Effective Parent/Teacher Relationships Jeff Danielian NAGC’s Teacher Resource Specialist Robin Schader, Ph.D. NAGC’s Paren...
Parents want to know how to help their child Teachers want to be able to teach their class of children
Effective Parent/Teacher Relationships <ul><li>Managing Expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Letting Go of Assumptions </li></ul>
 
 
<ul><li>Child’s interests </li></ul><ul><li>Life experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Strengths & weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Ab...
The Student The Child <ul><li>Interests </li></ul><ul><li>Life experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Strengths & weaknesses </li><...
<ul><li>Child’s interests </li></ul><ul><li>Life experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Strengths & weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Ab...
<ul><li>AWARENESS </li></ul><ul><li>CLARITY </li></ul><ul><li>PERSPECTIVE, and </li></ul><ul><li>FLEXIBILITY  </li></ul>(a...
<ul><li>36 states do not require general education teachers to have training on the nature and needs of gifted and talente...
<ul><li>CLARITY :  Think about what you expect the other person to DO in response to your question or information. </li></...
http://www.nagc.org/CHP.aspx
<ul><li>Teacher View </li></ul><ul><li>I am a  fourth grade  teacher, just completing a second year of teaching. I’m strug...
1. Looking for clues beyond what’s expected  <ul><li>At School </li></ul><ul><li>Open up dialogue with the student’s famil...
<ul><li>Teacher  </li></ul><ul><li>I am a  fourth grade  teacher, just completing a second year of teaching. I’m strugglin...
<ul><li>Teacher  </li></ul><ul><li>Parent  </li></ul>FLEXIBITY   ? Think “Action Research”
 
 
 
 
Issue #1:  “We don’t have a gifted program, so what can I do?”  Issue #2:  “School’s Opening. How do we start off on the r...
Issue #8:  “How can I find appropriate, challenging resources for a child who is reading far above grade-level?” Issue #9:...
<ul><li>CD-ROM with over 300 resources, most of which are not available through any other source. </li></ul><ul><li>Carefu...
There are Five Mile Markers   representing different stages of nurturing gifted children.  The Mile Markers are numbered s...
http://www.nagc.org/CHP.aspx
http://www.nagc.org/backtoschool.aspx?terms=back+to+school
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Effective parent teacher

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  • Educators and parents have pre-conceived assumptions of their teacher and school without the experience. If we choose not to assume, we can have open conversations about “what we think is best” from an educational and parental perspective. Let the parent help the educator, and the educator, the parent. A dialogue is needed. The places they see the child may differ a great deal, in arrangement, responsibility, and assumptions they too have, but the child is the same child.
  • The start of school is an opportunity for renewing….and an opportunity for taking a fresh look. [Do we need googley eyes? Eyebrows?] We started writing CHP because NAGC receives similar questions from teachers and parents; however, rarely is there an opportunity to explore how the “other side” might face the issue. Interestingly, both groups benefit from the same information even though they look at it from different perspectives and have different roles to play in helping gifted children reach their potential. Connecting for High Potential is a one-page, tear-and-share guide to encourage conversations between teachers and parents
  • [Notes not written. But, I think here we should go into what we mean….and indicate that the list is NOT inclusive]
  • BUT HOW TO SHARE….[Here’s the meat of the matter. Now we can talk more about Connecting for High Potential and the different topics already covered]
  • Of course there are a LOT of other issues. In fact, It turns out there are BIG PROBLEMS that are really different at home and at school. While the issues may not overlap (such as Mother’s going to die. Father’s going to Iraq. OR Both parents work and there’s no one at home OR the child is being bullied at school OR ? and there’s no one at home), the manifestations can effect learning….and effect home behavior. Communication is clearly a key. But how?
  • Of course there are a LOT of other issues. In fact, It turns out there are BIG PROBLEMS that are really different at home and at school. While the issues may not overlap (such as Mother’s going to die. Father’s going to Iraq. OR Both parents work and there’s no one at home OR the child is being bullied at school OR ? and there’s no one at home), the manifestations can effect learning….and effect home behavior. Communication is clearly a key. But how?
  • Talk about group who selected. Organized to help you find what you need, instantly.
  • Effective parent teacher

