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Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview
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Dublin City Council - City and Competitiveness Research Overview

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Overview of research in Dublin City Council with examples of selected initiatives.

Overview of research in Dublin City Council with examples of selected initiatives.

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  • Word of caution in relation to benchmarkingBe wary of the metricsBranding opportunity
  • Green Economy – Green IFSC, green way etc….
  • Transcript

    • 1. Dublin from global to localJamie Cudden – Research, Dublin City CouncilTwitter: @jcudden jamie.cudden@dublincity.ie
    • 2. Recent Publications• "A roadmap for branding Dublin", developed on behalf of the Creative Dublin Alliance which outlines a series of actions and recommendations to deliver an internationally competitive brand for Dublin. www.creativedublinalliance.ie• Dublins role in the national and global economy; a one year research collaboration developed in partnership with the School of Planning at UCD on behalf of the Dublin Regional Authority. www.dra.ie• "Demographic Trends in Dublin", a position paper drawing out current and future population trends and the policy implications• www.creativedublinalliance.ie *updated version will be uploaded by end of 2012• ―Talent attraction and retention in the Dublin Region‖ developed as part of Dublin’s participation in the world class cities partnership (WCCP) http://www.slideshare.net/jcudden/dublin-talent-presentation- 23-06-12-wccp * All our indicator and benchmarking reports are available on the Creative Dublin Alliance site
    • 3. Presentation Overview• Look at the international perspective on cities & global trends• What does it mean to Dublin?• Benchmarking our performance• Some selected initiatives and research projects
    • 4. Why do Cities Matter? Many observers talk about the 21st century being the century of cities. The world is not flat . For the first time in 2010 over half the worlds population now live in cities. 3.8 billion by 2015 (53%) They drive global GDP. Generating more than 80 per cent of global GDP today. Cities occupy just 2% of the world’s land surface yet they house more than 50% of the world’s population
    • 5. City Networks
    • 6. Green Credentials of Cities
    • 7. Cities represent the Biggest Commercial Opportunity in the coming decades• One-third of the world’s population—2.6 billion people—live in emerging-market cities, and by 2030, that number will increase by an additional 1.3 billion.• Middle-class population expected to rise 70 percent between 2010 and 2015. Effecting everything from where these individuals live to how they consume. Source: Boston Consulting Group
    • 8. “ While $8.1 billion was spent on smart city technologies in 2010, by 2016 that number is projected to reach $39.5 billion” Source: ABI Research 2011
    • 9. Twitter - resourcesThe City 2.0 @TheCity2_0Bruce Katz @bruce_katz VP @BrookingsInst | In the face of economic stagnation, fiscal turmoil & federal gridlock, we are witnessing The Metropolitan RevolutionMETROPOLIS @metropolis_org Metropolis is the leading international association that gathers cities and metropolitan regions with more than a million inhabitants. http://www.metropolis.orgurbandata @urbandata Cross-Sector Urban Affairs: Progressive City Planning, Health Equity, Governance 2.0, Data & Community Indicators. Views my own. Mark Abraham, Exec Dir @CTDataCentre for Cities @CentreforCities The Centre for Cities is an independent research and policy institute, committed to helping #cities improve their economic performance.C40 Cities @c40cities The C40 is a network of the worlds largest cities committed to implementing sustainable climate-related policies locally to help address concerns globally.ICIC @icicorg The Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC) promotes urban economic and business development in Americas inner cities.LivingCities @Living_Cities 22 of the worlds largest foundations and corporations united to bring the power of mainstream markets to underserved urban areas - Innovate:Invest:LeadCEOs for Cities @CEOsforCities CEOs for Cities is a national, cross-sector civic lab of urban leaders advancing the next generation of great American cities.Richard Florida @Richard_Florida Urbanist, Author, Professor, Researcher, Talker, Bike Rider, Guitar PlayerIBM Smarter Cities @IBMSmartCitiesOfficial IBM Smarter Cities account. Managed by Meredith Hannon and Vineeta Durani. Follows the IBM Social Computing Guidelines. #SmarterCities@PPS_Placemaking The Project for Public Spaces has practiced non-profit #planning, #design & edu in 3000 communities, 50 states & 42 countries. New York City · http://www.pps.org
    • 10. “ Well over half of the world’s population now lives in cities, generating more than 80% of global GDP. Already, global business is beginning to plan strategy from a city, rather than a country, perspective. Given the rapid growth and development of many cities, particularly in emerging markets such as China and India, competition between them for business, investment and talent will only get fiercer” Source: Economist Intelligence Unit 2011 / Citi BankLeading global cities are New York, London, Singapore and Hong Kong
    • 11. Top 10 Global Cities on comprehensive indexesSource: Greg Clarke, The business of cities, 2011 (excellent overview of international city benchmarking)
