
  • “ Sometimes all that is needed to open a line of communication is a simple step back, allowing the situation to come into focus.” From the pages of:
    • Teacher
    • I am a fourth grade teacher, just completing a second year of teaching. I’m struggling with thoughts of “where I went wrong” with respect to some of my students. Several seemed bored, but one student really sticks in my mind –– she gradually stopped participating; even in subjects I thought she would enjoy. The quality of her homework slipped, and, by the end of the year, she had become pretty much a loner…withdrawn from friends.
    • Parent
    • In 3 short years, I’ve watched my son morph from being so excited about school that he could hardly sleep at night, to a child who practically has to be dragged from the house to the school bus. He’s obviously so unhappy…and only in the third grade . I don’t even know how to begin to sort out what’s happening and I don’t want to be “one of those moms” who bothers the teacher but, at this rate (if he gets his way), my boy will be a fourth grade dropout!
    Differing Perspectives
    • Child’s interests
    • Life experiences
    • Strengths & weaknesses
    • Abilities
    • Attitudes
    • Hopes & dreams
    • School policies
    • Curriculum & content
    • Teaching methods
    • Peer interactions
    • Classroom organization
    • Developmental guidelines
    different roles PARENTS TEACHERS different information Robin Schader, 1999 [email_address]
    • Child’s interests
    • Life experiences
    • Strengths & weaknesses
    • Abilities
    • Attitudes
    • Hopes & dreams
    • School policies
    • Curriculum & content
    • Teaching methods
    • Peer interactions
    • Classroom organization
    • Developmental guidelines
    Share information and ideas about encouraging and supporting a child’s good learning. Making a Difference
  • “ The monotony of daily classes is lost when students are allowed to discover who they are as individuals.” From the pages of:
  • Common Attributes of Giftedness
    • motivation
    • communication skills
    • well-developed memory
    • insight
    • imagination/creativity
    • advanced ability to deal with symbol systems
    • advanced interests
    • problem-solving ability
    • inquiry
    • reasoning
    • sense of humor Frasier & Passow 4
        • Retention of large quantities of information
        • Advanced comprehension
        • Varied interests and high curiosity
        • High level of language development and verbal ability
        • Unusual capacity for processing information
        • Accelerated pace of thought processes
        • Comprehensive synthesis of ideas
        • Ability to generate original ideas and solutions
        • Capacity to integrate ideas and disciplines
        • Early differential patterns for thought processing
        • Evaluative approach towards self and others
        • Persistent and goal-directed behavior
    Cognitive (Thinking) Characteristics
  • Affective (Feeling) Characteristics
        • Large accumulation of information about emotions
        • Unusual sensitivity to the feelings of others
        • Keen sense of humor
        • Heightened self awareness, feelings of being different
        • Idealism and sense of justice
        • Inner locus of control
        • Unusual emotional depth and intensity
        • High expectations of self/others
        • Perfectionism
        • Strong need for consistency between values/actions
        • Advanced levels of moral judgment
  • Physical (Sensation) Characteristics
        • Heightened sensory awareness
        • Unusual discrepancy between physical and intellectual development
        • Low tolerance for lag between their standards and their athletic skills
  • Intuitive Characteristics
        • Early involvement and concern for intuitive knowing
        • Open to intuitive experiences
        • Creativity apparent in all areas of endeavor
        • Ability to predict
        • Interest in future
  • Societal Characteristics
    • Strongly motivated by self-actualization needs
    • Advanced capacity for conceptualizing and solving societal problems
    • Leadership
    • Involvement with the meta-needs of society (i.e., justice, truth, beauty)
  • “ Students should never think of themselves as failures, but should look for skills to improve.” “ Education, much like life, is an ever changing process. Failure, as a variable, always comes into play.” From the pages of:
  • Mindset
    • Dr. Carol Dweck’s idea of mindset is straight forward. Those with a “ fixed mindset ,” she believes, are under the assumption that their talent lies in fixed traits. Instead of developing their abilities, they rely on the praise of success, without mention of the effort and hard work required, qualities possessed, and embraced by those in a “ growth mindset .”
  • Vygotsky
    • The Zone of Proximal Development ( ZPD), is the difference between what a learner can do without help and what he or she can do with help.