    1. 1. Effective Parent/Teacher Relationships Jeff Danielian NAGC’s Teacher Resource Specialist Robin Schader, Ph.D. NAGC’s Parent Resource Advisor
    2. 2. Parents want to know how to help their child Teachers want to be able to teach their class of children
    3. 3. Effective Parent/Teacher Relationships <ul><li>Managing Expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Letting Go of Assumptions </li></ul>
    4. 6. <ul><li>Child’s interests </li></ul><ul><li>Life experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Strengths & weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Abilities </li></ul><ul><li>Attitudes </li></ul><ul><li>Hopes & dreams </li></ul><ul><li>School policies </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum & content </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching methods </li></ul><ul><li>Peer interactions </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom organization </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental guidelines </li></ul>different roles PARENTS TEACHERS different information Robin Schader, 1999 [email_address]
    5. 7. The Student The Child <ul><li>Interests </li></ul><ul><li>Life experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Strengths & weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Abilities </li></ul><ul><li>Attitudes </li></ul><ul><li>Hopes & dreams </li></ul><ul><li>Adhere to School policies </li></ul><ul><li>Take part in Curriculum & content </li></ul><ul><li>Exposure to a variety of Teaching methods </li></ul><ul><li>Multitude of Peer interactions </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom “Time” </li></ul><ul><li>Development </li></ul>
    6. 8. <ul><li>Child’s interests </li></ul><ul><li>Life experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Strengths & weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Abilities </li></ul><ul><li>Attitudes </li></ul><ul><li>Hopes & dreams </li></ul><ul><li>School policies </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum & content </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching methods </li></ul><ul><li>Peer interactions </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom organization </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental guidelines </li></ul>Share information and ideas about encouraging and supporting a child’s good learning. Here’s what will make a difference
    7. 9. <ul><li>AWARENESS </li></ul><ul><li>CLARITY </li></ul><ul><li>PERSPECTIVE, and </li></ul><ul><li>FLEXIBILITY </li></ul>(a willingness to try ACTION RESEARCH)
    8. 10. <ul><li>36 states do not require general education teachers to have training on the nature and needs of gifted and talented students at any point in their careers. </li></ul><ul><li>Gifted children spend 80 percent of their time in the regular classroom, yet only 61% of classroom teachers have had any training in meeting their needs </li></ul><ul><li>Only a handful of states require all teachers to receive training in gifted and talented education before they start teaching. </li></ul>AWARENESS : Not Many Teachers Have Had The Benefit of Training in Gifted Education http://www.nagc.org/index.aspx?id=533
    9. 11. <ul><li>CLARITY : Think about what you expect the other person to DO in response to your question or information. </li></ul><ul><li>“ My child is BORED.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ My child isn’t being challenged.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Your child isn’t working up to potential.” </li></ul>
    10. 12. http://www.nagc.org/CHP.aspx
    11. 13. <ul><li>Teacher View </li></ul><ul><li>I am a fourth grade teacher, just completing a second year of teaching. I’m struggling with thoughts of “where I went wrong” with respect to some of my students. Several seemed bored, but one student really sticks in my mind –– she gradually stopped participating; even in subjects I thought she would enjoy. The quality of her homework slipped, and, by the end of the year, she had become pretty much a loner…withdrawn from friends. </li></ul><ul><li>Parent View </li></ul><ul><li>In 3 short years, I’ve watched my son morph from being so excited about school that he could hardly sleep at night, to a child who practically has to be dragged from the house to the school bus. He’s obviously so unhappy…and only in the third grade . I don’t even know how to begin to sort out what’s happening and I don’t want to be “one of those moms” who bothers the teacher but, at this rate (if he gets his way), my boy will be a fourth grade dropout! </li></ul>PERSPECTIVE