    • 12. The Top 600 Global CitiesTop 600 cities account for 60% of global GDP yet hold about 20% of thepopulation
    • 13. City GDP 2005Source: McKinsey CityScope
    • 14. City GDP 2025• Over 100 new Chinese cities to enter the top 600 by 2025• Not just megacities
    • 15. Urban Economic Clout Moves East
    • 16. Rapidly Expanding Middle Class Source: The New Global Middle Class: A Cross-Over from West to East. Wolfensohn Center for Development at Brookings
    • 17. • Metros drive economic growth, action shifts to Asia, Latin America, & Eastern Europe: • 90% of the fastest-growing metropolitan economies among the 200 largest worldwide were located outside North America and Western Europe. • By contrast, 95% of the slowest-growing metro economies were in the United States, Western Europe, and earthquake-damaged Japan.Source: Brookings Metro Monitor, 2011
    • 18. Importance of Cities― Most OECD metro-regions have a higherGDP per capita than their national average (66out of 78 metro-regions), a higher labourproductivity level (65 out of 78 metro-regions)and many of them tended to have fastergrowth rates than their countries‖―Cities such as "Successful cities attract talented youngBudapest, Seoul, Copenhagen, Dublin, highly-skilled workers, are centres ofHelsinki, Randstad-Holland and Brussels innovation and entrepreneurship and arethat concentrate nearly half of their competitive locations for global andnational GDP whilst regional headquarters. The proximity ofOslo, Auckland, Prague, London, Stockh universities to research and productionolm, Tokyo, and Paris account for around facilities means cities are where newone third‖ products are developed and commercialised. More than 80% of patents are filed in cities.― Source: OECD, competitive cities in the OECD Global economy
    • 19. We live in a spiky worldSource: Atlantic, The World is Spiky, 2005
    • 20. Source: Dublin Chamber of Commerce 2010, Making the Case for Dublin
    • 21. What does this mean for Dublin?―Dublin operates in an intensely competitive world where increasingly it is cities (and not states) competing for investment, talent, tourism, internat ional students‖
    • 22. What does this mean for Dublin?Global trends:• Increasing levels of human mobility and demand for skills (expected to double by 2020)• Growth projections for international students (to triple by 2020) and transnational tourism (+75% by 2020)• About taking these opportunities• Markets and cities that have never heard of DublinSources:• Dirks. S., Keeling, M and Gurdgiev, C., 2010, Smarter Cities for Smarter Growth, IBM Institute for Business Value.• UN World Tourism Organisation (2009)• Young-Chul Kim (2009): The Asia-Pacific education market and modes of supply. In: The Asia- Pacific education market, eds. William Tierney and Christopher Findlay, quoted in Hawthorne 2008.
    • 23. The importance of City Branding• “Cities must understand what place characteristics make them distinctive. All cities are part of the global economy and are now more connected physically and electronically. Nevertheless, unique place characteristics continue to distinguish one city from another and create competitive advantage”Making Creative Knowledge Cities – A guide for policy makers• “Governments are beginning to wake up to the fact that cities, countries and regions all need a new way of looking at identity, strategy, development, competitiveness and purpose if they are to survive in a very new world order”
    • 24. Branding Research
    • 25. What Other Cities Are Doing?
    • 26. Building on Dublin’s Brand – which is currently unmanaged Dublin – Unesco City of literature, City of Science, 2012 - 4 Nobel laureates, Joyce, Shaw, Beckett, Heaney -Popular tourist destination World design capital Bid -3.7 million overseas tourists in 2010 - FDI success storyTop tourist destination was the GuinnessStorehouse with 1 million visits in 2011
    • 27. Dublin Quotes – positives• ―Dublin is becoming known as the silicon valley of Europe – there is an exciting new crop of both indigenous and international entrepreneurs establishing and growing their businesses here‖• ―Decadent, delightful and full of surprises, Dublin packs a punch that, delivered correctly, will leave you reeling but still wanting more. That’s big talk for a small capital‖…‖A city whose soul and sociability makes it the charismatic of all capitals‖ Lonely Planet Guide Dublin, 2011.• ―A transformed city since the days of O’Casey and Joyce Ireland’s capital may have replaced its legendary tenements with modern buildings, but it’s essential spirit remains intact‖ Fodors 2011
    • 28. Brand Objectives Attract international Talent, Business and Investment Support our exporting industries Promote the goals of the tourism industry Increase national pride in Ireland’s capital city Strengthen citizens identity and engagement with Dublin
    • 29. Who is leading this? Collaborative City Leadership & Governance Model(Triple helix model) Positioning Dublin in the national context – a voice for Dublin in the absence of a strong regional governance model Strategic Approach - twice yearly International Benchmarking Reports & meetings with the Taoiseach: International – National – City Region Engaging People - Expanding Networks across Public, Private, Creative & Civic Sectors
    • 30. Creative Dublin Alliance Structure
    • 31. Creative Dublin Alliance Website www.creativedublinalliance.ie
    • 32. Do we have a vision for Dublin?