    • Child follows an adult's example and gradually develops the ability to do certain tasks without help or assistance.
    • The distance between the actual developmental level as determined by independent problem solving and the level of potential development as determined through problem solving under adult guidance, or in collaboration with more capable peers.
  • Dabrowski
    • Theory of Positive Disintegration
    • A process of development involving characteristic dynamisms and some degree of awareness of development. It releases the creative powers of the individual, it enriches his psyche, and it carries his growth toward a higher level of psychological functioning.
    • Overexcibilities (OE)
    • Overexcitability (OE) is a higher than average capacity for experiencing internal and external stimuli.
    • Types:
    • psychomotor
    • sensual
    • imaginational
    • intellectual
    • emotional
  • “ Educators can only guide students in the right direction, offering suggestions and ideas along the way. The rest is up to them.” From the pages of:
  • Multiple Intelligences (MI)
    • Linguistic intelligence ("word smart")
    • Logical-mathematical intelligence ("number/reasoning smart")
    • Spatial intelligence ("picture smart")
    • Bodily-Kinesthetic intelligence ("body smart")
    • Musical intelligence ("music smart")
    • Interpersonal intelligence ("people smart")
    • Intrapersonal intelligence ("self smart")
    • Naturalist intelligence ("nature smart")
  • Art Costa’s Habits of Mind
    • Persisting – Do stick to it.
    • Communicating with clarity and precision – Be clear.
    • Managing impulsivity – Take your time.
    • Gathering data through all senses – Use your natural pathways.
    • Listening with understanding and empathy – Understand others.
    • Creating, imagining, innovating – Try a different way.
    • Thinking flexibly – Look at it another way.
    • Responding with wonderment and awe – have fun figuring it out.
    • Thinking about your thinking (metacognition ) – Know your knowing.
    • Taking responsible risks – Venture out.
    • Striving for accuracy and precision – Find the best possible solution.
    • Finding humor – Laugh a little.
    • Questioning and problem posing – How do you know.
    • Thinking interdependently – Learning with others.
    • Applying past knowledge to new situations – Use what you learn.
    • Remaining open to continuous learning – Learn from experiences.
  • “ Dreams begin at home or in the classroom.” From the pages of:
  • Factors contributing to Creativity
    • Amabile: Intrinsic motivation
    • the love, satisfaction, and challenge of a particular event which directs talent.
    • Maslow :
    • Self-actualization concept
    • the creative individual continues to develop by recognizing his own potential, and the motivation comes from inner strength and confidence.
  • Positive Characteristics of Creativity
    • aware of their own creativeness
    • original
    • independent
    • willing to take risks
    • energetic
    • curious
    • keen sense of humor
    • attracted to complexity and novelty
    • artistic
    • open-minded
    • need for privacy, alone time
    • perceptive
  • Negative Characteristics of Creativity
    • questioning rules and authority
    • stubbornness
    • low interest in details
    • forgetfulness
    • carelessness and disorganization with unimportant matters
    • absentmindedness
    • indifference to common conventions
    • tendency to be emotional
  • “ Simply asking “How’s it going” can open up the line of communication between teacher and student.” From the pages of:
  • Social and Emotional Issues Facing Gifted Adolescents
    • Underachievement
    • Bullying
    • Peer / Family (Relations/Pressure)
    • Identity Formation
    • ADHD/ODD/LD
    • Sensitivity/Over excitability
    • School Climate
    • Stereotyping
    • Siblings
    • Multicultural
    • Low SES
    • Perfectionism
    • Sports vs. Smarts
    • Jean Peterson’s (2008)
    • The Essential Guide to Talking with Gifted teens
    • Minneapolis, MN
    • Free Spirit Press
  • Edited by Maureen Neihart, Sally M. Reis, Nancy M. Robinson, & Sydney M. Moon Section I: Issues Deriving From Student Advancement Compared With Age Peers Section II: Common Areas of Psychological Response Section III: Gifted Children and Youth With Special Needs Section IV: Promising Practices and Interventions and Recommendations for Future Action Social and Emotional Issues: What Have We Learned and What Should We Do Now? Contributors
  • The Twice-Exceptional Learner (2E)
    • Frustration with inability to master certain academic skill
    • Learned helplessness
    • General lack of motivation
    • Disruptive classroom behavior
    • Perfectionism
    • Super sensitivity
    • Failure to complete assignments
    • Lack of organizational skills
    • Demonstration of poor listening and concentration skills
    • Deficiencies
    • Low self-esteem
    • Unrealistic self-expectations
    • Absence of social skills with some peers
  • “ If it is skills you are evaluating, give them choice of content. If it is content, give them choice of product” From the pages of:
  • Abilities, Interests, & Learning Styles
  • Three Ring Conception Over Houndstooth Pattern
  • Renzulli
    • “ A better understanding of people who use their gifts in socially constructive ways can help us create conditions that expand the number of people who contribute to the growth of social as well as economic capital.”