    12. 14. 1. Looking for clues beyond what’s expected <ul><li>At School </li></ul><ul><li>Open up dialogue with the student’s family early! It’s not always easy to figure out what’s going on with students who seem disengaged, for many times the problems have nothing to do with school at all. A wide range of circumstances at home, pre-conceived notions about expectations, overexciteabilities, and prior experience may be taking its toll on the development of the student seated before you. Talk with your students. Sometimes all it takes is a short walk down a hallway or quick “check-in” after class. A “how’s everything going?” or “is everything alright?” can go a long way. </li></ul><ul><li>Yes, there’s usually more than meets the eye. Learn more about possible learning issues in the book The Mislabeled Child: Looking beyond behavior to find the true sources––and solutions––for children’s learning challenges (Hyperion, 2006). (Resource) </li></ul><ul><li>Find new ways to incorporate your own interests, ideas, favorites, and personal stories into your lessons. Students are more apt to open up and share their own beliefs when they recognize similarities between themselves and the teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>At Home </li></ul><ul><li>Boredom? Don’t assume it’s a result of repetitive, easily understood or mastered tasks. Signs of boredom can be symptomatic of work that is too difficult, as well. Children who “appear” bored may be overwhelmed by all sorts of environmental, social, emotional, or learning problems. For more, check “The Challenges of Boredom” at: (LINK) </li></ul><ul><li>Sensory integration disorders can also contribute to learning problems and classroom issues. Learn how one mother uncovered why her highly gifted son was struggling, and then found solutions in “Elementary Lessons for Mom” at: (LINK) </li></ul><ul><li>Food additives such as artificial colors, artificial flavors and preservatives like butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) can cause adverse reactions such as hyperactivity, depression, and migraines. It has been suggested that gifted children with overexcitabilities may show more obvious reactions. For additional information, read “Soothing Overexcitabilities With Food” at: (LINK) </li></ul>
    13. 15. <ul><li>Teacher </li></ul><ul><li>I am a fourth grade teacher, just completing a second year of teaching. I’m struggling with thoughts of “where I went wrong” with respect to some of my students. Several seemed bored, but one student really sticks in my mind –– she gradually stopped participating; even in subjects I thought she would enjoy. The quality of her homework slipped, and, by the end of the year, she had become pretty much a loner…withdrawn from friends. </li></ul><ul><li>Parent </li></ul><ul><li>In 3 short years, I’ve watched my son morph from being so excited about school that he could hardly sleep at night, to a child who practically has to be dragged from the house to the school bus. He’s obviously so unhappy…and only in the third grade . I don’t even know how to begin to sort out what’s happening and I don’t want to be “one of those moms” who bothers the teacher but, at this rate (if he gets his way), my boy will be a fourth grade dropout! </li></ul>FLEXIBITY
    14. 16. <ul><li>Teacher </li></ul><ul><li>Parent </li></ul>FLEXIBITY ? Think “Action Research”
    15. 21. Issue #1: “We don’t have a gifted program, so what can I do?” Issue #2: “School’s Opening. How do we start off on the right foot?” Issue #3: “What do we need to know about children who have already mastered pre-school or kindergarten skills prior to entering the classroom?” Issue #4: “ But she (or he) doesn’t seem gifted to me…” Signs of giftedness can be unrecognized or misunderstood. Issue #5: “Giftedness? What does the label mean…?” Issue #6: “We know this child is gifted. Now that there’s no question about the high potential, what is my role? What are some practical ways I can support and encourage? Issue #7: “Are there ways to help the gifted child who procrastinates, has anxiety, and/or never seems to think things are good enough?” Available Issues of NAGC’s Connecting for High Potential
    16. 22. Issue #8: “How can I find appropriate, challenging resources for a child who is reading far above grade-level?” Issue #9: “This child is a classic ‘absent-minded professor.’ How can she or he ever learn organizational skills?” Issue #10: “What should we know about gifted children and stress?” Issue #11: Rights? Gifted Students? The Law? What should I know? Issue #12: Does Being Gifted Mean Gifted All the Time? Gifted at Home, but not at School (or vice versa)? Can “Gifted” be Gifted in Only Some Subjects? Issue #13: “ Homework? Making it worthwhile.” Issue #14: “ A friend is a friend is a friend, indeed: Gifted children and peers” Issue #15 : “Bored, apathetic, lost interest in school? Behavior problems? Don’t despair. Try applying Cooperative Action Research! Available Issues of NAGC’s Connecting for High Potential
    17. 23. <ul><li>CD-ROM with over 300 resources, most of which are not available through any other source. </li></ul><ul><li>Carefully Selected </li></ul><ul><li>Well Organized </li></ul><ul><li>Searchable </li></ul><ul><li>Reproducible </li></ul><ul><li>Customizable </li></ul>
    18. 24. There are Five Mile Markers representing different stages of nurturing gifted children. The Mile Markers are numbered sequentially, but you can begin at any Mile Marker. Every driver is able to take whatever path best meets his or her needs.
    19. 25. http://www.nagc.org/CHP.aspx
    20. 26. http://www.nagc.org/backtoschool.aspx?terms=back+to+school

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