    • 33. Working towards this joint vision…..
    • 34. Developing a regional vision requires an holistic approachHow we think about regional development How we could apply this to Dublin ▪ Infrastructure ▪ Sectors and companies Economic ▪ Competitiveness 1 Regional vision growth ▪ Talent ▪ Labour market 1 2 3 ▪ Health coverage and service ▪ Utilities efficiency Quality of ▪ Education 2 life/social ▪ Equality imperative ▪ Finance and funding ▪ Security Economic Quality Sustaina- growth of life bility ▪ Carbon emission reductions Sustain- ▪ Waste management 3 ▪ Green transportation ability 4 Public management and ▪ Energy efficiency finances ▪ Regulation Public ▪ Performance management 4 management ▪ Tax collection and finances ▪ Top team alignment 3 Source: McKinsey, 2012 8
    • 35. Benchmarking Dublin – Why?• Dublin is now considered a truly global city and as such features in most of the international city benchmarking indices• Dublin is a small city in the international scale and we certainly outperformed in relation to our size.• Helps understanding the cities performance in the national, European and international context• Learn from best practice• Performance in key international metrics such as:• Quality of living, Costs, Competitiveness, Economy, International tourism arrivals, International conferences / events , International student numbers
    • 36. Dublin – International Comparisons• Dublin is a small city in the international scale and we certainly outperformed in relation to our size.• Mercer Quality of living (2011) places Dublin in the top quartile (26th) ahead of cities such as San Francisco, Helsinki, Boston, Madrid and Seattle.* 2012 has seen Dublin drop to 35th position in the rankings• The capital of a small island – open economy that is outward looking – exports are key• 2nd most globalised country in the world• A hub for US investment: Since 1990 there has been more capital investment (189 billion) into Ireland compared to the BRICS combined.
    • 37. • Dublin was the 14th richest city by GDP per capita ($55,578) out of 200 largest globalmetros (2010-11)• Dublin was the 3rd worst economic performer out of the top 200 largest global metros(198th in 2011)
    • 38. Continued Success in attracting Foreign Direct Investment- 2011 a record breaking year for Foreign Direct Investment- A twin track economy – tech sector is performing strongly in Dublin,job shortages in some areas- Dublin faring better than rest of Ireland
    • 39. Dublin – Example Benchmarks* Quality of Living • Dublin 26th city in the world for quality of living (2011) • Dublin 16th top city in the world for personal safety • Top 5 global cities are: Vienna, Zurich, Auckland, Munich, Düsseldorf Costs of Living • Dublin is now outside of the top global 50 cities for costs of living (58th) from 42nd in 2010. • 6 years ago Dublin was 10th • Top 5 global cities are Luanda (Angola), Tokoyo, N’djamena (Chad), Moscow, Geneva* The following slides demonstrate the wide range of international rankings and benchmarks
    • 40. #9 #9 The Copenhagenize Report Once the third great bicycle city in Europe, after Copenhagen and Amsterdam, Dublin suffered the same car-centric fate as everywhere else but what a grand rebound the city is undertaking. A wildly successful bike share programme, visionary politicians who implemented bike lanes and 30 km/h zones, and a citizenry who have merely shrugged and gotten on with it. The only city scoring full bonus points, Dublin is an inspiration and a city worth watching. Copenhagenize Fixes The leading bicycle city in the Anglo-Saxon world got to where they are because of ballsy political decision-making. A bridgehead is established. It will, however, require further intense infrastructure implementation to return Dublin to the heady days of last century. The new cycle track along the canal is brilliant, but now Dublin needs to find the funds for more.http://copenhagenize.eu/index/criteria.html
    • 41. TomTom Traffic Congestion Index-Dublin 16th most congestedcity in 2012- 24th most congested city inEurope in 2011 (down from 6thin 2010)
    • 42. Globalisation and World Cities Network (2011)Dublin is a highly connected city in the international contextIs ranked as an alpha minus city - according to the globalisation andworld cities network (looking at presence of advanced producer servicesfirms in global cities)
    • 43. Dublin Second Friendliest World City-British adults choose Dublin as the 2nd friendliestworld city (YouGOV survey on behalf of DK travelguides) 2011
    • 44. Wealth Report- Dublin was the worst performer in residential property prices (85thWith a 25% decline on 2009 (Knight frank / Citi)
    • 45. EIU Globe Shopper Index (2011) Dublin ranked 14th /33 in the economist globe shopper city index (ranked 4th in Europe for shops)
    • 46. Dublin: Best new global city for startups - Dublin just rated one of the best new global cities for start ups - Silicon Docks Badge
    • 47. EIU competitiveness: Dublin Profile
    • 48. Examples of Initiatives• Sustainability Indicators• Dublin’s role in the national and international economy• Open Data and Dublinked• Your Dublin Your Voice• Uniquely Dublin• Greenway, GreenIFSC• Innovation Dublin• Smart Cities