  • Operation Houndstooth
    • Serves as the backdrop to Renzulli’s three-ring conception of giftedness.
    • Presents personality factors that aid in the manifestation of gifted behaviors; Above average ability, Task commitment, and Creativity.
    • Renzulli found that certain personality characteristics; Optimism, Courage, Romance, Sensitivity, Energy, and a Sense of destiny enhance this manifestation.
    • Necessary to build social capital and use it for the betterment of mankind.
  •  
  • “ The journey is difficult, immense. We will travel as far as we can, but we cannot in one lifetime see all that we would like to see or to learn all that we hunger to know.” - Loren Eiseley
  •  
  • “ The ability to identify potential, offer differentiated curriculum (process and product), and assess with individuality are three tools I continue to refine year after year.” From the pages of:
  • Renzulli’s Enrichment Triad Model
  •  
  • The Multiple Menu Model: A Practical Guide for Developing Differentiated Curriculum Creative Learning Press Bookstore
  • 21 st Century Learning
    • 21 st century skills learned through our curriculum, which is interdisciplinary, integrated, project-based, and more, include and are learned within a project-based curriculum by utilizing the seven survival skills advocated by Tony Wagner in his book, The Global Achievement Gap :
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Collaboration across Networks and Leading by Influence
    • Agility and Adaptability
    • Initiative and Entrepreneurialism
    • Effective Oral and Written Communication
    • Accessing and Analyzing Information
    • Curiosity and Imagination
  • The Art of Creative Thinking     Fluency – the production of a great number of ideas     Flexibility – producing a variety of categories of ideas.     Originality – production of ideas that are unique or unusual.     Elaboration – production of ideas that display detail or enrichment..
  • Morphological Matrix Students list the attribute of two or more related topics in order to create a new product, story, etc.
  • Creative Problem Solving The CPS technique encourages students to answer convergent and divergent questions, consider alternatives, and create solutions to problems by formulating an action plan.
    • Start with convergent questioning to find issues.
    • Wouldn’t it be nice if …
    • Wouldn’t it be awful if …
    • Gather information:
    • The next step in CPS is considering the problem at a deeper level.
    • Gather information about the concept of composting by considering the 5W’s and H…who, what, when, where, why and how or how often?
    • Isolate one problem:
    • After thinking about all the issues related to composting, isolate one problem or issue that needs to be addressed.
    • Make this issue the focus of the remaining work on the concept. Get agreement from the group that this particular problem is the focus.
    • Find solutions to the one underlying problem:
    • Ask the group to brainstorm possible solutions to this one problem.
    • Be sure to consider solving the problem from many different perspectives
    • Create a dynamic action plan:
    • Develop an action plan that will tell who will take charge of the idea, how long it will take the idea to be put into place, where the work will be done, and what materials will be necessary throughout the planning and implementation of the plan.
  • Attribute Listing Let the students examine the diagram and describe each part of the contraption. After observing the parts, ask the students to predict what each will do for the entire contraption. Tell about the attributes of each part. Then, have them decide how the parts can be altered to produce better results. THINK CREATIVELY!!!
  • “ SCAMPER” In 1977, Bob Eberle rearranged some common divergent thinking questions into the acronym “SCAMPER” to help students create new ideas by systematically modifying something already existing. Letter Representing Sample Questions S Substitute What similarities exist? What could be substituted for ________? C Combine Might something be combined or brought together to solve the new challenge? A Adapt What changes or adjustment can be made to help us now? M Modify/Magnify/Minify What could happen if you could change the situation to match these conditions? P Put to other uses In what other ways might parts be used? E Eliminate/Elaborate What could be removed or enhanced? R Reverse/Rearrange What effects would come from changing the sequence?
