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Accidents in japan
Accidents in japan
Accidents in japan
Accidents in japan
Accidents in japan
Accidents in japan
Accidents in japan
Accidents in japan
Accidents in japan
Accidents in japan
Accidents in japan
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Accidents in japan

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  • 1. ACCIDENTS in JAPANI. NUCLEAR ACCIDENTSII. AIRLINES ACCIDENTSIII. FUJIN RAIJIN ACCIDENT
  • 2. They classify accidents into two types:Bussonjiko: an accident involving damage to property. Jinshinjiko: an accident resulting in injury or death.
  • 3. Nuclear AccidentTokaimura nuclear accidentThere have been two Tokaimura nuclear accidents.On 11 March 1997, in a Dōnen plant.On 30 September 1999, in a JCO plant.The first Tokaimura nuclear accident was the nuclear disaster whichoccurred on 11 March 1997, in a nuclear reprocessing plant of the Dōnen (PowerReactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation).Another name is the Dōnen accidentOn the night of 11 March 1997, a small explosion occurred in a nuclear reprocessingplant of the Dōnen. In this accident, approximately 40 workers were exposed to radiation.The second and more serious Tokaimura nuclear accident (Japanese: Tōkai-mura JCO-rinkai-jiko) indicates the nuclear disaster which occurred on 30 September 1999, resultedin two deaths.It was the worst civilian nuclear radiation accident in Japan prior to the Fukushima Daiichnuclear disaster of 2011. International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). This scale runs from0, indicating an abnormal situation with no safety consequences, to 7, indicating anaccident causing widespread contamination with serious health and environmentaleffects.
  • 4. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was a series of equipmentfailures, nuclear meltdowns, and releases of radioactive materials at theFukushima I Nuclear Power Plant, following the Tōhoku earthquake andtsunami on 11 March 2011.It is the largest nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl disaster of 1986, andonly the second disaster (along with Chernobyl) to measure Level 7 on theInternational Nuclear Event Scale.When the Tohoku earthquake occurred, the reactors on Units 1, 2, and 3were operating, but those on Units 4, 5, and 6 had already been shut downfor periodic inspection. Units 1, 2 and 3 underwent an automatic shutdown(called SCRAM) when the earthquake struck
  • 5. Airline AccidentsJapan Airlines Flight 123 was a Japan Airlines domestic flight from Tokyo InternationalAirport (Haneda) to Osaka International Airport (Itami). On Monday, August 12, 1985,suffered mechanical failures 12 minutes into the flight and 32 minutes later crashed intotwo ridges of Mount Takamagahara in Ueno, Gunma Prefecture, 100 km from Tokyo.The crash site was on Osutaka Ridge near Mount Osutaka. All 15 crew members and505 out of 509 passengers died, resulting in a total of 520 deaths and four survivors.It is the deadliest single-aircraft accident in history, and the second-deadliest accidentalplane crash in history*All Nippon Airways Flight 60 crashed into Tokyo Bay while on approach to land atTokyo International Airport on 4 February 1966 killing 133 people in the deadliest single-plane incident until 1971. The cause of the crash is undetermined.*All Nippon Airways Flight 61—Hijacked and taken back over Tokyo, Japan.BOAC Flight 911—In flight structural failure due to clear-air turbulence near Mount Fuji,Japan.*Canadian Pacific Airlines Flight 402— Crashed on landing at Tokyo InternationalAirport in fog.*Japan Airlines Flight 123—Crashed into Mount Osutaka, Japan.*Japan Airlines Flight 907 and Japan Airlines Flight 958—Nearly collided near Yaizu,Japan.*China Airlines Flight 120—Caught fire and exploded on Naha Airport,Okinawa,Japan.
  • 6. Japan Sasago tunnel collapse December 2012Nine people are now confirmed to havedied after a major tunnel collapsed in JapanThe bodies were found in three vehicles that were crushed by fallen concrete panelsin the Sasago tunnel about 80km (50 miles) west of the capital TokyoA fire broke out after the tunnel caved in on Sundayand a number of survivors fled to safety on footThe usually busy tunnel remains closed, as police are investigating potentialnegligence.There will be serious questions about how a major tunnel on one of Japans mostimportant traffic arteries could have failed so catastrophically,The private company that runs the highway has said the tunnel was given a majorinspection just two months ago and was given a clean bill of health, ourcorrespondent adds.
  • 7. Fujin Raijin Accident – 2007Japan’s worst amusement-park disaster happened in2007 at Expoland, outside of Osaka.The Fujin Raijin II roller coaster derailed, sending carsflying off the tracks, which killed a college student andinjured 19 others.The accident revealed that the coaster’s axles had notbeen replaced in 15 years. Even worse, they reopenedafter the accident and safety inspectors discoveredanother train with an axle about to snap that the parkwas still letting run. Expoland closed soon after,blaming “a lack of customers.”
  • 8. END!thank you...

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