    • 49. Sustainability IndicatorsWithin the next 25-30 years Dublin willhave an established internationalreputation as one of the mostsustainable, dynamic and resourceful cityregions in EuropeDeveloping a scorecard that monitors Dublin’s performance on a yearly basis
    • 50. Dublin Green City Index •Dublin is starting from a very low base •This is being re-confirmed with the development of our own sustainability indicators Source: Siemens, EIU, 2010
    • 51. Selection of indicators selected
    • 52. Conclusions• Major challenges in measuring and monitoring city performance. Definition of a city region?• Lack of quality spatial data• Moving towards evidence based policy development? Slow progress….• Do we actually monitor and measure strategy?• Planning systems in local government - lack of GIS tools, appropriate data to base decisions• Open data offers a solution – decisions will be open to independent scrutiny ?
    • 53. Open Data - Dublinked
    • 54. 2011 Functional Urban Dublin How can we manage this? Governance Challenge
    • 55. “DUBLIN’S ROLE IN THE IRISH AND GLOBAL ECONOMY, 2012”To examine Dublin’s place and role in thenational and global economies throughevidence based research coupled withhigh level interview and to deliver aresearch package of evidence whichexplores the importance of the Dublin cityregion to future national economic success Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H. 59
    • 56. Broad Level Objectives• To examine through evidence based research, optimal location for investment in terms of infrastructure provision, attractiveness, employment and talent capacities, sustainable development patterns.• To create a database and a methodological approach suitable for economic development analysis which can be readily updated as further data streams e.g. census data are published.• To build on and align with past and current research, internationally, nationally, regionally and as carried out within the local authorities of the city region. Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H. 60
    • 57. Structure of the StudyDelivery of a research package - 3 Reports have beenproduced and distilled into a synthesis report  Report 1 – Collation and assessment of available quantitative socio-economic data  Report 2 – Spatial analytic approaches assessing socio- economic development  Report 3 - Analysis of interviews, relevant reports and literature  Report 4 - Synopsis of key policy issues and series of recommendations Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 58. Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 59. Starting points for discussion Dublin – a national asset Socio-Economic Profile of the City Demographic Profile Appraisal of the Urban Challenges Access to Services, Opportunity Innovation Clusters MNE’s and FDI The importance of Dublin nationally The role of regions Global Benchmarks Input from key stakeholders Planning Policy and Governance Recommendations –maximising resources, infrastructural development, scenario planning Future work Role of Tourism Transport and Connectivity (including route development internationally) The importance of economic corridors
    • 60. Opinion on Dublin - SWOT STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES Ability to attract, produce and retain High unemployment/Youth talent- critical mass of talent Unemployment Good business environment – cluster Interregional competition effect Outdated planning and governance A city of global scale and/or structures importance Inadequate Connectivity Relatively good quality of living Economic crisis Much improved transport infrastructure OPPORTUNITIES THREATS Attracting new investment/entrants Lack of investment in critical Increased collaboration across public infrastructure (water, rail) and private Skill shortages Growing new creative industry Competition from emerging markets Enhancing the tourism potential Factors undermining competitiveness- Enhancing the built fabric and Congestion unlocking underdeveloped areas Antisocial behaviour Connecting to emerging cities Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 61. Results Data on tax contribution for the year 2008 delivered in response to a Parliamentary Question in 2010 found that citizens or companies located in Dublin[1] – contributed 55.6% of all VAT in 2008, followed by Cork at 8.8% and Kildare 3.4 – paid 62.4% of all Corporation Tax yielding €3.2bn out of a total tax of €5.1bn in 2008. – paid 50.6% of state PAYE in 2008 producing an estimated exchequer revenue of €5 billion for the Government. – paid 38.8% of non-PAYE income tax followed by Cork at 11%, Galway 4.5%, Kildare 4%, Limerick 3.9%, Meath 3.5%, Wicklow 3.4% and Tipperary 3.0%. – contributed 41% of all Capital Gains Tax intakes – Figures taken from response to parliamentary question July 2010 [2]• [1] A number of caveats are attached to these figures due to reporting discrepancies such as Corporation Tax being collated based on the county address of company HQ or the relevant branch for tax purposes.• [2] http://www.leovaradkar.ie/?p=1076 Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 62. Spatial Representations -Job Density and the Functional Urban Region Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 63. Locations in Dublin IDA investment locations Investment Locations by key (Gateway) areas Opportunity Map for Enterprise Potential