  • Projects with a Focus
    • Research Papers
    • Collections of Artwork
    • Newspaper Editorials
    • Lesson Plans for a Classroom
    • Pamphlets or PowerPoints
    • Presentations
    • Films, Videos, Photo Stories, and Podcasts
    • Awards & Contests
    • Photographic Collections
    • Essays
    • Poem Collections
  • Students need to see
    • Doctors and teachers who travel across the globe, healing and educating.
    • Politicians who lobby and fight strongly for a cause.
    • Engineers and economists who seek to establish community and financial structure in ailing countries.
    • Scientists who involve themselves in medical and genetic research.
    • Stars of celebrity status who use their creativity and commitment not just for entertainment, but to improve the world.
  • We, as educators and parents
    • Need to be attentive in our attempts to pass on the knowledge that we have, the events we have experienced, and the personal stories we have.
    • Need to expose our students to the global community, which is quite larger than the neighborhoods, the towns, or even the states where the students live.
    • Need to teach the skills used for problem solving, decision making, and creative production in our classrooms
    • Must not forget that our students our humans, living on this earth, sharing resources and interacting with each other on a social level.
  • The Student The Child + _ - +
    • Interests
    • Life experiences
    • Strengths & weaknesses
    • Abilities
    • Attitudes
    • Hopes & dreams
    • Adhere to School policies
    • Take part in Curriculum & content
    • Exposure to a variety of Teaching methods
    • Multitude of Peer interactions
    • Classroom “Time”
    • Development
  • “ Every generation has a chance to change the world. Pity the nation that won’t listen to its boys and girls. The sweetest melody is the one we haven’t heard.” - I’ll Go Crazy If I Don’t Go Crazy Tonight from: No Line on The Horizon U2 2009
  • “ We, educators and parents, are key to debunking the myths. The time has come to reverse the unrealistic conceptions of not only what the field has to offer, but also what it truly means to be a gifted and talented student in today’s society.” From the pages of:
  •  
  • While we may sail different ships…….. …… ..We are on the same sea.
  • “ The ways in which we communicate throughout the school day are as varied as the students we teach. During engagement with students, we read aloud and lecture, offer encouragement through written and oral assessment, and engage in one-on-one discussions. Contact with parents takes the form of short notes, longer letters, e-mails, phone calls, and at times through parent/teacher conferences.” From the pages of:
  • The Educator
    • Share strategies with parents for creating an optimal work environment at home.
    • Construct homework assignments with a creative edge.
    • Offer variety and choice and focus on interest when possible. (Exhibitions, Long-Term Class projects, II’s)
    • Keep a great record of incomplete, missed, or repetitive missed assignments.
  • Conversations @ School
    • Has your child asked for assistance from a member of the faculty?
    • Let your child know that each of his/her teachers cares about their learning.
    • Have them make an appointment to see a teacher, or simply stop them before or after class, or in the hall.
    • Have you contacted your child’s teacher?
    • Most importantly, make “them” aware of what you observe at home. After all the child you send is the student they see.
  • Conversations @ Home
    • Have you talked about the homework with your child?
    • If you’re encountering resistance from your child, find out why.
    • Is it the sheer volume of work?
    • Is it the level of difficulty?
    • Is it a matter of clearly defined expectations?
    • Are you asking to see their work too often? Answers to these questions can serve
    • as a basis for a conversation with the teacher.
  • “ Just as the handyman seeks a home improvement blog for answers about a leaky pipe, or the gardener seeks out advice on planting lettuce, the educator, faced with students of high ability on a daily basis, and the parent, caring and raising a child, should seek out resources for information, insight, and advice.” From the pages of:
  • Parent Section
    • Parenting for High Potential
    • ABC’s of Gifted Education
    • New Products / Resources
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • Camps and Summer Programs
    • WOW Parent Night Information
  • Parent Section
    • Parenting for High Potential
    • ABC’s of Gifted Education
    • New Products / Resources
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • Camps and Summer Programs
    • WOW Parent Night Information
  • Parent Section
    • Parenting for High Potential
    • ABC’s of Gifted Education
    • New Products / Resources
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • Camps and Summer Programs
    • WOW Parent Night Information
  • Parent Section
    • Parenting for High Potential
    • ABC’s of Gifted Education
    • New Products / Resources
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • Camps and Summer Programs
    • WOW Parent Night Information
  • Parent Section
    • Parenting for High Potential
    • ABC’s of Gifted Education
    • New Products / Resources
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • Camps and Summer Programs
    • WOW Parent Night Information
  • Issue #1: “We don’t have a gifted program, so what can I do?” Issue #2: “School’s Opening. How do we start off on the right foot?” Issue #3: “What do we need to know about children who have already mastered pre-school or kindergarten skills prior to entering the classroom?” Issue #4: “ But she (or he) doesn’t seem gifted to me…” Signs of giftedness can be unrecognized or misunderstood. Issue #5: “Giftedness? What does the label mean…?” Issue #6: “We know this child is gifted. Now that there’s no question about the high potential, what is my role? What are some practical ways I can support and encourage? Issue #7: “Are there ways to help the gifted child who procrastinates, has anxiety, and/or never seems to think things are good enough?” Available Issues of NAGC’s Connecting for High Potential
  • Issue #8: “How can I find appropriate, challenging resources for a child who is reading far above grade-level?” Issue #9: “This child is a classic ‘absent-minded professor.’ How can she or he ever learn organizational skills?” Issue #10: “What should we know about gifted children and stress?” Issue #11: Rights? Gifted Students? The Law? What should I know? Issue #12: Does Being Gifted Mean Gifted All the Time? Gifted at Home, but not at School (or vice versa)? Can “Gifted” be Gifted in Only Some Subjects? Issue #13: “ Homework? Making it worthwhile.” Issue #14: “ A friend is a friend is a friend, indeed: Gifted children and peers” Issue #15 : “Bored, apathetic, lost interest in school? Behavior problems? Don’t despair. Try applying Cooperative Action Research! Available Issues of NAGC’s Connecting for High Potential
  • Parent Section
    • Parenting for High Potential
    • ABC’s of Gifted Education
    • New Products / Resources
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • Camps and Summer Programs
    • WOW Parent Night Information
  • Parent Section
    • Parenting for High Potential
    • ABC’s of Gifted Education
    • New Products / Resources
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • Camps and Summer Programs
    • WOW Parent Night Information
  • Educator Section
    • Teaching for High Potential
    • Resources
    • Hot Topics
    • Gifted Program Standards
    • Higher Education
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • The Teacher’s Corner
  • Educator Section
    • Teaching for High Potential
    • Resources
    • Hot Topics
    • Gifted Program Standards
    • Higher Education
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • The Teacher’s Corner
  • Educator Section
    • Teaching for High Potential
    • Resources
    • Hot Topics
    • Gifted Program Standards
    • Higher Education
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • The Teacher’s Corner
  • Educator Section
    • Teaching for High Potential
    • Resources
    • Hot Topics
    • Gifted Program Standards
    • Higher Education
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • The Teacher’s Corner
  • Educator Section
    • Teaching for High Potential
    • Resources
    • Hot Topics
    • Gifted Program Standards
    • Higher Education
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • The Teacher’s Corner
  • Educator Section
    • Teaching for High Potential
    • Resources
    • Hot Topics
    • Gifted Program Standards
    • Higher Education
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • The Teacher’s Corner
  • Educator Section
    • Teaching for High Potential
    • Resources
    • Hot Topics
    • Gifted Program Standards
    • Higher Education
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • The Teacher’s Corner
  • Educator Section
    • Teaching for High Potential
    • Resources
    • Hot Topics
    • Gifted Program Standards
    • Higher Education
    • Connecting for High Potential
    • The Teacher’s Corner
  • Resources for Everyone
    • Networks
    • New Web Pages dedicated to STEM, Myths, Standards, Equity
    • Up to date Daily News
    • Conventions, Academies, and WOW
    • Best of the Best Toys
    • Summer Programs
  • Thanks