    • 64. Business Locations• Where business locate across two growth sectors• Hot Spots in a few Key Gateways ICT Financial and Insurance Activities Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 65. Talent and EducationDublin and a few keyGateways are thecentres for talent andopportunityDublin is the onlyGateway with moregraduates than itproducesTalent attraction andretention a recurrenttheme of interviewprocessBroader issue ofagglomeration andclustering (business,talent etc.) Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 66. Different Strengths in Different Areas Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 67. Conclusions• By international standards Dublin is a medium sized or small city, ranked 77th out of 78 cities in terms of population by the OECD. Capital city regions in small and medium sized European states such as Ireland, Denmark and Netherlands often play a dominant role• Dublin accounts for almost half of national GDP and its effective management and continued success is critical for the performance of the entire economy Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 68. Conclusions• Dublin has the critical mass of skills and workforce to attract investment• Business Demography analysis shows that Dublin has been resilient in certain sectors such as ICT and Finance, actually growing the numbers of enterprises notably in ICT.• Key areas such as transport, water and broadband infrastructure require future proofing to maintain the competitiveness of Dublin. International benchmarks indicate a need to improve our performance in these areas to maintain competitiveness Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 69. Conclusions• Interview also revealed a strong body of opinion which felt that local government structures are sub-optimal and that ―regions‖ should set employment as well as population targets……• Form, Financing and Function go hand in hand• Common messages included continued potential of the city region, inadequate broadband, need for greater levels of collaboration, threat of congestion, brownfield regeneration, skill and language deficiencies and the challenge of maintaining competitiveness• Collaboration Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H. Williams, B., and knowledge share…
    • 70. Recommendations• Strategic (and Technical) – To use evidence to influence future policy • Recognising in particular : – global position and the importance of international benchmarks – The importance of joined up data and thinking – Following on, it is recommended that under the auspices of the Creative Dublin Alliance that the research is used to develop a strong and unified vision and purpose for the city region. Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 71. Recommendations• A succession of ignored policy recommendations from the 1960’s on the form, funding and financing of local government are listed in Report 3. These reports generally support the interview opinion that local government should have greater levels of autonomy with the assigning of revenue generation powers to local government linked with expenditure responsibilities. Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 72. RecommendationsIt should be clearly recognised that Dublin is aunique case and national asset.If we maximise the capacity of Dublin we maximisethe potential of the entire country. Targetedinvestment in key infrastructure is necessitatede.g. to realise water resilience Williams, B., Foley, W., Cudden, J. & Shahumyan, H.
    • 73. Your Dublin Your Voice:• An opinion panel of over 3,000 members has been formed to find out their views on living, working and studying in the city region. Owned by the city• Cost effective method of citizen engagement• Allows us to track sentiment over time• And to run regular surveys helping to inform policies• People from all ages and backgrounds are represented on the panel reflecting the diverse cosmopolitan nature of Dublin - over 50% of respondents have lived outside of Ireland for any period of time, there are also over 60 nationalities and representatives from all 32 counties in Ireland. 14% non-Irish. www.yourdublinyourvoice.ie
    • 74. Best things about Dublin(as identified by people that live here)• ―Vibrant international city with a small town feel‖• ―Dublin has a buzz that others citys dont have‖• ―That it has the diversity and energy of a young and vibrant 21st century city‖• ―Compact city where you can see a city, a fishing harbour and the mountains all in one day‖• ―It’s nice and compact so that where ever you go you’ll always know someone nearby.‖• ―Lots of interesting people means lots of interesting events and venues, and because of it’s size you hear about them and can get to them easily.‖
    • 75. Categories www.uniquelydublin.ie
    • 76. Other InitiativesSmart Cities – Testbedding New Technologies

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